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Ord 165 Establishing a program of comprehensive Emergency ManagementORDINANCE NO. .165 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING A PROGRAM INCLUDING MITIGATION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE AND RECOVERY PHASES OF COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT; ACKNOWLEDGING THE OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR; AUTHORIZING THE APPOINTMENT OF AN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COORDINATOR; AND PROVIDING FOR THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THOSE OFFICES; IDENTIFYING AN OPERATIONAL ORGANIZATION; GRANTING NECESSARY POWERS TO COPE WITH ALL PHASES OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT WHICH THREATEN LIFE AND PROPERTY IN THE CITY OF WESTLAKE, TX AUTHORIZING COOPERATIVE AND MUTUAL AID AGREEMENTS FOR RELIEF WORK BETWEEN THIS AND OTHER CITIES OR COUNTIES AND FOR RELATED PURPOSES; PROHIBITING UNAUTHORIZED WARNING AND ALL -CLEAR SIGNALS AND MAKING VIOLATIONS A MISDEMEANOR PUNISHABLE BY FINE NOT TO EXCEED $100 WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of `,! r,4,iij'e finds that the identification of potential hazards and the prevention or mitigation of their effects must be an on-going concern of the City if the lives and property of the populace are to be protected; and WHEREAS, the City Council hereby declares that the preparation of a Comprehensive Emergency Management plan, and the means for its implementation, for the protection of lives and property in the City of l ,c-5._ - from natural or man -caused disasters or threat thereof is immediate y essential; and WHEREAS, the City Council further finds that in times of disasters which may imperil the safety of the inhabitants of the City, or their property, it becomes necessary to effectuate and place into operation the preconceived plans and preparations with a minimum of delay; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds, therefore, that the preparation, and imple- mentation of such plans are now imperative; BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OFJ,f; Section I. ORGANIZATION There exists the office of Emergency Management Director of the City of h'`,C—I'_ i. r which shall be held by the Mayor in accordance with state law. (a) An Emergency Management Coordinator may be appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the Director; (b) The Director shall be responsible for a program of comprehensive emergency management within the city and for carrying out the duties and responsibilities set forth in this ordinance. He/she may delegate authority for execution of these duties to the Coordinator, but ultimate responsibility for such execution shall remain with the Director. (c) The operational Emergency Management organization of the City of j shall consist of the officers and employees of the City so esfgriated by the Director in the emergency management plan, as well as organized volunteer groups. The functions and duties of this organization shall be distributed among such offi- cers and employees in accordance with the terms of the emergency management plan. Section 2. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR - POWERS AND DUTIES The duties and responsibilities of the Emergency Management Director shall include the following: (a) Conduct an on-going survey of actual or potential hazards which threaten life and property within the city and an on-going program of identifying and requiring or recommending the implementation of measures which would tend to prevent the occurrence or reduce the impact of such hazards if a disaster did occur. (b) Supervision of the development and approval of an emergency man- agement plan for the City of, - and shall recommend for adoption by the City Cou cil all mutual aid arrangements deemed necessary for the implementation of such plan. (c) Authority to declare a local state of disaster. The declaration may not be continued or renewed for a period in excess of 7 days except by or with the consent of the City Council. Any order or proclamation declaring, continuing, or terminating a local state of disaster shall be given prompt and general publicity and shall be filed promptly with the City Secretary. (d) Issuance of necessary proclamations, regulations or directives which are necessary for carrying out the purposes of this ordi- nance. Such proclamations, regulations, or directives shall be disseminated promptly by means calculated to bring its contents to the attention of the general public and, unless circumstances attendant on the disaster prevent or impede, promptly filed with the City Secretary. (e) Direction and control of the operations of the ),€'Se GJ}F{z %X Emergency Management organization as well as the training o Emergency Management personnel. (f) Determination of all questions of authority and responsibility that may arise within the Emergency Management organization of the City. (g) Maintenance of liaison with other municipal, county, district, state, regional or federal, Emergency Management organizations. (h) Marshaling of all necessary personnel, equipment or supplies from any department of the City to aid in the carrying out of the pro- visions of the emergency management plan. (i) Supervision of the drafting and execution of mutual aid agreements, in cooperation with the representatives of the state and of other local political subdivisions of the state, and the drafting and execution, if deemed desirable, of an agreement with the county in which said city is located and with other municipa- lities within the county, for the county -wide coordination of Emergency Management efforts. (j) Supervision of, and final authorization for the procurement of all necessary supplies and equipment, including acceptance of private contributions which may be offered for the purpose of improving Emergency Management within the City. (k) Authorizing of agreements, after approval by the City Attorney, for use of private property for public shelter and other purposes. (1) Survey of the availability of existing personnel, equipment, supplies and services which could be used during a disaster, as provided for herein. (m) Other requirements as specified in Texas Disaster Act 1975 (V.T.C.S. Article 6889-7). Section 3. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN A comprehensive Emergency Management Plan shall be developed and maintained in a current state. The plan shall set forth the form of the organization, establish and designate divisions and functions, assign responsibilities, tasks, duties, and powers, and designate officers and employees to carry out the provisions of this ordinance. As provided by state law, the plan shall follow the standards and criteria established by the State Division of Emergency Management of the State of Texas. Insofar as possible, the form of organization, titles and terminology shall conform to the recommen- dations of the State Division of Emergency Management. When approved, it shall be the duty of all departments and agencies to perform the functions assigned by the pian and to maintain their portion of the plan in a current state of readiness at all times. The emergency management plan shall be considered supplementary to this ordinance and have the effect of law during the time of a disaster. Section 4. INTERJURISDICTIONAL PROGRAM The Mayor is hereby authorized to join with the County Judge of the County of Tarrant and the mayors of the other cities in said county in the formation of an-mergency Management Council for the County of Afv T and shall have the authority to cooperate in the preparation of a joint emergency management plan and in the appointment of a joint Emergency Management Coordinator, as well as all powers necessary to participate in a county -wide program of emergency management insofar as said program may affect the City of Westlake, Tx, Section 5. OVERRIDE At all times when the orders, rules, and regulations made and promulgated pursuant to this ordinance shall be in effect, they shall supersede and override all existing ordinances, orders, rules, and regulations insofar as the latter may be inconsistent therewith. Section 6. LIABILITY This ordinance is an exercise by the City of its governmental functions for the protection of the public peace, health, and safety and neither the City of )1 So y cl E, the agents and representatives of said City, nor any individua er, firm, partnership, corporation, association, or trustee, nor any of the agents thereof, in good faith carrying out, complying with or attempting to comply with, any order, rule, or regulation promulgated pursuant to the provisions of this ordinance shall be liable for any damage sustained to persons as the result of said activity. Any person owning or controlling real estate or other premises who voluntarily and without compensation grants to the City ofya license of privilege, or otherwise permits the City to inspect, desigrfate and use the whole or any part or parts of such real estate or premises for the purpose of sheltering persons during an actual, impending or practice enemy attack or natural or man-made disaster shall, together with his successors in interest, if any, not be civilly liable for the death of, or injury to, any person on or about such real estate or premises under such license, privi- lege or other permission or for loss of, or damage to, the property of such person. Section 7. COMMITMENT OF FUNDS No person shall have the right to expend any public funds of the City in carrying out any Emergency Management activity authorized by this ordinance without prior approval by the City Council, nor shall any person have any right to bind the City by contract, agreement or otherwise without prior and specific approval of the City Council unless during a declared disaster. During a declared disaster, the Mayor may expend and/or commit public funds of the city when deemed prudent and necessary for the protec- tion of health, life, or property. Section 8. OFFENSES; PENALTIES (a) It shall be unlawful for any person willfully to obstruct, hinder, or delay any member of the Emergency Management organization in the enforcement of any rule or regulation issued pursuant to this ordinance, or to do any act forbidden by any rule or regulation issued pursuant to the authority contained in this ordinance. (b) It shall likewise be unlawful for any person to wear, carry or display any emblem, insignia or any other means of identification as a member of the Emergency Management organization of the City of &k - , unless authority to do so has been granted to such person by the proper officials. (c) Any unauthorized person who shall operate a siren or other device so as to simulate a warning signal, or the termination of a warning, shall be deemed guilty of a violation of this ordinance and shall be subject to the penalties imposed by this ordinance. (d) Convictions for violations of the provisions of this ordinance shall be punishable by fine not to exceed r dollars le " ($ /e ). Section 9. SEVERABILITY If any portion of this ordinance shall, for any reason, be declared invalid such, invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions thereof. Section 10. LIMITATIONS This ordinance shall not be construed so as to conflict with any State or Federal statute or with any military or naval order, rule, or regulation. Section 11. REPEALER All ordinances, parts of ordinances, or resolutions in conflict herewith are expressly repealed. j READ AND APPROVED on first reading this the 6th day of July, 19871997. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on second reading this the day of . 19 r ova y;'-Zi City of z,- y j Texas ATTEST: TIf y City Secretary JOINT RESOLUTION WHEREAS, the Cities of Blue Mound, Dalworthington Gardens, Edgecliff Village, Fort Worth, Haslet , Kennedale, Lakeside, Lake Worth, Pantego, Pelican Bay, Sansom Park, Westlake, Westover Hills and Westworth Village by city ordinance and Tarrant County by Commissioners' Court Order No. 58675, have established similar programs of comprehensive emergency management including the mitigation, preparedness , response, and recovery phases of emer- gency management ; and WHEREAS, the cities and the county find that vulnerability to many potential hazards is shared by residents of the aforemen- tioned cities and the unincorporated portions of Tarrant County; and WHEREAS, the cities and the county further find that the common goal of emergency management can best be achieved through a cooperative organization which shares the emergency planning resources of the cities and county; and WHEREAS, the contemplated action is specifically authorized by the aforementioned ordinances and court order; THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that there is hereby established the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Interjurisdictional Emergency Management Plan under the control of the Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management , according to terms which are mutually acceptable to all parties. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Mayor of Fort Worth and the Tarrant County Judge shall mutually appoint an Emergency Management Coordinator to coordinate all aspects of the Tarrant County program of comprehensive emergency management , including the preparation and maintenance of an interjurisdictional emer- gency management plan for Tarrant County and all participating cities in accordance with this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Mayor of the other partici- pating cities shall each appoint an Emergency Management Coordi- nator to coordinate with the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator in the preparation and maintenance of an interjurisdictional emergency management plan. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this resolution abrogates and supersedes the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Joint Resolution dated September 9 , 1986. RESOLVED this 1st day of June 19 89 00, 4W Ad4�/AJ Mayor, ity of Fort Worth couTtt Judge(,/ Tarrant County Ref. Ord. No. 9692 Ref. romm. Court Order 58675 C Mayor, Citylue Mound Mayor, ity of Pantego Ref. Ord. No. 206 Ref. O d. No. 89-01 Mayor, City of Dalworthington Mayor, ty of Pelican Bay Gardens, Ref. Ord. NO. 88-3 Ref. Ord. No. 61 yor, Lit yof Edgecliff Village Mayor, City 6f- Sansom Par Ref. Ord. No. 234 Ref. Ord. No. 238 7 Mayor, City of Haslet Mayor, City of Westlake Ref. fid. No. 1 Ref. Or No. 165 Mayor, City of Kennedale Mayor, City o Westover Hills Ref Ord. No. 88-16 Ref. Ord. No. 3-23-87 Mayor, City of Lakeside M r, City Westworth Ref. Ord. No. 115 VIT11age, Ref. Ord. No. 130 �e' ' ' Mayor, Ci y of Lake Worth Ref. Ord. No. 340 -2- �PO4F 0,? �GT�CIO': FORT WORTH • TARRANT COUNTY Alwi * 0OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENTdo9ao1000 THROCKMORTON STREET .�•• FORT WORTH, TEXAS 76102 (817) 870.6170 • (817) 334.1473 June 1, 1989 Attached is change 8, June 1, 1989, to the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Emer- gency Plan. This change includes the biennial recertification of the plan and a revi- sion to the Crisis Relocation Plan based on the FEMA NAPB-90. Remove Insert Page i and i-a Page i, June 1, 1989 Page 2, Annex E2 Page 2, Annex E2, June 1, 1989 Page 16, Annex E2 Page 16, Annex E2, June 1, 1989 Appendix 1 through 11 Appendix 1 through 10 Annex E2 Annex E2, June 1, 1989 •X.. 41 I add FORT WORTH - TARRANT COUNTY a A OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT xX P, 1000 THROCKMORTON STREET *. , FORT WORTH, TEXAS 76102 (817) 870.6170 • (817) 334-1473 June 1, 1989 TO ALL RECIPIENTS: This letter constitutes a recertification of the Fort Worth-Tarrant County Emergency Plan, June 1, 1987, by all political subdivisions signatory to the plan. The plan is current and valid as of June 1, 1989. All communities participating in this plan are included when the term "Tarrant County" is used in that context. The scope of this plan does not obligate a community's resources outside its political boundaries. Sharing of resources is addressed in mutual and/or automatic aid agreements. Please insert this letter in front of the Emergency Plan. -,�&* /�4� j 4Lw�� 6-x� T County u ge Fort Worth Mayor Blue Mo un yor Lake Worth Mayor -�,'J rtington ens Mayor Pahtego Mayor W gec i Village Mayor Pe i Mayor i �+ � G Grp 2� r/✓L�� Mayor Sansom Park mayor ne a e MayorWe-stla keyor Lake 3 e Mayor estover Hills MayT W ' tworth Villtfge Mayor i Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 6. The Texas State Crisis Relocation Plan has established lower risk relocation areas for each of the areas to be evacuated. Areas reserved for Fort Worth/Tarrant County comprise the following thirty-one counties: Brown, Callahan, Childress , Coleman, Comanche , Cottle, Dickens, Eastland, Erath, Fisher, Hall, Hamilton, Haskell, Howard, Jack, Johnson, Jones , Kent, King, Knox, Motley, Palo Pinto, Parker, Runnels, Scurry, Shackelford, Stephens , Stonewall, Throckmorton, Wise and Young. The location of these hosting areas, resident popula- tion and number of relocatees assigned are outlined in appen- dices to this annex. 7. Host counties have prepared plans for the reception and care of relocated residents of Fort Worth/Tarrant County. The Texas State Crisis Relocation Plan provides for the redirec- tion of supply channels for food, fuel and other essential consumer goods to the host counties. 8. Certain vital facilities and activities must be continued in or adjacent to the evacuated risk area either to preserve the integrity of the vacant city, or to assist in providing essential goods and services to the relocated population and their hosts, or for defense purposes. 9. Mandatory evacuation authority does not exist in the State of Texas, but authority does exist to control ingress and egress from a disaster area (Section 5, Texas Disaster Act of 1975). B. Assumptions 1. Increased public interest in emergency management is ex- pected during a period of international tension, especially when general war is perceived as a possibility. Cooperation of persons and organizations involved in both the risk areas and host areas is likely during the crisis period. 2. Relocation of the population from the risk areas will occur only by direction of the Governor, most likely in conjunc- tion with a declaration of national emergency by the Presi- dent. 3. Crisis Relocation plans will be implemented only if there is sufficient time to allow controlled evacuation of the risk areas. Relocation plans are based on the assumption that a minimum of seventy-two (72) hours will be available for move- ment between the time Crisis Relocation plans are imple- mented and the time when an enemy attack could occur. Move- ment of the population from the risk area can easily be completed within the time available. -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDICES Appendix 1 - Tarrant County Risk Area Zip Codes Appendix 2 - Destination and Route Assignments Appendix 3 - Crisis Relocation Route Map Appendix 4 - What To Take With You Appendix 5 - Tarrant County Zip Code Boundaries Appendix 6 - Tarrant County Risk Area Assembly Points Appendix 7 - Liaison Teams Appendix 8 - Transportation Resources Appendix 9 - Checklists Tab 1 - Executive Group Tab 2 - Emergency Management Tab 3 - Emergency Public Information Tab 4 - Fire and Rescue Tab 5 - Law Enforcement Tab 6 - Health and Medical Tab 7 - Communications Tab 8 - Warning Tab 9 - Radiological Defense Appendix 10 - Glossary Date Alton Bostick, Coordinator Emergency Management -16- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 1 TARRANT COUNTY RISK AREA ZIP CODES Estimated Estimated Population Route Population Route Zip Moving Designation Zip Moving Designation 75050 6,000 A-1 76105 24,000 D-3 75051 2,000 E-1 76106 38,000 C-5/C-6 75052 4,000 E-1 76107 26,000 D-2 75261 4,000 B-3 76108 17,000 C-1 76006 13,000 C-1 76109 15,000 C-9/C-10 76010 36,000 E-1 76110 26,000 D-5 76011 18,000 C-7/C-8 76111 16,000 C-2 76012 20,000 C-2 76112 35,000 C-7 76013 30,000 D-4 76114 18,000 C-2 76014 26,000 E-1 76115 13,000 D-5 76015 14,000 E-1 76116 35,000 C-9 76016 25,000 E-1 76117 23,000 C-1 76017 17,000 E-1 76118 29,000 C-2 76018 1,000 E-1 76119 51 ,000 D-1 76020 10,000 B-5 76126 16,000 C-9 76021 15,000 B-6 76127 7,000 C-2 76022 15,000 B-8 76131 3,000 B-12 76034 12,000 B-2 76132 5,000 D-1 76039 12,000 B-2 76133 34,000 C-9 76040 12,000 B-2 76134 16,000 E-2 76051 16,000 A-1 76135 18,000 B-10 76052 9,000 B-2 76137 3,000 B-7 76053 22,000 C-3 76140 18,000 E-1 76054 12,000 B-2 76148 19,000 B-3 76060 1,000 E-1 76155 2,000 B-1 76071 1,000 B-4 76179 9,000 B-10 76092 7,000 B-11 76180 17,000 B-7 76102 6,000 C-6 76248 14,000 B-1 76103 14,000 C-4 76262 6,000 B-9 76104 23,000 D-3 -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 z 00 w � U N >C W H cc w z a a I 00 U W O 4 1--I O O O O O O H r7 > H O O N O Cn a N N •-� w o a 0 o o N u z N N o o v off � � u H x m bo m k x bo x C 0) d a v u x a .se o u C u jr-i z W m ro u a u c co o 4J co3 O ~' >4 ~' O o 0 0 o v z W H O O O O L +J 4J +-J +J FX4 I I rn I I -7 I 0h 7 -W RS O r- m 0, PO 0n O PCI M PO M -4 PCI rn _4 C7 W 00 -- aN 00 0T -4 -4 •--4 -- M H W N •-+ M -4 00 W H • �+ F O m O O MV m m 7 mm O 0 O ro O 0 m O co co O co m O O O rn U x U C!) 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PVT wl _ 4 _ MEN 0 42 A �• _ •� �. ��►—•moi. � 6 9 d - 1 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 4 Q D of 7 W ►.� f ¢ J Z ° U a 0 1,pjjl 3 W o m ; ° p m =I E' �6 (n A U o WCD 0 m m a ca a m mi til a LL c n c O m a E N a m c a ^_� N Z E > ; a m e c 3 ,JD 3 m L p mlY a` m m t n of 0 U m o a E ; m O D U. 0 L x x 3 Eof U � m 11 p O 'iC U L m m E O O n .-'' o D u ° o m E O O O m m m 0 os � m m r „ g z }' am � ro a o oISI sty a 3 E a o p I = o v ~ Q m c- T p Y m Z awY c� a E ° \� N � a ®p LoE W O O v t O 4 y o L of h W > m m W m v m _ m m N m e u m 'p D O E aQmi n s D L z•' L j E m C a p op Yc C E ? m � m C U L A _m � - 9.•- U C C L a D O m h O m Z m m C C O W N c �c m c o a , m m m o ¢ E Q d N O m U 2 � _ _� _o u � m E Y m n a` � t m m n O +S O N �` _> > D O U C E �p N U V o Y E �- ~ r p „ u o a m o m c L a m Z M A o o = a m V i u w m L° �o a u = o o - o Q o m ,mn C U p m t O o u g D p E E L 1 m = a _ L 3 e N � C N N oN I m m _ E A m D Y E O 7 C N E L a o N 2 m n N n r } win c a ... E N m= m C n - 'Lt z w i ° 7 W m n A "� u N u u c W v a z �� ml vi W co o w a ; 0 c _e • =1 m L a 1+ O n 0 S C O G C pl D7 U� 7. • • 0 0 a a 3 m C �r / J CI > 14 a {i h 7 o `o c d c a a Y 7 is U O q 1° � .I cc i h Toa o d m u cc kDI n! _ h I LL m � m - u a_ 5 in N W Li E v. =i d, LI .� LL aom me m ° q =° m — S la o 0i 3; o' 10I ' LZ In _ _1_ Ch. 8 - Jun. 1,1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 5 09 Z$ ;tco ib Z-i7, Y-� j 11 QK, R _L. J04 co J w im in en rao�. J LLJ f7 f o LLJ t=^ 4 1 IT r ^_ cr a —1— EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 5 in .i1 Woco 0, ' LuJ L ::E� P � ' o Wn r a � bwa�o� wl - LL . uj Lu Lu 5�� Qp9 —I -¢^ q e I _ - - _ Ed le C-4 of 010 ce cc+ ZN - �y t7u c,4 ' •' I ;� /rte. _ - Lu corte'° S ix cN W n ^ � of f j � l --• —2— EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 6 RISK AREA ASSEMBLY POINTS Persons requiring public transportation for relocation to a host county should pro- ceed to the elementary school closest to their residence. CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDRESS ZIP CODE Arlington Amos, Elizabeth 3100 Daniel Dr. 76014 Atherton 2101 Overbrook Dr. 76014 Berry, C.B. 1800 Joyce St. 76010 Blanton, Louise 1900 S. Collins St. 76010 Butler 2121 Margaret Dr. 76012 Corey 5201 Kelly Elliot Rd. 76017 Crow, Corrinne 1201 Coke Dr. 76010 Ditto, Ruth 3001 Quail Lane 76016 Duff, C.C. 3200 Lynwood Dr. 76013 Dunn 2201 Woodside Dr. 76013 Fitzgerald 5201 Creek Valley Dr. 76018 Foster 1025 High Point Rd. 76015 Goodman, Ethel 1400 Rebecca Lane 76014 Hill 2020 W. Tucker Blvd. 76013 Johns, Gertrude 1900 Sherry St. 76010 Key 3621 Roosevelt Dr. 76016 Knox, Veda 500 W. Houston St. 76011 Little , Jason B. 4215 Little Rd. 76016 Miller 6401 W. Pleasant Ridge Rd. 76016 Morton 2900 Barrington Pl. 76014 Pope, B.N. 901 Chestnut Dr. 76012 Rankin, Bess 1900 Oleander Dr. 76010 Roark, Maude V. 2401 Roberts Cir. 76010 Roquemore 2001 Van Buren Dr. 76011 Sherrod 2626 Lincoln Dr. 76012 Short, Beatrice 2000 California Ln. 76015 South Davis 2001 S. Davis Dr. 76013 Speer, Maxie 811 Fuller St. 76012 Swift, Ruby Ray 1101 S. Fielder Rd. 76013 Thornton, Myrtle 2301 E. Park Row Dr. 76010 Wimbish, W.R. 1601 Wright St. 76012 Wood 3300 Pimlico Dr. 76017 Azle Azle 301 Church St. 76020 Eagle Heights Lucern Drive 76135 Liberty Rt. 2, Box 222 76020 Walnut Creek 1010 Boyd Rd. 76020 -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 6 CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDRESS ZIP CODE Burleson Dunn, Nola 201 S. Dobson St. 76028 Frazier, A.E. 900 S.W. Hillside Dr. 76028 Mound 205 S.W. Thomas St. 76028 Norwood, J.W. 619 Evelyn Lane 76028 Crowley Deer Creek 1301 Crowley Rd. S. 76036 Race, Bess 512 Peach St. 76036 Sycamore 1601 Country Manor Rd. 76134 Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Bryson 1201 Old Decatur Rd. 76179 Eagle Mountain Boat Club Rd. 76179 Gililland, L.A. 701 Waggoman Rd. 76131 Saginaw 300 W. McLeroy Blvd. 76179 Everman Bishop 501 Vaughn Ave. 76140 Hommel 308 W. Enon Ave. 76140 Ray 7309 Sheridan Rd. 76134 Souder 201 Forest Hill Dr. 76140 Fort Worth Benbrook 800 Mercedes St. 76126 Burton Hill 519 Burton Hill Rd. 76114 Carter Park 1204 E. Broadus Ave. 76115 Castleberry 5220 Ohio Garden Rd. 76114 Circle Park 708 N.W. 21st St. 76106 Clarke, G.C. 3300 S. Henderson St. 76110 Clayton, Lily B. 2000 Park Place Dr. 76110 Como 4000 Horne St. 76107 Daggett, E.M. 958 Page Ave. 76110 Denver Avenue 1412 Denver Ave. 76106 De Zavala 1419 College Ave. 76104 Diamond Hill 3000 Oscar Ave. 76106 Dillow, S.S. 4000 Avenue N 76105 East Handley 2617 Mims St. 76112 Eastern Hills 5917 Shelton Dr. 76112 Eastland St. 4108 Eastland St. 76119 East Van Zandt 800 Hattie St. 76104 Forest Hill 5615 Forest Hill Dr. 76119 Glen Park 3601 Pecos St. 76119 Green, W.M. 4612 David Strickland Rd. 76119 Greenbriar 1605 Grady Lee 76134 Helbing, H.V. 3524 N. Crump St. 76106 Hubbard 1333 W. Spurgeon Ave. 76115 Kirkpatrick, M.L. 3229 Lincoln Ave. 76016 Logan, M.I. 2300 Dillard 76105 McDonald, Atwood 1850 Barron Lane 76112 -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 6 CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDRESS ZIP CODE Fort Worth McRae , D. 3316 Avenue N 76105 (Continued) Meadowbrook 4330 Meadowbrook Dr. 76103 Merrett, Luella 7325 Kermit Ave. 76116 Mitchell Blvd. 3601 Mitchell Blvd. 76105 Moore, M.A. 1809 N.E. 36th St. 76106 Morningside 2601 Evans Ave. 76104 Nash, Chas. E. 401 Samuels Ave. 76102 Natha Howell 1324 Kings Hwy. 76111 North Castleberry 5300 Buchanan St. 76114 North Hi Mount 3801 W. 7th St. 76107 Oakhurst 2700 Yucca Ave. 76111 Oaklawn 3220 Hardeman St. 76119 Pate , A.M. 3800 Anglin Dr. 76119 Peak, Carroll 1212 Elmwood Ave. 76104 Phillips, Mary Louise 3020 Bigham Blvd. 76116 Ridglea Hill 6817 Cumberland Rd. 76116 Rosen, Sam 2613 Roosevelt Ave. 76106 Sagamore Hill 701 S. Hughes St. 76103 Sellars, David K. 4200 Dorsey St. 76119 Shulkey, Bruce 5533 Whitman Ave. 76133 South Fort Worth 900 W. Fogg St. 76110 South Hi Mount 4101 Birchman St. 76107 South Hills 3309 Bilglade Rd. 76133 Springdale 3207 Hollis St. 76111 Stevens, J.T. 6161 Wrigley Way 76133 Sunrise 3409 Stalcup Rd. 76119 Tanglewood 3060 Overton Park Dr. W. 76109 Turner, W.J. 3001 Azle Ave. 76106 Walton, Maudrie M. 5816 Rickenbacker P1. 76112 Washington Heights 3215 N. Houston St. 76106 Waverly Park 3604 Cimmaron Trail 76116 Westcliff 4300 Clay St. 76109 Westcreek 3401 Walton Ave. 76133 Western Hills 2805 Laredo Dr. 76116 Williams, Versia L. 901 Baurline Ave. 76111 Worth Heights 519 E. Butler St. 76110 Grapevine-Colleyville Cannon, W.F. 1300 W. College 76051 Colleyville 5800 Colleyville Blvd. 76034 Dove 1932 Dove Rd. 76051 Taylor, O.C. 5300 Pool Rd. 76034 Timberline 3220 Timberline Dr. 76051 -3- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 6 CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDRESS ZIP CODE Haltom City Birdville 3126 Bewley St. 76117 Browning Heights 3701 N. Hamilton Rd. 76117 Francisco, W.T. 3701 Layton St. 76117 South Birdville 2600 Solona St. 76117 Stowe, O.H. 4200 Doeline St. 76117 West Birdville 3001 Layton St. 76117 Haslet-Lakeview Haslet Haslet 76052 Lakeview 100 Village Trail 76262 Hurst-Euless-Bedford Bedford Heights 1000 Cummings Dr. 76021 Bellaire 501 Bellaire Dr. 76053 Bell Manor 1300 Winchester Way 76022 Donna Park 1125 Scott Dr. 76053 Harrison Lane 1000 Harrison Lane 76053 Hurst Hills 525 Billie Ruth Lane 76053 Lakewood 1600 Donley Dr. 76039 Midway Park 409 Ector Dr. 76039 North Euless 1101 Denton Dr. 76039 Oakwood Terrace 700 Ranger St. 76040 Porter, W.A. 2750 Prestondale Dr. 76054 Shady Brook 2601 Shady Brook Dr. 76021 Shady Oaks 1400 Cavender Dr. 76053 South Euless 605 S. Main St. 76040 Spring Garden 2400 Cummings Dr. 76201 Stonegate 900 Bedford Rd. 76022 West Hurst 501 Precinct Line Rd. 76053 Wilshire 420 Wilshire Dr. 76040 Keller Florence Johnson Road 76248 Keller 326 E. Price St. 76248 Parkview 6900 Bayberry (Ft. Worth) 76137 Whitley Road Whitley Rd. @ Starnes Rd. 76248 Kennedale Kennedale 100 E. Mistletoe Dr. 76060 Lake Worth Morris, Effie 6800 Telephone Rd. 76135 Mansfield Boren, J.L. 1400 Country Club Dr. 76063 Mansfield 605 E. Broad St. 76063 Nash, Erma 600 E. Broad St. 76063 Ponder, Alice Hwy. 287 S. 76063 Rendon, Tarver Rendon Road 76028 -4- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 6 CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ADDRESS ZIP CODE North Richland Hills Foster Village 6800 Springdale Lane 76180 Glenview 3900 Norton Dr. 76118 Holiday Heights 5221 Susan Lee Lane 76118 Mullendore, Alliene 4100 Flory St. 76118 Richland 3250 Scruggs Park Dr. 76118 Smithfield 6724 Smithfield Rd. 76180 Snow Heights 4801 Vance Blvd. 76118 Thomas, Carrie 8200 O'Brian Way 76180 Southlake Johnson, Jack B. 1200 N. Carroll Ave. 76092 Springtown Springtown-Reno F.M. Rd. 1542 76020 Watagua Watagua 5937 Whitley Rd. 76148 White Settlement Liberty 7976 Whitney Dr. 76108 North 8500 Rockway St. 76108 West 8901 White Settlement Rd. 76108 -5- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 7 LIAISON TEAMS I. General Liaison Teams will be designated by the Emergency Management Direc— tor to travel to the host areas as advance parties. II. Situation The host jurisdictions have insufficient resources to provide for the care and maintenance of the relocated population. III. Concept of Operations — Risk area Liaison Teams will be assigned to designated host area EOCs. — Liaison Teams will travel the relocation route to the host area and will designate rest areas along the route. Rest area loca— tions will be relayed back to the risk area EOC. Rest areas will be selected to provide for fuel, water , medical aid , vehicle maintenance , comfort facilities, and information. The most logical rest areas will be located near comihunities along the relocation route . A member of the Liaison Team will be posted at the rest area to identify the area and to coordinate movement to the host area. — The Liaison Teams will be dispatched to their respective host area when it appears that a movement is imminent. — The Liaison Teams will coordinate and relay requests for re— sources to the Tarrant County EOC. — The Liaison Teams will be housed, fed, and otherwise cared for in the same fashion as the relocatees. — The Liaison Teams will maintain records of their activities and will remain under the supervision and control of the risk area EOC while they are in the host area. —1— Ch. 8 — June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 8 TRANSPORTATION RESOURCES Relocation of the non-private vehicle transportation dependent population will be coordinated through the EOC. In addition to the resources listed below, vehicles/ buses will be available from business and industry, churches, private schools, and private transportation companies. QUANTITY/TOTAL CAPACITY QUANTITY/TOTAL CAPACITY (WITH LIFTS & NUMBER OF (W/O LIFTS) WHEELCHAIRS) TOTAL A. Public Transportation Arlington 0/28 7/21 7/49 Fort Worth 142/5,731 3/9 145/5,740 B. Independent School Districts Arlington 136/7,516 12/48 148/7,564 Azle 48/3,408 3/20 51/3,468 Birdville 35/1,543 3/13 38/1,556 Carroll 17/1,096 1/6 18/1,102 Castleberry 11/645 1/4 12/649 Crowley 21/1,430 4/8 25/1,438 Eagle Mountain 32/2,191 3/6 35/2,197 Everman 19/1,261 2/16 21/1,277 Fort Worth 296/19,654 32/128 328/19,782 Grapevine 41/2,051 2/6 43/2,057 H.E.B. 58/2,820 4/20 62/2,900 Keller 38/2,464 4/16 42/2,480 Kennedale 7/496 1/3 8/499 Lake Worth 9/693 1/3 10/696 Mansfield 47/3,530 3/5 50/3,535 Northwest 28/1,810 1/3 29/1,813 White Settlement 18/1,203 1/3 19/1,206 C. American Red Cross 11/130 8/20 19/150 -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 CHECKLISTS Tarrant County can appropriately be considered a high risk area during a period of severe international crisis which could result in a nuclear attack upon the United States. Crisis Relocation is an option to protect the population if there is suffi- cient time to allow controlled evacuation of the risk area. The Crisis Relocation Plan requires a considerable amount of pre-planning by many agencies. Checklists have been prepared to assist tasked agencies in developing pro- cedures to support the Tarrant County Crisis Relocation Plan. -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 1 EXECIITIVE GROUP CHECKLIST Pre-Crisis Phase : - prepare , maintain and insure proper distribution of the crisis reloca- tion annex to the Emergency Operations Plan - insure that the annex includes adequate provisions to: increase readiness of host and risk area relocation organizations ° mobilize relocation organization when requested by the Governor insure training of those auxiliary civil defense workers whose tasks are peculiar to nuclear civil protection activities provide by construction and/or upgrading sufficient fallout shelters to protect the increased population of the host communi- ties ° organize , staff and equip the local EOC in the manner prescribed for a crisis relocation emergency ° analyze , record and report the local emergency situation during a crisis relocation - maintain a standby organization to initiate crisis relocation in- creased readiness operations - insure that service chiefs carry out preparatory tasks shown under pre-crisis phase - insure that the information concerning the number and category of risk area evacuees to be relocated to the host communities is kept current by checking periodically with the risk area - establish public information policy and supervise release of informa- tion - assure the maintenance of a roster of key organizations and industries necessary for support of local, state and national functions - for essential risk area activities, prepare standby guidance for iden- tification of key workers and issuance of proper organization identifi- cation - establish policy and prepare standby local economic stabilization measures as needed -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 1 - update inventories of manpower, special skills, buildings, supplies and equipment of all types which would be necessary to support crisis relocation NOTE: IF NUCLEAR ATTACK WARNING IS RECEIVED, OR IF AN ACTUAL ATTACK TAKES PLACE WITHOUT WARNING: Implement the local emergency operations plan for nuclear attack contingency (community shelter plan [CSP]). Increased Readiness Phase : - alert all executive staff members, service chiefs and other key govern- ment officials - instruct service chiefs and other key staff to begin carrying out actions shown under "Increased Readiness" in the checklist(s) con- tained in each section of this handbook - conduct briefing for EOC group and all service chiefs: review number and source of relocatees anticipated review location(s) of reception center(s) and medical facilities review major areas of responsibility of each service ° review channels of inter-service communications - establish 24-hour communications at local EOC - complete preparations to organize, activate or expand the relocation organization - notify service chiefs to begin accelerated training of auxiliary per- sonnel, volunteers and other emergency workers as needed - supervise the review of resources available in host area - conduct increased readiness phase review and update plan - notify Disaster District EOC when relocation plan review and update is completed - continue preparation for mobilization of emergency forces - supervise printing of emergency public information -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 1 - supervise release of periodic information bulletins concerning crisis relocation plans - advise critical risk area organizations and industries to notify their key workers of potential work assignments and to issue identification - complete similar notification and issuance of identification for key local government personnel and volunteers Mobilization of the crisis relocation organization should take place when the State EOC notifies the host area government that evacuation of the risk area is imminent. - notify service chiefs and other staff personnel to begin keeping an internal organization journal and other official records to reflect actions taken from time of mobilization - advise risk area industries to shut down non-essential activities and to institute planned provisions for continuation of critical opera- tions - monitor mobilization measures , prepare to respond to unexpected developments which could affect relocation plans - continue measures to bring emergency organization to highest level of readiness to carry out crisis relocation plan and local emergency oper- ations plan - notify Disaster District EOC of actions taken and request assistance where needed NOTE: IF NUCLEAR ATTACK WARNING IS RECEIVED, OR IF AN ACTUAL ATTACK TAKES PLACE WITHOUT WARNING: Implement the local emergency operations plan for nuclear attack contingency (community shelter plan [CSP]). Movement Phase: alert service chiefs, notify them to: ° mobilize all emergency organizations ° begin actions shown under "Movement Phase" as outlined in the checklist(s) contained for each service in this handbook inform the public: ° announce to local residents that crisis relocation has begun -3- Ch. 8 - June 1. 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 1 ° provide information and instructions to relocatees while en route and upon arrival in the host area provide information and instructions to residents of the host areas - review readiness actions already started; expedite those necessary to complete mobilization of relocation organization - monitor and direct all relocation operations from the local EOC NOTE: IF NUCLEAR ATTACK WARNING IS RECEIVED, OR IF AN ACTUAL ATTACK TAKES PLACE WITHOUT WARNING: Implement the local emergency operations plan for nuclear attack contingency (community shelter plan [CSP]). Relocated Phase : - insure that service chiefs and other emergency staff carry out actions shown under "Relocated Phase" outlined in the checklist(s) for each service - insure that priority is given to construction and upgrading of enough fallout shelters for the combined relocated and resident population in the host area and to hardening of blast and fallout shelter spaces in the risk area - inform the Disaster District EOC of number of relocatees in the host area - maintain flow of public information through mass media - announce State and local government policies regarding economic stabil- ization and measures to control or ration essential resources - obtain, analyze, record and disseminate information about local opera- tions to the services and to the public - continue to submit situation reports and other reports to the State EOC, as requested Shelter Phase: - disseminate local attack warning by all available means - activate the shelter plan -4- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 1 - monitor the movement of personnel to fallout shelters - make necessary public announcements to keep all citizens informed on the general situation - conduct damage assessment as conditions permit - inform relocatees of conditions in the risk area - determine when people can leave fallout shelters - respond to directions from the State EOC for long-range recovery opera- tions Return Phase: - notify the service chiefs to carry out actions shown under the "Return Phase" checklist(s) for their activities - use mass media and internal communications to: ° urge relocatees to help restore all property used during the relo- cation period ° announce public transportation schedule, routes to be used, condi- tions in the risk area - coordinate movement with neighboring Jurisdictions and the risk area to provide an orderly flow of return traffic - issue general announcement for return movement to begin, in accordance with Governor's request - initiate action where necessary to return to normal those parts of the host community which were altered or disturbed by crisis relocation activity and which were not returned to normal by relocatees - collect claims , records, receipts and all documentation possible con- cerning impact of crisis relocation to be forwarded to the appropriate State agencies when requested - insure return of borrowed equipment to proper Jurisdiction - release service augmentation and assist in their return -5- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 2 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COORDINATOR Pre-Crisis Phase: - prepare and review SOPS and plans for internal operations of EOC - inform Executive Group of EOC status - insure that EOC is properly equipped for crisis relocation operations - coordinate with emergency services to insure their readiness to con- duct operations from the EOC - train EOC groups - identify EOC space requirements, and, if necessary, plan for expansion of EOC office space to accommodate enlarged staff Increased Readiness Phase: - complete pre-crisis phase activities - advise Executive Group on measures to increase readiness of EOC and crisis relocation organization; initiate alerting of crisis relocation organization - begin 24-hour communications watch - when notified that relocation is imminent: ° activate EOC conduct staff briefing and review EOC operating procedures ° make final preparations for crisis relocation operations Movement and Relocated Phases: - brief Executive Group on status of crisis relocation operations - exercise staff supervision of the EOC staff and exercise other author- ity delegated by the Executive Group - insure that each EOC element maintains adequate written records of messages, directives, requests and actions -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 2 Shelter Phase: - insure that warning is disseminated - take shelter or move operations to an appropriate protected site if the EOC is not a fallout shelter - collect and pass information on radiation and shelter operations to the Disaster District and keep shelters informed of the situation Return Phase : - notify the services when the return phase is to begin - keep the Executive Group informed of the status of cleanup operations and other actions to return the community to normal - provide written records of EOC actions to appropriate authority when the EOC operation is phased out -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 3 EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION CHECKLIST Pre-Crisis Phase: - organize and staff Information organization - review sample news releases and adapt to local situation - prepare crisis relocation news releases as requested by Executive Group Increased Readiness Phase : - print and distribute CSP - alert key Information staff personnel - review crisis relocation annex and appendices and brief staff - meet with news media representatives to explain the details of crisis relocation and solicit their cooperation in informing the public when requested - prepare news releases to inform the resident population; releases to be made as requested by Executive Group - coordinate any news releases with appropriate emergency staffs - prepare news releases soliciting assistance and cooperation of resi- dents to prepare to receive relocatees Mobilization of the Information organization should take place when noti- fied by the local government that evacuation of the risk area is imminent. - call up all Information personnel - prepare additional news releases to keep resident population fully informed on status of crisis relocation and the necessity for the sacrifices that will be required - provide Public Information Package to Reception and Care Service for relocatees - release Public Information Package for distribution for all residents -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 3 Movement Phase: — keep public informed of status of relocation — prepare and release specific information as requested by Executive Group Relocated Phase — maintain flow of public information through mass media ; including information about risk area conditions — prepare and release specific information as requested by Executive Group — coordinate releases through service chiefs as applicable Shelter Phase: — discontinue normal operations, move to shelter — provide available information to shelters; including information about risk area conditions — upon emergence from shelter keep public fully informed of situation in consonance with existing policy Return Phase: — encourage relocatees to assist in returning facilities to their original condition and help in general cleanup — publish the plan for return movement of relocatees including traffic routes and conditions to be expected in the risk area —2— Ch. 8 — June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 4 FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICE CHECKLIST Pre-Crisis Phase : - review and update Fire and Rescue annexes periodically - maintain current list of fire fighting and rescue resources available in host county - determine increased manpower requirements for fire protection - determine need for additional personnel and equipment to support in- creased population - develop communications capabilities between all participants in the Fire and Rescue Service - inform EOC Communications Specialist of any additional communications requirements - develop plans for acquisition of suitable water carrying vehicles, piping, pumps or other equipment to provide additional water supply as backup for expanded fire operations and increased number of fire fight- ing units - develop and maintain a listing of requirements for supplemental fire fighting equipment and supplies in congregate care facilities - plan for use of any risk-area support to be provided, arrange to ob- tain necessary hose fittings - recruit and train sufficient personnel to meet requirements for radio- logical monitoring stations, shelter radiological monitors and decon- tamination - plan for search and rescue operations which may be required - coordinate requirements statement with Fire Chief Increased Readiness Phase: - prepare to expand billeting facilities and make necessary arrangements to accommodate fire protection/rescue personnel and equipment that may be allocated from the risk area - establish and check out communications links between the EOC and fire/ rescue operational sites -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 4 - provide training for designated key workers in areas of early fire suppression and reporting procedures - accelerate training of radiological defense personnel and auxiliaries - follow up on requirements statement to determine extent to which re- quirements for augmentation may be met Mobilization of the Fire and Rescue Service should take place when notified by local government that evacuation of the risk area is imminent. - call up required off-duty personnel and auxiliaries - inspect potential congregate care facilities for fire and safety haz- ards - man fire and rescue section at EOC - coordinate with Health and Medical Service for medical support of res- cue teams - coordinate plans to augment Law Enforcement during movement phase , if applicable - report completion of internal readiness actions to EOC Movement Phase: - deploy fire fighting resources to provide maximum support of the resi- dent and relocated populations - increase fire inspection and safety patrols if necessary - augment Law Enforcement traffic control to extent possible, and as requested - be prepared to respond to calls along evacuation movement routes Relocated Phase: - coordinate with Reception and Care Service to recruit and train volun- teers for each lodging and shelter who will: prepare a fire evacuation plan for each building occupied organize occupants to keep a 24-hour fire watch at each lodging and shelter ° keep exits unblocked, detect fire hazards -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 4 - organize fire prevention teams to inspect and enforce fire prevention safety measures in all buildings, insure adequate exits are available - recruit and train risk area fire watch teams from among the non-relo- catees - establish regulations to control smoking, use of cooking fires, use of electrical appliances and flammables in lodging/shelter areas - coordinate with Resource Service to establish restrictions on water use where necessary to maintain adequate water pressure - advise and instruct resident and hosted population in self-help for fire fighting and rescue operation in lodgings and shelter - instruct residents and building managers in how to turn off gas and other utilities Shelter Phase : - receive attack warning from EOC or police station/sheriff's office - activate warning system; use other available means to put out public warning - assist residents and building managers in turning off gas and other utilities - assist in the movement of residents and relocatees to fallout shelter - move units to pre-planned positions and take shelter - establish and operate radiological monitoring stations as specified in the Radiological Defense Annex - coordinate with supply service to shut down utilities, if necessary - continue to provide whatever fire fighting service is possible during the in-shelter period - organize search and rescue parties, assist injured people in the imme- diate area as capability permits - help repair damaged shelters - help survey and report damage -3- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 4 - help search for survivors in area as applicable when radiation levels permit - conduct decontamination operations as necessary to minimize radiation levels and to permit resumption of essential operations Return Phase : - make safety check of congregate lodging, mass feeding centers and other reception/care facilities - augment Law Enforcement traffic control to extent possible and appli- cable - release augmenting personnel and equipment - provide support to other services for return to normal operations -4- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 5 LAW ENFORCEMENT CHECKLIST Pre-Crisis Phase: - prepare, review, and update SOPS to support this annex - identify law enforcement resource available within the jurisdiction and maintain current resource list - maintain a standby organization for expanded services during a crisis relocation - determine what manpower and equipment would be needed for crisis relo- cation operations and what additional manpower, vehicles , communica- tions and special equipment would be needed from outside sources; coordinate with Executive Group to request needed resources from risk area (in risk area, identify resources which can be sent) - maintain updated traffic control plans for movement of evacuees through the host county to registration centers Increased Readiness: - complete readiness actions - review traffic movement and control plan; alert and brief key staff personnel - make specific personnel and equipment assignments - insure that movement plans are coordinated with registration plans - activate law enforcement communications systems at the local EOC; establish communications link with Disaster District , with risk area and with nearby communities - prepare for use of any additional communications equipment provided by risk area - prepare to use any additional personnel provided from outside sources - coordinate with Public Information Officer to announce traffic control measures which affect local residents; call for volunteers to help with auxiliary police duties - begin accelerated training of traffic control, housing/shelter secur- ity and other auxiliary personnel as needed -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 5 Mobilization of the Law Enforcement organization should take place when notified by the local government that evacuation of the risk area is immi- nent. - alert all law enforcement agencies - begin full-time operations from the EOC - call up off-duty personnel, reserve personnel and trained volunteers - integrate any additional personnel and equipment provided from outside sources into local organization - assemble and brief all personnel on their specific assignments - mark controlled routes with signs, position barricade materials, pre- pare traffic control points, mark highway turn-offs - identify and mark parking areas for relocatees' vehicles - coordinate with Resource Services to arrange for tow trucks and emer- gency fuel supplies to keep roads open during Movement Phase ; arrange for snow/ice removal from critical routes, if applicable - provide security for important communications, transportation, stor- age , utility and industrial facilities and other key points - report completion of internal readiness actions to EOC em Movent Phase: - complete increased readiness actions - activate traffic control plan - man traffic control posts , post directional signs and set up barri- cades to channel traffic to parking areas near the registration cen- ters - assist disabled motorists - provide traffic control and security at the registration center and at all parking areas - provide police support with communications link at each registration center; provide police liaison as necessary - coordinate with Fire and Rescue Services for general public safety support in lodging areas; report fire hazards to Fire Department -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 5 Relocated Phase : - establish foot and vehicle security patrols and guard posts - consider temporary suspension of enforcement measures for certain minor offenses, e.g. , traffic violations and other lesser misdemeanors - consult with local courts regarding disposition of persons in custody - advise the Executive Group of any recommendations for legal action to: ° prevent hoarding, pilfering, misuse of critical supplies ° establish curfews, establish restricted areas - coordinate with Public Information Officer to release public safety information and instructions to general public Shelter Phase : - disseminate warning as per Warning Annex to base emergency operations plan - augment warning system as necessary to alert resident and relocated populations - assist radiological monitoring and reporting - coordinate with Fire and Rescue Service to organize search and rescue teams - move to shelter; if possible, provide uniformed public safety officer at each fallout shelter - support damage assessment efforts - re-establish lost communications links - restrain individuals from premature return to risk area - assist with recovery operations in host area - prepare to carry out long-range recovery -3- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 5 Return Phase: - coordinate return of relocatees with neighboring jurisdictions and the risk area - activate traffic control posts and provide traffic control - assist disabled motorists - release augmentees as situation permits - return equipment which has been received on loan -4- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 HEALTH AND MEDICAL CHECKLIST Pre-Crisis Phase : - prepare, review, and update SOPs to support this annex - organize a Health and Medical Service organization - assign crisis relocation responsibilities to specific health/medical facilities, activities and individuals - maintain current list of all health/medical facilities in the host area - list other facilities which could be converted to temporary hospitals/ medical treatment facilities during an emergency - in conjunction with Red Cross, maintain current data concerning blood collecting and banking services/facilities; maintain list of potential donors for rare blood types - maintain current estimate of health/medical personnel and material resources on hand in host area and update periodically - determine what personnel and resource support would be required from outside sources during a crisis relocation period - recruit and train volunteers and medical auxiliaries for service dur- ing a relocation period; assist in first-aid instruction for the pub- lic - develop contingency plans for large numbers of casualties - develop plans to reduce hospital population by accelerating discharge of patients during crisis relocation - develop plan for use of Packaged Disaster Hospital (PDH) (if avail- able) - review current status of drinking water supplies, garbage and waste disposal facilities - develop plans for: ° emergency immunization program ° housing inspection ° food inspection ° vector control garbage and waste disposal inspections -7- EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 - determine minimum requirements for risk area operations during crisis relocation and develop plans for consolidation of risk area facilities and for transfer of patients and excess Health and Medical personnel, equipment and supplies to host areas Increased Readiness Phase : - alert key Health and Medical Services personnel - review host area crisis relocation plan and health/medical appendix, brief staff, meet with other emergency services to discuss mobiliza- tion plans - complete any unfinished pre-crisis actions - review requirements for health/medical supplies, equipment, personnel and other resources needed for crisis relocation - review inventories of health/medical personnel, resources and facili- ties - update requirements statement - review all health/medical assignments - prepare for call up of unassigned health/medical personnel - review plan for expansion of existing medical facilities; prepare space and equipment for additional beds and treatment areas - review status of PDH's; prepare for use of PDH if available - identify patients who could be discharged to release hospital beds - coordinate with Reception and Care Service to: ° determine where on-site medical assistance will be needed ° prepare first-aid stations or clinics ° review procedures for medical screening of relocatees and local residents - review procedures for sorting of patients during disaster - review plans for increased public health control measures during a crisis relocation -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 - plan inspection procedures for lodging areas, water and sewage sys- tems, garbage disposal, disposition of pet animals - determine current status of communicable diseases in the host area; plan for increased surveillance during relocation - review status of public health supplies, pesticides, immunization mate- rial, drugs, etc. - determine transportation requirements for movement of patients, health and medical personnel, equipment and supplies to the host areas and coordinate with Resources Service to ensure that necessary transporta- tion can be provided - review plans for emergency morgue and for identification of dead - report to appropriate EOC when increased readiness actions have been completed Mobilization of the Health and Medical Service organization should take place when notified by the local government that evacuation of the risk area is imminent. - alert and call to duty all health/medical personnel and auxiliaries - complete increased internal readiness actions already started; fully mobilize the host area Health and Medical Service - coordinate with Public Information Officer to announce health/medical information or instructions to relocatees and local residents - coordinate with Communications Officer to insure adequate communica- tions services are activated between health service section at EOC and all medical facilities and operating areas - man health/medical section at EOC and major health/medical facilities on 24-hour basis - coordinate with Reception and Care Service to: review medical support operations at the registration center ° prepare first-aid stations in lodging areas ° provide health and medical support to local residents ° inspect lodging, feeding areas -3- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 ° inspect food and water supplies and storage areas recommend measures to provide emergency waste disposal, construct emergency toilets, etc. ° provide communicable disease surveillance at registration centers ° provide sick call schedule for residents and relocatees - organize medical field team for medical support outside established medical facilities as needed; organize first-aid stations or clinics where needed - begin expansion of existing medical facilities ; discharge patients where possible - organize public health field teams, as needed - designate emergency morgue area, coordinate with local funeral direc- tors for disposition of dead - report mobilization status to EOC Movement Phase: - coordinate consolidation of risk area facilities and transfer of patients, health and medical personnel, equipment and supplies to host areas as planned - notify all health/medical organizations that evacuation has begun - respond to emergency requests for medical assistance in connection with crisis relocation movement activity - determine any special health/medical problems of relocatees as they arrive at registration centers - review status of first-aid stations, clinics and other temporary health/medical facilities - notify administrative division of health/medical supply needs - continue public health inspections and surveillance of: ° lodging areas ° water supply ° food handling and storage -4- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 sewage disposal system ° garbage disposal procedures ° environmental health provisions of hospitals, institutions, other public facilities - provide adequate rodent and vector control in host area - conduct immunization program, as needed - provide veterinary service, as needed - coordinate with Resource Service to obtain materials or equipment un- available through health/medical channels - activate temporary morgue , if necessary; maintain proper identifica- tion and burial records and forward this information to the administra- tive division - maintain accurate records of health/medical supplies and services used or provided in the host area Relocated Phase: - continue actions initiated in Movement Phase as deemed necessary - maintain necessary services for non-relocatees and for commuting key workers in the risk area - public health teams perform continuing on-site investigations and inspections - evacuate seriously ill/injured patients requiring care beyond the capability of local facilities - assign Medical Service teams on an "as needed" basis to first-aid stations - institute schools for residents and relocatees on care and treatment of fallout sheltered populations; assign persons recruited from these schools as shelter health/medical aides - coordinate transportation requirements for moving patients to shelter Shelter Phase: - disseminate attack warning to all health/medical personnel -5- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 6 — insure that patients, staff and other medical personnel move to desig— nated fallout shelter areas — suspend all health and medical activities which do not directly con— tribute to the saving of lives, prevention of illness and prevention and control of certain health hazards — limit admission to seriously sick and injured — increase bed capacities in anticipation of increased admissions — establish emergency treatment stations, as needed — notify health personnel to report to shelter manager as health/medical operations advisor — instruct shelterees on public health measures which must be accom— plished to minimize dangers of radiological fallout; coordinate with RADEF shelter monitor — instruct shelterees on medical treatment for exposure to radiation Return Phase: — notify all Health Service organizations when relocation is to end — coordinate return of patients , personnel, equipment and supplies to the risk area — provide emergency medical support during return movement — phase out medical support operations and release augmenting personnel and equipment — return PDH to storage — inventory all supplies on hand — restock depleted medical supplies — inspect lodging and feeding areas for health hazards — arrange for disposal of any contaminated food or medical supplies — inspect sanitary landfills and waste disposal areas; advise Resource Service on methods of handling solid waste — notify all health/medical services when to return to normal operations — forward all records of materials and services used or provided during relocation period to the appropriate public records custodian - —6— Ch. 8 — June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 7 COMMUNICATIONS CHECKLIST Reference Communication Annex to the Emergency Operations Plan Pre-Crisis Phase: - review the crisis relocation annex periodically - coordinate with local telephone company; arrange for emergency instal- lation of telephones; coordinate crisis relocation needs with tele- phone company plans for dedicated lines, "hotlines" and line load con- trols Increased Readiness Phase: - review crisis relocation plan, check status of: ° communications equipment needed for crisis relocation operations ° EOC communications plans for utilization of amateur and citizens band radio equip- ment - check with all services to determine where service operation centers will be located - insure establishment of communications within the host area between lodging, sheltering and feeding complexes and between the host area and the risk areas as well as the Disaster District EOC and adjacent jurisdictions - alert telephone company to be ready to install emergency phones at all operating areas in order of priority; arrange for line load controls to give priority to emergency services Mobilization of Communications should take place when notified by the local government that evacuation of the risk area is imminent. - request telephone company to install emergency telephones, begin line load controls - insure that traffic control posts have adequate communications with the EOC - alert RACES organizations -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 7 - monitor Emergency Broadcast System - begin control of communications from EOC - designate net control station and alternates for each radio net Movement and Relocated Phases: - monitor communications support of traffic control operations - establish and maintain communications among elements of the crisis relocation organization - continue EBS listening watch - implement communications priorities Shelter Phase: - help disseminate warning through all available communications systems - limit radio and telephone communications to critical emergency mes- sages - maintain communications with fallout shelters and radiological monitor- ing stations - maintain communications with Disaster District Return Phase: - monitor communications support of traffic control operations - phase down operations as instructed by Executive Group -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 8 WARNING CHECKLIST Reference Warning Annex to the Emergency Operations Plan Pre-Crisis Phase: - review and update the warning provisions of the local Emergency Opera- tions Plan - determine if any additional warning measures, equipment or planning will be necessary to furnish warning to the expanded population - coordinate with local stations (radio and TV) - test warning system periodically Increased Readiness Phase : - begin continuous communications watch - test warning communications system - insure immediate capability to activate warning system in the event of attack warning - coordinate with Emergency Public Information officer and Executive Group Relocated Phase : - complete increased readiness phase actions - insure that warning system and plans cover the entire relocated and resident population in accordance with the actual situation - advise host area Executive Group of any impending or existing natural or man-made disasters which might interrupt crisis relocation opera- tions Shelter Phase: - refer to Shelter Annex - acknowledge to sender receipt of attack warning if and when warning is received - notify designated personnel -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 8 — activate the warning system — sound audio warning signals for three to five minutes in a series of short blasts or wavering tone, repeated as long as necessary — notify the Emergency Management Director on receipt of "all clear" —2— Ch. 8 — June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 9 RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE CHECKLIST Reference Radiological Defense Annex to the Emergency Operations Plan Pre-Crisis Phase : - review the crisis relocation annex periodically - review and update RADEF plans and SOPS periodically - maintain current data on RADEF monitors, stations and equipment avail- able in this host area - establish means of communications and reporting procedures for fixed and mobile RADEF monitoring stations - determine what additional RADEF personnel, training and equipment will be necessary for crisis relocation operations, include in requirements statement - determine how requirements for additional RADEF personnel and equip- ment will be met at time of relocation - establish nuclear detonation (NUDET) reporting procedures Increased Readiness Phase: - complete any unfinished pre-crisis phase plans and actions - obtain and distribute necessary additional RADEF equipment - insure that RADEF equipment and communications are in place and ready - begin accelerated training of RADEF monitors - coordinate any additional communications system requirements with Communications Officer - test RADEF communications system and monitoring equipment Movement Phase: - receive , test and store monitoring sets and dosimeters provided by risk area Relocated Phase: complete any unfinished Increased Readiness Phase actions -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 9 TAB 9 - coordinate with Reception and Care Service and Fallout Shelter Officer to insure that RADEF system provides adequate coverage - conduct accelerated training for any additional RADEF monitors re- quired - assign shelter monitors to fallout shelters - distribute shelter monitor sets and dosimeters Shelter Phase: - carry out actions outlined in the Radiological Defense Annex - alert all monitors , establish communications , begin monitoring for fallout - plot radioactive fallout patterns and predict future fallout levels and patterns - prepare RADEF reports for Executive Group and the State EOC - prepare RADEF information for public release through the Public Infor- mation Officer - determine length of stay and allowable radiation dose for anyone need- ing to leave a fallout shelter for an emergency purpose - maintain dose rate and dosimeter reading records for all persons per- forming emergency missions - determine the approximate exposure level for each shelter - advise the Shelter Officer of any necessary changes in fallout shelter occupancy - determine what decontamination measures are needed to restore vital facilities - determine where decontamination efforts could substantially improve the protection of fallout shelters - mark radiological hazards - determine when radiation levels will permit people to leave fallout shelters - assist in decontamination operations -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 10 GLOSSARY Conglomerate - A high-risk area with its designated host areas. Congregate Care Facilities - Facilities , to include public and private buildings, in the Host Areas that may be used to lodge and accommodate evacuees. Generally, assigned space is approximately 40 square feet per person. CRP - Crisis Relocation Planning - Comprehensive investigation into the practicability of and planning for evacuating high-risk areas when nuclear attack threatens, and temporarily re- locating non-essential residents of those areas into smaller towns , cities and rural areas where nuclear blast and fire effects are not likely to occur. CSP - Community Shelter Plan - A plan developed for a local government which enables the officials of that government to give their people infor- mation so they may answer the questions , "Where do I go?" and "What do I do?" in event of a nuclear attack launched on the U. S. with little or no warning. EMP - Electromagnetic Pulse - An effect that occurs when a nuclear weapon is detonated. EMP ener- gy can be collected by long cables or antennas to form voltage surges strong enough to burn out many items of electrical equipment. Essential Industries - Those producers of goods and/or services which may be essential to national defense or com- munity/regional well-being during a national emergency. Evacuating Jurisdiction - The jurisdiction that is sending its people into safer areas during the emergency period. Evacuation Control - The plans made by the various services to out- Procedures line their duties and to control the orderly movement of people during the evacuation period. Evacuee - The individual who is moved to a less haz- ardous area some distance from his home. -1- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 10 Fallout - The process or phenomenon of the fallback to the earth's surface of particles contaminated with radioactive material from the radioactive cloud. The term is also applied in a collec- tive sense to the contaminated particulate matter itself. The early (or local) fallout is defined, somewhat arbitrarily, as those particles which reach the earth within 24 hours after a nuclear explosion. The delayed (or world-wide ) fallout consists of the smaller particles which ascend into the upper troposphere and into the stratosphere and are carried by winds to all parts of the earth. The delayed fallout is brought to earth, main- ly by rain and snow, over extended periods ranging from months to years. High-Risk Area - An area considered relatively more likely to experience the direct weapons effects (blast, heat and initial nuclear radiation) in event of a nuclear attack on the U.S. For planning purposes it has been assumed that the metro- politan areas of the state as well as some other areas of significant military-indus- trial-economic importance are at greater risk from the blast and fire effects of a nuclear attack than are other areas. High-risk desig- nations do not constitute a prediction that all or even most large cities -- or any specific city -- will necessarily be subject to direct attack. However, any attack which includes industrial objectives could include large cities as likely targets. Host Area (Jurisdiction) - That geographic area or political jurisdic- tion, usually a county, or cities , towns and communities within a county, in which high- risk area residents are received, processed, lodged , cared for and sheltered during the crisis relocation emergency period. "In-Place" Planning - See CSP. Lodging - The facilities in which evacuees are housed in the Host Jurisdiction. NCP - Nuclear Civil Protection - Planning in this field involves both crisis relocation and community shelter (in-place ) planning . Nuclear civil protection planning is not com- plete without approved plans for both eventu- alities. -2- Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 10 Overpressure - The transient pressure , usually expressed in pounds per square inch, exceeding the ambient pressure , manifested in the shock (or blast) wave from an explosion. The variation of the overpressure with time depends on the energy yield of the explosion, the distance from the point of the burst , and the medium in which the weapon is detonated. The peak overpres- sure is the maximum value of the overpressure at a given location and is generally experi- enced at the instant the shock (or blast) wave reaches the location. PF - Protection Factor - A number used to express the relationship between the amount of fallout gamma radiation that would be received by an unprotected person and the amount that would be received by one in a shelter. An occupant of a shelter with a PF of 40 would be exposed to a dose rate 1/40 (2-1/2%) of the rate to which he would be exposed if his location were unprotected. PF Categories - In order to reduce the voluminous protection factor numbers to a manageable quantity, pro- tection factors are grouped into nine PF cate- gories and ranges as shown below: Protection Factor (PF) Reduction Factor Category Range Range 8 Over 1,000 .001 or less 7 500 - 1,000 .002 - .001 6 250 - 499 .004 - .002 5 150 - 249 .007 - .004 4 100 - 149 .010 - .007 3 70 - 99 .014 - .010 2 40 - 69 .025 - .014 1 20 - 39 .050 - .025 0 10 - 19 .100 - .050 X 1 - 9 1,000 - .100 Rest Stop - A designated area, usually operated by a host jurisdiction, where relocatees can obtain ser- vices necessary to permit continued travel. Depending on the distance relocatees will have traveled before reaching the rest stop, and the distance to their host destination or to the next rest stop, some or all of the follow- ing services should be available at each rest stop: food, fuel, restrooms, minor vehicular repairs and/or service , and minor medical attention. -3- Ch. 8 - June 1. 1989 EMERGENCY PLAN ANNEX E2 APPENDIX 10 Risk Categories - Based upon background information used in designating high-risk areas , priority , as listed below, indicate priority of planning effort: Category I designates places which are Counterforce Targets, i.e . , places which con- tain strategic offensive military forces or supporting elements therefore. Category II designates other places of high military value. Category III is assigned to the remainder of the designated high-risk areas , i.e. , the urban/industrial complexes not covered in Cate- gories I and II. Shelter, Fallout - Fallout Shelter - A selected Civil Defense area with a Protection Factor (PF) which will reduce the effects of fallout on the persons within that area. Traffic Control Points - Places along evacuation routes that are manned by police or other designated personnel to direct and control movement to and from the area being evacuated. TRIAGE - A system of assigning priorities of medical treatment to casualties on the basis of urgen- cy, chance for survival, etc. -4 Ch. 8 - June 1, 1989 ��G�NGY MANq��3 Civil Preparedness Guide ( W z Federal Emergency Management Agency Washington, D.C. 20472 CPG 1-8, CHG 2 September 30, 1988 Guide for the Development of State and Local Emergency Operations Plans 1. Purpose. This change transmits annex G and a page change to Civil Preparedness Guide CPG 1-8, Guide for the Development of State and Local Emergency Operations Plans, dated October 11, 1985, (Interim Guidance) • 2. Action Required. Holders of CPG 1-8 shall make the following changes and file this transmittal in front of CPG 1-8 for reference purposes. Page Changes: Remove Pages Insert Pages 5-3 and 5-4 5-3 and 5-4 5-G1 thru 5-G19 (file after page 5-E24) --------------- rant C. Peterson Associate Director State and Local Programs and Support September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 AnnexE - Evacuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E1 Tab 1 Chart of Interjurisdiction Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E6 Appendix E.1 - Evacuation in Response to Threat of Nuclear Attack 5-E7 Tab 1 Map of High Hazard Area . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E12 Tab 2 Map of 2 psi Areas . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E13 Tab 3 Map of Liberty County Evacuation Divisions . . . . . . . . . . 5-E14 Tab 4 Map of Central City Evacuation Divisions . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E15 Tab 5 Table of Reception Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E16 Tab 6 Table of Organizations Relocating as such . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E17 Tab 7 Table of Evacuee Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E18 Tab 8 Table of Route Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E19 Tab 9 Traffic Control Points for Evacuation of Nuclear Attack HHA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix E.2 - Nuclear Power Plant Incident/Accident Evacuation. . . 5-E20 Tab 1 Map of Liberty County Plume EP7_ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-E23 Tab 2 Map of Evacuation Areas and Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tab 3 Table of Evacuation Area Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tab 4 Traffic Analysis Results Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AnnexF - Reception and Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annex G - In-place Protective Shelter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-G1 Annex H - Health and Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-H1 AnnexI - Law Enforcement . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AnnexJ - Public Works . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AnnexK - Fire and Rescue . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annex L - Radiological Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-L1 Tab 1 Chart of Liberty County RP Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-L6 Tab 2 Table of RP Hazards • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-L7 Tab 3 Detailed Radiological Protection SOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix L.1 - Nuclear Attack Hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-L9 Tab 1 Table of Radiation Level Reporti,ng Locations . . . . . . . . 5-L12 Tab 2 Table of Shelter RP Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-L13 Appendix L.2 - Nuclear Power Plant Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tab 1 Map of Radiological Sampling and Monitoring Points . . AnnexM - Human Services .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AnnexN - Resource Management . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * An asterisk under the page number indicates that there is no illustrative example of the plan element in this sample plan. 5-3 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 BASIC PLAN I. PURPOSE This plan predetermines, to the extent possible, actions to be taken by the governments of Liberty County and its municipalities , and by cooperating private organizations, to prevent disasters if possible, to reduce the vulnerability of county residents to any disasters that may strike , to establish capabilities for protecting citizens from the effects of disasters, to respond effectively to the actual occurrence of disasters , and to provide for recovery in the aftermath of any emergency involving extensive damage or other debilitating influence on the normal pattern of life within the community. II. SITUATION ANS ASSUMPTIONS A. Situations Liberty County is exposed to many hazards, al 1 of which have the potential to disrupt the community, cause damage, and create casualties. Possible natural hazards include hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, forest and brush fires , and earthquakes. There is also the threat of war-related incidents such as a nuclear, biochemical , or conventional attack. Other disaster situations could develop from a hazardous materials accident, nuclear power plant accident, major transportation accident , terrorism, or civil disorder. B. Assumptions 1 . While it is likely that outside assistance would be available in most major disaster situations affecting the county and while plans have been developed to facilitate coordination of this assistance, it is necessary for Liberty County to plan for and to be prepared to carry out disaster response and short-term recovery operations on an independent basis. Inc u e any other assumptions determined to be necessary during the planning process that are significant in terms of impact on actual emergency management activities. III. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS A. General It is the responsibility of Liberty County government to protect life and property from the effects of hazardous events. Local government has the primary responsibility for emergency management activities. When the emergency exceeds the local government' s capability to respond , assistance will be requested from the State government. The Federal Government will provide assistance to the State, when appropriate. 5-4 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 I ANNEX G IN-PLACE PROTECTIVE SHELTER G. I. PURPOSE The purpose of this annex is to establish an option for the Liberty County emergency organization of protecting people from the effects of any disaster agent that threatens or actually strikes the community by placing them in suitable shelter facil- ities. G. II. SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS A. Situation. Protective shelter is a population protection option that may be needed in disasters or disaster-threat situ- ations caused by numerous disaster agents including most of those identified in the Liberty County hazards analysis. Protective shelter is especially applicable in emergencies or disasters caused by nuclear attack, hazardous materials accidents, torna- does, hurricanes, and peacetime nuclear incidents or accidents. B. Assumptions. If the population of Liberty County is endangered by the effects of any disaster agent, the Liberty County emergency organization under the direction of elected public officials will attempt to determine the optimal strategy for ensuring the safety of the public and will take action to implement that strategy. G. III . CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS A. Direction and Control . A disaster or potential disaster that generates a requirement for protecting people from a harmful environment is of sufficient seriousness to justify activation of the Liberty County emergency organization. Situation analysis, planning, policy making, coordination, and ultimate direction and control will be carried out from the central EOC in accordance with the Direction and Control Annex to this plan. Field oper- ations will continue to be managed using the procedures and interorganizational coordination methods established under Liberty County's Incident Command System. B. Population Protection Options. The two principal alternatives for population protection are evacuation and shelter. In an actual disaster or disaster-threatening situ- ation, Liberty County officials would use one or the other or 5-Gl CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 I possibly both options, depending on the best available estimate of the situation, to minimize injury to the people involved. Evacuation is usually the preferred option, but it must be evaluated in terms of the overall benefit to the evacuees, taking into account the conditions at the selected destination and any risk of exposure to the disaster agent while in route. For consideration of sheltering in place, it is important to deter- mine the relative protection from potential disaster agents provided by the available residential, commercial, and recre- ational structures in the community and to identify special facility populations, e.g. , the hospitalized and the incarcer- ated, for whom in-place shelter may be the only available option. The two options have traditionally been treated separately, because many disasters seem likely to require strategies that heavily emphasize one or the other option. It is also true that treating the two options separately permits the jurisdiction to establish a useful division of labor in planning and preparedness for population protection. It is important to remember, however, that in an actual emergency the two population protection options are very closely related and might well have to be invoked simultaneously. The separate planning and capability-building processes for the two options are complementary. Neither one, standing alone, adequately addresses the needs generated by many disaster situations, .but together they cover almost any contin- gency reasonably well. C. Relationship to Temporary Housing/Mass Care. In the multihazard planning context, temporary housing and mass care for people displaced from their homes by disaster effects are most often functions of private relief organizations. Providing protective shelter on an emergency basis is clearly a responsi- bility of government. The two functions are treated separately, therefore, in the Liberty County EOP. There is, however, a close relationship between these functions. It is essential that the organizations primarily responsible for them work closely together and carry on preparedness activities in close coordina- tion. D. Interiurisdictional Relationships. The county and the three municipalities in the county that have emergency management departments will develop and maintain the capability to provide protective shelter for the population in any situation for which such action is appropriate. In localized emergencies, the municipality involved may respond independently while the others stand by to provide assistance if required. The Liberty County Emergency Organization will be responsible for any situation that 5-G2 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 I occurs outside the boundaries of the municipalities that have protective shelter systems. In very large-scale emergencies, the resources of the county and of all the municipalities in the county will be activated and will be centrally controlled from the county EOC or an alternate. This includes a nuclear attack emergency situation as described in appendix G. 1 to this annex. G. IV. ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES A. Organization. Liberty County's organization for protec- tive shelter is the same as the Liberty County Emergency Organ- ization described in annex A to this plan. B. Responsibilities. 1. Protective shelter systems will be developed and maintained by the Liberty County Emergency Organization and by the emergency organizations of Central City, Fisherville, and Harvest Junction. 2 . The warden of the Columbia State Prison is respon- sible for providing a protective shelter system for the staff and inmates of the prison. While Liberty County officials have no jurisdiction with respect to the prison, it is State policy to maintain a close working relationship between State facilities and neighboring local governments. The county and prison author- ities have agreed, therefore, to work cooperatively and provide mutual support in all phases of emergency management. 3 . The Liberty County Emergency Program Manager (EPM) will be responsible for: a. Developing and maintaining a protective shelter system to protect the population from the effects of a nuclear attack. b. Developing a system and procedures for evalu- ating the evacuation and in-place shelter options in the event of a large-scale hazardous materials spill or release or in the event of a peacetime nuclear incident or accident. The time available in which to decide whether to evacuate or shelter in place in a hazardous materials or peacetime nuclear incident is often very limited, and it may be necessary for first responders to make an immediate decision. Factors such as the nature of the material or materials, the atmospheric conditions, the threat of fire or explosion, and estimated duration of toxic effects can 5-G3 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 influence the final determination. For large-scale incidents or incidents with the potential to seriously affect large popula- tions, the EPM will be prepared to assemble appropriately quali- fied advisors, to obtain information for analysis, to evaluate the protective actions already taken by first responders, and to develop recommendations on remedial or further actions for the coordination group in the county EOC. This decision support system and procedures will be incorporated into the Direction and Control Annex of this plan and into hazard-specific appendixes as required. 4 . The Liberty County Public Health Officer will be responsible for developing and maintaining a Protective Action Guide (PAG) on protective shelter for a fixed nuclear facility accident at the Blue Water Nuclear Power Plant. This PAG will serve as the basis for a hazard-specific appendix to this annex. 5. The Liberty County Public Works Director will be responsible for developing a list of the best available tornado shelters in the county to serve as the basis for a hazard specific appendix to this annex. Include assignments of responsibilities for other officials and agencies as appropriate. G.V. ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS Functions related to administration and logistics are frequently carried out by members of the Liberty County emergency organization working at the county EOC, even in emergency situa- tions that do not call for complete activation of the emergency organization. In situations that involve use of in-place protec- tive shelter, measures to meet these requirements generally will be centrally carried out and controlled by a group working under the direction of the County Manager or official designee in accordance with the Basic Plan and Resource Management Annex of this plan. G.VI. PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE This annex was developed and is maintained by the Liberty County Department of Emergency Management. All departments and agencies assigned responsibilities in paragraph G. IV. are expected to develop and maintain implementing plans and proce- 5-G4 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 dures to support their roles in coordination with the county emergency program manager. Development and maintenance of hazard-specific appendixes are covered in the appendixes. G.VII. AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES A. Authorities. Not used. See paragraph VII of the Basic Plan. B. References. Not used. See hazard-specific appendixes to this annex. G.VIII. DEFINITION OF TERMS Protective Shelter. An enclosed area that will protect occupants against specified disaster effects up to a given intensity. 5-G5 i September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 APPENDIX G. 1 In-place Protective Shelter for Nuclear Attack G. 1. I . PURPOSE The purpose of this appendix is to document Liberty County's approach to providing the population shelter protection from any effects of nuclear weapons that might be experienced in the jurisdiction. G. 1. II. SITUATION AND ASSUMPTIONS A. Situation. 1. While it is not considered very likely, it is possible that a nuclear attack could be launched against the United States with little or no warning. If this did occur, there would be no alternative but to shelter the people in the best available protective facilities near their locations at the time. 2 . Part of Liberty County has been designated a nuclear attack high-risk area. It is considered probable that a nuclear attack would be preceded by a period of escalating tensions and crisis. It is likely that an enemy's intention to attack would be detected in time to evacuate the residents of high-risk areas to host areas in parts of the State less likely to be directly attacked. Evacuation is Liberty County's primary population protection option for residents of high-risk areas. (Evacuation is covered in annex E to this plan. ) 3 . In-place protection in shelter facilities located in high-risk areas offers much less assurance of survival than evacuation, but it has the potential of saving many lives that would otherwise be lost in a nuclear attack. B. Assumptions. 1. It is prudent to assume that the high-risk area near the Liberty County Airport is a high priority target area, since the enemy might wish to deny use of this facility to our military forces and might strike it in a preemptive attack. 2 . It is reasonable to assume that the remaining target areas in Liberty County are of lesser priority than the 5-G6 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 I airport and would likely be struck only in case of an all-out nuclear war. G. 1. III. CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS A. General. Protecting the population in-place from the effects of a nuclear attack involves four principal functions or activities: (1) Warning the population, (2) directing them to the best available shelter protection, (3) supporting the sheltered population within the limitations imposed by the environment, and (4) releasing the surviving population from shelter when weapon- caused hazards are no longer a threat to survival. B. Phases of Shelter Operations. The phases of shelter operations and the actions appropriate to each phase are as follows: 1. Warning Phase. This phase begins with the receipt of attack warning or upon observation of a nuclear detonation and ends when movement to shelter begins. (The warning function is covered in annex C to this plan. ) Actions in this phase include, to the extent possible, any of the following not completed during the increased-readiness period (if there is any) : Receipt and dissemination of warning; preparation by county and municipal emergency organizations to assist the population to move to public shelters; full staffing of the EOC, shelter complex headquarters (SCH' s) , and other control facilities; activation of public shelters; activation of emergency communications; and implementation of emergency shutdown by industries, utilities, and other appropriate installations. 2 . Movement-to-Shelter Phase. This phase begins when people start moving to public shelters and ends when movement to shelters is complete or when operations to assist movement must cease because of attack effects. Primary actions in this phase include: Control and coordination of pedestrian and vehicular traffic and protection of vital community resources, facilities, and services. If a nuclear detonation occurs in or near the county during this phase, the surviving population will be directed to resume movement as rapidly as possible to the best fallout protection they can reach in no more than 20 minutes, to their allocated shelters if it is possible to reach them in that time. Operations stress the need (a) to place the shelterees in maximum blast/fallout protective posture IMMEDIATELY upon shelter occupancy; (b) take fire prevention actions if not done previ- ously (close all window blinds and shades) in all home or public 5-G7 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 I shelters; and (c) be prepared to extinguish attack-caused igni- tions IMMEDIATELY in all home or public shelters. 3 . In-Shelter Phase. a. This phase begins when a substantial portion of the population has arrived at public fallout shelters and ends when a major portion of the population can leave shelter for short periods. The in-shelter phase may continue from 1 or 2 to as many as 14 days after movement to shelter, depending upon fallout intensity. Operations are carried out to the extent possible in the general areas of radiological monitoring, shelter management, intershelter and remedial movements, immediate rescue, care of the sick and injured, shelter resupply, and provision of emergency information to the population. Additional information on all of these areas of activity is included in the appropriate annexes and appendixes to this plan and in references cited in the authorities and references paragraphs throughout the plan. b. Operations stress keeping shelterees in maximum fallout protective posture in all home or public shelters and using Emergency Broadcast System (EBS) radio and, for public shelters, communications from the EOC or SCH' s to shelters to provide as much information as possible on the emergency situ- ation. C. Radiological Defense (RADEF) functions will be carried out in accordance with annex L to this plan. In-shelter radiation measurements will be used as a basis for determining the best-protected shelter areas in the facility, using adjoining areas of the facility to alleviate crowding when radiation intensities permit, maintaining radiation exposure records for shelter occupants, determining feasibility of emergency excur- sions outside of shelter, providing information as requested to the SCH and the EOC, requesting advice from the SCH and the EOC on emergency actions in extreme situations, and providing situation information to the shelter occupants. d. If the county or parts of the county receive no fallout during the first 24 hours of an attack on the United States, the population will, nevertheless, be kept in shelter for an additional 1 or more days or until information is received from higher levels that no additional detonations are expected. County and municipal emergency services on instructions from the 5-G8 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 i EOC will carry out essential operations such as firefighting, public safety patrols, adjusting population distribution in shelters, improving food and water supplies, controlling essential utilities, and caring for the sick and injured. e. Fire-suppression operations will emphasize maximum self-help by the people, including shelter fire control teams organized in public shelters, in addition to operations by the county's professional and volunteer fire companies. f. Unless directed otherwise by the policy group in the EOC, priority actions will be taken during the in-shelter phase of shelter operations as shown in the table in figure 5-2 . 4 . Shelter-Emergence Phase. This phase begins when a major portion of the population can leave shelter for short periods. The end of this phase is dependent upon the- postattack condition of the community. a. If Liberty County has suffered no physical damage in the attack, this phase will end as soon as radiation no longer constitutes a significant hazard; utilities are function- ing on a minimum essential basis; and county and municipal emergency services personnel are ready to control movement of individuals to their homes and to provide such essential services as firefighting, law enforcement, decontamination, welfare, and health and medical treatment. b. If any part of the county is damaged by blast and fire, the surviving population of such areas will be cared for in public shelters until more satisfactory arrangements can be made. The Liberty County emergency organization will be reconstituted as required and will continue emergency operations using local resources and any support that may be available. c. Radiological decontamination other than of personnel will not be attempted except as directed from the EOC. d. If postshelter residual radiation levels in any part of Liberty County are relatively high, remedial movement of the population may be required. Remedial movement will be planned in coordination with Mutual Aid Region 4 and may be carried out within the county or to a neighboring county. 5-G9 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30. 1988 I Fire Situation Fallout Situation Negligible Controllable2 Uncontrollable2 Negligible Negligible Fallout- Negligible Fallout- Negligible Fallout- (under 0.5 R/hr) Negligible Fire Controllable Fire Uncontrollable Fire Moderate Fallout- Maintain initial shel- Control or suppress Uncontrollable Fire ter posture; provide fires; treat injured; Severe Fallout- aid to other juris- maintain population Uncontrollable Fire dictions as feasible; in shelter. prepare for reception People in public shel- of survivors. ters rated as having high fire risk will be moved to alternate Moderate Moderate Fallout- Moderate Fallout- shelters as specified (0.5 to 50 R/hr) Negligible Fire Controllable Fire on Map 3 as soon as (Note: Actions under uncontrollable fire moderate fallout Protect population in Control or suppress situation is antici- conditions should be shelter; conduct fires on a dose- pated or develops. predicated on the dose-limitedl essen- limitedl basis; treat Movement will commence assumption that tial operations; injured; maintain upon order from county severe fallout may provide aid to other population in shelter. authorities at the occur.) jurisdictions as EOC, upon the initi- feasible. ative of shelter complex directors, Severe Severe Fallout- Severe Fallout- shelter managers, ore (over 50 R/hr) Ngligible Fire Controllable Fire government employees (Note: Usually in the high-fire-risk preceded by 5 to 30 Make maximum use of Suppression or control shelters. minutes of moderate available shelter; of fires must be fallout.) conserve shelter undertaken by shelter resources; minimize population and fire outside operations. personnel; treat injured; stay in shelter. lDose in shelter, plus operational mission dose to operational personnel, will be limited to 100 R in the first 5 days after attack, unless specific authorization to exceed this limit is given by county authorities at the EOC. 2In jurisdictions where plans do not cover fire and blast contingencies, omit the 2 right-hand columns. Figure 5-2 . In-Shelter Phase Priority Actions e. The population for which remedial movement is not required will be instructed on measures to minimize radiation exposure prior to release from shelters. This instruction will be reinforced and elaborated in a continuing public information effort. C. Continuity of Government. Maintaining continuity of local government under law is problematical in a situation that requires in-place protective shelter under threat of nuclear attack. Both the Liberty County and Central City EOC' s are in an area that has been designated a "Very High Direct Effects Risk Area" in the Federal Emergency Management Agency' s guidance on nuclear attack risk assumptions. The Kingston EOC is in an area that has been designated a "Medium Direct Effects Risk Area" in the same guidance. The Harvest Junction EOC is in a "Low Direct 5-G10 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 Effects Risk Area, " and the Fisherville EOC is outside of any area defined as direct effects risk in the Federal guidance. All of these EOC's except Fisherville are within the high-risk area defined for evacuation in this plan. It must be remembered, however, that neither the Federal Government guidance nor the local plans developed with State assistance attempts to predict what an actual nuclear attack would be like. No one knows what targets would be hit in a nuclear attack on this country. It follows that no one can predict which, if any, of the EOC's in Liberty County would be directly affected by weapons effects in a nuclear attack. Evacuation provides a greater degree of certainty of survival for most of the risk area population, but in-place protection for the population and for government forces should never be thought of as futile or as not worth the trouble. Even if the worst-case assumptions proved to be valid, some lives would be saved by making the best possible use of available shelter. The approach to maintaining continuity of government described in annex A to this plan is valid, therefore, for a situation that requires the county emergency organization to use an in-place protective shelter strategy to protect the population. G. l. IV. ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES A. ORGANIZATION. If a situation exists in which it is necessary to use in-place shelter to protect the population from nuclear weapons effects, it is very likely--though not certain-- that the Liberty County emergency organization including all eight planning and operations (P&O) zones would already be fully activated. If the emergency organization is not activated and any P&O zones are not operational at the time of attack warning, they should immediately and spontaneously take action to become SO. B. ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES. 1. Development and maintenance of the in-place protec- tive shelter system is a responsibility of the Liberty County Department of Emergency Management (LCDEM) . 2 . The Liberty County Emergency Program Manager (EPM) is responsible for: a. Coordinating with officials of the municipal- ities within Liberty County and with heads of other departments of county government and with representatives of appropriate 5-Gll CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 i private sector organizations on the development and maintenance of an in-place protective sheltering capability. b. Maintaining an inventory of the nuclear attack shelter facilities in the county. c. Developing a nuclear attack population protec- tion strategy which establishes multiple options to be applied selectively depending on the specific circumstances of the actual emergency. d. Developing an allocation of the entire popula- tion of Liberty County to the facilities included in the shelter inventory. e. Designating a Shelter System Officer for the county. 3 . The Shelter System Officer (SSO) is responsible for supporting the EPM in carrying out the responsibilities enumer- ated in G. 1. IV.B.2 . and is specifically responsible for: a. Inspecting shelter facilities and verifying their usability, capacity, and accessibility (especially to the handicapped or other people with special needs) ; b. Developing agreements for shelter use; c. Marking and stocking shelters and/or developing plans to mark and stock shelters during a crisis period; d. Coordinating and participating in the training of shelter managers; e. Developing and coordinating the effort to develop new shelters to alleviate identified deficits and to increase the level of protection provided by the shelters included in the resource inventory; and f. Serving, in an actual emergency, in the EOC as the coordinator of all shelter activities in the county. Provide assignments of responsibilities for other organizations as required. 5-G12 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 1 G. 1.V. ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS Not used. See Paragraph G.V. of Annex G. G. 1.VI . PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE This appendix is maintained by LCDEM. The county EPM will determine requirements for implementing plans and procedures to support protective shelter operations and will provide guidance to officials of P&O Zones, to other departments of county govern- ment, and to appropriate private sector organizations. It should be noted that protective shelter planning for the nuclear attack hazard is an intergovernmental process. The response to such a catastrophe would have to be fully integrated and coordinated across all levels of government. The Federal Government ' s primary contribution to this plan is the guidance that was used to develop the nuclear attack risk assumptions upon which it is based and guidance on plan content which is intended to promote substantial compatibility of plans and systems nationwide. State emergency management planners contributed in a major way to the development of this plan by preparing the initial versions of the shelter lists and shelter allocation that appear in the tabs to this appendix. Numerous other important parts of the total planning structure that supports the shelter capability do not appear in this plan. These include most of the implementing plans and procedures which have been, or must be, developed and maintained by all operating units that have responsibilities for any parts of the shelter system. G. l.VII. AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES A. Authorities. See Paragraph VII. , Section A. of the Basic Plan. B. References. Federal Emergency Management Agency. Guidance for Develop- ment of an Emergency Fallout Shelter Stocking Plan, CPG 1-19, Washington, D. C. , 1983 . Federal Emergency Management Agency. Shelter Management Handbook, FEMA-59, Washington, D. C. , 1984 . Federal Emergency Management Agency. Sheltering and Care Operations, CPG 2-8 , Chapters 7 and 8, Washington, D. C. , 1987 . 5-G13 I CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 Federal Emergency Management Agency. Life Support Oper- ations in Shelters, CPG 2-20, Washington, D. C. , 1988 . Federal Emergency Management Agency. Habitability and Human Problems in Shelters, CPG 2-21, Washington, D. C. , 1988 . G. 1.VIII. DEFINITION OF TERMS High-Risk Area (Nuclear Attack). An area defined in a valid emergency operations plan, or in Federal planning guidance, for which it is a national policy to prepare to protect the popula- tion from the direct effects of nuclear detonations as well as from fallout. The principal criterion for defining these areas is that they are relatively more likely than others to be subject to blast overpressures of 2 pounds per square inch (psi) or more . in a large-scale nuclear attack. An area that receives 2 psi or more blast overpressure would also be likely to experience other direct weapons effects, particularly large fires. High Fallout Risk Area (Nuclear Attack). An area defined in a valid emergency operations plan, or in Federal Guidance, which has the potential for receiving exceptionally high levels of fallout radiation but is not designated a high-risk area, i.e. , an area considered likely to experience 2 psi blast overpressure and other direct weapons effects in a large-scale nuclear attack. The principal criterion for designating an area as a high fallout risk area is a calculated 1-week total fallout radiation dose of 6, 000 R or more from a computer analysis that assumes a nuclear attack with surface-burst weapons on the peacetime locations of U. S. strategic retaliatory forces, wind patterns that are typical of the area involved in any one or all 12 months of the year, and a commonly used set of ideal assumptions concerning the terrain and other characteristics of the area affected. Tabs to Appendix G. 1. Tab 1 - Table of Liberty County Shelter Facilities Tab 2 - Tabular Summary of Liberty County Shelter Allocation Tab 3 - Map of Liberty County Shelter Facilities, Complexes, and Areas Served 5-G14 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 Tab 1 to Appendix G. 1 Provide a table listing all facilities used in the shelter allocation, showing the number of spaces by PF Category, the fire code, and the relative blast protected spaces if appropriate. 5-G15 I CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 Tab 2 to Appendix G. 1 Provide a table summarizing the allocation of the population to shelter facilities and indicating the number .of people that could not be allocated to existing public shelter facilities. 5-G16 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 1 Tab Ito Appendix G. 1 Provide a map that shows the shelter facilities, the shelter complexes if any, and the areas for which the population is allocated to a given shelter or complex. I Provide hazard-specific appendixes for other hazards as required. 5-G17 I CPG 1-8, Chg 2 September 30, 1988 I Summary of In-Place Shelter Allocation Process The in-place shelter allocation is ordinarily developed by, or with substantial direct assistance from, federally-funded State-level emergency management planners. This summary is provided to briefly describe this complicated process to any readers who are not familiar with the Civil Defense Program or its approach for developing an in-place shelter capability as an option for protecting the population from the effects of a nuclear attack. 1. Obtain a copy of the National Shelter Survey (NSS) all facility listing for the county that is the subject of the allocation. 2 . Obtain detailed maps of the county, usually from the highway department, including reproducible base maps to be used for plotting allocation infor- mation. Obtain the latest census data and maps. 3 . Working with local officials, identify any facilities on the NSS listing that cannot be included in the county shelter list, because they must be reserved for priority emergency functions such as military operations and medical treatment facilities. 4 . Visually inspect (windshield survey) the remaining facilities to determine that they are suitable for shelters, number them, and plot them on a map. 5-G18 September 30, 1988 CPG 1-8, Chg 2 I 5. Identify barriers to movement, if any, and represent them on the map. 6. Make a preliminary comparison of shelter spaces and population. This can be done at the census tract level . 7 . Working with local officials, determine planning factors and policies that will make best use of the shelter resource as estimated in the preliminary analysis. Decisions must be made on travel distance and time for movement to shelter. The population distributions to be considered; i.e. , peak, resident, day/night, and special event; must be identified. Develop a policy on how to care for children if attack warning sounds during school hours. 8 . Make a detailed allocation of the population to shelter. 9 . Develop a summary, using tables and maps, showing the population allocated and not allocated to shelter. 10. Develop recommendations on measures for coping with shelter deficits. 11. Develop Emergency Public Information materials to tell the public where to go and what to do when warned of an imminent nuclear attack. 12 . Prepare a detailed report on the in-place shelter allocation for government officials to use in developing and maintaining emergency operations plans. 5-G19 U.S.GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1988 0-936002