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Res 20-01 Adoption of Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, January 2020 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION 20-01 A RESOLUTION BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPROVING ADOPTION OF THE TARRANT COUNTY HAZARD MITIGATION ACTION PLAN,JANUARY 2020. WHEREAS, The Town of Westlake, Texas (the "Town") recognizes the threat that natural hazards pose to people and property within Tarrant County; and WHEREAS, the County of Tarrant has prepared a multi-hazard mitigation plan, hereby known as Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, January 2020 in accordance with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000; and WHEREAS, Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, January 2020 identifies mitigation goals and actions to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property in the Town of Westlake from the impacts of future hazards and disasters; and WHEREAS, the Town and the Firm desire to enter into an engagement agreement (the "Engagement Agreement") that sets forth the agreement between the parties with respect to bond counsel services; and WHEREAS, adoption by the Town of Westlake demonstrates their commitment to the hazard mitigation and achieving the goals outlined in the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, January 2020. WHEREAS,the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the people of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: THAT, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: THAT the Town of Westlake Town Council does hereby approves adopting the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, January 2020 (Exhibit "A". SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. Resolution 20-01 Page 1 of 2 PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 27TH DAY OF JANUARY 2020. ATTEST: Laura Wheat, Mayor a ya Morrls, Assistant to the Town Secretary Amanda DeGan, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: L. Stanton Lowry, Town Atto ey for WEST TE X PAS Resolution 20-01 Page 2 of 2 20ϮϬ Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan This page intentionally left blank. Executive Summary We cannot control when or where a tornado or other natural hazard will strike, but we can save lives and reduce property damage by understanding the risks and taking action to address those risks. In the process, we can increase resilience in our community, environment, and economy. Participating jurisdictions in the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) are dedicated to the protection of local citizens and their property, and to the improvement of the quality of life for all residents. Mitigation has been defined as “sustained action to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to human life and property from natural, human-caused, and technological hazards.”1 It is fundamentally a loss-prevention function characterized by planned, long-term alteration of the built environment to ensure resilience against natural and human-caused hazards. This loss-prevention function has been illustrated by the Multi-Hazard Mitigation Council study of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) mitigation projects, which shows that for every dollar invested in mitigation, six dollars of disaster losses were avoided.2 Mitigation should form the foundation of every emergency management agency’s plans and procedures. Emergency management agencies should adopt mitigation practices to reduce, minimize, or eliminate hazards in their community. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan identifies the hazards faced by participating jurisdictions, vulnerabilities to these hazards, and mitigation strategies for the future. The plan fulfills the requirements of the Federal Disaster Mitigation Act as administered by the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). 1 State of Texas Mitigation Handbook, page 1-1. 2 Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: 2017 Interim Report, page 1. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ŝ The planning area for this plan is for Tarrant County, Texas (m arked in red on the Texas map) and includes the following jurisdictions: ¾City of Arlington ¾City of Azle ¾City of Bedford ¾City of Blue Mound ¾City of Colleyville ¾City of Crowley ¾City of Dalworthington Gardens* ¾Town of Edgecliff Village* ¾City of Euless ¾City of Everman* ¾City of Forest Hill ¾City of Fort Worth ¾City of Grapevine ¾City of Haltom City ¾City of Haslet ¾City of Hurst ¾City of Keller ¾City of Kennedale ¾City of Lake Worth ¾Town of Lakeside ¾City of Mansfield* ¾North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) ¾City of North Richland Hills ¾Town of Pantego* ¾City of Richland Hills ¾City of River Oaks* ¾City of Saginaw ¾City of Southlake ¾Unincorporated Tarrant County ¾University of North Texas Health and Science Center* ¾City of Watauga ¾Town of Westlake ¾City of Westworth Village *Jurisdictions that did not participate in the 2015 Tarrant County HazMAP. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ŝŝ The following map shows the locations of all participating jurisdictions except the unincorporated areas of the county. A map of these areas can be found in the Unincorporated Tarrant County annex. This HazMAP is the result of two years of study, data collection, analysis, and community feedback. Representatives and citizens from participating jurisdictions attended public meetings to discuss the hazards their communities face and the vulnerabilities those hazards present. Representatives from each participating jurisdiction reviewed drafts of the HazMAP and added input to the mitigation strategies presented in the plan. Tarrant County citizens were also active participants in the development of the plan. Citizens attended public meetings that were advertised online, on bulletin boards, and in newsletters to share their concerns about hazards faced in the community and how to mitigate the effects of these hazards. All participants involved in this plan understand the benefits of developing and implementing mitigation plans and strategies. Elected officials, public safety organizations, planners, and many others have worked together to develop and implement this HazMAP, displaying that they have the vision to implement mitigation practices and therefore reduce the loss of life and property in their communities. Source: Texas Almanac. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ŝŝŝ Acronyms DFW- Dallas-Fort Worth EMC- Emergency Management Coordinator EOC- Emergency Operations Center FEMA- Federal Emergency Management Agency HazMAP- Hazard Mitigation Action Plan HMPT- Hazard Mitigation Planning Team LPT- Local Planning Team N/A- Not Applicable NCEI- National Centers for Environmental Information NCTCOG- North Central Texas Council of Governments NFIP- National Flood Insurance Program NFPA- National Fire Protection Association NWS- National Weather Service OWS- Outdoor Warning Siren RLP- Repetitive Loss Properties SRLP- Severe Repetitive Loss Properties TDEM- Texas Division of Emergency Management TxDOT- Texas Department of Transportation UNTHSC- University of North Texas Health and Science Center UTA- University of Texas at Arlington WUI- Wildland-Urban Interface dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ŝǀ Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................ i Acronyms ..................................................................................................................................................... iv Section 1: Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Authority ............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.3 Scope ................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.4 Purpose ............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.5 Mitigation Goals .................................................................................................................................. 2 1.6 Plan Organization ................................................................................................................................ 3 1.7 Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Strategy Maintenance Process .................................................... 4 1.8 Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan Adoption ................................................................... 4 Section 2:Planning Process .......................................................................................................................... 5 2.1 Collaborative Process .......................................................................................................................... 5 2.1.1 HMPT Points of Contacts ............................................................................................................. 6 2.2 Public Involvement.............................................................................................................................. 8 2.3 Existing Data and Plans ....................................................................................................................... 8 2.4 Timeframe ........................................................................................................................................... 9 2.5 Planning Meetings ............................................................................................................................ 10 Section 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment ............................................................................... 13 3.1 Hazard Overview ............................................................................................................................... 14 3.2 Changes in Development .................................................................................................................. 15 3.2.1 Major Disaster Declarations since the 2015 HazMAP................................................................ 15 3.2.2 Increase in Vulnerability ............................................................................................................ 16 3.2.3 Decrease in Vulnerability ........................................................................................................... 22 3.3 Profiling Natural Hazards .................................................................................................................. 24 3.3.1 Drought ...................................................................................................................................... 27 3.3.2 Earthquake ................................................................................................................................. 32 3.3.3 Expansive Soils ........................................................................................................................... 38 3.3.4 Extreme Heat ............................................................................................................................. 39 3.3.5 Flooding ...................................................................................................................................... 42 3.3.6 Thunderstorms ........................................................................................................................... 55 3.3.7 Tornadoes .................................................................................................................................. 61 dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ǀ 3.3.8 Wildfire....................................................................................................................................... 66 3.3.9 Winter Storms ............................................................................................................................ 68 3.4 Technological Hazards ...................................................................................................................... 71 3.5 Vulnerabilities ................................................................................................................................... 72 3.5.1 National Critical Facilities and Infrastructure ............................................................................ 72 3.5.2 Natural Environment- Federally Protected Species ................................................................... 76 3.5.3 Historic Buildings and Districts ................................................................................................... 76 3.5.4 Local Critical Facilities and Infrastructure .................................................................................. 76 3.6 Extent ................................................................................................................................................ 77 Section 4: Mitigation Strategy .................................................................................................................... 78 4.1 Mitigation Strategy ........................................................................................................................... 79 4.2 Funding Priorities .............................................................................................................................. 79 4.3 Mitigation Goals ................................................................................................................................ 79 4.4 Action Items ...................................................................................................................................... 80 Section 5: Jurisdictional Annexes ................................................................................................................ 81 Section 6: Executing the Plan ...................................................................................................................... 83 6.1 Plan Implementation ........................................................................................................................ 83 6.2 Evaluation ......................................................................................................................................... 83 6.3 Multijurisdictional Strategy and Considerations............................................................................... 84 6.4 Plan Update ....................................................................................................................................... 84 6.5 Plan Maintenance ............................................................................................................................. 84 6.6 Continued Public Involvement .......................................................................................................... 85 6.7 Incorporation into Existing Planning Mechanisms ........................................................................... 86 Section 7: Conclusion .................................................................................................................................. 87 Appendix A: Meeting Documentation ........................................................................................................ 89 Public Announcements............................................................................................................................ 90 Attendance Records .............................................................................................................................. Ϯϲϭ Appendix B: Supporting Documents ......................................................................................................... Ϯϴϳ Annotated List of Rare Species in Tarrant County ................................................................................ Ϯϴϴ Historic Sites in Tarrant County ............................................................................................................ ϮϵϮ Natural Cooperative Soil Survey ........................................................................................................... ϯϮϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ǀŝ Section 1: Introduction 1.1 Overview The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) as written fulfills the requirements of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000), which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Disaster Mitigation Act provides federal assistance to state and local emergency management entities to mitigate the effects of disasters. The HazMAP also encourages cooperation among various organizations across political subdivisions. The 20ϮϬ HazMAP is an update of the 2015 FEMA-approved HazMAP. The title was changed from the Local Mitigation Action Plan to Hazard Mitigation Action Plan to clearly specify the intent of the document. With each update, new challenges are identified, new strategies proposed, and when incorporated, the updated plan grows in complexity, but not necessarily in utility. The content in this plan update is designed and organized to be as reader-friendly and functional as possible. The structure and format of this plan has significantly changed from the initial mitigation plan adopted in 2015; however, the quality of information has been maintained. This update fulfills the requirements of the DMA 2000. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) reviewed the evolution of its planning processes throughout the previous three years. The following plan is the result of that effort. The information provided in Section 3 reflects the impact of the hazards on all of Tarrant County, not solely the participating jurisdictions. The results of the vulnerability analysis and risk assessment, including historical events, are documented in the individual annexes for participating jurisdictions. The historical events documented in Section 3 reflect the events that impacted the entire county, not solely the unincorporated areas of the county. Reference to Tarrant County in Section 3 refers to the county as a whole and not solely unincorporated Tarrant County. 1.2 Authority The purpose of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), as amended by the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, is “to reduce the loss of life and property, human suffering, economic disruption, and disaster assistance costs resulting from natural disasters.” Section 322 of the act specifically addresses mitigation planning and requires state and local governments to prepare multi-hazard mitigation plans as a precondition for receiving FEMA mitigation grants. Understanding that identifying the risks within the community and working collectively toward the prevention of is vital, NCTCOG has taken the lead role in the development of the Tarrant County HazMAP. 1.3 Scope The scope of the Tarrant County HazMAP encompasses all participating entities in Tarrant County, as noted in the Executive Summary. This plan identifies natural and, for some jurisdictions, technological hazards that could threaten life and property in the communities. Assessing technological hazards is not a requirement for this hazard mitigation action plan, but select jurisdictions have included these hazards dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭ in this plan. The scope of this plan includes both short and long-term mitigation strategies, implementation, strategies, and possible sources of project funding to mitigate identified hazards. 1.4 Purpose This HazMAP is intended to enhance and complement federal and state recommendations for the mitigation of natural and technological hazards in the following ways: „Substantially reduce the risk of loss of life, injuries, and hardship from the destruction of natural and technological disasters. „Improve public awareness of the need for individual preparedness and building safer, more disaster resilient communities. „Develop strategies for long-term community sustainability during community disasters. „Develop governmental and business continuity plans that will continue essential private sector and governmental operations during disasters. Tarrant County is susceptible to a number of different natural hazards that have potential to cause property loss, loss of life, economic hardship, and threats to public health and safety. Occurrence of natural disasters cannot be prevented; however, their impact on people and property can be lessened through hazard mitigation measures. Mitigation planning is imperative to lessen the impact of disasters in Tarrant County. This plan is an excellent method by which to organize Tarrant County’s mitigation strategies. The implementation of the plan and its components is vital to preparing a community that is resilient to the effects of a disaster. The implementation of this HazMAP can reduce loss of life and property and allow the participating communities to operate with minimal disruption of vital services to citizens. This HazMAP provides a risk assessment of the hazards Tarrant County is exposed to and puts forth several mitigation goals and objectives that are based on that risk assessment. This Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan was developed by the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT). The plan represents collective efforts of citizens, elected and appointed government officials, business leaders, non-profit organizations, and other stakeholders. This plan, and updating the plan, and timely future updates of this plan, will allow Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions to comply with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 and its implementation regulations, 44 CFR Part 201.6, thus resulting in eligibility to apply for federal aid for technical assistance and post-disaster hazard mitigation project funding. The update will also prioritize potential risks and vulnerabilities in an effort to minimize the effects of disasters in the participating communities. 1.5 Mitigation Goals The goals are to protect life and reduce bodily harm from natural hazards, and to lessen the impacts of natural hazards on property and the community through hazard mitigation. These goals are the basis of this plan and summarize what the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team will accomplish by implementing this plan. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯ 1.6 Plan Organization The 20ϮϬ Tarrant County HazMAP is organized into seven sections which satisfy the mitigation requirements in 44 CFR Part 201.6, with two appendices providing the required supporting documentation. 1. Section 1: Introduction a. Describes the purpose of the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan and introduces the mitigation planning process. 2. Section 2: Planning Process a. Describes the planning process and organization for each participating jurisdiction, satisfying requirements 201.6(c)(1), 201.6(b)(2), 201.6(b)(1), 201.6(b)(3), 201.6(c)(4)(iii), and 201.6(c)(4)(i). 3. Section 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment a. Describes the hazards identified, location of hazards, previous events, and jurisdictional profiles, satisfying requirements 201.6(c)(2)(i) and 201.6(c)(2)(ii). 4. Section 4: Mitigation Strategy a. Reflects on the mitigation actions previously identified and examines the ability of Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions to implement and manage a comprehensive mitigation strategy, satisfying requirements 201.6(c)(1), 201.6(c)(3)(i), 201.6(c)(3)(ii), 201.6(c)(3)(iii), 201.6(c)(3)(iv), 201.6(c)(4)(ii), and 201.6(b)(3). 5. Section 5: Individual Jurisdictional Annexes a. Each annex contains five chapters. Each participating jurisdiction has written an annex detailing the planning process, hazard analysis, capabilities, mitigation strategies and action items, and plan maintenance information, satisfying requirements 201.6(c)(1), 201.6(b)(2), 201.6(b)(1), 201.6(b)(3), 201.6(c)(4)(iii), 201.6(c)(4)(i), 201.6(c)(2)(i), and 201.6(c)(2)(ii). b. To clarify, any reference to “chapter” will refer to a jurisdiction’s annex, while “section” will refer to a section in the main body of this HazMAP. 6. Section 6: Plan Maintenance a. Describes plan monitoring, evaluating, and updating strategies, plan incorporation, and future public updates for each participating jurisdiction, satisfying requirements 201.6(c)(4)(i), 201.6(c)(4)(ii), and 201.6(c)(4)(iii). 7. Section 7: Conclusion 8. Appendix A: Documentation from Planning and Public Meetings 9. Appendix B: Supporting Documentation dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯ 1.7 Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Strategy Maintenance Process The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team, consisting of a representative from each participating jurisdiction, will continue to collaborate as a planning group in coordination with the North Central Texas Council of Governments Emergency Preparedness Department. Primary contact will be through emails and conference calls, with strategy meetings to occur at least annually. The points of contact for the county, jurisdictions, and NCTCOG will jointly lead the plan maintenance and update process by: „Assisting jurisdictional Local Planning Teams in updating their individual contributions to the county Hazard Mitigation Action Plan. „Assisting interested Local Planning Teams that would like to begin their mitigation planning process. „Facilitating Tarrant County HazMAP meetings and disseminating information. „Collaborating data for the county-wide sections. „Requesting updates and status reports on planning mechanisms. „Requesting updates and status reports on mitigation action projects. „Assisting jurisdictions with mitigation grants. „Assisting jurisdictions with implementing mitigation goals and action projects. „Providing mitigation training opportunities. „Maintaining documentation of local adoption resolutions for the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan. 1.8 Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan Adoption Once the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan has received FEMA “Approved Pending Local Adoption” each participating jurisdiction will take the Tarrant County HazMAP to their Commissioners Court or city councils for final public comment and local adopt ion. A copy of the resolution will be inserted into the Tarrant County HazMAP and held on file at the North Central Texas Council of Governments. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰ Section 2:Planning Process Requirement §201.6(b) An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process shall include: §201.6(b)(1)An opportunity for the public to comment on the plan during the drafting stage and prior to plan approval; §201.6(b)(2) An opportunity for neighboring communities, local and regional agencies involved in hazard mitigation activities, and agencies that have the authority to regulate development, as well as businesses, academia and other private and non-profit interests to be involved in the planning process; and §201.6(b)(3)Review and incorporation, if appropriate, of existing plans, studies, reports, and technical information. §201.6(c)(1) [The plan shall document] the planning process used to develop the plan, including how it was prepared, who was involved in the process, and how the public was involved. §201.6(c)(4)(i)[The plan maintenance process shall include a] section describing the method and schedule of monitoring, evaluating, and updating the mitigation plan within a five-year cycle 2.1 Collaborative Process During the planning process, jurisdictions were encouraged to work with neighboring jurisdictions within the county, local and regional agencies, and other mitigation partners in order to develop a unified approach to mitigation and to address situations that could affect one another. Bringing together mitigation strategies from the unincorporated area of the county and its 33 participating jurisdictions into a unified plan is a strategy that offers a model for county-wide coordination. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) was comprised of leaders from each participating jurisdiction’s Local Planning Team (LPT), and other relevant agencies. Each LPT provided local hazard information and capabilities. Each jurisdiction’s vulnerabilities and mitigation needs were explicitly recognized in the strategy, along with those of the overall county. The following stakeholders were invited to participate in the mitigation planning process via email by participating jurisdictions and to attend public meetings via the participating jurisdictions’ websites and public flyers. Stakeholders were encouraged to review the plan and provide relevant information and feedback. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱ Organization Represented Position Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator Wise County Emergency Management Coordinator Johnson County Emergency Management Coordinator Parker County Emergency Management Coordinator Denton County Emergency Management Coordinator Ellis County Emergency Management Coordinator Dallas County Emergency Management Coordinator U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Director – Civil Works U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lake Grapevine Manager Tarrant County Environmental Services Director Tarrant County Community College District Director of Emergency Management University of Texas at Arlington Emergency Management Coordinator Tarrant Regional Water District Lake Patrol Independent School Districts of Participating Jurisdictions Superintendents Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base Emergency Management Coordinator Texas Department of Transportation Emergency Operations Utility Providers Emergency Operations Local Emergency Planning Committee Emergency Management Coordinator Texas Division of Emergency Management District Coordinator, Field Response Texas Division of Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation Planner State Fire Marshal’s Office District 6, Inspector National Weather Service – Fort Worth Warning & Coordination Meteorologist NCTCOG’s Emergency Preparedness Planning Council Chair NCTCOG’s Regional Emergency Preparedness Advisory Council Chair Local City and Town Councils Local elected officials The North Central Texas Council of Governments was responsible for plan facilitation and coordination with Tarrant County HMPT members and stakeholders throughout the process. 2.1.1 HMPT Points of Contacts The following are members of the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT). These HMPT members were also the point(s) of contact for their respective jurisdiction during this plan update. Local Planning Team (LPT) members for each jurisdiction are in their respective jurisdictional annex. Tarrant County HMPT Members Jurisdiction Job Title Role in the HMPT Arlington Emergency Management Administrator Jurisdictional information Arlington Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲ Jurisdiction Job Title Role in the HMPT Azle Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Bedford Deputy Chief of Emergency Operations Jurisdictional information Blue Mound Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Colleyville Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Crowley Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Dalworthington Gardens Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Edgecliff Village Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Euless Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Everman Director of Emergency Services Jurisdictional information Forest Hill Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Fort Worth Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Grapevine Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Haltom City Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Haslet Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Hurst Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Keller Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Kennedale Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Lake Worth Fire Marshal/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Lakeside Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Mansfield Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information NCTCOG Emergency Preparedness Specialist Jurisdictional information dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳ Jurisdiction Job Title Role in the HMPT North Richland Hills Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Pantego Police Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Richland Hills Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information River Oaks Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Saginaw Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Southlake Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) Associate Director, Emergency Management and Business Continuity Jurisdictional information Unincorporated Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Watauga Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Westlake Fire Chief/Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information Westworth Village Emergency Management Coordinator Jurisdictional information 2.2 Public Involvement As stated in the Executive Summary, citizens attended public meetings that were advertised online, on bulletin boards, and in newsletters to share their concerns about hazards faced in the community and how to mitigate the effects of these hazards. Some jurisdictions also used public surveys and posted the HazMAP online for citizens to view and comment on. NCTCOG hosted a public meeting on behalf of jurisdictions on February 6, 2018 at the Tarrant County Northeast Courthouse. The jurisdictions who used this opportunity to reach the public were in attendance and advertised the meeting within their jurisdiction. The public had the chance to learn about natural hazards in Tarrant County and why jurisdictions were developing a plan to mitigate the effects of these hazards. Citizens signed in and sat through the presentation but did not have any comments or questions at the end. The supporting documentation, advertisements, and details of this meeting and other meetings or outreach strategies are documented within Appendix A in this HazMAP. 2.3 Existing Data and Plans Existing hazard mitigation information and other relevant Hazard Mitigation Action Plans were reviewed during the development of this plan. Data was gathered through numerous sources, including Geographic dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴ Information Systems (GIS). The intent of reviewing existing material was to identify existing data and information, shared objectives, and past and ongoing activities that can help inform the mitigation plan. It also helps identify the existing capabilities and planning mechanisms to implement the mitigation strategy. The table below outlines the sources used to collect data for the plan: Data Source Data Incorporation Purpose County appraisal data, census data, city land use data Population and demographics Population counts, parcel data, and land use data National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Hazard occurrences Previous event occurrences and mapping for hazards Texas Forest Service/Texas Wildfire Risk Assessment Summary Report Wildfire threat and urban interface Mapping and wildfire vulnerability National Dam Inventory Dam information High-hazard dam list Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Flood Zones, National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) studies Flood zone maps and NFIP information GIS mapping of flood zones and NFIP data October 2017 NFIP Flood Insurance Manual Change Package NFIP Information Repetitive Loss Properties and Community Rating System (CRS) ratings State of Texas Hazard Mitigation Plan, 2013 and 2018 Hazards and mitigation strategy Support the goals of the state 2015 Tarrant County HazMAP All sections This is an update of that plan 2017 Marion County HazMAP Hazard profiles Adopt FEMA-approved format of plan Hazard Mitigation: Integrating Best Practices into Planning Planning process Use proven techniques in developing the HazMAP Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund National Priority List Protected sites Risk assessment- identify critical areas National Register of Historic Places Historic districts Risk assessment Texas Parks & Wildlife List of Rare Species Endangered or protected species Risk assessment 2.4 Timeframe The planning process for the update of the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan was approximately two years. The table below is the timeline followed. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵ Activity Time Period Kickoff meeting August 17, 2017 Created planning teams September 30, 2017 Capabilities assessment February 15, 2018 Hazard identification & risk assessment March 5, 2018 Public outreach completed March 31, 2018 Mitigation strategy (goals & action items) reviewed March 19-April 15, 2018 Reviewed HazMAP draft May 15- June 15, 2018 Updated plan as needed June 15- June 30, 2018 Final draft reviewed June 30- July 6, 2018 Send HazMAP to TDEM/make revisions as needed As Applicable Send to FEMA/ make revisions as needed As Applicable Adoption & signatures Once “Approved Pending Adoption” designated received. Activities were either led or monitored by the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) and public outreach strategies were conducted by the participating jurisdictions. The details of these activities are provided in the individual annexes of the jurisdictions. 2.5 Planning Meetings During the planning process, each Local Planning Team (LPT) met to discuss relevant information from the jurisdiction and to review objectives and progress of the plan. The goals of these meetings were to gather information and to provide guidance for the jurisdictions throughout the planning stages. The following table is a snapshot of the meetings held by the North Central Texas Council of Governments and the HazMAP participants: Date Meeting Location August 7, 2017 Kickoff meeting Tarrant County Northeast Courthouse September 18, 2017 NCTCOG Program Directors meeting NCTCOG October 26, 2017 Capabilities (Richland Hills, White Settlement) Richland Hills Fire Station November 1, 2017 Capabilities (Pantego, Mansfield) NCTCOG November 1, 2017 Capabilities (Forest Hill, Kennedale) NCTCOG November 3, 2017 Capabilities (Southlake, Westlake) Southlake Department of Public Safety Headquarters November 7, 2017 Capabilities (Lake Worth, Lakeside, Saginaw, Azle) Lake Worth Fire Station November 7, 2017 Capabilities (Dalworthington Gardens) NCTCOG November 8, 2017 Capabilities (River Oaks) River Oaks City Hall November 9, 2017 Capabilities (Bedford) Bedford Fire Station dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬ Date Meeting Location November 9, 2017 Capabilities (Blue Mound, Haslet, Watauga) Watauga Fire Station November 20, 2017 NCTCOG planning team NCTCOG January 10, 2018 Bedford planning team meeting Bedford Fire Station January 31, 2018 Hazard workshop NCTCOG February 6, 2018 Public meeting & workshop Tarrant County Northeast Courthouse February 8, 2018 UNTHSC hazard meeting with planning team UNTHSC February 9, 2018 Bedford hazard meeting with planning team Bedford Fire Station February 19, 2018 River Oaks hazard meeting with planning team NCTCOG March 15, 2018 Kennedale hazard meeting with planning team Kennedale Fire Station April 5, 2018 Mitigation workshop for all participants Crowley Recreation Center April 11, 2018 Mitigation workshop for all participants Richland Hills Link Recreation Center April 16, 2018 Haslet mitigation meeting with planning team Haslet Fire Station April 18, 2018 Southlake mitigation meeting with planning team Southlake DPS HQ April 18, 2018 Kennedale mitigation meeting with planning team Kennedale Fire Station April 19, 2018 NCTCOG mitigation meeting with planning team NCTCOG April 26, 2018 UNTHSC hazard meeting with planning team UNTHSC April 26, 2018 Dalworthington Gardens mitigation strategy meeting with planning team Dalworthington Gardens Police Station May 4, 2018 Fort Worth mitigation strategy meeting with planning team Joint Emergency Operations Center May 9, 2018 Tarrant County Unincorporated mitigation strategy meeting with planning team NCTCOG June 14, 2018 Lake Worth mitigation strategy meeting with planning team Lake Worth Fire Station dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭ This page intentionally left blank. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮ Section 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Requirement §201.6(c)(2)(i) [The risk assessment shall include a] description of the type, location and extent of all natural hazards that can affect the jurisdiction. The plan shall include information on previous occurrences of hazard events and on the probability of future hazard events. §201.6(c)(2)(ii)[The risk assessment shall include a] description of the jurisdiction’s vulnerability to the hazards described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section. This description shall include an overall summary of each hazard and its impact on the community. All plans approved after October 1, 2008 must also address NFIP [National Flood Insurance Program] insured structures that have been repetitively damaged by floods. The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(A)The types and numbers of existing and future buildings, infrastructure, and critical facilities located in the identified hazard areas; §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(B)An estimate of the potential dollar losses to vulnerable structures identified in this section and a description of the methodology used to prepare the estimate. §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(C)Providing a general description of land uses and development trends within the community so that mitigation options can be considered in future land use decisions. §201.6(c)(2)(iii)For multi-jurisdictional plans, the risk assessment section must assess each jurisdiction’s risks where they vary from the risks facing the entire planning area. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯ 3.1 Hazard Overview Through an assessment of previous federally declared disasters in Texas, historical events and potential events in Tarrant County, and a review of available local mitigation action plans, it was determined that this Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) will address the risks associated with the following 9 natural hazards: ¾Drought ¾Earthquakes ¾Expansive Soils ¾Extreme Heat ¾Flooding (including dam failure) ¾Thunderstorms (including hail, wind, lightning) ¾Tornadoes ¾Wildfires ¾Winter Storms Since the adoption of the previous HazMAP, the definition of a thunderstorm now includes hail, high winds, and lightning. These individual hazards within a thunderstorm will not be listed separately. In 2013, Tarrant County began experiencing earthquakes. It is suspected that dormant fault lines have been disturbed. Earthquakes have been added to the list of natural hazards profiled in this update for jurisdictions that feel they could be potentially impacted by them. Because dams are man-made structures, dam failures are typically considered technological hazards. However, since most dam failures result from prolonged periods of rainfall, they are often cited as secondary or cascading effects of natural flooding disasters and are not identified as a primary hazard. This plan update incorporates the risk and vulnerabilities related to dam failure, when applicable, in the flooding section. Due to the frequency of occurrence and high impact of hazards during this planning period, the ranking order of these hazards has changed since the 2015 plan. Each participating jurisdiction conducted a risk assessment and prioritized the hazards affecting their planning area and determined their best course of action. This information, along with historical events, vulnerabilities, future probability, and impacts are documented within the individual annexes. The definition of vulnerability is the susceptibility of people, property, industry, resources, ecosystems, or historical buildings and artifacts to the negative impact of a disaster.3 The participating jurisdictions have taken into account the possible effects on population, economy, existing and future structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and the natural environment for each hazard. Participating jurisdictions understand that identifying technological hazards is not required for a mitigation plan and jurisdictions that chose to do so did so voluntarily. The ranking of natural hazards and technological hazards will remain separate in this HazMAP. 3 FEMA Module 2-5 Understanding Vulnerability. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰ 3.2 Changes in Development Tarrant County has a vibrant and diverse economy that attracts new and relocating businesses, retail development, and new housing construction. If business is to succeed, then economic development must flourish. A collaboration of public and private agencies, along with businesses and individuals, is always ready to step forward to promote the excellent quality of life that makes the community a great place to live, work, and raise families. Changes in development include population variability, climate variability, and various mitigation actions implemented. Individual jurisdictions have identified specific changes in development, when applicable, in their annexes. 3.2.1 Major Disaster Declarations since the 2015 HazMAP The following table lists the recent major disaster declarations that have occurred since the approval of Tarrant County’s 2015 HazMAP: Declared Disaster Code Incident Period Date Declared Description DR-4159 October 30-31, 2013 December 29, 2013 Severe storms and flooding DR-4136 April 17-20, 2013 August 2, 2013 West, Texas fertilizer explosion DR-4223 May 4- June 23, 2015 May 29, 2015 Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding DR-4245 October 22-31, 2015 November 25, 2015 Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding DR-4255 December 26, 2015- January 21, 2016 February 9, 2016 Severe winter storms, tornadoes, strait-line winds, and flooding DR-4266 March 7-29, 2016 March 19, 2016 Severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding DR-4269 April 17-30, 2016 April 25, 2016 Severe storms and flooding DR-4272 May 26-June 24, 2016 June 11, 2016 Severe storms and flooding DR-4332 August 23-September 15, 2017 August 25, 2017 Hurricane Harvey dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱ 3.2.2 Increase in Vulnerability Climate Variability A key factor to an increase in vulnerability is climate variability. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Texas’s climate is changing. Most of the state has warmed between one-half and one degree Fahrenheit (°F) in the past century. In the eastern two-thirds of the state, average annual rainfall is increasing, yet the soil is becoming drier. Rainstorms are becoming more intense, and floods are becoming more severe... In the coming decades, storms are likely to become more severe, deserts may expand, and summers are likely to become increasingly hot and dry, creating problems for agriculture and possibly human health. Our climate is changing because the earth is warming. People have increased the amount of carbon dioxide in the air by 40% since the late 1700s. Other heat-trapping greenhouse gases are also increasing. These gases have warmed the surface and lower atmosphere of our planet about one degree during the last 50 years. Evaporation increases as the atmosphere warms, which increases humidity, average rainfall, and the frequency of heavy rainstorms in many places—but contributes to drought in others…4 The following is an article from the Dallas Morning News that describes the effects of climate change specifically in North Texas, where Tarrant County is located: The United States has just come off a record year for weather and climate disasters and, by most accounts, it's only going to get worse. Last year hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria; the wildfires and floods in California; and tornado outbreaks in the Midwest and the South delivered $306.2 billion in damages, more than any year in history when adjusted for inflation. Texas is particularly vulnerable to a changing climate. It has had more costly weather-related disasters than any other state, and those events will happen more often as air and ocean temperatures climb, scientists say. "Climate change is not just about polar bears," said Katharine Hayhoe, a climate scientist at Texas Tech University with an impressive YouTube following. "It will affect North Texas profoundly." Between 2041 and 2050, Dallas-Fort Worth may see August temperatures rise from a mean of 86 degrees Fahrenheit at the end of the 20th century to 94 degrees, with extremes rising above 120, reports one study by scientists at the University of Texas at Arlington. Longer droughts and more extreme rainstorms will pose a challenge for those who manage drinking water supplies, those who raise cattle, and those who oversee our roads and railways. The changes may also have unexpected effects on people's daily lives, including jobs. Intense heat can imperil cars and airplanes, evaporate drinking water supplies, and halt outdoor labor such as farm work and construction. Adam Smith, a scientist with the federal government's main climate agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, calls Texas "the disaster capital of the United States." 4 What Climate Change Means for Texas. August 2016. EPA 430-F-16-045. United States Environmental Protection Agency.< https://archive.epa.gov/epa/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/climate-change-tx.pdf> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲ As Smith explains, Texas is susceptible to almost every kind of weather and climate hazard, from extreme cold to extreme heat, from severe drought and wildfires to torrential floods. Texas is also home to a booming population and critical infrastructure, including the petrochemical plants that were damaged in Hurricane Harvey. "Texas is a hot-spot for a wide range of extreme natural events due to its geography," said Smith. "We expect many of these extremes to become more frequent and intense as time moves forward." While uncertainty is built into climate models, scientists have a high degree of confidence in many of the changes they observe and predict. The bigger, longer and more common an event is, the greater the accuracy with which scientists can project how climate change will impact it, said Hayhoe, a lead author of a November 2017 climate change report overseen by scientists at 13 federal agencies. Larger events have more data associated with them and can be easier to model. Researchers are very confident that climate change will increase both average and extreme temperatures. They are also confident that climate change is likely to increase the risk of heavy precipitation in many areas and may bring stronger droughts to the south-central and southwestern parts of the U.S. Projected impacts on smaller-scale events like tornadoes and ha ilstorms are less well understood. One area of consensus is the cause of climate change. "It is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century," note the authors of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, a Congressionally mandated review that scientists conduct every four years. They add that there are no convincing alternative explanations. Below is how these changes will affect our area, the evidence behind the projections, and how confident scientists are in each of these findings. Heat More record-setting heat in North Texas is a virtual certainty. Already, we are living through the warmest period in the history of modern civilization, the federal report found, and that warming will accelerate. Climate science contrarians often attack the models on which climate projections are based. Myron Ebell, who led President Donald Trump's transition team at the Environmental Protection Agency, accepts that humans are most likely responsible for warming, but he says models have exaggerated the outcome. Ebell is director of the Center for Energy and Environment at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a libertarian advocacy group based in Washington, D.C. He acknowledges that he is not a scientist. In fact, researchers have used models to predict global temperature changes for more than 50 years, and the models' projections have been fairly accurate over the long term. In the early 21st century, a discrepancy appeared between observed and modeled temperatures-a period dubbed the "global warming slowdown" or "hiatus." dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳ Scientists have published scores of studies on the mismatch and tied it to several factors that contributed to lower-than-expected observed temperatures. Those factors include a series of small volcanic eruptions, the cooling effects of which scientists had underestimated, and lower than expected solar output. Findings from those studies are helping to improve climate model simulations and helping scientists better understand why there are differences between simulations and observations in the early 21stcentury, said Ben Santer, a climate scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Global average temperatures increased about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit in the last 115 years. In Dallas, they climbed from about 65 degrees Fahrenheit during the early part of the 20th century to 68 degrees Fahrenheit during the most recent decade. If nothing is done to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, average temperatures in the city may reach the low 70s by 2050 and surpass 75 degrees by the end of the century. The Dallas area warmed twice as fast as the North Texas region as a whole due to urbanization combined with long-term warming, said John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas' state climatologist and a professor at Texas A&M University. Rapid development in Dallas accelerates the so-called "urban heat island" effect. Man-made building materials absorb and lock in more heat than soil and natural landscapes, so urban areas are generally warmer than rural areas, especially after sunset. While some northern areas stand to benefit from warmer weather, that is not the case for Dallas- Fort Worth. "North Texas and a lot of the southern United States are quite close to thresholds where things get really bad," said Amir Jina of the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy. Earlier this year, he and colleagues published a study in the journal Science that estimated economic damage from climate change in each county of the United States. Once temperatures reach the high 90s, equal to or above body temperature, fatality rates go up. And Jina's study predicts 24 extra deaths per 100,000 people each year in Dallas County by the end of the century if global emissions increase at the same rate they have been. That would be 600 extra deaths per year at the county's 2015 population level. Heat also affects roads. A 2015 study by the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) that focused on the impact of climate change on transportation predicted "an increase in wildfires along paved highways, heat-induced stress on bridges and railroads, air-conditioning problems in public transport vehicles and heat-related accidents by failure of individual vehicles and heat-related stress." The study concluded, "These impacts can be translated into substantial mobility and economic loss." Drought Along with heat will come stronger drought, which "has profound economic impacts," said Hayhoe. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴ The prediction that North Texas will have longer and more severe droughts is based on multiple factors, including the relationship between high temperatures and soil dryness and the presence of more frequent and longer lasting high-pressure systems in summer that suppress rainfall and deflect storms away from our area. Hayhoe points to Texas' 2010-2013 drought as a probable sign of things to come. Although this drought occurred naturally, as a result of a strong La Niña eve nt that typically brings dry conditions to our area, it was exacerbated by extreme heat. That event created severe hay shortages for cattle farmers and led some ranchers to prematurely slaughter their herds or export them out of state. "Cotton can be drought-resistant, but not cattle," said Hayhoe. The 2015 UTA study predicts a reduction in soil moisture of 10% to 15%in all seasons by 2050, which can also lead to cracked pavement and the premature loss of roads, railways, and other infrastructure. Heat and drought also pose a problem for drinking water supplies, which North Texas sources from surface reservoirs that will be increasingly prone to evaporation. Hayhoe says some water managers are considering pumping the reservoirs underground during exceptionally hot and dry conditions, or covering them with polymer "blankets." The blankets are an invisible layer of organic molecules that can help reduce evaporation. Floods While it's not likely that annual precipitation totals will change in North Texas, rainfall patterns likely will. Hayhoe and Nielsen-Gammon both say we will likely see enhanced "feast or famine" cycles with torrential rainstorms in the spring followed by longer than usual dry periods. These predictions carry a high degree of certainty, because climatologists have already recorded this trend playing out. "Rainfall becoming more extreme is something we expect because we've observed this not just in North Texas but throughout the United States, and models consistently predict it will continue to happen," said Nielsen-Gammon. Severe rainstorms, the UTA scientists predict, will have the capacity to flood highway exit and service roads in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 100-year floodplain. "While the state highway system was built above flooding levels, the connector roads may be easily flooded," said Arne Winguth, a climate scientist at UTA who co-authored the report. Tornadoes and hail Two events climate scientists cannot reliably project are hailstorms and tornadoes. "A lot of the things we care about are too small-scale to predict with more confidence," said Nielsen-Gammon. "The historical record is not large enough for longer-term forecasts." There is some evidence that tornadoes, like rainstorms, are becoming more concentrated on fewer days and that their season has become less predictable. The same is true with hail. "One thing we expect to happen with a warming climate is that the average humidity in the lower atmosphere may decrease, and if that happens it's easier for hail dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵ to stay frozen," said Nielsen-Gammon. "That factor might increase hailstorms, but that's just one of many factors that do affect hail." Economy Jina of the University of Chicago predicted in his study that climate change would decrease Dallas County's annual income by 10% to 20% in the coming decades unless emissions are reduced. "North Texas is one of the worst-affected places in the country," he said. Much of the loss comes from higher mortality rates, soaring air-conditioning costs, and reduced labor productivity. To track labor productivity, Jina and his colleagues examined national time-use surveys, diaries kept by thousands of volunteers across the country, and compared them with local weather data. He found that on extremely hot days, people tended to stop working about 30 minutes early. "There's direct evidence that people concentrate less well, make more mistakes and their brain just functions less efficiently if it's too hot," he said. Heat also disrupts sleep. "The general lack of productivity leads to them saying, 'No more work today.'" The good news is that many climate-change effects are manageable. They do require local and federal authorities to plan ahead and take action, said Smith of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "It is important," he said, "to address where we build, how we build and also to build protections for populations already exposed in vulnerable areas."5 All participating jurisdictions are experiencing the effects of climate variability. The following information is part of the climatic impact vulnerability assessment conducted by the North Central Texas Council of Governments Department of Transportation and the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) and is a compilation of historical climate data and projected future climate information for the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metropolitan Area: „The UTA climate group gathered climate and weather data from 1900 to 2010 to interpret the historic trends in extremes and variability of temperature and precipitation suggesting an increase in temperature, particularly in the summer season, and an increase in rainfall and rainfall intensity, primarily during the spring season. „Historic weather-related disruption of transportation is mainly related to extreme events like snow and ice storms as well as damages by severe supercell-type thunderstorms. „Future climate prediction suggests extreme temperatures of up to 125°F by the end of 21st century, exceeding historic heat waves by 12°F. „By 2050, soil moisture is reduced by 10-15% in all seasons compared to historic values due to increase in temperatures. This suggests a higher risk of infrastructure damage by cracking and, together with elevated temperatures, a higher-than-present risk of fires, particularly in wooded neighborhoods. „Higher likelihood of drought will also amplify the urban heat island, particularly during summer months, that can result in up to 10°F temperature difference between downtown Dallas and adjacent rural locations. 5 Climate change to bring North Texas longer droughts, heavy rains, 120-degree temps within 25 years. Kuchment, Anna. 2018, February 15. <https://www.dallasnews.com/news/climate-change-1/2018/02/15/climate-change-to- bring-texas-longer-droughts-heavy-rains-120-temps-august-within-25-years> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬ „An increase in mean rainfall by up to 10% and severe thunderstorms by up to 40% in the spring season will likely lead to a higher risk of flooding affecting the infrastructure. „Extreme flooding events exceeding historic floods are expected as a result of more tropical storm systems occurring in the fall season.6 Population Increase National forecasts of population and economic growth indicate that this region will continue to add residents and jobs well into the future. The 2030 projections produced by the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) use the year 2000 as a base year and project population and employment in five-year increments to 2030. Over the 30-year horizon, the 16-county North Texas region is anticipated to add 1.6 million households with a corresponding 4.1 million people and 2.3 million non-construction jobs. This represents an average annual population growth rate of 2.6% for these 30 years, a magnitude of growth never before experienced in the North Central Texas region. NCTCOG forecasts reflect only one set of growth assumptions. If circumstances change, real growth outcomes might be considerably different.7 The following table reflects the changes in participating jurisdictions’ demographics since the adoption of the 2015 HazMAP. Red text represents an increase in population. Jurisdiction 2015 Population Estimate 2017 Population Estimate Arlington 379,370 382,230 Azle 11,140 11,800 Bedford 48,060 48,560 Blue Mound 2,390 2,390 Colleyville 23,760 24,630 Crowley 14,130 14,440 Euless 54,050 54,870 Forest Hill 12,380 12,500 Fort Worth 792,720 815,430 Grapevine 48,520 49,130 Haltom City 42,640 42,740 Haslet 1,660 1,720 Hurst 38,340 38,410 Keller 42,890 44,620 Kennedale 7,130 7,420 Lake Worth 4,680 4,710 Lakeside 1,330 1,690 Mansfield 56,368 (2010 population) 63,670 North Richland Hills 66,300 67,120 Richland Hills 7,920 7,920 6 Climate Change/Extreme Weather Vulnerability and Risk Assessment for Transportation Infrastructure in Dallas and Tarrant Counties. March 24, 2015. <http://www.uta.edu/faculty/awinguth/Research/NCTCOG_FHWAClimateChangePilot_RevisedFinal_3-24-15.pdf> 7 North Texas to 2030: Extending the Trends. Vision North Texas. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭ Jurisdiction 2015 Population Estimate 2017 Population Estimate Saginaw 20,480 21,320 Southlake 27,710 28,880 Watauga 23,590 23,600 Westlake 1,120 1,310 Westworth Village 2,620 2,620 Tarrant County 1,922,470 1,966,440 Source: North Central Texas Regional Data Center. Mansfield has a 2010 population estimate, as they had a city mitigation plan approved in 2010. There is no data available for NCTCOG population changes from 2015-2017. Change in population for Dalworthington Gardens, Edgecliff Village, Pantego, River Oaks, and the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) are not included, as these jurisdictions are new participants on the ϮϬϮϬ Tarrant County HazMAP. The following chart reflects the 2017 population estimate for these new participants: Jurisdiction 2017 Population Estimate Dalworthington Gardens 2,330 Edgecliff Village 3,220 Everman 6,348 NCTCOG 367 (employees) Pantego 2,470 River Oaks 7,310 UNTHSC 5,000 (student, faculty, staff) 3.2.3 Decrease in Vulnerability Factors that decrease vulnerability to hazards include the mitigation actions that are addressed in jurisdictional annexes and the adoption of new codes and policies. The Environment & Development Department at NCTCOG plays a major role in regional coordination and management of reports and projects that improve regional resilience to natural hazards through the following programs: „The Corridor Development Certificate (CDC) – The CDC process aims to stabilize flood risk along the Trinity River. The CDC process does not prohibit floodplain development but ensures that any development that does occur in the floodplain will not raise flood water levels or reduce flood storage capacity. A CDC permit is required to develop land within a specific area of the Trinity floodplain called the Regulatory Zone, which is similar to the 100-year floodplain. o Under the CDC process, local governments retain ultimate control over floodplain permitting decisions, but other communities along the Trinity River Corridor are given the opportunity to review and comment on projects in their neighbor’s jurisdiction. As the Metroplex economy continues to grow and develop, the CDC process will prevent increased flood risks „The Trinity River COMMON VISION Program- Local governments along the Trinity River launched a regional initiative that has stimulated excitement and galvanized support for a new Trinity River COMMON VISION. It is composed of these elements: o A safe Trinity River, with stabilization and reduction of flooding risks. o A clean Trinity River, with fishable and swimmable waters. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮ o An enjoyable Trinity River, with recreational opportunities linked by a trails system within a world-class greenway. o A natural Trinity River, with preservation and restoration of riparian and cultural resources o A diverse Trinity River, with local and regional economic, transportation and other public needs addressed. „NCTCOG-OneRain Contrail Flood Warning Software- Contrail software that delivers automated real-time data collection, processing, validation, analysis, archiving and visualization of hydrometeorological and environmental sensor data. „The integrated Stormwater Management (iSWM) Program- The iSWM™ Program for Construction and Development is a cooperative initiative that assists cities and counties to achieve their goals of water quality protection, streambank protection, and flood mitigation, while also helping communities meet their construction and post-construction obligations under state stormwater permits. o Development and redevelopment by their nature increase the amou nt of imperviousness in our surrounding environment. This increased imperviousness translates into loss of natural areas, more sources for pollution in runoff, and heightened flooding risks. To help mitigate these impacts, more than 60 local governments are cooperating to proactively create sound stormwater management guidance for the region through the integrated Stormwater Management (iSWM) Program. „16-County Watershed Management Initiative- Communities from across the region come together to collaborate on how to reduce the risks of flooding in their communities. „Texas Smartscape- Texas SmartScape™ is a landscape program crafted to be "smart" for North Central Texas. Based on water-efficient landscape principles, it promotes the use of plants suited to our region's soil, climate, and precipitation that don't require much—if any—additional irrigation, pesticides, fertilizer, or herbicides to thrive. o The two main goals of the program are to: ƒImprove stormwater runoff quality ƒConserve local water supplies The article below details a major project underway in Tarrant County and addresses smart development along the Trinity River. Typically, development in a hazard-prone area, such as a floodplain, is recognized as a factor that increases the vulnerability of an area, but this smart approach to design and development actually decreases vulnerability. A Smart Approach to Land Development along the Trinity River The Trinity River is a major part of Fort Worth's rich and colorful history. In 1849, an army outpost was established on the banks of the river at the confluence of the West Fork and the Clear Fork, and that convergence anchors the downtown area today. The "Master Plan" for the Trinity River is a concept literally decades in the making. Encouraged by community volunteers in the 1980s, developed by urban designers and specialty consultants in the 1990s, and adopted by city council in 2003, the Trinity River Vision Master Plan encompasses 88 miles of the Trinity River and its greenbelts and tributaries throughout the Fort Worth area. The "vision" has always been to advocate for this natural resource, keeping the river beautiful, dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯ accessible, enjoyable, and productive and to make sure it remains a valuable asset for the entire community. The plan includes a major restoration of the park’s ecosystem and provides numerous and diverse recreational amenities. These are secondary, however, to the flood control aspects. According to a 2006 report conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers, 86% of the levies in the project area failed flood testing. This further motivated developer to move forward with re-structuring the area. The plan focuses on eight segments of the Trinity River and its tributaries: Clear Fork North, Clear Fork South, Marine Creek, Mary's Creek, Sycamore Creek, West Fork East, West Fork West, and the Central City area now called Trinity Uptown. It considers environmental quality, conservation, recreation facilities, trail developments, reforestation, beautification, and linkage to neighborhoods, downtown, and other special districts. The plan also addresses adjoining land uses, transportation, and how other facilities best complement and benefit from the greenways. When completed, Gateway Park will be three times the size of Central Park in New York City, making it the largest urbanized park in the country.8 3.3 Profiling Natural Hazards The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) is a tool to assist in the identification and documentation of natural hazards faced by the county and participating jurisdictions. Hazard profiles were created by compiling data from the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) regional natural hazards risk assessments, damage assessments, hazard data, and geographic information. Of the 15 hazards identified in the State of Texas Hazard Mitigation Plan, the Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) identified nine that could affect participating jurisdictions in Tarrant County. Coastal erosion, land subsidence, and hurricane/tropical storm will not be profiled because of their extremely low risk to the participating jurisdictions. Dam failure is an accidental or unintentional collapse, breach, or other failure of an impoundment structure that results in downstream flooding. Though there are 63 dams are in the county, no jurisdiction has claimed to be at severe risk to flooding from dam failure in the next five years. Drought, earthquakes, expansive soils, extreme heat, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and winter storms have a county-wide impact, which includes all participating jurisdictions. Wildfires are most likely a threat to jurisdictions that are rural with undeveloped land. Flooding is also expected anywhere in the county, but is most likely a threat to jurisdictions containing 100-year floodplains or bodies of water. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) has identified the following natural hazards as having the potential to cause damage in the county and participating jurisdictions: ¾Drought ¾Earthquakes ¾Expansive Soils ¾Extreme Heat ¾Flooding 8 Trinity River Vision. <https://www.tarrantcounty.com/en/county/supermenu-contents/residents/trinity-river- vision.html> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰ ¾Thunderstorms ¾Tornadoes ¾Wildfires ¾Winter Storms Drought, earthquakes, expansive soils, extreme heat, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and winter storms do not have geographic boundaries and can impact the entire county equally, which includes all participating jurisdictions. Wildfires can be expected to threaten rural and urban jurisdictions with undeveloped land. Flooding is a severe threat to jurisdictions containing 100-year floodplains or bodies of water. WĂƌƚŝĐŝƉĂƚŝŶŐũƵƌŝƐĚŝĐƚŝŽŶƐƚŚĂƚĚŝĚŶŽƚĐůĂŝŵǁŝůĚĨŝƌĞƐĂƐĂŚĂnjĂƌĚĚŝĚƐŽďĞĐĂƵƐĞƚŚĞƌĞŚĂƐďĞĞŶŶŽ ŚŝƐƚŽƌLJŽĨŝŵƉĂĐƚƐ͕ƚŚƵƐƚŚĞƌĞŝƐŶŽĞdžƉĞĐƚĂƚŝŽŶŽĨŝŵƉĂĐƚƐŝŶƚŚĞĨƵƚƵƌĞ͘ Additionally, a jurisdiction may not have claimed wildfires as a hazard due to the urban landscape of the jurisdiction as well as the swift response from the fire department. Referencing the following table, jurisdictions that are not at risk to wildfires include ĞĚĨŽƌĚ͕ ůƵĞ DŽƵŶĚ͕Forest Hill, >ĂŬĞ tŽƌƚŚ͕ the North Central Texas Council of Governments, Pantego, Saginaw, Watauga, and Westworth Village. WĂƌƚŝĐŝƉĂƚŝŶŐũƵƌŝƐĚŝĐƚŝŽŶƐƚŚĂƚĚŽŶŽƚĐůĂŝŵĨůŽŽĚŝŶŐĂƐĂŚĂnjĂƌĚǁŽƵůĚĚŽƐŽĞŝƚŚĞƌďĞĐĂƵƐĞƚŚĞƌĞĂƌĞ ŶŽĨůŽŽĚƉůĂŝŶƐ͕ƚŚĞƌĞĂƌĞŶŽĐƌŝƚŝĐĂůĂƐƐĞƚƐŝŶĂĨůŽŽĚƉůĂŝŶ͕ŽƌƚŚĞƌĞŚĂƐďĞĞŶŶŽŚŝƐƚŽƌLJŽĨŝŵƉĂĐƚƐ͕ ƚŚƵƐƚŚĞƌĞŝƐŶŽĞdžƉĞĐƚĂƚŝŽŶŽĨŝŵƉĂĐƚƐŝŶƚŚĞĨƵƚƵƌĞ͘This is not the case in Tarrant County, as all participants have identified flooding as a potential threat to their communities. The table on the next page reflects the rankings of each hazard, per jurisdiction. Jurisdiction Drought Earthquake Expansive Soils Extreme Heat Flooding Thunderstorms Tornadoes Wildfires Winter Storms Arlington 5 9 8 6 1 3 2 7 4 Azle 7 9 8 6 2 3 1 5 4 Bedford 6 8 2 5 4 1 3 Eͬ 7 Blue Mound 3 9 5 4 7 1 2 Eͬ6 Colleyville 8 9 5 6 2 1 3 7 4 Crowley 5 9 8 7 3 2 1 6 4 Dalworthington Gardens 2 9 6 1 4 3 5 7 8 Edgecliff Village 8 9 7 4 5 1 2 3 6 Euless 6 9 5 4 3 1 2 8 7 Everman 7 9 5 4 1 3 2 8 6 Forest Hill 8 7 6 5 4 2 1 N/A 3 Fort Worth 7 9 8 6 2 1 4 5 3 Grapevine 5 9 8 7 3 2 1 6 4 Haltom City 6 7 5 4 1 3 2 9 8 Haslet 7 9 4 6 5 1 2 8 3 Hurst 8 9 5 4 3 2 1 7 6 dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱ Jurisdiction Drought Earthquake Expansive Soils Extreme Heat Flooding Thunderstorms Tornadoes Wildfires Winter Storms Keller 8 9 5 7 4 2 1 6 3 Kennedale 5 9 8 7 3 2 1 6 4 Lake Worth 7 8 4 2 5 1 3 Eͬ6 Lakeside 4 9 5 3 7 1 2 6 8 Mansfield 6 9 3 7 2 1 4 8 5 NCTCOG 7 8 6 4 5 1 3 N/A 2 North Richland Hills 2 3 4 5 1 6 7 8 9 Pantego 4 8 5 3 7 1 2 N/A 6 Richland Hills 4 8 2 3 5 1 6 ϵ 7 River Oaks 8 9 7 3 6 1 2 5 4 Saginaw 8 5 3 7 6 2 1 N/A 4 Southlake 5 9 8 4 2 3 1 7 6 Tarrant County 6 9 7 4 3 1 2 5 8 UNTHSC 6 8 5 4 7 1 2 9 3 Watauga 3 8 5 4 7 1 2 N/A 6 Westlake 7 8 9 6 5 1 2 3 4 Westworth Village 8 7 6 5 4 1 2 N/A 3 The following natural hazard profiles are listed in alphabetical order and do not represent their rank, as each jurisdiction prioritized the hazards independently. This section covers part of the requirement of 44 CFR 201.6(c)(2)(i) and 44 CFR 201.6 (c)(2)(ii). The information provided in this section reflects the impact of the hazards on all of Tarrant County, not solely the participating jurisdictions. The results of the vulnerability analysis and risk assessment, including historical events, are documented in the individual annexes for participating jurisdictions. The historical events documented in this section reflect the events that impacted the entire county, not solely the unincorporated areas of the county. Reference to Tarrant County in this section refers to the county as a whole and not solely unincorporated areas of Tarrant County. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϲ 3.3.1 Drought Drought can be defined as a water shortage caused by the natura l reduction in the amount of precipitation expected over an extended period of time, usually a season or more in length. It can be aggravated by other factors such as high temperatures, high winds, and low relative humidity. Tarrant County experiences a cycle of extended wet and drought conditions that can extend over a period of months even years. Extended periods of drought can have an enormous impact on an area by affecting the abundance of water supply, the agriculture economy, and foundations of structures. Drought may affect the entire Tarrant County planning area equally. The following maps and chart reflect the annual changes in drought conditions between the years 2015 to 2018. Tarrant County has experienced an increase in drought conditions over the years, with 2016 being the wettest year during this time period. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϳ http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϴ Source: United States Drought Monitor. DϬ D1 D2 D3 D4 As shown in the Percent Area graph, 2014-2015 had the greatest severity and longest time period of D3-D4 drought conditions. Besides major crop damage, these extreme drought conditions have the potential to put Tarrant County in extreme fire danger and could cause widespread water shortage and restrictions, creating a water emergency.dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϵ The following chart describes the drought monitoring indices along with drought severity, return period, and a description of the possible impacts of the severity of drought. The following map reflects the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) for Tarrant County and the state of Texas. KBDI is an index used to determining forest fire potential. The drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is balanced with precipitation and soil moisture (assumed to have a maximum storage capacity of 8-inches) and is expressed in hundredths of an inch of soil moisture depletion. The drought index ranges from 0 to 800, where a drought index of 0 represents no moisture depletion, and an index of 800 represents absolutely dry conditions. Presently, this index is derived from ground based estimates of temperature and precipitation derived from weather stations and interpolated manually by experts at the Texas Forest Service (TFS) for counties across the state. Researchers at Texas A&M University are working with the TFS to derive this index fr om AVHRR satellite data and NEXRAD radar rainfall within a GIS. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬ Historical Events of Drought since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location Date Time Type Dth Inj PrD CrD Totals: 0 0 2.00K 7.00K Tarrant (Zone) 02/01/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 0.00K 2.00K Tarrant (Zone) 03/01/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 0.00K 3.00K Tarrant (Zone) 04/01/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 0.00K 1.00K Tarrant (Zone) 08/25/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 0.00K 0.00K Tarrant (Zone) 09/01/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 0.00K 1.00K Tarrant (Zone) 10/01/2015 00:00 Drought 0 0 2.00K 0.00K Totals: 0 0 2.00K 7.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭ In total, property damage from drought totals $2,000 and crop damage totals $7,000. Calculations of annualized losses due to drought events were conducted using historical data obtained from the National Climatic Data Center. The annualized loss value can be interpreted as the impact expected from drought in terms of annualized human losses and human injuries, and annualized property losses. As observed in the table, Tarrant County can expect approximately an annual $667 in property losses, and $2,334 of crop losses each year as a result of drought, with no injuries or deaths expected from this event. In Texas, local governments are empowered to take action on the behalf of those they serve. When drought conditions exist, a burn ban can be put in place by a county judge or county Commissioners Court prohibiting or restricting outdoor burning for public safety.9 3.3.2 Earthquake An earthquake is a sudden motion or trembling caused by an abrupt release of accumulated strain on the tectonic plates that comprise the earth's crust. The theory of plate tectonics holds that the earth's crust is broken into several major plates. These rigid, 50- to 60- mile thick plates move slowly and continuously over the interior of the earth, meeting in some areas and separ ating in others. As the tectonic plates move together they bump, slide, catch, and hold. Eventually, faults along or near plate boundaries slip abruptly when the stress exceeds the elastic limit of the rock, and an earthquake occurs. The ensuring seismic activity and ground motion provoke secondary hazards: surface faulting and ground failure. The vibration or shaking of the ground during an earthquake is referred to as ground motion. In general, the severity of ground motion increases with the amount of energy released and decreases with distance from the causative fault or epicenter. When a fault ruptures, seismic waves are propagated in all directions, causing the ground to vibrate at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 30 Hz. Seismic waves are referred to as P waves, S waves, and surface waves. Due to the risk associated with a distant quake, earthquakes may affect the entire planning area equally. Tarrant County has a very low earthquake risk, with a total of 18 earthquakes since 1931. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) database shows that there is a 0.18% chance of a major earthquake within 30 miles of Tarrant County within the next 50 years. The largest earthquake within 30 miles of Tarrant County was a 3.6 Magnitude in 2017.10 9 Fire Danger: Texas Burn Bans. Texas A&M Forest Service. 2018. <http://texasforestservice.tamu.edu/TexasBurnBans/> 10 Homefacts. Earthquake Information for Tarrant County, Texas. 2018. <https://www.homefacts.com/earthquakes/Texas/Tarrant-County.html> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϮ Historical Events of Earthquakes since 2015 The jurisdictions in Tarrant County are identified in blue. The remaining earthquakes occurred within 30 miles of Tarrant County, thus increasing the likelihood of a future earthquake in Tarrant County. Legend Tarrant County 2017 2016 2015 Time Magnitude Location in North Texas 2017-09-14T16:45:38.990Z 2.6 3.7 miles East-Southeast of Euless 2017-09-01T16:27:50.070Z 2.1 3.1 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2017-08-25T11:41:34.560Z 3 3.1 miles South of Farmers Branch 2017-06-21T22:52:05.320Z 2.8 1.2 miles Southwest of Reno 2017-05-01T16:10:09.410Z 2.3 1.2 miles Southwest of Fort Worth 2016-09-22T12:37:00.020Z 2.4 3.1 miles Northeast of Irving 2016-09-12T14:03:51.210Z 2.6 3.1 miles North-Northwest of Venus 2016-02-04T15:46:56.360Z 2.7 4.3 miles South-Southwest of Mansfield 2016-01-31T06:06:21.570Z 2.1 1.2 miles West of Irving 2015-12-17T22:29:55.710Z 3 0.6 miles South-Southeast of Haslet 2015-12-17T04:24:08.840Z 2.1 2.5 miles North-Northwest of Irving 2015-12-07T00:27:24.860Z 2.8 1.2 miles East of Irving 2015-12-06T00:44:08.510Z 2.1 3.7 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-12-04T14:22:58.700Z 2.1 3.7 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-12-04T06:56:03.250Z 2.6 3.7 miles South of Farmers Branch 2015-12-03T21:35:59.000Z 2.8 3.1 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-11-16T03:09:02.770Z 2.4 3.7 miles North of Irving 2015-11-15T22:07:51.400Z 2 2.5 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-11-03T02:37:41.390Z 2.2 2.5 miles North of Irving 2015-10-29T22:24:39.570Z 2.5 1.9 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-10-28T01:33:37.110Z 2.2 3.1 miles North of Irving 2015-10-27T13:01:07.520Z 2.3 3.7 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-10-23T12:30:04.520Z 2.6 2.5 miles Northwest of Venus 2015-10-23T12:11:07.850Z 2.1 4.3 miles Northwest of Venus 2015-10-19T23:12:03.180Z 2.3 3.1 miles North of Irving 2015-10-19T22:39:47.980Z 2.7 3.1 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-10-18T00:17:37.060Z 2.4 3.7 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-10-04T05:57:09.220Z 2.1 3.7 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-10-01T21:28:26.140Z 2.7 1.2 miles East of Irving 2015-09-22T10:18:43.020Z 2.4 3.1 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-09-20T23:25:08.930Z 2.6 0.6 miles North-Northwest of Irving 2015-09-16T21:55:24.080Z 2.1 1.9 miles North of Irving dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϯ Time Magnitude Location in North Texas 2015-09-14T21:04:59.040Z 2 3.1 miles South of Farmers Branch 2015-09-12T12:16:16.840Z 2.2 1.2 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-09-12T09:34:20.660Z 2.5 2.5 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-08-31T08:15:37.160Z 1.8 2.5 miles East-Northeast of Irving 2015-08-25T20:59:47.930Z 2.2 2.5 miles North of Irving 2015-08-25T20:18:31.760Z 2.1 1.2 miles North of Irving 2015-08-12T11:13:28.340Z 2.7 2.5 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-07-18T15:30:09.260Z 2.6 2.5 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-07-16T00:17:49.460Z 1.8 2.5 miles North of Irving 2015-07-13T11:03:56.270Z 2.4 1.2 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-06-28T05:40:35.630Z 2.1 3.7 miles Northwest of Irving 2015-06-27T10:19:02.930Z 2.3 3.7 miles South of Farmers Branch 2015-06-15T09:37:14.520Z 2.4 3.1 miles Southeast of Mansfield 2015-06-13T13:34:47.480Z 2.3 3.7 miles South of Farmers Branch 2015-05-18T18:14:29.920Z 3.3 3.1 miles North of Irving 2015-05-10T01:59:31.750Z 2.4 4.3 miles North of Venus 2015-05-09T16:12:38.390Z 2.7 4.3 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-05-07T22:58:05.200Z 4 3.1 miles North of Venus 2015-05-04T13:57:59.870Z 2.7 3.7 miles West of University Park 2015-05-04T08:49:27.750Z 2.1 2.5 miles West-Northwest of University Park 2015-05-03T16:12:04.480Z 2.5 4.3 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-05-03T15:11:16.150Z 3.2 2.5 miles North of Irving 2015-04-03T08:58:11.070Z 2.2 3.1 miles South-Southeast of Farmers Branch 2015-04-03T04:28:37.020Z 2.3 3.7 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-04-03T03:04:49.640Z 2.5 3.7 miles Northeast of Irving 2015-04-02T22:36:21.040Z 3.3 3.1 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-04-02T10:38:06.000Z 2.7 2.5 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-03-25T04:57:14.320Z 2.6 3.1 miles Northwest of Venus 2015-03-14T07:31:16.290Z 2.7 3.1 miles North-Northeast of Irving 2015-03-12T14:41:14.790Z 2 2.5 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-03-12T01:55:02.270Z 2.4 3.1 miles South-Southwest of Farmers Branch 2015-03-08T03:12:22.340Z 2.2 2.5 miles East-Northeast of Irving 2015-02-27T12:18:21.710Z 3.1 2.5 miles East-Northeast of Irving Source: U.S. Geological Survey. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϰ Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions experienced a few earthquakes during the time period analyzed for this plan. There is the potential for future earthquake events, as Azle and Irving faults were recently discovered. Earthquakes from surrounding areas can also affect the participating jurisdictions. Though no dollar-amount of destruction was found, it is expected that all county and jurisdictional assets are considered vulnerable and can be exposed to this hazard. Assets near the Azle and Irving fault lines are most vulnerable to an earthquake event. Loss estimates are based on total amount over a period of time. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan reports no loss estimates. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϯϲ In the picture above, it shows that most earthquakes since 1973 have occurred in the neighboring state of Oklahoma. If an Oklahoma earthquake is large enough, participating jurisdictions in Tarrant County can feel the shake, as Oklahoma is about 180 miles north. Jurisdictions in Tarrant County have experienced multiple earthquakes since 2009. The picture above reflects the level of ground shaking from earthquakes in 2017. Tarrant County is at a Level V or VI on the Modified Marcelli Intensity Chart, with shaking being moderate to strong. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϳ 3.3.3 Expansive Soils Expansive soils are soils that contain large percentages of swelling clays that may experience volume changes of up to 40% in the absence or presence of water. This type of plastic deformation is common in Tarrant County. Homes built on expanding smectite clays without due precautions will likely will be structurally damaged as the clay takes up water. Cracks will appear in walls and floors. Damage can be minor, but it also can be severe enough for the home to be stru cturally unsafe. Expansive soil is considered one of the most common causes of pavement distresses in roadways. Depending upon the moisture level, expansive soils will experience changes in volume due to moisture fluctuations from seasonal variations. Expansive soils may affect the entire Tarrant County planning area equally. Expansive soils is a condition that is native to Texas soil characteristics, and cannot be documented as a time- specific event, except when it leads to structural and infrastructure damage. The great increase in damages in Texas caused by problems with expansive soils can be traced to the rise in residential slab-on-grade construction which began to accelerate in the 1960s. Prior to that time, most residential construction in Texas was pier and beam, with wood siding or other non-masonry covering. Affected homes will be heavily influenced by their proximity to a large body of water, such as homes on Eagle Mountain Lake, whereas older pier and beam foundations will behave in an entirely different manner. Western and Central Tarrant County consists of several different limestone formations (the Washita group) made up of limestone and shale that produce a variety of clay-rich soils with rocky shallow soil horizons. Eastern Tarrant County is supported by Woodbine sandstone, a picturesque rolling topography dominated by sandy loams and clay-rich soils. These sandier soils allow for subsurface water movement and require special consideration. This propensity for water movement can easily compromise the foundations of homes in Tarrant County.11 11 Fort Worth Foundation Repair. Perma Pier Foundation Repair of Texas. 2018. <https://www.permapier.com/service-areas/fort-worth-foundation-repair/> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϴ 3.3.4 Extreme Heat Extreme heat is characterized by a combination of very high temperatures and exceptionally humid conditions. When persisting over a period of time, it is called a heat wave. Extreme heat can also be a factor that drastically impacts drought conditions, as high temperatures lead to an increased rate of evaporation. Extreme heat can also lead to heat stroke and even death in vulnerable populations, such as the elderly and the very young, if exposed to the high temperatures for an extended period of time. Extreme heat may affect the entire Tarrant County planning area equally. The following scale was used to determine the extent of extreme heat in Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions. The Heat Index is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperature. To find the Heat Index temperature, look at the Heat Index Chart below. As an example, if the air temperature is 96°F and the relative humidity is 65%, the heat index-how hot it feels-is 121°F. The red area without numbers indicates extreme danger. The National Weather Service (NWS) will initiate alert procedures when the Heat Index is expected to exceed 105°-110°F (depending on local climate) for at least 2 consecutive days. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϵ NWS also offers a Heat Index chart, below, for areas with high heat but low relative humidity. Since heat index values were devised for shady, light wind conditions, exposure to full sunshine can increase heat index values by up to 15°F. Also, strong winds, particularly with very hot, dry air, can be extremely hazardous. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϬ The map below shows the average number of days per year locations can expect to exceed 100°F by the end of this century, if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase. Based on this information, parts of Texas that experienced 10 to 20 days of 100°F weather per year in recent decades may experience more than 100 days over 100°F by the end of the century. This includes Tarrant County. Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States Climate Resilience Toolkit. Historical Events of Extreme Heat since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location Date Time Type Dth Inj PrD CrD Tarrant (Zone) 06/23/2017 16:00 Heat 1 0 0.00K 0.00K Totals: 1 0 0.00K 0.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. Extreme heat impacts large areas and cross jurisdictional boundaries; therefore, all of Tarrant County is exposed to this hazard. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϭ 3.3.5 Flooding Flooding is defined as the accumulation of water within a water body and the overflow of excess water onto adjacent floodplain lands. The floodplain is the land adjoining the channel of a river, stream, ocean, lake, or other watercourse or water body that is susceptible to flooding. The statistical meaning of terms like “100-year flood” can be confusing. Simply stated, a floodplain can be located anywhere; it just depends on how large and how often a flood event occurs. Floodplains are those areas that are subject to inundation from flooding. Floods and the floodplains associated with them are often described in terms of the percent chance of a flood event happening in any given year. As a community management or planning term, “floodplain” most often refers to an area that is subject to inundation by a flood that has a 1% chance of occurring in any given year (commonly referred to as the 100-year floodplain). Common flooding hazards within the planning area include flood hazards from flash flooding and new development. Floodwater can disguise many dangerous obstacles, like uncovered manholes or debris that can cause someone to fall over. Standing water, or water that isn't flowing, can also become a breeding ground for bugs that can make people very ill. Another risk can be downed power lines which may still be live. On the following map, the floodway and 100-year floodplain are identified along the rivers and creeks in Tarrant County. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϮ Source: Property Shark dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϰϯ A flash flood is a rapid flood that inundates low-lying areas in less than six hours. This is caused by intense rainfall from a thunderstorm or several thunderstorms. Flash floods can also occur from the collapse of a man-made structure or ice dam. Construction and development can change the natural drainage and create brand new flood risks as the concrete that comes with ne w buildings, parking lots, and roads create less land that can absorb excess precipitation from heavy rains. Flash floods are a high risk hazard since they can tear out trees and destroy buildings and bridges. Below is a map of low water crossings in Tarrant County as of 2012, identified by yellow circles. A low water crossing provides a bridge or overpass when water flow is low. Under high-flow conditions, water runs over the roadway and impedes vehicular traffic. Texas leads the nation in flash flood deaths and most are due to people crossing these low areas in times of flooding . Additional details on flooding are provided in the jurisdictional annexes. Source: Texas Low Water Crossing Inventory_032312; dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϰ There are 15 major river basins within Texas and eight coastal basins, each with varying hydrological regimes and water supply capabilities. Each of the basins has several unique features, both climatic (such as precipitation and evaporation), as well as physiographic (geology, slope, soil type, vegetation and land use practices) which contribute to the nature of runoff from the basins. The West Fork Trinity River is the only major river in Tarrant County and can affect some of the participating jurisdictions. There are a total of four branches of the Trinity River: the West Fork, Clear Fork, Elm Fork, and East Fork. The Trinity is a slow, meandering river with many twists and turns from its headwaters to its mouth. Dams have been erected to create Lake Bridgeport, Eagle Mountain Lake and Lake Worth, the latter two being in or on the outskirts of Fort Worth. The West Fork Trinity River has its headwaters in Archer County. From there it flows southeast, through the man-made reservoirs Lake Bridgeport and Eagle Mountain Lake then flowing eastward through Lake Worth and then the city of Fort Worth. Features of Major River Basins in Tarrant County River Basin Total Area (square miles) Area in Texas (square miles) River Length (miles) Length in Texas (miles) Average Flow (acre-feet per year) Trinity 17,913 17,913 550 550 5,727,000 dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϱ Tarrant County has of a few major lakes that are used for surface water and recreation. Their current water levels are listed below. Currently, these lakes have recovered from previous drought periods and are close to or at capacity. Recent Conditions of Lakes in Tarrant County Reservoir Percent Full Water Level (feet) Height Above Conservation Pool (feet) Reservoir Storage (acre-feet) Conservation Storage (acre-feet) Conservation Capacity (acre-feet) Surface Area (acres) Arlington 99.2 549.83 -0.17 39,862 39,862 40,188 1,919 Benbrook 100.0 694.48 0.48 87,439 85,648 85,648 N/A Cedar Creek 100.0 322.06 0.06 646,750 644,686 644,686 N/A Eagle Mountain 100.0 649.42 0.32 182,650 179,880 179,880 N/A Grapevine 100.0 537.08 2.08 179,459 164,703 164,703 7,273 Richland- Chambers 97.6 314.38 -0.62 1,086,376 1,061,452 1,087,839 42,287 Worth 99.2 593.92 -0.08 33,221 33,221 33,495 3,423 Source: Water Data for Texas, https://waterdatafortexas.org/reservoirs/statewide. Dam Failure A dam is defined as a barrier constructed across a watercourse for the purpose of storage, control, or diversion of water. Dams typically are constructed of earth, rock, concrete, or mine tailings. A dam failure is an accidental or unintentional collapse, breach, or other failure of an impoundment structure that results in downstream flooding. Because dams are man-made structures, dam failures are usually considered technological hazards. The hazard extent rating scale for dam failure is based on the amount of potential damage that can be caused by a failure. For the purposes of this hazard analysis, damage from dam failure only takes into account areas where developed property is affected. Although dam failures can cause extensive damage, there has been no recorded failures in Tarrant County as a wide array of measures, including maintenance, are taken to ensure structural integrity. Ninety-five percent of dams in Tarrant County are regulated by a state agency and 3% are regulated by a federal agency. The average age for the 63 dams is 53 years old. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϲ At the time this plan was written, specific inundation data for dams in Tarrant County was unavailable; however, it can be said that all people, property, and environments located in an inundation area would be affected by dam failure. One of the two high hazard federal dams shown in red on the following map is in a participating jurisdiction. It is owned by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District (CESF). Dam Name City Owner Benbrook Lake Fort Worth U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District (CESF) According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), there are 33 state regulated dams in Tarrant County that are high hazard and there are 8 dams that are significant hazard. Twenty-five of the high hazard dams have an emergency action plan (EAP), and all 8 of the significant hazard dams have an EAP. Below is a list of the dams in Tarrant County provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Those without a city name can be presumed to be located in the unincorporated Tarrant County. The list reflects the most current 2018 National Inventory of Dams (NID) database. State and federal dam regulators provided their data from May to November 2018 for inclusion in the 2018 database. Please contact the respective state or federal regulatory authority for the most up-to-date information. The NID consists of dams meeting at least one of the following criteria; 1. High hazard potential classification - loss of human life is likely if the dam fails. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϳ 2. Significant hazard potential classification - no probable loss of human life but can cause economic loss, environmental damage, disruption of lifeline facilities, or impact other concerns. 3. Height is equal to or exceeds 25 feet and storage exceeds 15 acre-feet. 4. Height exceeds 6 feet and storage is equal to or exceeds 50 acre-feet. Dam Name Jurisdiction Owner EAP Benbrook Lake Fort Worth U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District (CESF) Yes Grapevine Lake Grapevine CESF Yes Lake Arlington Dam Arlington City of Arlington Yes Lake Como Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Luther Lake Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Eagle Mountain Dam Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Water District Yes Haywire Lake Number 2 Dam Lake Worth David Leonard Not Required Haywire Lake Number 1 Dam Lake Worth David Leonard Not Required Knapp Lake Dam Haltom City Texas Department of Transportation No White Lake Dam Fort Worth Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth, Nolan High School Yes Marine Creek Dam Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Water District Yes Lake Worth Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Loughridge Lake Dam City of Fort Worth Not Required Millbrook Addition Dam Fort Worth Millbrook Addition Homeowners Association Not Required Fosdic Lake Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Echo Lake Dam Fort Worth Tarrant County Yes Prestonwood Lake Dam Arlington Eddie Cheatham Not Required Cement Creek Dam Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Water District Yes Willow Creek Lake Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Nutt Dam Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Water District Not Required East Balancing Reservoir Dam Bisbee Tarrant Regional Water District Yes West Balancing Reservoir Dam Bisbee Tarrant Regional Water District Yes Western Training Lagoon Dam Haltom City Western Company of North America Not Required Rush Creek Lake Dam Arlington Lake Interlochen Homeowners Association Not Required dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϴ Dam Name Jurisdiction Owner EAP Meadows Lakes East Lake Dam Richland Hills Meadow Lakes Community Improvement Association, Skylark Circle Community Improvement Association No Trigg Lake Dam Irving Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport Board Yes Woodland West Lake Dam Pantego Woodland West Lake Association Yes North Side Drive Dam Number 3 Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Not Required Cityview Lakes Dam 2 Cityview Owners Association Not Required Cityview Lakes Dam 3 Cityview Owners Association Not Required Arbor Dam 1 Arbor Development Company Not Required Arbor Dam 2 Arbor Development Company Not Required Stoneglen Dam Number 1 Hunt Resources Inc. Not Required Stoneglen Dam Number 2 Hunt Resources Inc. Not Required Stoneglen Dam Number 8 Hunt Resources Inc. Not Required Lakewood Dams 1-3 Lakewood Addition Homeowners Association Not Required Capp Smith Park Retention Lake Dam City of Watauga Yes Fourth Street Low Water Dam Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Water District Not Required Timarrow Lake Iv Dam Timarrow Land Corporation Not Required Glen Garden Golf and Country Club Dam Glen Garden Golf and Country Club Yes Lake Mb 3a Dam Hillwood Properties Corporation No French Lake Dam Fort Worth City of Fort Worth Yes Bal Lake Dam Fort Worth Jearl Walker Yes Fidelity South Lake Dam Trophy Club FMR Texas Limited Partnership Yes Fidelity North Lake Dam Trophy Club FMR Texas Limited Partnership Yes Pd3 1 East Lake Dam 1 The Vaquero Club Inc. Yes Eden Lake Dam Fort Worth The Landing at Eden Lake Homeowners Association No Dow Lake Dam Robert Dow Not Required dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϰϵ Dam Name Jurisdiction Owner EAP Arlington Southwest Nature Preserve Dam Arlington City of Arlington Yes Elkins Lake Dam City of Dalworthington Gardens Yes Boys Ranch Activity Center Dam City of Bedford Parks Department Yes Mansfield ISD Ron Whitson Agricultural Center Dam Mansfield Independent School District (ISD) No Stone Lake Dam Stone Lake Homeowners Association Yes Ridglea Country Club Estates Dam David Smith, Mark Gerrick, Shawn Smith No Timberlake Phase 5 Timber Lake Residential Association Inc, City of Southlake Yes Lake Mb3 Dam Hillwood Properties Corporation No Lost Creek Golf Club Dam Benbrook Somerset Lost Creek Golf Limited Yes McPherson Ranch Dam Fort Worth McPherson Ranch Owners Association Yes Alan Saxe Pond Arlington City of Arlington Yes Tehama Ridge Dam DR Horton-Texas Limited Yes Meadows Lakes West Lake Dam North Richland Hills Meadow Lakes Community Improvement Association, Skylark Circle Community Improvement Association No Chisholm Park Lake Dam City of Hurst Yes Greenbriar Dam City of Fort Worth Yes Source: National Inventory of Dams, https://nid-test.sec.usace.army.mil/ords/f?p=105:1 Italicized dams are not in the participating jurisdictions of this plan. The hazard classification of dams and inundation maps are not available to the public, per Homeland Security regulations. If specific information is needed for a dam, please contact the dam owners or the Dam Safety Section of the TCEQ via the Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator. The extent of dam failure in the planning area has not yet been determined as a result of a lack of data regarding inundation levels. It is believed that all census blocks within a 5-mile radius are at risk to failure from the dams with the largest water capacity. The cities of Arlington, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Lake Worth, North Richland Hills, Pantego, and the unincorporated county are the only jurisdictions with dams listed in their area. Due to the lack of data, in the next five years these jurisdictions will have a goal to work with the state to conduct a study to fill the data deficiency, including inundation zones, vulnerability to, and potential impacts of a dam failure. NFIP As a participating member in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), Tarrant County is required to regulate any development in designated flood prone areas. All work within a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designated floodplain requires a floodplain permit. The floodplain permit is free; however, it may require additional information indicating that adjacent property owners will not be adversely impacted due to the development. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϬ Additional information may include, but is not limited to, an elevation certificate, a flood study, a topographical survey of before and after conditions, Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR), Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), and Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA). A property owner is required to obtain a floodplain permit prior to performing any type of work in the floodplain, including the placement of fill. The finished floor elevation of new homes constructed in a floodplain must be located at least one foot above the base flood elevation. Prior to the submittal of any documents to FEMA, the county floodplain administrator will review the documents to ensure they are in compliance with the county's floodplain regulations A permit will only be issued after it is determined that the proposed work will not have an adverse impact on adjacent property owners, will not decrease the flood carrying capacity of the watercourse and will not create a situation that is dangerous during flooding events. As development occurs along with growth, more property is exposed. In fact, due to the rapid development in the area, the planners have experienced problems determining building footprints within the floodplain and are working to accurately identify the number and types of buildings vulnerable to flooding. Among the NFIP’s policyholders are thousands whose properties have flooded multiple times. Called “repetitive loss properties,” these are buildings and/or contents for which the NFIP has paid at least two claims of more than $1,000 in any 10-year period since 1978. “Severe repetitive loss properties” are those for which the program has either made at least four payments for buildings and/or contents of more than $5,000 or at least two building-only payments that exceeded the value of the property. These two kinds of properties are the biggest draw on the NFIP Fund. They not only increase the NFIP’s annual losses and the need for borrowing; but they drain funds needed to prepare for catastrophic events. Community leaders and residents are also concerned with the Repetitive Loss problem because residents' lives are disrupted and may be threatened by the continual flooding. The primary objective of identifying these properties is to eliminate or reduce the damage to property and the disruption to life caused by repeated flooding of the same properties. The following table reflects the loss statistics for repetitive loss properties in participating jurisdictions. In summary, there was over $35,184,127.07 in payments made to the jurisdictions and over 2,000 losses. Loss Statistics as of 05/31/2018 Loss Statistics: from January 1, 1978 through report "as of" date above Jurisdiction Total Losses Closed Losses Open Losses Closed Without Payment (CWOP) Losses Total Payments Arlington 888 669 1 219 $18,679,502.23 Azle 53 39 0 14 $1,114,627.32 Bedford 59 33 0 26 $175,230.99 Blue Mound 3 2 0 1 $21,810.93 Colleyville 54 36 0 18 $652,382.45 dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϭ Loss Statistics as of 05/31/2018 Loss Statistics: from January 1, 1978 through report "as of" date above Jurisdiction Total Losses Closed Losses Open Losses Closed Without Payment (CWOP) Losses Total Payments Crowley 2 2 0 0 $10,676,72 Dalworthington Gardens 9 5 0 4 $38,738.70 Edgecliff Village 15 10 0 5 $72,918.51 Euless 109 91 0 18 $2,876,085.49 Everman 75 42 21 12 $646,802.08 Forest Hill 20 12 0 8 $145,600.40 Fort Worth 584 425 3 156 $4,651,310.81 Grapevine 50 39 0 11 $1,020,289.91 Haltom City 122 88 0 34 $3,349,909.45 Haslet 2 1 0 1 $2,645.94 Hurst 115 86 0 29 $1,235,231.11 Keller 52 42 0 10 $1,137,017.37 Kennedale 20 17 0 3 $118,404.88 Lake Worth 1 1 0 0 $3,951.81 Lakeside 1 0 0 1 $0 North Richland Hills 111 87 0 24 $718,857.87 Pantego 12 8 0 4 $39,574.45 Richland Hills 100 79 0 21 $1,140,570.00 River Oaks 4 4 0 0 $67,027.56 Saginaw 7 7 0 0 $111,199.79 Southlake 24 19 1 4 $434,383.78 Tarrant County (unincorporated) 242 192 1 49 $4,066,415.57 Watauga 85 68 0 17 $533,697.51 Total 2,029 1,537 2 491 $35,184,127.07 Total losses – All losses submitted regardless of the status. Closed losses –Losses that have been paid. Open losses – Losses that have not been paid in full. CWOP losses – Losses that have been closed without payment. Total Payments – Total amount paid on losses. Source: Claim Information by State, https://bsa.nfipstat.fema.gov/reports/1040.htm#48. The tables below provide information about the repetitive loss and severe repetitive loss properties within the participating jurisdictions as of January 31, 2019. dŚĞƚLJƉĞƐŽĨƉƌŽƉĞƌƚŝĞƐĂƌĞŝĚĞŶƚŝĨŝĞĚŝŶƚŚĞ ŝŶĚŝǀŝĚƵĂůĂŶŶĞdžĞƐ͕ĂƐĂƉƉůŝĐĂďůĞ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϮ Repetitive Loss Properties Community name CID Total Payments Avg. Payment Losses Properties Arlington 485454 $3,889,452.43 $34,118.00 114 46 Azle 480584 $21,535.92 $10,767.96 2 1 Bedford 480585 $58,571.22 $5,857.12 10 5 Colleyville 480590 $599,369.37 $27,244.06 22 8 Crowley 480591 $220430.81 $55107.7 4 1 Dalworthington Gardens 481013 $36,535.65 $6,089.28 6 3 Edgecliff Village 480592 $41,616.15 $20,808.08 2 1 Euless 480593 $824,603.42 $24,253.04 34 14 Everman 480594 $59,488.23 $11,897.65 5 2 Forest Hill 480595 $94,672.35 $47,336.18 2 1 Fort Worth 480596 1,889,511.41 12,681.28 149 50 Grapevine 480598 479,318.89 22,824.71 21 10 Haltom City 480599 $2,769,530.21 $57,698.55 48 13 Keller 480602 $591,093.51 $23,643.74 25 8 Kennedale 480603 $24,266.13 $6,066.53 4 2 North Richland Hills 480607 $111,736.97 $11,173.70 10 4 Pantego 481116 $67,512.77 $13,502.55 5 2 Richland Hills 480608 $512,929.49 $15,543.32 33 9 Saginaw 480610 $10,825.99 $2,706.50 4 1 Southlake 480612 $142,182.06 $35,545.52 4 2 Tarrant County (unincorporated) 480582 $1,176,586.27 $21,392.48 55 16 Watauga 480613 $250,061.33 $8,622.80 29 12 Severe Repetitive Loss Properties Community name CID Total Payments Avg. Payment Losses Properties Arlington 485454 $102,089.39 $25,522.35 4 1 Euless 480593 $67,429.34 $16,857.33 4 1 Keller 480602 $297,060.09 $59,412.02 5 1 Tarrant County (unincorporated) 480582 $380,296.75 $27,164.05 14 2 The Community Rating System (CRS) is a voluntary program for communities that participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The goals of the CRS are to reduce flood damages to insurable property, strengthen and support the insurance aspects of the NFIP, and encourage a comprehensive approach to floodplain management. The CRS has been developed to provide incentives in the form of premium discounts for communities to go beyond the minimum floodplain management requirements to develop extra measures to provide protection from flooding. For a community to be eligible, it must be in full compliance with the NFIP. All communities start out with a Class 10 rating, which provides no discount. There are 10 CRS classes: Class 1 requires the most credit points and gives the greatest premium discount; Class 10 identifies a dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϯ community that does not apply for the CRS or does not obtain a minimum number of credit points and receives no discount. There are 18 activities recognized as measures for eliminating exposure to floods. Credit points are assigned to each activity. The activities are organized under 4 main categories: x Public Information x Mapping and Regulation x Flood Damage Reduction x Flood Preparedness Premium discounts ranging from 5% to a maximum of 45% are applied to eligible policies written in a community as recognition of the floodplain management activities instituted. All CRS communities must maintain completed FEMA elevation and floodproofing certificates for all new and substantially improved construction in the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) after the date of application for CRS classification. These certificates must be available upon request. Therefore, in writing a policy, an agent/producer should be able to get these certificates from any CRS community. In addition, some CRS communities receive credit for having completed certif icates for Post-Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) buildings constructed prior to the CRS application date. If they do receive this credit, these certificates should also be available to agents/producers writing flood insurance. The following participating jurisdictions in Tarrant County have CRS ratings. All other participating jurisdictions are not ranked. Community Rating System Eligible Communities Effective May 1, 2018 Community Number Community Name CRS Entry Date Current Effective Date Current Class % Discount for SFHA* % Discount for Non- SFHA Status** 485454 Arlington 10/1/91 05/1/18 6 20 10 C 480596 Fort Worth 10/1/12 10/1/12 8 10 5 C 480599 Haltom City 10/1/12 10/1/12 7 15 5 C 480601 Hurst 10/1/92 10/1/17 8 10 5 C 480607 North Richland Hills 10/1/91 10/1/16 7 15 5 C 480608 Richland Hills 05/1/14 05/1/14 8 10 5 C Source: October 2017 NFIP Flood Insurance Manual. For the purpose of determining CRS discounts, all AR and A99 zones are treated as non-SFHAs. *SFHA: Special Flood Hazard Area **Status: C = Current, R = Rescinded Participating jurisdictions describe details of their NFIP participation within their jurisdictional annex. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϰ 3.3.6 Thunderstorms A thunderstorm is a storm that consists of rain-bearing clouds and has the potential to produce hail, high winds, and lightning. Hail Hail occurs when, at the outgrowth of a severe thunderstorm, balls or irregularly shaped lumps of ice greater than 0.75 inches in diameter fall with rain. Early in the developmental stages of a hailstorm, ice crystals form within a low-pressure front due to warm air rising rapidly into the upper atmosphere and the subsequent cooling of the air mass. Frozen droplets gradually accumulate on the ice crystals until, having developed sufficient weight, they fall as precipitation. The TORRO scale for hail extends from H0 to H10 with its increments of intensity or damage potential related to hail size (distribution and maximum), texture, fall speed, speed of storm translation, and strength of the accompanying wind. An indication of equivalent hail kinetic energy ranges (in joules per square meter) has now been added to the first six increments on the scale, and this may be derived from radar reflectivity or from hail pads. The International Hailstorm Intensity Scale recognizes that hail size alone is insufficient to accurately categorize the intensity and damage potential of a hailstorm, especially towards the lower end of the scale. For example, without additional information, an event in which hail of up to walnut size is reported (hail size code 3: hail diameter of 21-30 mm) would be graded as a hailstorm with a minimum intensity of H2-H3. Additional information, such as the ground wind speed or the nature of the damage the hail caused, would help to clarify the intensity of the event. For instance, a fall of walnut-sized hail with little or no wind may scar fruit and sever the stems of crops but would not break vertical glass and so would be ranked H2-H3. However, if accompanied by strong winds, the same hail may smash many windows in a house and dent the bodywork of a car, and so be graded an intensity as high as H5. However, evidence indicates maximum hailstone size is the most important parameter relating to structural damage, especially towards the more severe end of the scale. It must be noted that hailstone shapes are also an important feature, especially as the "effective" diameter of non-spheroidal specimens should ideally be an average of the coordinates. Spiked or jagged hail can also increase some aspects of damage. Below is the TORRO Hailstorm Intensity Scale (H0 to H10) in relation to typical damage and hail size codes. TORRO Hailstorm Intensity Scale Size Code Intensity Category Typical Hail Diameter (mm)* Probable Kinetic Energy, J-m2 Typical Damage Impacts H0 Hard Hail 5 0-20 No damage H1 Potentially Damaging 5-15 >20 Slight general damage to plants, crops dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϱ TORRO Hailstorm Intensity Scale Size Code Intensity Category Typical Hail Diameter (mm)* Probable Kinetic Energy, J-m2 Typical Damage Impacts H2 Significant 10-20 >100 Significant damage to fruit, crops, vegetation H3 Severe 20-30 >300 Severe damage to fruit and crops, damage to glass and plastic structures, paint and wood scored H4 Severe 25-40 >500 Widespread glass damage, vehicle bodywork damage H5 Destructive 30-50 >800 Wholesale destruction of glass, damage to tiled roofs, significant risk of injuries H6 Destructive 40-60 Bodywork of grounded aircraft dented, brick walls pitted H7 Destructive 50-75 Severe roof damage, risk of serious injuries H8 Destructive 60-90 Severe damage to aircraft bodywork H9 Super Hailstorms 75-100 Extensive structural damage, risk of severe or even fatal injuries to persons caught in the open H10 Super Hailstorms >100 Extensive structural damage, risk of severe or even fatal injuries to persons caught in the open *Approximate range (typical maximum size in bold), since other factors (e.g. number and density of hailstones, hail fall speed, and surface wind speeds) affect severity. Wind Straight-line winds are often responsible for the wind damage associated with a thunderstorm. These winds are often confused with tornadoes because of similar damage and wind speeds. However, the strong and gusty winds associated with straight-line winds blow roughly in a straight line, unlike the rotating winds of a tornado. Downbursts or micro-bursts are examples of damaging straight-line winds. A downburst is a small area of rapidly descending rain and rain-cooled air beneath a thunderstorm that produces a violent, localized downdraft covering 2.5 miles or less. Wind speeds in some of the stronger downbursts can reach 100 to 150 miles per hour, which is similar to that of a strong tornado. The winds dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϲ produced from a downburst often occur in one direction and the worst damage is usually on the forward side of the downburst. The following Beaufort Wind Chart shows the description and scale used to classify the wind intensity in a thunderstorm. The scale is now rarely used by professional meteorologists, having been largely replaced by more objective methods of determining wind speeds—such as using anemometers, tracking wind echoes with Doppler radar, and monitoring the deflection of rising weather balloons and radiosondes from their points of release. Nevertheless, it is still useful in estimating the wind characteristics over a large area, and it may be used to estimate the wind where there are no wind instruments. The Beaufort scale also can be used to measure and describe the effects of different wind velocities on objects on land or at sea. The Beaufort Scale of Wind (Nautical) Beaufort Number Name of Wind Wind Speed knots kph 0 Calm <1 <1 1 Light air 1–3 1–5 2 Light breeze 4–6 6–11 3 Gentle breeze 7–10 12–19 4 Moderate breeze 11–16 20–28 5 Fresh breeze 17–21 29–38 6 Strong breeze 22–27 39–49 7 Moderate gale (or near gale) 28–33 50–61 8 Fresh gale (or gale) 34–40 62–74 9 Strong gale 41–47 75–88 10 Whole gale (or storm) 48–55 89–102 11 Storm (or violent storm) 56–63 103–114 12–17 Hurricane 64 and above 117 and above Lightning Lightning results from the buildup and discharge of electrical energy between positively and negatively charged areas within thunderstorms. A “bolt” or brilliant flash of light is created when the buildup becomes strong enough. These bolts of lightning can be seen in cloud-to-cloud or cloud-to-ground strikes. Bolts of lightning can reach temperatures approaching 50,000°F. While lightning is mostly affiliated with dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϳ thunderstorms, lightning often strikes outside of these storms, as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. FEMA states that an average of 300 people are injured and 80 people are killed in the United States each year by lighting. Direct strikes have the power to cause significant damage to buildings, critical facilities, infrastructure, and the ignition of wildfires which can result in widespread damages to property and persons. Lightning is the most significant natural contributor to fires affecting the built environment. The lightning activity level (LAL) is a common parameter that is part of fire weather forecasts nationwide. LAL is a measure of the amount of lightning activity using values 1 to 6 where: LAL Cloud and Storm Development Lightning Strikes Per 15 Minutes 1 No thunderstorms - 2 Cumulus clouds are common but only a few reach the towering cumulus stage. A single thunderstorm must be confirmed in the observation area. The clouds produce mainly virga, but light rain will occasionally reach the ground. Lightning is very infrequent 1-8 3 Towering cumulus covers less than two-tenths of the sky. Thunderstorms are few, but two to three must occur within the observation area. Light to moderate rain will reach the ground and lightning is infrequent 9-15 4 Towering cumulus covers two to three-tenths of the sky. Thunderstorms are scattered and more than three must occur within the observation area. Moderate rain is common and lightning is frequent 16-25 5 Towering cumulus and thunderstorms are numerous. They cover more than three-tenths and occasionally obscure the sky. Rain is moderate to heavy and lightning is frequent and intense >25 6 Similar to LAL 3 except thunderstorms are dry According to the following map from the National Lightning Detection Network, jurisdictions in Tarrant County experience a flash density of 12-20 flashes per square mile, per year. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϱϵ The National Weather Service uses the following Storm Prediction Center (SPC) activity levels to represent severe weather outlooks. Tarrant County averages approximately 11 significant thunderstorm events (with hail and high winds) per year, according to National Weather Service (NWS) records. Though most new homes and buildings in participating jurisdictions are built to resist the effects of all but the strongest thunderstorms, a number of mobile and manufactured home parks and vehicles remain vulne rable. Thousands of homes and vehicles can be damaged in a single storm, causing millions of dollars in damages.12 12 State of Texas Mitigation Plan. 2013, page 72. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϬ 3.3.7 Tornadoes A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that comes in contact with the ground. A tornado can either be suspended from, or occur underneath, a cumuliform cloud. It is often, but not always, visible as a condensation funnel. The Enhanced Fujita Scale, or EF Scale, is the scale for rating the strength of tornadoes during the observed time period via the damage they cause. Six categories from EF0 to EF5 represent increasing degrees of damage. The scale takes into account how most structures are designed and is thought to be an accurate representation of the surface wind speeds in the most violent tornadoes. Enhanced Fujita Scale Enhanced Fujita Category Wind Speed in Miles Per Hour (MPH) Potential Damage EF0 65-85 Light damage. Peels surface off some roofs; some damage to gutters or siding; branches broken off trees; shallow-rooted trees pushed over. EF1 86-110 Moderate damage. Roofs severely stripped; manufactured homes overturned or badly damaged; loss of exterior doors; windows and other glass broken. EF2 111-135 Considerable damage. Roofs torn off well-constructed houses; foundations of frame homes shifted; manufactured homes completely destroyed; large trees snapped or uprooted; light object become projectiles; cars lifted off ground. EF3 136-165 Severe damage. Entire stories of well-constructed houses destroyed; severe damage to large buildings such as shopping malls; trains overturned; trees debarked; heavy cars lifted off the ground and thrown; structures with weak foundations blown away some distance. EF4 166-200 Devastating damage. Well-constructed houses and whole frame houses completely leveled; cars thrown and small projectiles generated. EF5 >200 Incredible damage. Strong frame houses leveled off foundations and swept away; automobile-sized projectiles fly through the air in excess of 300 feet. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϭ The highest likelihood of tornadoes can be expected in the spring season, from March-May. The previous chart shows 58 tornadoes during the spring season over the 1950-2018 time period. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϮ According to the charts above, most of the tornadoes in Tarrant County are classified as weak on the intensity scale and are rated as an EF0, but could escalate to an EF3 or potentially stronger. Most tornadoes occur in the afternoon to evening hours of the day, the chart above reflects a high amount of tornado occurences between the hours of 1200-2000 (12PM-8PM). dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϯ The picture above illustrates tornado tracks between 1950-2018. The strongest tornadoes in Tarrant County have been an EF3. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϰ Between 2015 and 2018, there have been 7 recorded tornadoes in Tarrant County, according to the chart above. According to the National Climatic Data Center, there has been over $1 million dollars of property damage from tornadoes in Tarrant County, with zero crop damage reported. Historical Events of Tornadoes since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Mag': Magnitude, 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location County Date Time Mag Dth Inj PrD CrD Hodge (non- participant) Tarrant 11/05/2015 16:08 EF0 0 0 120.00K 0.00K Keller Tarrant 11/17/2015 03:28 EF0 0 0 210.00K 0.00K Benbrook Lake (non-participant) Tarrant 03/08/2016 08:03 EF0 0 0 330.00K 0.00K Hicks (non- participant) Tarrant 03/23/2016 20:08 EF0 0 0 90.00K 0.00K Mansfield Tarrant 01/15/2017 20:13 EF0 0 0 75.00K 0.00K Hicks (non- participant) Tarrant 03/29/2017 01:08 EF0 0 0 300.00K 0.00K Fort Worth Blue Mound Airport Tarrant 03/29/2017 01:10 EF0 0 0 100.00K 0.00K Totals: 0 0 1.225M 0.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϱ 3.3.8 Wildfire Wildfire, or wildland fire, is any fire occurring on grassland, forest, or prairie, regardless of ignition source, damages, or benefits. Wildfires are fueled almost exclusively by natural vegetation. Interface or intermix fires are urban/wildland fires in which vegetation and the built environment provide fuel. Firestorms are events of such extreme intensity that effective suppression is virtually impossible. Firestorms occur during extreme weather and generally burn until conditions change or the available fuel is exhausted. Note: Though there have been numerous ignitions, Tarrant County does not classify wildfires as a hazard until they are 25 acres or larger. This is the point at which additional outside help may need to be called in through the use of mutual aid agreements. For the purposes of this hazard analysis, wildfires are assessed under what is known as the wildland-urban interface (WUI). The WUI is an area of development that is susceptible to wildfires due to the amount of structures located in an area with vegetation that can act a fuel for a wildfire. The WUI creates an environment in which fire can move readily between structural and vegetation fuels. The expansion of these areas has increased the likelihood that wildfires will threaten structures and people. Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Source: Texas Wildfire Risk. Wildfires can cause significant damage to property and threatens the lives of people who are unable to evacuate WUI areas. All improved property, critical facilities, and critical structures and infrastructure located in these wildfire-prone areas are considered vulnerable and can be exposed to this hazard. Jurisdictions that are not at risk to wildfires include ĞĚĨŽƌĚ͕ ůƵĚ DŽƵŶĚ͕Forest Hill, >ĂŬĞ tŽƌƚŚ͕ the North Central Texas Council of Governments, Pantego, Saginaw, Watauga, and Westworth Village ĚƵĞƚŽƚŚĞŝƌƵƌďĂŶŝnjĞĚůĂŶĚƐĐĂƉĞĂŶĚƋƵŝĐŬĨŝƌĞĚĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚƌĞƐƉŽŶƐĞƚŝŵĞ͘ No Data 1-LT 1 hs/40 ac 2-1 hs/40 to 1 hs/20 ac 3-1 hs/20 to 1 hs/10 ac 4-1 hs/10 to 1 hs/5 ac 5-1 hs/5 to 1 hs/2 ac 6-1 hs/2 to 3 hs/ac 7-GT 3 hs/ac *hs- house *ac- acre dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϲ Wildfire Threat Source: Texas Wildfire Risk. There were no reports of a wildfire event in Tarrant County from February 1, 2015 to November 1, 2017, according to the National Climatic Data Center. Data from the Texas Forest Service ends at 2015. No Data 1-Low 2 3-Moderate 4 5-High 6 7-Very High dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϳ 3.3.9 Winter Storms Winter storms originate as mid-latitude depressions or cyclonic weather systems, sometimes following the path of the jet stream. A winter storm or blizzard combines heavy snowfall, high winds, extreme cold, and ice storms. Many winter depressions give rise to exceptionally heavy rain and widespread flooding and conditions worsen if the precipitation falls in the form of snow. The winter storm season varies widely, depending on latitude, altitude, and proximity to moderating influences. The time period of most winter weather is expected to be during the winter season, between Nov ember and March. Winter storms affect the entire planning area equally. During periods of extreme cold and freezing temperatures, water pipes can freeze and crack, and ice can build up on power lines, causing them to break under the weight or causing tree limbs to fall on the lines. These events can disrupt electric service for long periods of time. An economic impact may occur due to increased consumption of heating fuel, which can lead to energy shortages and higher prices. Schools often close when severe winter weather is forecasted, and it becomes a logistics burden for parents who then have to miss work or find alternative child care. House fires and resulting deaths tend to occur more frequently from increased and improper use of alternate heating sources. Fires during winter storms also present a greater danger because water supplies may freeze and impede firefighting efforts. Cold snaps in which temperatures fall below the freezing point of 32°F do happen on an annual basis in the Tarrant County and are highlighted in the table below. Dallas/Fort Worth Freeze Data and Cold Season Temperatures Season First Occurrence Equal or Less Than: Low for Winter (°F) Last Occurrence Equal or Less Than: Number of Freezes 32°F 20°F 10°F 10°F 20°F 32°F 2017- 2018 December 07 January 01 - 13 - January 18 February 12 25 2016- 2017 December 08 December 18 - 14 - January 08 January 08 11 2015- 2016 November 22 - - 27 - - February 26 17 2014- 2015 November 12 January 08 - 16 - January 08 March 07 40 Source: National Weather Service- Dallas/Fort Worth- Freeze Data and Cold Season Temperatures. The following article highlights the severe impacts of winter weather in North Central Texas and Tarrant County. Though this article is from the 2013 storm, it describes what Tarrant County could experience again. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϴ National Weather Service: North Texas Snowfall Events December 5-6, 2013 A winter storm affected much of North and Central Texas for an extended period from December 5th through the 10th. A combination of freezing rain, sleet, and a little snow began falling during the day on the 5th and continued through the morning hours of the 6th. As the ice and sleet settled on the 6th, a thick layer of ice paralyzed most of the area north of a line from Goldthwaite to Cleburne to Ennis to Sulphur Springs. In this area, accumulations of sleet and ice measured up to 5" with the highest amounts from Denton to Sherman to Bonham. Temperatures remained below freezing until the 9th and 10th resulting in a prolonged winter event. Most residents were forced to remain at home for several days. A new term, coined "cobblestone ice," was used to describe the condition of the ice on the interstates and highways due to the compaction of ice and sleet. NBC 5 News captured "cobblestone ice" on North Texas roads. South of this area, lighter amounts of icing occurred producing mainly icy bridges, overpasses, and elevated surfaces. As a result of the ice storm, significant tree damage occurred with thousands of tree branches falling under the weight of the ice. Power lines were also brought down, and at the peak of the storm, 275,000 customers were without power in the North Texas region. Most schools, especially in the hardest hit areas, were closed for several days. Some businesses were forced to close for a day or two also. Hundreds of injuries were reported due to falls on the ice but exact numbers were not available. Seven fatalities occurred during this event; 4 in vehicles, 2 from exposure, and 1 from a fall on the ice. Early estimates from the insurance council estimated $30 million in residential insured loses. The estimate did not include damage to vehicles or roads. Many roads and bridges were damaged from the ice and/or from attempts by Texas Department of Transportation to remove the ice using plows and graders. Hundreds of people and semi-trucks were stranded for long periods on many of the main highways and interstates including I-35 from Fort Worth to the Oklahoma border and Interstate 20 from Fort Worth going west in Tarrant County. The clean-up from this event took weeks and even a few months is some places.13 13 North Texas Snowfall Events 2013-1879, National Weather Service. <https://www.weather.gov/fwd/snowevents> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϲϵ Though there has not been a major winter event recorded since this 2013 example, a severe winter storm happening in the next five years cannot be ruled out, as weather patterns have been evolving along with the change in climate, mentioned earlier. The following scale was used to determine the extent of winter conditions: Historical Events of Winter Weather since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location Date Time Type Dth Inj PrD CrD Tarrant (Zone) 02/28/2015 21:30 Winter Weather 0 0 15.00K 0.00K Tarrant (Zone) 03/04/2015 20:26 Winter Weather 0 0 0.00K 0.00K Tarrant (Zone) 03/05/2015 00:30 Winter Weather 0 0 0.00K 0.00K Totals: 0 0 15.00K 0.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϬ Historical Events of Winter Storm since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location Date Time Type Dth Inj PrD CrD Tarrant (Zone) 02/22/2015 18:30 Winter Storm 0 0 25.00K 0.00K Totals: 0 0 25.00K 0.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. Historical Events of Sleet since 2015 Column Definitions: 'Dth': Deaths, 'Inj': Injuries, 'PrD': Property Damage, 'CrD': Crop Damage Location Date Time Type Dth Inj PrD CrD Tarrant (Zone) 03/04/2015 19:00 Sleet 0 0 0.00K 0.00K Tarrant (Zone) 03/04/2015 20:00 Sleet 0 0 10.00K 0.00K Totals: 0 0 10.00K 0.00K Source: National Centers for Environmental Information. In total, property damage from the various hazards within a winter storm totals $50,000 since 2015. 3.4 Technological Hazards Some participating jurisdictions have chosen to analyze technological hazards that impact them. Technological hazards are an increasing source of risk to people and their environment. This is an effect of the globalization of production, an increase of industrialization and a certain level of risk related to accidents connected with production, processes, transportation, and waste management. These risks are associated with the release of substances in accident conditions or with the production of such substances under certain conditions as fire. These substances could affect human health or the environment by contamination and their effects on animals and plants.14 Examples of technological hazards include hazardous material events, infectious disease outbreaks, national security hazards, nuclear accidents, power failure, and telecommunication failure. The jurisdictions that chose to profile technological hazards identified and described technological hazards within their individual annex. 14 Technological Hazard. American Red Cross. 2017. <https://www.preparecenter.org/topics/technological-hazard> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϭ 3.5 Vulnerabilities Vulnerabilities can be social, environmental, economic, or political in nature. These vulnerabilities in turn have various impacts. We know that, by definition, disasters are capable of causing death and injury. We also know that housing and schools may be destroyed. These particular losses may be considered to be social impacts, as they affect the ability of individuals and families to function. With regard to negative environmental impacts, if a community contains important ecological sites (e.g., the site of a unique flora or fauna habitat), then these areas may be extremely vulnerable to almost any sort of disaster. There is monetary loss, or negative economic impact, whenever buildings, non-structural property, or infrastructure is damaged or destroyed. These losses can also result in loss of jobs, loss of economic stability, and loss of services (e.g., power). The more vulnerable the community is to these types of losses, the greater the economic vulnerability to a disaster. The ability of the community to influence policy makers to reduce vulnerabilities is critical. A disaster entails political impacts. After a disaster has struck, a community often turns to its politicians when looking for guidance. Vulnerabilities may be considered in terms of the individual, the location, the capacity to respond, and the time of day, week, or year. The definition of vulnerability is “the susceptibility of people, property, industry, resources, ecosystems, or historic buildings and artifacts to the negative impact of a disaster.” The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) conducted a risk assessment to determine vulnerabilities in their jurisdictions. Vulnerabilities within each participating jurisdiction are specified in the individual annexes. Below is an overview of vulnerabilities within Tarrant County, including national critical facilities, federally protected species, historic properties, and local critical facilities and infrastructure. 3.5.1 National Critical Facilities and Infrastructure A critical facilities and infrastructure provides services and functions essential to a community, especially during and after a disaster. For a critical facility to function, building systems and equipment must remain operational. Furthermore, it must be supplied with essential utilities (typically power, water, waste disposal, and communications, but occasionally natural gas and steam). According to the Department of Homeland Security, there are 16 critical infrastructure sectors whose assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, are considered so vital to the United States that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination thereof. x Chemical Sector x Commercial Facilities Sector x Communication Sector x Critical Manufacturing Sector x Dams Sector x Defense Industrial Base Sector x Emergency Services Sector x Energy Sector x Financial Services Sector x Food and Agriculture Sector x Government Facilities Sector x Healthcare and Public Health Sector x Information Technology Sector x Nuclear Reactors, Materials, and Waste Sector x Transportation Sector x Water and Wastewater Systems Sector dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϮ Critical facilities and infrastructure on a national scale impact the participating jurisdictions in Tarrant County and the entire United States. While many of these facilities and infrastructure are documented in the regional Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA), the following sites are unique national critical facilities located in a few of the participating jurisdictions. EPA National Priorities List of Superfund Sites The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Superfund program is responsible for cleaning up some of the nation’s most contaminated land and responding to environmental emergencies, oil spills, and natural disasters. To protect public health and the environment, the Superfund program focuses on making a visible and lasting difference in communities, ensuring that people can live and work in healthy, vibrant places. The EPA National Priorities List (NPL) is the list of sites of national priority among the known releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants throughout the United States and its territories. The NPL is intended primarily to guide the EPA in determining which sites warrant further investigation.15 According to the list, there are two superfund sites in Tarrant County. They are identified by yellow diamonds in the map below: The following pictures reflect the details of the two superfund sites in Tarrant County. 15 Superfund: National Priority List (NPL). United States Environmental Protection Agency. <https://www.epa.gov/superfund/superfund-national-priorities-list-npl> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϯ 1. Sandy Beach Road Ground Water Plume, Azle, Texas dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϰ 2. Air Force Plant #4 (General Dynamics), Fort Worth, Texas dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϱ 3.5.2 Natural Environment- Federally Protected Species Texas Parks & Wildlife established a list of federally and state protected species within Tarrant County. All species on the county list are tracked in the Texas Natural Diversity Database (TXNDD). Species include birds, fishes, mammals, mollusks, and reptiles.16 This list is provided in Appendix B. Currently, there are no regional plans related to the future of North Texas’ natural assets of habitat, plants, animals, open space areas and corridors, tree canopy or carbon footprint. This includes Tarrant County. There are studies of particular topics that have been conducted for other purposes. For example, the Environmental Impact Statement of an individual project considers the project’s impact on endangered species. Also, there are studies underway on particular topics but for smaller areas within the North Texas region.17 Under Section 12.0011 of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Code, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) is charged with "providing recommendations that will protect fish and wildlife resources to local, state, and federal agencies that approve, permit, license, or construct developmental projects" and "providing information on fish and wildlife resources to any local, state, and federal agencies or private organizations that make decisions affecting those resources." Project types reviewed by TPWD include reservoirs, highway projects, pipelines, urban infrastructure, utility construction, renewable energy, and residential and commercial construction, as well as many others. 3.5.3 Historic Buildings and Districts Historic landmarks and districts are important to consider when evaluating vulnerabilities to hazards. What is historic, and worth saving, varies with the beholder. “Historic” applies to a building that’s part of a community’s tangible past. Creating and expanding historic districts can increase property values, strengthen neighborhoods, provide an incentive for rehabilitating historic buildings, and promote a sense of neighborhood and community pride. According to the Texas Historic Sites Atlas, Tarrant County has 124 cemeteries, 32 museums, and 392 historical markers listed in the atlas. There are also 6 state antiquities landmarks, 115 national register properties, and 6 courthouses on the list.18 There is a list of historic sites in Tarrant County from the National Register of Historic Places located in Appendix B. 3.5.4 Local Critical Facilities and Infrastructure This hazard mitigation action plan (HazMAP) provides enough information regarding critical facilities to enable the jurisdiction to identify and prioritize appropriate mitigation actions. However, some information may be deemed highly sensitive and should not be made available to the public. Information jurisdictions consider sensitive should be treated as an addendum to the mitigation plan so that it is still a part of the plan, but access can be controlled. 16 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Wildlife Division, Diversity and Habitat Assessment Programs. TPWD County Lists of Protected Species and Species of Greatest Conservation Need. Tarrant County 30 December 2016. 17 North Texas to 2030: Extending the Trends. Vision North Texas. 18 Texas Historical Sites Atlas. 2015. Texas Historical Commission. <https://atlas.thc.state.tx.us/> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϲ Jurisdictional annexes provide this information and/or instructions regarding how this information can be obtained. 3.6 Extent The scale used to determine the maximum probably extent of each hazard is described below. The extent for each natural hazard, defined as the maximum strength of the hazard, in the jurisdictions is documented within the individual annexes. Extent Scale Minor Medium Major Drought PDSI -1.99 to 1.99+ PDSI -2.00 to -2.99 PDSI -3.00 to -5.00 Earthquake Mercalli Scale: I-V Richter Scale: 0-4.8 Mercalli Scale: VI-VII Richter Scale: 4.9-6.1 Mercalli Scale: VIII-XII Richter Scale: 6.2-8.1+ Expansive Soils EI Expansion Potential: 21- 50 (Low) EI Expansion Potential: 0-21 (Very Low) EI Expansion Potential: 51-90 (Medium) EI Expansion Potential: 91-130 (High) EI Expansion Potential: >130 (Very High) Extreme Heat Heat Index 80F-105F Heat Index 105F-129F Heat Index >130F Flooding Outside of 100yr and 500yr Flood Zones, Zone A, AE, X 500yr Flood Zone, Zone X 100yr Flood Zone, Zone AE, A Thunderstorm Hail: H0-H4, 5-40mm Wind Force: 0-3 Knots: <1-10 LAL: 1-2 Hail: H5-H6, 30-60mm Wind Force: 4-6 Knots: 11-27 LAL: 3-4 Hail: H7-H10, 50- >100mm Wind Force: 8-12 Knots: 28-64+ LAL: 5-6 Tornado EF0 EF1-EF2 EF3-EF5 Wildfire KBDI 0-200 KBDI 200-400 KBDI 600-800 Winter Storms Temperatures 40F to 35F Wind chill 36F to 17F Temperatures 30F to 20F Wind chill 25F to -4F Temperatures 15F to - 45F Wind chill 7F to -98F dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϳ Section 4: Mitigation Strategy Requirement §201.6(c)(3) [The plan shall include the following:] A mitigation strategy that provides the jurisdiction’s blueprint for reducing the potential losses identified in the risk assessment, based on existing authorities, policies, programs, and resources, and its ability to expand on and improve these existing tools. §201.6(c)(3)(i)[The hazard mitigation strategy shall include a] description of mitigation goals to reduce or avoid long-term vulnerabilities to the identified hazards. §201.6(c)(3)(iii)[The hazard mitigation strategy shall include a] section that identifies and analyzes a comprehensive range of specific mitigation actions and projects being considered to reduce the effects of each hazard, with particular emphasis on new and existing buildings and infrastructure. All plans approved by FEMA [Federal Emergency Management Agency] after October 1, 2008, must also address the jurisdiction’s participation in the NFIP [National Flood Insurance Program], and continued compliance with NFIP requirements, as appropriate. §201.6(c)(3)(iv)[The hazard mitigation strategy shall include an] action plan, describing how the action identified in paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section will be prioritized, implemented, and administered by the local jurisdiction. Prioritization shall include a special emphasis on the extent to which benefits are maximized according to a cost benefit review of the proposed projects and their associated costs. §201.6(c)(4)(ii)For multi-jurisdictional plans, there must be identifiable action items specific to the jurisdiction requesting FEMA approval or credit of the plan. [The plan shall include a] process by which local governments incorporate the requirements of the mitigation plan into other planning mechanisms such as comprehensive or capital improvements, when appropriate. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϴ 4.1 Mitigation Strategy The mitigation strategy serves as the long-term blueprint for reducing the potential losses identified in the risk assessment. The Stafford Act directs hazard mitigation plans to describe hazard mitigation actions and establish a strategy to implement those actions. Therefore, all other requirements for a hazard mitigation plan lead to and support the mitigation strategy. Individual jurisdictions adopted specific goals and strategies based on the needs of the jurisdiction. The following mitigation action items have been ranked by the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT). The HMPT went through a ranking process to determine which strategies they would prioritize for completion. To identify priorities, jurisdictions considered the scope and impact of action and completed a cost-benefit analysis for each action. Each participating jurisdiction recommended strategies that would benefit either the jurisdiction or the county as a whole. All project cost estimations are based on agency expertise by those submitting mitigation actions as well as previous project costs; however, many projects provided have not yet undergone the official benefit- cost analysis provided by FEMA. In these cases, jurisdictions derived the benefit cost per project based on a study conducted by the National Institute of Building Science. This study estimates that past 23 years of federally funded natural hazard mitigation has prevented approximately one million nonfatal injuries, 600 deaths, and 4,000 cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a total cost savings of $68 billion. The key findings of the report included that $1 spent on mitigation saves society an average of $6, with positive benefit-cost ratios for all hazard types studied.19 Therefore, to reflect the benefits of future projects, each estimated project was multiplied by 6 to represent the benefit of each mitigation strategy. Utilizing this information, in addition to their jurisdiction’s priorities, jurisdictions ranked their mitigation strategies and submitted them to the HMPT. 4.2 Funding Priorities As necessary, Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions will seek outside funding sources to implement mitigation projects in both the pre-disaster and post-disaster environments. When applicable, potential funding sources have been identified for proposed actions listed in the mitigation strategies. Funding priority will go toward action items with the high positive impact on community resilience as measured by the action’s scope and cost-benefit analysis. 4.3 Mitigation Goals The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team reviewed the previous Tarrant County mitigation goals and unanimously agreed to forego these goals and adopt the following hazard mitigation goals: “Our goals are to protect life and reduce bodily harm from natural hazards, and to lessen the impacts of natural hazards on property and the community through hazard mitigation.” 19 Multihazard Mitigation Council (2017) Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves 2017 Interim Report: An Independent Study. Principal Investigator Porter, K.; Co-Principal Investigators Scawthorn, C.; Dash, N.; Santos, J.; Investigators: Eguchi, M., Ghosh., S., Huyck, C., Isteita, M., Mickey, K., Rashed, T.;P. Schneider, Director, MMC. National Institute of Building Sciences, Washington. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϳϵ 4.4 Action Items A list of action items was identified by each jurisdictional Local Planning Team (LPT) and is located in the jurisdiction’s annex. Priority will go towards projects with the highest positive impact on community resilience, including life safety and property protection. Previous action items are also recorded in these annexes. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϬ Section 5: Jurisdictional Annexes Section 5 contains the individual jurisdictional annexes. The annexes were developed by each individual jurisdiction in order to provide a greater level of detail specific to the jurisdiction. Each annex contains five chapters. 1.Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the jurisdiction and contents of the annex. 2.Chapter 2 covers the planning process and those involved. Elements included in this chapter are the plan development and adoption process and the organization of the planning effort, including Local Planning Team (LPT) members. This fulfills requirements §201.6(c)(1)), §201.6(b)(2)), §201.6(b)(1)), §201.6(b)(3)), §201.6(c)(4)(iii)), and §201.6(c)(4)(i). 3.Chapter 3 provides the hazard identification and risk assessment. The assessment includes: the geographic area effected; future probability of occurrence; maximum probable extent; and vulnerability narratives, which identifies points of vulnerability in each jurisdiction for each hazard. Additionally, chapter three includes the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) compliance information. This fulfills requirements §201.6(c)(2)(i)), §201.6(c)(2)(ii)), §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(A)), §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(B)), §201.6(c)(2)(ii)(C)), and §201.6(c)(2)(iii). 4.Chapter 4 provides a summary of jurisdictional capabilities. Elements in this chapter include: legal and regulatory capabilities; administrative and technical capabilities; fiscal capabilities; and implementation capabilities, which fulfill requirement §201.6(c)(3). 5.Chapter 5 provides the jurisdictional mitigation strategies and action items. The elements included are mitigation goals and the action items associated with those goals, which fulfill requirements §201.6(c)(3)(ii)), §201.6(c)(3)(i)), §201.6(c)(3)(iv)), and §201.6(c)(3)(iii). dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϭ Jurisdictional annexes start on the following pages: A-1 City of Arlington B-1 City of Azle C-1 City of Bedford D-1 City of Blue Mound E-1 City of Colleyville F-1 City of Crowley G-1 City of Dalworthington Gardens* H-1 Town of Edgecliff Village* I-1 City of Euless J-1 City of Everman K-1 City of Forest Hill L-1 City of Fort Worth M-1 City of Grapevine N-1 City of Haltom City O-1 City of Haslet P-1 City of Hurst Q-1 City of Keller R-1 City of Kennedale S-1 City of Lake Worth T-1 Town of Lakeside U-1 City of Mansfield* V-1 North Central Texas Council of Governments W-1 City of North Richland Hills X-1 Town of Pantego* Y-1 City of Richland Hills Z-1 City of River Oaks* AA-1 City of Saginaw BB-1 City of Southlake CC-1 Unincorporated Tarrant County DD-1 University of North Texas Health and Science Center* EE-1 City of Watauga FF-1 Town of Westlake GG-1 City of Westworth Village *Jurisdictions that did not participate in the 2015 Tarrant County HazMAP. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϮ ϮϬϮϬ Town of Westlake JURISDICTIONAL ANNEX WITHIN THE TARRANT COUNTY HAZARD MITIGATION ACTION PLAN dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭ This page intentionally left blank. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮ Contents Chapter 1: Introduction ............................................................................................................................ - &&Ͳ5 - 1.1 Planning Process Point of Contact .................................................................................................. - &&Ͳ5 - 1.2 Annex Organization ......................................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ5 - 1.3 Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) Adoption ....................................................................... - &&Ͳ5 - 1.4 Supporting Maps ............................................................................................................................. - &&Ͳ5 - Chapter 2: Planning Process ................................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ11 - 2.1 Development and Adoption Process ............................................................................................ - &&Ͳ11 - 2.2 Organizing the Planning Effort ...................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ11 - Chapter 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment .......................................................................... - &&Ͳ13 - 3.1 Changes in Development since 2015 ............................................................................................ - &&Ͳ13 - 3.2 Community Profile ........................................................................................................................ - &&Ͳ13 - 3.3 Natural Hazard Profiles ................................................................................................................. - &&Ͳ16 - 3.4 Historical Events ............................................................................................................................ - &&Ͳ32 - 3.5 Overall Vulnerability ..................................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ32 - Chapter 4: Capabilities Assessment ........................................................................................................ - &&Ͳ33 - Chapter 5: Mitigation Strategy ............................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ37 - 5.1 Mitigation Goals ............................................................................................................................ - &&Ͳ37 - 5.2 2015 Action Items ......................................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ37 - 5.3 New Action Items .......................................................................................................................... - &&Ͳ57 - 5.4 Plan Incorporation into Existing Planning Mechanisms ................................................................ - &&Ͳ64 - dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯ This page intentionally left blank. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϰ Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 Planning Process Point of Contact The point of contact during the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) planning process for the Town of Westlake was the Emergency Management Coordinator. 1.2 Annex Organization This annex has five chapters that satisfy mitigation requirements in 44 CFR Part 201: Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Planning Process Chapter 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Chapter 4: Capabilities Assessment Chapter 5: Mitigation Strategy The information provided in this annex is for the Town of Westlake alone. All pertinent information that is not identified in this annex is identified in the other sections of this HazMAP or within the respective appendices. 1.3 Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) Adoption Once the Tarrant County HazMAP has received the designation “Approved Pending Local Adoption” from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Town of Westlake will take the HazMAP to Town Council for final public comment and local adoption. A copy of the resolution will be inserted into the HazMAP and held on file at the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). 1.4 Supporting Maps The following maps provide an overview of the Town of Westlake: x Development Activities Map x Land Use Plan Map x Parks and Open Space Plan Map x Residential Subdivisions Map x Planned Developments Map dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&ͲϭϬ Chapter 2: Planning Process (In compliance with 201.6(c)(1)) 2.1 Development and Adoption Process To apply for federal aid for technical assistance and post-disaster funding, local jurisdictions must comply with Part 201.3 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (DMA 2000) implemented in the Federal Code of Regulations 44 CRF Part 201.6. While the Town of Westlake has historically implemented measures to reduce vulnerability to some hazards, passage of DMA 2000 helped town officials recognize the benefits of a long-term approach to hazard mitigation. This approach is achieved by a gradual decrease of hazard- associated impacts through the implementation of a hazard mitigation action plan (HazMAP). The town’s involvement in the Tarrant County HazMAP represents the collective efforts of the Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) members, all participating Local Planning Team (LPT) members, the public, and stakeholders. The town developed this annex in accordance with Part 201.6(c)(5) of DMA 2000. This HazMAP and annex identifies hazards and mechanisms to minimize damages associated with these hazards. 2.2 Organizing the Planning Effort A comprehensive approach was taken in developing the HazMAP. An open involvement process was established for the public and all stakeholders, which provided an opportunity for everyone to be involved in the planning process and make their views known. The public meeting was advertised with notices in the local newsletter and on social media. Two teams worked simultaneously on this Tarrant County HazMAP: 1.Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT): This team consisted of points of contact from each participating jurisdiction. The HMPT met to discuss county-wide topics, including hazards and mitigation strategies. The points of contact were the leads of their Local Planning Team (LPT). 2.Local Planning Team (LPT): Each jurisdiction had a LPT that consisted of the Emergency Management Coordinator for that jurisdiction as well as designated representatives from within the jurisdiction. This team met to assess capabilities, hazards, and mitigation strategies within the jurisdiction. 2.2.1 Local Planning Team (LPT) This annex within the Tarrant County HazMAP was developed by the Town of Westlake’s Local Planning Team (LPT), with support from the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). The efforts of the LPT were led by the town’s Emergency Management Coordinator. The LPT was assembled in 2017 with representatives from the Town of Westlake. The town acted as the plan development consultant, providing hazard mitigation planning services. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϭ Town of Westlake Local Planning Team (LPT) Members for the ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Jurisdiction Agency/Organization Position Role in LPT Town of Westlake Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department Emergency Management Coordinator General oversight, hazard identification, and plan development Town of Westlake Fire/EMS Department Fire Chief Hazard identification and plan development Town of Westlake Fire/EMS Department Deputy Fire Chief Hazard identification and plan development Town of Westlake Fire/EMS Department Assistant Emergency Management Coordinator Hazard identification and plan development Town of Westlake Public Works Department Public Works Director Hazard identification and plan development Town of Westlake Economic Development Assistant to Town Manager Hazard identification and plan development In addition, NCTCOG’s Emergency Preparedness Department participated in the following activities associated with development, approval, and adoption of the plan: 1.Prepared, based on community input and LPT direction, the first draft of the plan and provided technical writing assistance for review, editing, and formatting. 2.Submitted proposed plan to the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for review and approval and completed any edits requested by these organizations. 3.Coordinated plan adoption processes with the town, TDEM, and FEMA. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϭϮ Chapter 3: Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (In compliance with 201.6(c)(2)(i), 201.6(c)(2)(ii), 201.6(c)(2)(ii)(A), 201.6(c)(2)(ii)(B), 201.6(c)(2)(ii)(C), 201.6(c)(2)(iii), and 201.6(c)(3)(ii)) The following information serves to assist the town in determining and prioritizing appropriate mitigation action items to reduce losses from identified hazards. 3.1 Changes in Development since 2015 (In compliance with 201.6(d)(3)) Increasing Vulnerability New development in hazard-prone areas: There has been no recorded change since 2015. Decreasing Vulnerability Mitigation actions implemented to reduce risk or adopted codes to protect future development: Adopted the 2015 International Building and Fire Codes in January, 2017. A full list of completed mitigation actions items are described in Chapter 5 of this annex. 3.2 Community Profile The following tables reflect the community profile, vulnerable facilities in the jurisdiction, and the critical facilities and infrastructure that are exposed to the identified hazards and have the potential to be impacted. This information was gathered from the United States Census and from the Town of Westlake. Community Profile from US Census Bureau Quick Facts (Source-www.census.gov) Population Estimates (V2016) 1,483 Persons under 5 years (%) Data unavailable Persons 65 years and over (%) Data unavailable Language other than English spoken at home (%) Data unavailable With a disability, under age 65 (%) Data unavailable Persons without health insurance, under age 65 (%) 1.1 Persons in poverty (%) 5.6 Median household income $250,000+ Households, 2012-2016 382 Median value of owner-occupied housing units, 2012-2016 $1,604,900 The critical and vulnerable facilities listed below are in the hazard area for all or some of the hazards identified in the Town of Westlake. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϯ Town of Westlake Critical and Vulnerable Facility/Asset Inventory Facility/Asset Name or Description and Address Type of Asset Capacity Square Feet Structure Value Content Value Solana Business Complex Government / Commercial 1,100 people 2,128,001 $259,959,403 $129,979,500 Westlake Water Pump /Storage Station Utility 2 people N/A $4,000,000 $4,800,000 Fidelity Investments Commercial 4,500 people 3,054,288 $141,135,543 $70,567,500 Deloitte University Commercial 3,000 people 765,000 $139,130,626 $68,000,000 Westlake Fire Station (Temporary Structures) Fire Rescue 20 people 4,500 $300,000 $4,500,000 Westlake Academy Primary / Secondary Charter School 660 people 55,704 $6,662,849 $3,386,520 Additional critical facilities and assets are shown on the following map. Capacity, square feet, structure value, and content value were not available for most locations on this map. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϭϱ 3.3 Natural Hazard Profiles The Town of Westlake’s Local Planning Team (LPT) ranked potential hazards in order of risk, with 1 being the highest. Risk, for the purposes of hazard mitigation planning, is the potential for damage or loss created by the interaction of natural hazards with community assets. If a natural hazard does not and could not impact the Town of Westlake in any way, not applicable (N/A) is used as its rank and its reasoning is noted in the hazard profile section of this chapter. Rank of Risk Natural Hazard 1 Thunderstorm (includes hail, wind, lightning) 2 Tornado 3 Wildfire 4 Winter Storms 5 Flooding 6 Extreme Heat 7 Drought 8 Earthquake 9 Expansive Soils The following terms are used to describe the geographic area affected, probability of future occurrence, and the maximum probable extent. Geographic Area Affected „Negligible: Less than 10 percent of planning area. „Limited: 10 to 25 percent of planning area. „Significant: 25 to 75 percent of planning area. „Extensive: 75 to 100 percent of planning area. o Planning area refers to the entire Town of Westlake. Probability of Future Occurrence „Unlikely: Event possible in next 10 years. „Occasional: Event possible in next 5 years. „Likely: Event probable in next 3 years. „Highly Likely: Event probable in next year. Maximum Probable Extent (Magnitude/Strength of Hazard using the following extent scale) „Minor: Limited classification on scientific scale, slow speed of onset or short duration of event. „Medium: Moderate classification on scientific scale, moderate speed of onset or moderate duration of event. „Major: Severe classification on scientific scale, fast speed of/immediate onset or long duration of event. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϲ Extent Scale Minor Medium Major Drought PDSI -1.99 to 1.99+ PDSI -2.00 to -2.99 PDSI -3.00 to -5.00 Earthquake Mercalli Scale: I-V Richter Scale: 0-4.8 Mercalli Scale: VI-VII Richter Scale: 4.9-6.1 Mercalli Scale: VIII-XII Richter Scale: 6.2-8.1+ Expansive Soils EI Expansion Potential: 21- 50 (Low) EI Expansion Potential: 0-21 (Very Low) EI Expansion Potential: 51-90 (Medium) EI Expansion Potential: 91-130 (High) EI Expansion Potential: >130 (Very High) Extreme Heat Heat Index 80F-105F Heat Index 105F-129F Heat Index >130F Flooding Outside of 100yr and 500yr Flood Zones, Zone A, AE, X 500yr Flood Zone, Zone X 100yr Flood Zone, Zone AE, A Thunderstorm Hail: H0-H4, 5-40mm Wind Force: 0-3 Knots: <1-10 LAL: 1-2 Hail: H5-H6, 30-60mm Wind Force: 4-6 Knots: 11-27 LAL: 3-4 Hail: H7-H10, 50- >100mm Wind Force: 8-12 Knots: 28-64+ LAL: 5-6 Tornado EF0 EF1-EF2 EF3-EF5 Wildfire KBDI 0-200 KBDI 200-400 KBDI 600-800 Winter Storms Temperatures 40F to 35F Wind chill 36F to 17F Temperatures 30F to 20F Wind chill 25F to -4F Temperatures 15F to - 45F Wind chill 7F to -98F The full description of each hazard identified is provided in Section 3 of this HazMAP. Location: Drought, earthquakes, expansive soils, extreme heat, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and winter storms do not have geographic boundaries and can impact the entire county equally, which includes all participating jurisdictions. Wildfires can be expected to threaten rural and urban jurisdictions with undeveloped land. Flooding is a severe threat to jurisdictions containing 100-year floodplains or bodies of water. The following hazards are listed in alphabetical order and describe the location and extent of each hazard, details of previous occurrences, probability data on future events, and vulnerability to each hazard. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϳ 3.3.1 Drought Hazard Profile: Drought Category Response Risk Ranking 7 Geographic Area Affected Negligible Probability of Future Occurrence Occasional Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Property damage Loss of water supply Increases grassfire potential and intensity Negative impact on citizens, to include water restrictions and lack of drinkable water supply Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard. Jurisdiction’s ground-water supply: City of Fort Worth. Any zoning districts which allow for agricultural uses such as commercial stables and barns, farms, and animal lots, which could be impacted by drought: No. Describe any water restrictions used in your jurisdiction: There is voluntary compliance in conjunction with the “Eye on Water” software. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϴ 3.3.2 Earthquake Hazard Profile: Earthquake Category Response Risk Ranking 8 Geographic Area Affected Negligible Probability of Future Occurrence Unlikely Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Injury or death Property and infrastructure damage Water contamination or loss via broken pipes Transportation and communication disruption or damage Increase in traffic accidents Building collapse Natural gas leak Misplaced residents Power outages Natural environments damage, to include protected species and critical habitats Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard, though impacts are undetermined due the lack of historical data. Past damage done to jurisdictional roads and critical infrastructure due to earthquakes, including where the damage occurred and how much it cost to fix: No prior earthquakes reported. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϭϵ 3.3.3 Expansive Soils Hazard Profile: Expansive Soils Category Response Risk Ranking 9 Geographic Area Affected Negligible Probability of Future Occurrence Unlikely Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Property damage due to foundation damage Water contamination or loss via broken pipes Building and infrastructure damage Road damage Transportation delays due to road condition Damage to utility lines Vulnerabilities Because of the manner in which data for expansive soils is collected, the amount of damages in the town was unavailable. Expansive soils are a major consideration to all existing and future structures. Past damage done to jurisdictional roads and critical infrastructure due to expansive soils, including in what part of your jurisdiction the damage occurred: No historical data was found of any damage to critical infrastructure or roads due to expansive soils. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϬ 3.3.4. Extreme Heat Hazard Profile: Extreme Heat Category Response Risk Ranking 6 Geographic Area Affected Extensive Probability of Future Occurrence Highly Likely Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Heatstroke or death. People should stay indoors to prevent heatstroke; elderly people who cannot afford air conditioning are at greatest risk Property damage Loss of water supply Increases grassfire potential and intensity Impact on logistics Power outages Road buckling Disruption in critical infrastructure operations Vehicle engine failure Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard. Most vulnerable populations to extreme heat in your jurisdiction and their location within your jurisdiction: Westlake is an affluent community, and does not have resident populations who are vulnerable to extreme heat. The vulnerable populations would only include daytime outdoor laborers (e.g. construction and landscape laborers). Are there cases of extreme heat exposure resulting from special events held in your jurisdiction? There have been few special events in Westlake and rare incidents of heat exposure. Have any critical facilities in your jurisdiction experienced any impacts from extreme heat (e.g., power failure due to heat)? No. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϭ 3.3.5 Flooding Hazard Profile: Flooding Category Response Risk Ranking 5 Geographic Area Affected Negligible Probability of Future Occurrence Unlikely Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Loss of electricity Loss of, or contamination of, water supply Loss of property Structure and infrastructure damage – flooded structures and eroded roads Misplaced residents Snakes migrate and mosquitoes increase Fire – as a result of loss of water supply Debris in transportation paths Emergency response delays Disruption of traffic can lead to impacts to the economy Natural environments damage, to include protected species and critical habitats Vulnerabilities Based on historical data, flooding has caused zero injuries and fatalities per year and is expected to have the same results in the future. All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard. Past damage done to jurisdictional roads and critical infrastructure due to flooding, including where in your jurisdiction the damage occurred: No damage has been reported since 2015. Does your jurisdiction require a permit for foundation repairs? If so, approximately how much money has been spent by citizens to repair properties damaged by flooding? Yes, though there is no historical data indicating this expense. Intersections or traffic routes impacted by flooding: Roanoke Road at Marshall Branch, J.T. Ottinger Road at Marshall Branch, and Dove Road at Kirkwood Branch and Higgins Branch. See low water crossings below. These roads have the potential to flood. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϮ Names of any creeks or rivers that flood: Marshall Branch, Higgins Branch, and Kirkwood Branch. Low Water Crossings: A low water crossing provides a type of bridge when water flow is low. Under high- flow conditions, water runs over the roadway and precludes vehicular and pedestrian traffic. These crossings can be dangerous when flooded. Crossings are identified with a yellow dot. Road Flooding Source Low Water Crossing Type 2200 Highway 377 Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2000 Highway 377 Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1800 Highway 377 Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2400 Roanoke Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 3600 Highway 170 Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2200 Roanoke Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2000 Roanoke Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1800 Roanoke Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 3700 Thornton Drive Marshall Branch Non-vented Ford 3200 J. T. Ottinger Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 3100 J. T. Ottinger Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2300 J. T. Ottinger Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2800 Highway 114 Marshall Branch Bridge 2900 Dove Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2400 Dove Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2400 King Fisher Drive Marshall Branch Bridge 2100 Highway 114 Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2200 Capital Parkway Marshall Branch Vented Ford 2200 Destiny Way Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1300 Davis Boulevard Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1300 Post Oak Place Marshall Branch Bridge dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϯ Road Flooding Source Low Water Crossing Type 1800 Placid Oaks Place Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1500 Meandering Drive Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1800 Lakeshore Drive Marshall Branch Bridge 1800 Dove Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1700 Dove Road Marshall Branch Vented Ford 1400 Solana Boulevard Kirkwood Branch Vented Ford 2000 Sam School Road Kirkwood Branch Vented Ford 1900 Sam School Road Kirkwood Branch Vented Ford 1400 Dove Road Higgins Branch Vented Ford 2000 Highway 114 Kirkwood Branch Vented Ford Low Water Crossing Types Defined: Bridges are open-bottom structures with elevated decks. They may be designed with one or several piers. Low water bridges generally have greater capacity and are able to pass higher flows underneath the driving surface than most vented and unvented fords. Vented fords have a driving surface elevated some distance above the streambed with culverts (vents) that enable low flows to pass beneath the roadbed. The vents can be one or more pipes, box culverts, or open-bottom arches. In streams carrying large amounts of debris, the driving surface over the vent may be removable, permitting debris to be cleared after a large flow event. National Flood Insurance Program Compliance Participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is based on a voluntary agreement between a community and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). For communities that adopt a floodplain management ordinance to reduce flood risks to new construction, federally backed flood insurance is made available to property owners in the community. Compliance with the NFIP, however, extends beyond mere participation in the program. The three basic components of the NFIP include: 1) floodplain identification and mapping risk, 2) responsible floodplain management, and 3) flood insurance. The Town of Westlake is a participant in the NFIP and provides details about the community and their participation below. The following information was requested: CID 480614# Community Name Town of Westlake Counties Tarrant and Denton Counties Initial FHBM Identified 12/10/76 Initial FIRM Identified 6/02/93 Current Effective Map Date 4/18/11 Reg-Emer Date 6/2/93 Tribal No Source: http://www.fema.gov/cis/TX.html. Who acts as your floodplain administrator/manager? Graham Associates, Inc. is the town's engineer and floodplain administrator. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϰ What specific flooding ordinances and plans does your jurisdiction have? Chapter 42-Floods, which includes mitigation efforts. What are the building requirements for properties located in a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA)? Must comply with Chapter 42, Article XI: Drainage, and FEMA. What building restrictions, in regards to floodplains, does your jurisdiction enforce? All town ordinances and 2015 International Building and Residential Codes. Repetitive and Severe Repetitive Loss Properties: There are no repetitive loss properties and severe repetitive loss properties within the Town of Westlake. Repetitive loss properties are those for which two or more losses of at least $1,000 each have been paid under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) within any 10-year period since 1978. Severe repetitive loss properties are residential properties that have at least four NFIP payments over $5,000 each and the cumulative amount of such claims exceeds $20,000, or at least two separate claims payments with the cumulative amount exceeding the market value of the building. There are 2 dams and 12 residential parcels located in the 100-year floodplain, according to the Public Works Department and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Department. The following National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) questions were answered to the best of the Town of Westlake’s ability. Insurance Summary NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments How many NFIP policies are in the community? What is the total premium and coverage? State NFIP Coordinator or FEMA NFIP Specialist Policies in-force: 19 Insurance in-force: $7,740,000 Written premium in-force: $12,820 How many claims have been paid in the community? What is the total amount of paid claims? How many of the claims were for substantial damage? FEMA NFIP or Insurance Specialist 7 losses, $111,200, none substantial NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments How many structures are exposed to flood risk within the community? Community Floodplain Administrator (FPA) None based on FIRM. Describe any areas of flood risk with limited NFIP policy coverage Community FPA and FEMA Insurance Specialist N/A Staff Resources NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments Is the Community FPA or NFIP Coordinator certified? Community FPA No. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϱ Is floodplain management an auxiliary function? Community FPA Yes. Provide an explanation of NFIP administration services (e.g. permit review, GIS, education or outreach, inspections, engineering capability) Community FPA Floodplain permit required and development in floodplain restricted by town ordinance. What are the barriers to running an effective NFIP program in the community, if any? Community FPA Town ordinances restrict development in floodplain. Compliance History NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments Is the community in good standing with the NFIP? State NFIP Coordinator, FEMA NFIP Specialist, community records Yes. Are there any outstanding compliance issues (i.e. current violations)? No. When was the most recent Community Assistance Visit (CAV) or Community Assistance Contact (CAC)? Unknown. Is a CAV or CAC scheduled or needed? No. Regulation NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments When did the community enter the NFIP? Community Status Book https://www.fema.gov/ national-flood- insurance-program- community-status-book 12/10/76 Are the FIRMs digital or paper? Community FPA Digital. Do floodplain development regulations meet or exceed FEMA or state minimum requirements? If so, in what ways? Community FPA Yes . Provide an explanation of the permitting process. Community FPA, State, FEMA NFIP Unknown. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϲ Flood Insurance Manual: https://www.fema.gov/ flood-insurance- manual. Community FPA, FEMA CRS Coordinator, ISO representative CRS Manual: https://www.fema.gov/ media- library/assets/documen ts/8768?id=2434 Community Rating System (CRS) NFIP Topic Source of Information Comments Does the community participate in CRS? Community FPA, State, FEMA NFIP No. The Town of Westlake will continue to address the gaps in data over the next five years and expand the capabilities of the NFIP program by implementing NFIP-related mitigation actions identified in Chapter 5 of this annex. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϳ 3.3.6 Thunderstorm Hazard Profile: Thunderstorm Category Response Risk Ranking 1 Geographic Area Affected Extensive Probability of Future Occurrence Likely Maximum Probable Extent Major Potential Impact Property damage to fences, vehicles, equipment, and roofs Transportation delays Injuries and deaths Debris from trees and damaged property Electrical grid problems Communication problems – phone and internet lines down Natural environments damage, to include protected species and critical habitats Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard. Westlake is a predominantly newer construction community, built to modern building standards that provide high levels of protection to the population. The vulnerable populations would only include daytime outdoor laborers (e.g. construction and landscape laborers). Past damage due to thunderstorms, and specifically, which hazard within the thunderstorm (hail, high wind, and lightning): No recorded damage has occurred since 2015. Number of homes lost due to lightning-induced fires: None. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϴ 3.3.7 Tornado Hazard Profile: Tornado Category Response Risk Ranking 2 Geographic Area Affected Limited Probability of Future Occurrence Occasional Maximum Probable Extent Major Potential Impact Injury or death Power outage Blocked roadways from trees and damaged property Natural gas pipeline breaks – fire injuries, possible deaths Transportation disruption Rerouting traffic Loss of property Structure and infrastructure damage Misplaced residents Natural environments damage, to include protected species and critical habitats Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments are exposed to this hazard. There are several corporate campuses with high occupancies. There is one educational campus of 800 students. Past damage done to your jurisdiction’s roads and critical infrastructure due to tornadoes, including where the damage occurred and how much it cost to repair: There have been no reports of a tornado since 2015. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϮϵ 3.3.8 Wildfire Hazard Profile: Wildfire Category Response Risk Ranking 3 Geographic Area Affected Significant Probability of Future Occurrence Occasional Maximum Probable Extent Medium Potential Impact Injury or death Property and fence damage Road closure Traffic accidents Loss of power – burning utility poles Loss of property Structure and infrastructure damage Misplaced residents Loss of resources Natural environments damage, to include protected species and critical habitats Vulnerabilities All populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments in the town are exposed to this hazard, though the majority of the population lives in affluent neighborhoods separated from the vulnerable areas. Most vulnerable location (North, East, South, West) of your jurisdiction? Westlake has approximately 70% of undeveloped land that is primarily grazing pasture. The areas of most concern are the fields throughout the town that are along the roadways and have the greatest chance of being in contact with an ignition source. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϯϬ 3.3.9 Winter Storm Hazard Profile: Winter Storm Category Response Risk Ranking 4 Geographic Area Affected Extensive Probability of Future Occurrence Occasional Maximum Probable Extent Minor Potential Impact Structural damage Injuries or death Power outages Loss of ability to use roads for driving Increased traffic accidents Loss of heat Stranded travelers / motels at full capacity Tree debris create fuel load for fire hazard Delayed emergency response time Frozen/ busted pipes leading to loss of water Disruption of traffic Impacts to the economy Communication capabilities decrease Vulnerabilities Given the dynamic nature of winter storms, all populations, economy, structures, improved property, critical facilities and infrastructure, and natural environments in the town are exposed to this hazard. Bridges and overpasses that can be impacted by a winter storm, including street names and their location within your jurisdiction: Highways 114, 170, and 377 overpasses. What impacts are caused when these bridges and/or overpasses are impacted by winter storms? Minor traffic issues due to having to slow down to navigate iced over bridges, potential traffic accidents. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϭ 3.4 Historical Events According to the National Centers for Environmental Information, there have been no natural hazards that have occurred in the Town of Westlake since 2015, though neighboring cities of Keller and Southlake have experienced a variety of events, including thunderstorms, flash flooding, and tornadoes. 3.5 Overall Vulnerability The Town of Westlake identified their greatest vulnerabilities and concerns: ƒCommuters and outside laborers are the most vulnerable to the damaging effects of all the identified hazards. Westlake has current building standards; therefore, existing or future structures experience minimal risk from thunderstorms, severe weather, and other natural hazards. In addition, the majority of current homes and facilities have installed lightning rods. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϯϮ Chapter 4: Capabilities Assessment (In compliance with 201.6(c)(3)) The following capability assessment examines the ability of the town to implement and manage a comprehensive mitigation strategy. Strengths, weaknesses, and resources of the jurisdiction are identified as a means to develop an effective Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP). The capabilities identified in this assessment were evaluated collectively to develop feasible recommendations, which support the implementation of effective mitigation activities. A questionnaire was distributed to the Town of Westlake’s Local Planning Team (LPT) to initiate this assessment. The survey included questions regarding existing plans, policies, and regulations that contribute to or hinder the ability to implement hazard mitigation activities, including: legal and regulatory capabilities; administrative and technical capabilities; and fiscal capabilities. Planning and Regulatory Assessment Type of Plans Have capability? Does the plan address hazards? Does the plan identify projects to include in the mitigation strategy? Can the plan be used to implement mitigation actions? Comprehensive/Master Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Capital Improvement Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Economic Development Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Local Emergency Operations Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Continuity of Operations Plan No Transportation Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Stormwater Management Plan Yes Yes; Yes; Yes Community Wildfire Protection Plan No Other Plans (e.g., disaster recovery, climate change adaptation) No Land Use Planning and Ordinances Have capability? Is the ordinance an effective measure for reducing hazard impacts? Is the ordinance adequately administered and enforced? Zoning Ordinance Yes Yes; Yes Subdivision Ordinance Yes Yes; Yes Floodplain Ordinance Yes Yes; Yes Flood Insurance Rate Maps Yes Yes; Yes Natural Hazard Specific Ordinance (e.g., stormwater, wildfire) Yes Yes; Yes Acquisition of land for open space and public recreation uses Yes Yes; Yes dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϯ Building Code, Permitting, and Inspections Have capability? Building Code Yes Version/Year: 2015 International Building Code Building Code Effectiveness Grading Schedule (BGEGS) Score No Fire Department ISO Rating Yes Rating: 2 Site Plan Review Requirements Yes Type(s) of requirement: With all new development Administrative and Technical Assessment Administration Have capability? Describe capability. Is coordination effective? Planning Commission Yes Planning and Zoning Commission; Yes Mitigation Planning Committee Yes Planning and hazard assessment; Yes Maintenance programs to reduce risk (e.g., tree trimming, clearing drainage systems) Yes Progressive landscape development standards and ordinance; Yes Mutual Aid Agreements Yes All neighboring communities; Yes Staff Have capability? FT/PT* Is staffing adequate to enforce regulations? Is staff trained on hazards and mitigation? Is coordination between agencies and staff effective? Chief Building Official FT Yes; Yes; Yes Floodplain Administrator PT Third Party: Yes; Yes; Yes Emergency Manager FT Yes; Yes; Yes Community Planner FT Yes; Yes; Yes Civil Engineer PT Third Party: Yes; Yes; Yes GIS Coordinator FT Yes; Yes; Yes Other: FT Public Works Director, Fire Marshal: Yes; Yes; Yes *Full-time (FT) or part-time (PT) position Technical Have capability? Describe capability. Has capability been used to assess or mitigate risk in the past? Warning Systems/Services (e.g., Reverse 911, outdoor warning signals) Yes CodeRed, Outdoor Warning System, Reverse 911; Yes Hazard data and information Yes Tier II Reporting; Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA); No Grant writing Yes Fire Chief; Yes HaZUS analysis No Other N/A dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϰ Education and Outreach Assessment Program or Organization Have capability? Describe program or organization and how it relates to disaster resilience and mitigation. Could the program or organization help implement future mitigation activities? Local citizen groups or non-profit organizations focused on environmental protection, emergency preparedness, access and functional needs populations, etc. Yes A corporate campus partners group hosts quarterly meetings; Yes Ongoing public education or information program (e.g., responsible water use, fire safety, household preparedness, environmental education) Yes Website, water bill mailings, public education activities, and social media; Yes Natural disaster or safety related school programs Yes Website, social media, and public education activities; Yes StormReady certification No Firewise Communities Certification No Public/private partnership initiatives addressing disaster- related issues No Other No Financial Assessment Funding Resources Have capability? Has the funding resource been used in past? If yes, for what type of activities? Could the resource be used to fund future mitigation actions? Capital Improvements project funding Yes Yes, street and culvert improvements, outdoor warning siren installation, and new fire station; Yes Authority to levy taxes for specific purposes Yes Yes, property tax implementation; Yes Fees for water, sewer, gas, and/or electric services Yes Yes, improved water, sewer, stormwater mitigation; Yes Impact fees for new development Yes Yes, new development; Yes Stormwater utility fee No Incurrence of debt through general obligation bonds and/or special tax bonds Yes Yes, new fire station; Yes Incur debt through private activities No dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϱ Community Development Block Grant No Other federal funding programs No State funding programs No Other How can any of these capabilities be expanded and improved to reduce risk? Actions that can expand and improve existing authorities, plans, polices, and resources for mitigation include: budgeting for mitigation actions; passing policies and procedures for mitigation actions; adopting and implementing stricter mitigation regulations; approving mitigation updates; and additions to existing plans as new needs are recognized. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϲ Chapter 5: Mitigation Strategy (In compliance with 201.6(c)(3)(i), 201.6(c)(3)(i), 201.6(c)(3)(ii), 201.6(c)(3)(iv), 201.6(c)(3)(iii), and 201.6(c)(4)(ii)) The mitigation strategy serves as the long-term blueprint for reducing the potential losses identified in the risk assessment. The Stafford Act directs local mitigation plans to describe hazard mitigation action and establish a strategy to implement those actions.1 Therefore, all other requirements for a local mitigation plan (or hazard mitigation action plan) lead to and support the mitigation strategy. 5.1 Mitigation Goals The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) collectively reviewed the extensive list of mitigation goals of the 2015 Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) and unanimously chose to streamline the mitigation goals for this update. Therefore, the new goals are to protect life and reduce bodily harm from natural hazards, and to lessen the impacts of natural hazards on property and the community through hazard mitigation. 5.2 2015 Action Items The Town of Westlake’s action items in the 2015 Tarrant County HazMAP were determined by the 2015 Local Planning Team (LPT). Below are the action items from the 2015 plan and the status of each action. 1 Section 322(b), Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5165. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϯϳ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes Ensure effective communications are in place for emergency situations in the Town of Westlake. Purchase and install town-wide outdoor warning sirens for severe weather events. 24 months Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management $90,000 $5,000,000 Town funds, state and federal grant programs, donor funding STATUS: Completed Purchase and install town-wide voice, e-mail, and smart device “all-hazard” warning system. 6 months Westlake Fire Department $3,000/ year $5,000,000 Town funds, state and federal grant programs, donor funding STATUS: Completed Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires Construct and equip permanent structure to serve as Fire Department/ Training Facility/ Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in the Town of Westlake. Perform design and financial study to determine facility requirements. 6 months Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management, Planning and Development Department $2,500 in staff time $10,000 Town funds STATUS: Completed Contract for engineering and design of facility. 3 months Outside Contractor $20,000 $80,000 Town funds, donor funds STATUS: Completed Construct and equip permanent 2 years Various Contractors $6,000,000 $24,000,000 Town funds, bonds, hazard dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϯϴ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources fire station/ training/ Emergency Operations Center facility. mitigation grants, state funds STATUS: In progress Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires Implement a multi-jurisdictional Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) system for both police and fire from Colleyville, Keller, Southlake, and Westlake (NETCOM). Survey the eight departments and ascertain need and want as well as determine the number of users needed. 7 months North East Tarrant County Communications (NETCOM) Unknown Unknown Unknown STATUS: Deleted- no longer an objective Determine vendor for purchase. 1 year NETCOM with a representative from all cities Unknown Unknown Unknown STATUS: Deleted- no longer an objective Purchase hardware for all jurisdictions. 16 months NETCOM $90,000 $360,000 Individual town budgets STATUS: Deleted- no longer an objective Purchase software for dispatch center and each unit. 2 years NETCOM $10,000 $40,000 Individual town budgets STATUS: Deleted- no longer an objective Severe Thunderstorms Ensure effective communications Provide Westlake homeowners with 12 months Town leadership, Westlake Fire $8,000 $5,000,000 Hazard mitigation dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϯϵ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires are in place for emergency situations in the Town of Westlake. weather alert radios. Department, Office of Emergency Management. matching grants, donor funds STATUS: Deleted due to alternative communications medium Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes Reduce property loss/damage due to high winds in the Town of Westlake. Mandate “storm hardened” construction guidelines in Westlake. 2 years Planning and Zoning Department, Planning Department, Permitting Office $5,000 $1,000,000/ year Internal STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Install wind resistant window shutters at Westlake Academy. 3 years Westlake Fire Department, management, school board $50,000 $100,000 Hazard mitigation grants STATUS: Deleted due to costs Dam Failure Mitigate flooding from dam failure in the Town of Westlake. Conduct inundation studies and develop Emergency Action Plans for all high 18 months Westlake Fire Department, Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management, Tarrant County $200,000 $500,000 Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP), private dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&ͲϰϬ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources hazard dams in Westlake. Office of Emergency Management (support) foundations, dam owner STATUS: Deleted due to reallocation of resources Conduct a search for previously unidentified high hazard dams in Westlake. 9 months Westlake Fire Department, Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management, Tarrant County Office of Emergency Management (support) $20,000 $80,000 The cost of this project is low compared to the potential benefits of locating previously unknown high hazard dams. STATUS: Deleted due to reallocation of resources Hail Ensure Town of Westlake citizens have information regarding hail resilience. Evaluate town buildings to determine feasibility of installing hail-resistant roofing and window coverings with a focus on critical infrastructure. 1 year Westlake Town Engineer $25,000 $100,000 Hazard mitigation grant sources, insurance industry partnerships, town funds STATUS: Deleted due to reallocation of resources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϭ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Hail Ensure Westlake citizens have information regarding hail resilience. Develop and implement a public education campaign to encourage “hail-resistant” roofing in new construction and roof replacements. 9 months Westlake Planning and Development Department, Westlake Fire Department $1,000 $250,000 HMGP, insurance industry partnerships STATUS: Completed Drought Mitigate drought in the Town of Westlake. Develop a contingency plan to identify potential impacts of drought on the community to include utilities such as power generation and drinking water; health and safety including pre-existing health conditions and special needs; and emergency response such as 1 year Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management, Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management , Tarrant County Office of Emergency Management (support) $10,000 $40,000 HMGP, private foundations, water suppliers dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&ͲϰϮ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources fire suppression operations. STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Drought Mitigate drought in the Town of Westlake. Participate in the design and implementation of the Tarrant County-specific water conservation public education efforts to complement existing programs. 1 year Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management, Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management , Tarrant County Office of Emergency Management (support) $1,000 $4,000 HMGP, private foundations, water suppliers STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources Drought Upgrade water and irrigation systems to conserve water in Town of Westlake facilities. Install efficient irrigation systems in new and existing town facilities. Annually Public Works Department $50,000 $250,000 Town budget, grant opportunities STATUS: Deleted due to lack of funding and resources Extreme Temperatures Reduce the loss of life and property Conduct a study to determine the feasibility of 1 year Tarrant County Public Health Department, $5,000 $20,000 HMGP, other state or dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϯ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources damage resulting from extreme heat in Westlake. expanding monitoring of populations at risk from extreme heat. Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management federal public health grants STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Extreme Temperatures Reduce the loss of life and property damage resulting from extreme heat in Westlake. Enhance public education concerning extreme heat/severe weather preparedness. 6 months Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management $2,000 $8,000 HMGP, town funds STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Expansive Soils Mitigate expansive soils in Westlake. Continue to improve construction techniques through building code enhancements. Previously implemented/ ongoing Planning and Development Department $1,000/ year $50,000/ year Internal funding sources STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Continue to educate construction contractors, homeowners, and business owners Previously implemented/ ongoing Planning and Development Department, Office of Emergency Management $1,000/ year $50,000/ year Internal funding sources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϰ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources about mitigation techniques. STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Tornadoes Reduce loss of life/injury resulting from tornadic weather events. Develop and adopt an outreach program promoting the construction and use of safe rooms by: ඵEncouraging theconstruction and use of safe rooms in homes, critical infrastructure, and other vulnerable public structures. ඵEncouragingbuilders and homeowners to locate tornado safe rooms inside or directly adjacent to houses to prevent injuries due to flying debris or hail. 2 years/ continuous Westlake Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management, Engineering Department $5,000 $2,000,000 Staff time, grants, donors STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϱ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Update Westlake building and construction codes and ensure that they require or encourage wind engineering measures and construction techniques. 2 years/ continuous Westlake Facilities Department, Engineering Department $5,000 $5,000,000 Staff time STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Purchase and activate town-wide outdoor warning sirens and emergency warning notification system with the ability to contact each resident phone, email, and smart devices. 6 months Westlake Fire Department, Westlake Office of Emergency Management $130,000 $5,000,000 Town budget STATUS: Completed Flooding Reduce potential for property loss due to flooding. Perform relocation and protection for all critical facilities and infrastructure 12 months/ continuous Westlake Facilities Department, Engineering Department $20,000 $1,500,000 Staff time, town budget, grants dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϲ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources that may lie within known or designated floodplain areas. STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Replace existing Ottinger Road bridge, located between Westlake Cemetery and State Highway 170. This bridge lies below historic flood levels and is regularly inundated. 48 months Westlake Facilities Department, Engineering Department $350,000 $1,000,000 Town budget STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds Mitigate loss of life and damage from severe thunderstorm or high wind events. Retrofit (where necessary) town-owned buildings and critical facilities to reduce future wind damage. 4 years Office of Emergency Management, Facilities Department, Engineering Department $10,000 $100,000 Grants, donor funding, insurance industry partnerships STATUS: Deleted due to cost and resources Update (where necessary) Westlake construction 5 years Planning and Permitting Department, Facilities $20,000 $1,000,000 Grants, insurance, industry partnerships dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϳ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources guidelines requiring that storm hardened and wind resistant materials and techniques are utilized. Department, Maintenance Department STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Hail Protect against property loss and loss of life or injury from hail events. Install hail-resistant roofing and siding, structural bracing, shutters, laminated glass window panes, and hail-resistant roof coverings where needed on town-owned buildings and critical infrastructure to minimize damage. 4 years Facilities Department, Engineering Department, Office of Emergency Management, Fire Department, Planning Department $30,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, donor, sources STATUS: Delete due to cost and resources Develop and adopt an outreach program to increase public awareness of hail 24 months/ continuous Office of Emergency Management, Facilities Department, Engineering $5,000 $20,000 HMGP, donor, sources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϴ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources dangers, including: ƒMailing safetybrochureswith monthlywater bills.ƒPost warningsignage atlocal parksand otheroutdoorvenues.ƒTeachingschoolchildrenabout thedangers ofhail and howto take safetyprecautions.Department, Utilities Department STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϰϵ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Lightning Protect against property loss and injury or death form lightning strikes. Protect critical facilities and infrastructure from lighting damage with the following measures: ƒInstallinglightning protection devices such as lightning rods and grounding, on communications infrastructure and other critical facilities. 36 months/ continuous Maintenance Department, Facilities Department, Engineering Department, Fire Department, Information Technology Department $5,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, insurance partnerships STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Installing and maintaining surge protection on critical electronic equipment. 36 months/ continuous Maintenance Department, Facilities Department, Engineering Department, Fire Department, Information $5,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, insurance partnerships dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&ͲϱϬ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Technology Department STATUS: Completed Adopt new standards for hardening existing lightning protection materials and systems. 36 months/ continuous Maintenance Department, Facilities Department, Engineering Department, Fire Department, Information Technology Department $5,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, insurance partnerships STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Conduct outreach programs to promote awareness of lightning dangers ƒDeveloplightning “KnoWhat2Do” brochure for distribution through classroom. ƒMailing safetybrochures 24 months Office of Emergency Management, Fire Department, Utility Department $5,000 $20,000 Town budget, staff time dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϱϭ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources with monthly water bills. ƒPostingwarning signage at local parks. ƒTeachingschool children about the dangers of lightning and how to take safety precautions. STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Winter Storms Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, or loss of life due to winter storms. Reduce impacts to roadways by: ƒPlan foradequate roads and debris clearing capabilities. ƒPartner withcounty and state agencies for co-utilization of snow and Ice hazard 12 months Office of Emergency Management, Fire Department, Utility Department $5,000 $250,000 HMGP, local business donation, foundation grants dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&ͲϱϮ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources removal assets. STATUS: Completed Assist vulnerable populations by identifying specific residents who may be exceptionally vulnerable in the event of protracted winter storm events or power outages. 12 months Office of Emergency Management Staff Time Unknown Staff time STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Winter Storms Develop a winter weather awareness mitigation program for Town of Westlake residents. Develop a winter weather outreach program that provides tips and pertinent information to mitigate against hypothermia and icy conditions. Annually Office of Emergency Management $10,000 Unknown Budget STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Wildfire Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, Increase public education on how to reduce the risks to wildfires 6 months/ continuous Office of Emergency Management, Westlake Fire Department $1,000 $200,000 HMGP, town budget dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϱϯ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources or loss of life due to wildfire. (construction, landscaping, etc.). STATUS: DeleteĚͲŶŽůŽŶŐĞƌĂƉƌŝŽƌŝƚLJ Wildfire Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, or loss of life due to wildfire. Enact building permit codes that include wildfire resistant construction. 1 year Westlake Fire Marshal, Planning and Permitting Department $1,000 $200,000 HMGP, town budget STATUS: Completed Wildfire Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, or loss of life due to wildfire. Identify wildfire hazard areas and assess overall community vulnerability. Regulate development in wildfire hazard areas. 3 years Planning and Zoning Department $1,000 $200,000 HMGP, town budget STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Extreme Temperatures Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, or loss of life due to temperature extremes. Increase awareness of extreme temperature risk and safety by educating citizens regarding the dangers of 3 years/ continuous Office of Emergency Management, Westlake Fire Department $2,000 $100,000 HMGP, insurance partnerships, donor funds dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϱϰ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources extreme heat and cold and the steps they can take to protect themselves when extreme temperatures occur. STATUS: Deferred to ϮϬϮϬ,ĂnjDW Dam Failure Participate in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Community Rating System (CRS) program. Work with the town officials to become a member of the CRS program. March 2014 Town Planner $1,000 $2,000 Town Planner budget STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources Dam Failure Develop a buyout program for properties in the floodplain. Develop a buyout program for properties in the floodplain. As funding is available Public Works Department To be determined To be determined Local funds, HMGP, Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM), Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϱϱ Hazard Addressed Objective Action/Project Description Projected Time to Completion Department or Agency Responsible Estimated Cost Estimated Benefit Funding Sources Dam Failure Reduce potential for property loss, damage, injury, or loss of life due to dam failure. Conduct inundation studies and develop Emergency Action Plans for all high hazard dams in Westlake. 5 years Engineering Department $40,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, dam owners STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources Conduct a search for previously unidentified high hazard dams in Westlake. 5 years Engineering $40,000 $1,000,000 HMGP, dam owners STATUS: Deleted due to lack of resources dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶdŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž&&Ͳϱϲ 5.3 New Action Items The Town of Westlake’s action items were determined by the Local Planning Team for the ϮϬϮϬ ,ĂnjĂƌĚ DŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶ ĐƚŝŽŶ WůĂŶ (HazMAP). These actions include mitigation actions that qualify for mitigation funding as well as enforcement, maintenance, and response actions that the city has identified as opportunities to increase their resiliency to hazards. During the capabilities assessment and hazard analysis, previously impacted assets and populations were analyzed to determine the highest probability of damage and potential of loss of life per hazard. As $1 spent in mitigation saves a community an average of $6 in recovery 2, we used this data to develop a cost- benefit analysis: Estimated Cost x 6 = Estimated Benefit. Priority will go towards projects with the highest positive impact on community resilience, including life safety and property protection. Below are the action items for this HazMAP. Hazard(s) Addressed Earthquake, Thunderstorm, Tornadoes Ensure the structure to serve as Fire Department/Training Facility/Emergency Operations Center in the Town of Westlake is tornado-resistant and hail-resistant, to include but not limited to, the installation of a safe room. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 1 Estimated Cost: $9,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $54,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Fire Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Drought, Earthquakes, Expansive Soils, Extreme Heat, Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms Provide the Public Works Department with a hardened facility/workshop for housing critical equipment to mitigate the damages from the identified hazards. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 2 Estimated Cost: $2,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $12,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Public Works Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months 2 Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: 2017 Interim Report. National Institute of Building Science. < https://www.nibs.org/page/mitigationsaves> dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϱϳ Hazard(s) Addressed Winter Storms Enhance sanding and de-icing capabilities with more equipment to mitigate the impact of winter storms. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 3 Estimated Cost: $6,000 Estimated Benefit: $36,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Public Works Department Implementation Schedule: 6 months Hazard(s) Addressed Thunderstorms Implement lightning protection device standards (e.g., lightning rods) within building codes/standards. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 4 Estimated Cost: $5,000 Estimated Benefit: $30,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Property owners, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Building Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Earthquakes, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes Implement standards for storm hardened construction or safe rooms into building codes/standards for new and existing critical and vulnerable facilities. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 5 Estimated Cost: $6,000 Estimated Benefit: $36,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Building Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϱϴ Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Review and enhance the Town of Westlake’s floodplain mitigation ordinances and policies as needed. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 6 Estimated Cost: $4,500 Estimated Benefit: $27,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Public Works Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Drought Review Town of Westlake’s water conservation/drought contingency plan and update as necessary to mitigate the effects of drought. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 7 Estimated Cost: $1,500 Estimated Benefit: $9,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Public Works Department Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Extreme Heat Conduct a study to determine the feasibility of expanding monitoring of populations at risk from extreme heat. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 8 Estimated Cost: $1,5000 Estimated Benefit: $9,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 12 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϱϵ Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Replace existing bridge at Ottinger Road, located between Westlake Cemetery and State Highway 170. This bridge lies below historic flood levels and is regularly inundated. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 9 Estimated Cost: $350,000 Estimated Benefit: $2,100,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Public Works Department Implementation Schedule: 12 months Hazard(s) Addressed Drought, Earthquakes, Expansive Soils, Extreme Heat, Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms Enforce latest edition of buildings codes. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 10 Estimated Cost: $1,500 Estimated Benefit: $9,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Building Department, Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 36 months Hazard(s) Addressed Earthquakes Conduct an earthquake risk assessment within the community using HaZUS data and geographic information system (GIS) mapping. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 11 Estimated Cost: $3,000 Estimated Benefit: $18,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 12 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϲϬ Hazard(s) Addressed Drought, Earthquakes, Expansive Soils, Extreme Heat, Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms Enhance existing public integrated outreach program, informing residents on hazard mitigation measures related to the identified hazards. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 12 Estimated Cost: $1,500 Estimated Benefit: $9,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 12 months Hazard(s) Addressed Drought, Earthquakes, Expansive Soils, Extreme Heat, Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms Implement an education program, separate from the public education for residents, to educate construction contractors, homeowners, and business owners about mitigation techniques. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 13 Estimated Cost: $3,000 Estimated Benefit: $18,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Building Department, Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 12 months Hazard(s) Addressed Wildfire Identify wildfire hazard areas, assess overall community vulnerability, and regulate development in wildfire hazard areas. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 14 Estimated Cost: $3,000 Estimated Benefit: $18,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Fire Department, Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 12 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϲϭ Hazard(s) Addressed Drought, Earthquakes, Expansive Soils, Extreme Heat, Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms Provide alternative power solutions to new and existing critical facilities and infrastructure, to include the purchase and installation of generators. Participating Jurisdiction Town of Westlake Priority: 15 Estimated Cost: $20,000 Estimated Benefit: $120,000 Potential Funding Source(s): Town funds, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Schedule a Community Assistance Visit (CAV) by FEMA or a State agency on behalf of FEMA to assure that the city is adequately enforcing its floodplain management regulations. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 16 Estimated Cost: $1,000 Estimated Benefit: $6,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding ZĞƋƵŝƌĞƚŚĂƚƚŚĞĨůŽŽĚƉůĂŝŶĂĚŵŝŶŝƐƚƌĂƚŽƌďĞĐĞƌƚŝĨŝĞĚ͘ Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 17 Estimated Cost: $Ϯ͕ϬϬϬ Estimated Benefit: $ϭϮ͕ϬϬϬ Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: WƵďůŝĐtŽƌŬƐĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚ Implementation Schedule: 24 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&ͲϲϮ Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Conduct NFIP community workshops to provide information and incentives for property owners to acquire flood insurance. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 18 Estimated Cost: $500 Estimated Benefit: $3,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Remove existing structures from flood-prone areas to minimize future flood losses by acquiring and demolishing or relocating structures from voluntary property owners and preserving land subject to repetitive flooding. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 19 Estimated Cost: $1,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $6,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding Use bioengineered bank stabilization techniques and revetments to protect against flooding. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 20 Estimated Cost: $1,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $6,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϲϯ Hazard(s) Addressed Earthquakes, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes Require construction of safe rooms in new schools, daycares, and nursing homes. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 21 Estimated Cost: $1,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $6,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Wildfire Promote conservation of open space or wildland-urban interface boundary zones to separate developed areas from high-hazard areas. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 22 Estimated Cost: $100 Estimated Benefit: $600 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months Hazard(s) Addressed Flooding, Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Wildfire, Winter Storms To protect power lines, either bury overhead power lines, ensure ordinances for proper vegetation management practices, replace wood poles with steel or composite ones, or reinforce utility poles with guy wires. Participating Jurisdiction: Town of Westlake Priority: 23 Estimated Cost: $300,000,000 Estimated Benefit: $1,200,000,000 Potential Funding Source(s): City general fund, hazard mitigation grants Lead Agency/Department Responsible: Office of Emergency Management Implementation Schedule: 24 months 5.4 Plan Incorporation into Existing Planning Mechanisms Based on Requirement 201.6(c)(4(ii) and the State of Texas Mitigation Plan, the vulnerability and capabilities assessment for the town were carefully reviewed and considered when developing the mitigation actions for this plan. The Local Planning Team (LPT) will establish a process in which the mitigation strategy, goals, objectives, and actions outlined in this plan will be incorporated into the existing local planning strategies. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϲϰ Once the plan is adopted, the LPT will coordinate implementation with the responsible parties in the town, as well as external stakeholders as needed. The following steps will be taken in implementing this HazMAP into local plans: 1. Change is proposed by an elected official or other interested party. 2. Proposal is placed on the local agenda of the governing body. 3. Agenda is published at least 10 days in advance of the meeting at which it will be discussed, so members of the public have an opportunity to attend the discussion meeting. Publication may be made by posting the agenda on the city’s website, in the city newsletter, or on a public bulletin board. 4. Proposal is discussed at the public meeting, including any comments by members of the public attendance. 5. Proposal is voted on by the governing body. 6. If the proposal is passed, the change is implemented by the appropriate local authority. Existing planning mechanisms in which the HazMAP will be integrated are listed below. Type of Plan or Activity Department Responsible Update Schedule Actions to be Integrated Integration Method Capital Improvement Plan Public Works Department Annually Drainage improvement project; Roanoke Road When reviewing the Capital Improvement Plan, the leadership team will review this HazMAP to see which action items can be addressed with the fiscal and administrative capabilities of the town. Comprehensive Plan Town Administration As needed Development guidelines The town staff will review development plans for alignment with the Comprehensive Plan. Flood Hazard Prevention Ordinance Public Works Department As needed Flood hazard prevention activities and processes Town staff will review identified mitigation action items and consider plan revision as necessary. Although it is recognized that there are many possible benefits to integrating components of this Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) into other planning mechanisms, the LPT considers this HazMAP, including development and maintenance, to be the primary vehicle to ensure implementation of local hazard mitigation actions. This completes the annex for the Town of Westlake. For additional information, see Appendices A and B. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϲϱ This page intentionally left blank. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ dŽǁŶŽĨtĞƐƚůĂŬĞŶŶĞdž &&Ͳϲϲ Section 6: Executing the Plan Requirement §201.6(c)(4)(i) [The plan maintenance process shall include a] section describing the method and schedule of monitoring, evaluating, and updating the mitigation plan within a five-year cycle. 6.1 Plan Implementation The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Planning process was overseen by the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). The plan was submitted to the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for approval. It is expected that all participating jurisdictions will formally adopt the plan by resolution once the “Approved Pending Adoption” designation is received by FEMA, in accordance with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000. Each jurisdiction participating in this plan is responsible for implementing specific mitigation actions as prescribed in the mitigation strategies. In each mitigation strategy, every proposed action is assigned to a specific local department or agency in order to assign responsibility and accountability and increase the likelihood of subsequent implementation. This approach enables individual jurisdictions to update their unique mitigation strategy as needed without altering the broader focus of the county-wide plan. The separate adoption of locally-specific actions also ensures that each jurisdiction is not held responsible for monitoring and implementing the actions of other jurisdictions involved in the planning process. The Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator or their designee is the lead position for plan implementation and will work with the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) to ensure mitigation actions are implemented into jurisdictional planning procedures. Each participating jurisdiction will implement the plan and their individual mitigation actions in the timeframe appropriate for their planning processes. As necessary, the HMPT will seek outside funding sources to implement mitigation projects in both the pre-disaster and post-disaster environments. When applicable, potential funding sources have been identified for proposed actions listed in the mitigation strategies. 6.2 Evaluation All members of the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) will be responsible for ensuring that the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (HazMAP) is evaluated as required. Specifically, the Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator, or their designee, will convene the HMPT and ensure an evaluation is conducted in a thorough manner. This evaluation will include analysis of current mitigation projects, evaluation of success, reevaluation of future mitigation needs, and prioritization based upon changes in needs and/or capabilities of Tarrant County. The HMPT will reconvene annually to ensure that projects are on track and to reevaluate the mitigation goals, objectives, and action items. The mitigation plan shall be viewed as an evolving, dynamic document. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϯ 6.3 Multijurisdictional Strategy and Considerations Tarrant County will lead activities for mitigation planning county-wide. Although Tarrant County will be responsible for maintaining this plan, including the documentation of in-progress and completed action items, each participating jurisdiction is responsible for reporting hazards, their costs, and a status report on mitigation actions to the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) for recording in the plan. Each jurisdiction is responsible for completing mitigation activities by providing the capabilities and authorities needed to carry out activities. Participating jurisdictions completed an analysis of their current legal, staffing, and fiscal capabilities as they relate to hazard mitigation planning. Jurisdictional capabilities and authorities identified to ensure successful mitigation planning are located within the jurisdictional annexes. 6.4 Plan Update The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 requires that the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan be updated at least once every five years. During this process, all sections of the plan will be updated with current information, and analyses and new and/or modified mitigation actions will be developed. The revised plan will be submitted for state and federal review and approval and presented for approval to the Tarrant County Commissioners Court and the respective councils of incorporated cities included in this HazMAP. Likewise, each participating jurisdiction will undergo the same process for reviewing, revising and updating their respective plans and submitting them for approval by state, federal, and the local jurisdiction’s governing body. The plan will be updated every five years in accordance with federal requirements. Tarrant County’s Emergency Management Coordinator or their designee will be responsible for ensuring that this requirement is met. Tarrant County and the Hazard Mitigation Planning Team will review the HazMAP annually for needed updates. The HMPT will be involved in this process to ensure all jurisdictions provide input into the planning process. The public will be invited to participate in this process through public hearings. 6.5 Plan Maintenance It is the intention of all documented plan participants to formally adopt the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan after each maintenance revision. Once all participants adopt the changes, the revised HazMAP and proof of adoption will be submitted to the Texas Division of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The plan will be revised and maintained as required under the guidance of the HazMAP and formally adopted by Tarrant County and jurisdiction elected officials after each revision. Following formal adoption Tarrant County’s Commissioners Court, and formal adoption of the plan by the governing council of each participating jurisdiction, the actions outlined in the HazMAP will be implemented by the county and participating jurisdictions as described throughout this document. The Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator (EMC), or their designee, is responsible for ensuring the HazMAP and its components are monitored, evaluated, and reviewed semiannually by the responsible personnel. The EMC will use email to request the monitoring activities noted below be implemented and changes documented. The progress of action items will be tracked electronically as “in progress,” “deferred,” or “completed.” dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϰ These and other changes affecting the plan will be documented within the Tarrant County HazMAP file and identified as updates. Updates will be shared between participants by email or in a meeting (if deemed appropriate) twice a year, and included in annual evaluations and reviews, and five-year update of the plan. The lead of each Local Planning Team (LPT) is responsible for e nsuring their mitigation annex is monitored, evaluated, and reviewed on an annual basis. This will be accomplished by calling an annual meeting of the LPT and HMPT, whose members will provide assistance and expertise for plan review, evaluation, updates, and monitoring. This meeting will be open to the public and public notices will encourage community participation. During this annual meeting, the LPT point of contact will provide information and updates on the implementation status of each action item included in the plan. As part of the evaluation, the LPT will assess whether goals and objectives address current and expected conditions, whether the nature and/or magnitude of the risks have changed, if current resources are appropriate for implementing the HazMAP, whether outcomes have occurred as expected, and if agencies and other partners participated as originally proposed. These activities will take place according to the following timetable: Responsible Personnel Activity Update Schedule LPT Point of Contact Monitoring Plan: track implementation and action items, changes to risk assessment, changes to Local Planning Team (LPT), changes to capabilities, and plan integrations. Twice a year Evaluate Plan: assess effectiveness by evaluating completed actions, implementation processes, responsible personnel, and lessons learned. Annually Update Plan Once every five years At least once every five years, or more frequently if such a need is determined by the participants, the HazMAP will undergo a major update. During this process, all sections of the plan will be updated with current information and analyses and new and/or modified mitigation action plans will be developed. The revised plan will be submitted for review and approval to the Texas Division of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and presented to the governing council for approval and adoption. The plan will be updated every five years in accordance with regulations. 6.6 Continued Public Involvement As stated in Requirement 201.6(c)(4)(iii), the plan maintenance process shall include a discussion on how the community will continue public participation in the plan maintenance process. Ongoing public participation will be encouraged throughout the entire planning and implementation process. A copy of the plan will be provided on the jurisdiction’s websites and/or in the office of the LPT point of contact. Annual meetings held for monitoring, evaluating, and updating the HazMAP will be open to the public and public notices will encourage community participation. Public participation will be sought throughout the implementation, evaluation, and maintenance of the HazMAP. This participation will be sought in a multitude of ways, including but not limited to periodic presentations on the plan’s progress to elected officials, schools, or other community groups; annual questionnaires or surveys; public meetings; and postings on social media and interactive websites. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϱ 6.7 Incorporation into Existing Planning Mechanisms The primary means for integrating mitigation strategies into other local planning mechanisms will be through the revision, update, and implementation of each jurisdiction’s individual plans that require specific planning and administrative tasks (for example, plan amendments, ordinance revisions, and capital improvement projects). The members of the HMPT will remain charged with ensuring that the goals and strategies of new and updated local planning documents for their jurisdictions are consistent with the goals and actions of the Tarrant County HazMAP and will not contribute to increased hazard vulnerability in Tarrant County or its participating jurisdictions. During the planning process for new and updated local planning documents, such as a comprehensive plan, capital improvement plan, or emergency management plan, Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions will provide a copy of the Tarrant County HazMAP to the appropriate parties and recommend that all goals and strategies of new and updated local planning documents are consistent with and support the goals of the Tarrant County HazMAP and will not contribute to increased hazards in the affected jurisdiction(s). The following steps will be taken in implementing this HazMAP into local plans: 1. Change is proposed by an elected official or other interested party. 2. Proposal is placed on the local agenda of the governing body. 3. Agenda is published at least 10 days in advance of the meeting at which it will be discussed, so members of the public have an opportunity to attend the discussion meeting. Publication may be made by posting the agenda on the city’s website, in the city newsletter, or on a public bulletin board. 4. Proposal is discussed at the public meeting, including any comments by members of the public attendance. 5. Proposal is voted on by the governing body. 6. If the proposal is passed, the change is implemented by the appropriate local authority. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϲ Section 7: Conclusion Through the development of this plan, Tarrant County has developed a thorough hazard history, an inventory of critical facilities, and an updated contact list for emergency contacts at critical facilities. This data, when used in conjunction with the updated information about hazard threats and vulnerabilities, will prove to be invaluable to Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions. Natural hazards have been identified county-wide and technological hazards have been listed for selected jurisdictions that opted to include these hazards. Mitigation projects that could reduce the risk of lives and property due to the identified threats have been compiled and prioritized. The creation of the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) brought together stakeholders from communities and organizations onto one planning team. This group has been able to work together effectively and efficiently to produce this document and establish a greater awareness of risks and mitigation strategies. In addition to the HMPT, the creation of the Local Planning Team (LPT) in each jurisdiction brought together stakeholders and departments within the jurisdiction onto one planning team. This group was able to work together effectively and efficiently to produce jurisdictional data for this document and establish a greater awareness of risks and mitigation strategies. This plan will continue to evolve as necessary to properly represent the threats and vulnerabilities affecting Tarrant County. Continued public participation is encouraged and will continue through the ongoing multijurisdictional hazard mitigation process. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϳ This page intentionally left blank. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϴ Appendix A: Meeting Documentation The following pages in Appendix A include the public meeting announcements and attendance records from the participating jurisdictions. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϴϵ Public Announcements City of Arlington Arlington city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϬ City of Azle The City of Azle hosted a public meeting on September 18, 2018 at the Azle Fire Department. The meeting was advertised on the city website and public bulletin. No public comment was received. Azle city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϭ Azle press release. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϮ City of Bedford Bedford Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϯ Bedford city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϰ City of Blue Mound Blue Mound Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϱ Blue Mound city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϲ City of Colleyville Colleyvile city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϳ City of Crowley Crowley Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϴ Crowley Twitter page dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϵϵ Crowley electronic city newsletter. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϬ City of Dalworthington Gardens Dalworthington Gardens’ Nextdoor app. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϭ Town of Edgecliff Village Edgecliff Village town website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϮ City of Euless The mitigation plan was discussed at the public City Council me eting on February 13, 2018. Meetings are announced on the city website. No public comment was recorded. Euless City Council agenda. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϯ City of Everman A public hearing was scheduled as part of the regularly scheduled City Council meeting on December 11, 2018 at 6:30 pm at the City Hall located at 212 North Race Street, Everman, Texas 76140. The meeting was posted to the bulletin board outside City Hall on November 19th. The City Council meeting was later rescheduled for December 18. There was no public comment recorded. Everman City Hall bulletin. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϰ City of Forest Hill Forest Hill public building. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϱ City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth published the Fort Worth Annex on their Office of Emergency Management website. There was no public comment received. Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϲ City of Grapevine Grapevine City Hall bulletin. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϳ Grapevine City Hall bulletin. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϴ Grapevine Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϬϵ City of Haltom City Public bulletin board at Haltom City fire station. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϬ City of Haslet Haslet Facebook page. Haslet city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϭ City of Hurst Hurst city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϮ City of Keller Keller city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϯ Keller electronic city newsletter. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϰ City of Kennedale Kennedale Nextdoor app. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϱ Kennedale Facebook page. Kennedale Twitter page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϲ Kennedale city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϳ City of Lake Worth Lake Worth city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϴ City of Lakeside Lakeside public announcement. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϭϵ Lakeside public announcement. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϬ Lakeside council minutes. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϭ City of Mansfield Mansfield Twitter page. Mansfield Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϮ North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) NCTCOG public bulletin. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϯ City of North Richland Hills North Richland Hills city website. North Richland Hills Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϰ Town of Pantego Pantego Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϱ Pantego town website. Pantego town website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϲ City of Richland Hills A public hearing was held as part of the regularly scheduled City Council meeting on November 13,2017 at 7pm in the City Council chambers located at 3200 Diana Dr. Richland Hills, TX 76118. The meeting was posted to the bulletin board outside City Hall on October 30 th and published to the City website on the same date. Richland Hills’ city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϳ Richland Hills public bulletin board. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϴ City of River Oaks River Oaks’ city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϮϵ City of Saginaw Saginaw city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϬ Saginaw public building. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϭ City of Southlake Southlake Department of Public Safety Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϮ Southlake city website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϯ Unincorporated Tarrant County Tarrant County Public Health Nextdoor app. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϰ Tarrant County public bulletin. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϱ University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) UNTHSC online newsletter. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϲ UNTHSC online newsletter. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϳ UNTHSC university website. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϴ City of Watauga Watauga Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϯϵ Town of Westlake Westlake Facebook page. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϬ City of Westworth Village Westworth Village passed out citizen surveys at a local citizen’s meeting. The survey was four pages long and asked questions regarding local hazards, community assets, trusted resources, and mitigation activities that would be taken into consideration when developing the city’s annex in the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan. The following pages are the results of these surveys. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϰϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϱϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϲϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϳϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϴϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϭϵϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϬϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϭϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϭϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϭϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϮϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϯϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϯϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϯϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϰϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϰϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϰϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϱϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϱϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϱϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϲϬ Attendance Records The following pages are the various attendance sheets from a majority of the meetings conducted during the planning process of this Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϲϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϲϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϲϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϲ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϳ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϴ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϳϵ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϬ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϭ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϮ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϯ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϰ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϱ dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶϮϴϲ Appendix B: Supporting Documents Appendix B provides various information that support the mitigation actions and risk assessment identified in this hazard mitigation action plan. Information includes: x Annotated list of rare species in Tarrant County. x Historic sites in Tarrant County. x Natural Cooperative Soil Survey for dwellings on concrete slabs in Tarrant County. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϴϳ Annotated List of Rare Species in Tarrant County Under Section 12.0011 of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Code, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) is charged with "providing recommendations that will protect fish and wildlife resources to local, state, and federal agencies that approve, permit, license, or construct developmental projects" and "providing information on fish and wildlife resources to any local, state, and federal agencies or private organizations that make decisions affecting those resources." Project types reviewed by TPWD include reservoirs, highway projects, pipelines, urban infrastructure, utility construction, renewable energy, and residential and commercial construction, as well as many others. During project planning, and prior to construction, project areas should be surveyed for potential habitat for rare species as described on the following list. If potential habitat for a rare species is found, construction impacts to these areas should be avoided to the greatest extent practicable. If a rare species is found on a project, TPWD recommends contacting the Wildlife Habitat Assessment Program (WHAB) for additional guidance. Rare species are those native Texas species considered to be imperiled throughout a significant part of their range. Rare species are not protected by state or federal law. However, TPWD actively promotes their conservation in an effort to prevent future endangerment and need to propose for listing. Identifying the potential for adverse impacts to rare species and taking steps to avoid or minimize them on projects helps to further this goal. Below is the TPWD Annotated County Lists of Rare Species in Tarrant County. TARRANT COUNTY Last Updated: 12/30/2016 BIRDS Federal Status State Status American Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus anatum DL T Year-round resident and local breeder in west Texas, nests in tall cliff eyries; also, migrant across state from more northern breeding areas in US and Canada, winters along coast and farther south; occupies wide range of habitats during migration, including urban, concentrations along coast and barrier islands; low-altitude migrant, stopovers at leading landscape edges such as lake shores, coastlines, and barrier islands. Arctic Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus tundrius DL Migrant throughout state from subspecies’ far northern breeding range, winters along coast and farther south; occupies wide range of habitats during migration, including urban, concentrations along coast and barrier islands; low-altitude migrant, stopovers at leading landscape edges such as lake shores, coastlines, and barrier islands. BIRDS Federal Status State Status Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus DL T Found primarily near rivers and large lakes; nests in tall trees or on cliffs near water; communally roosts, especially in winter; hunts live prey, scavenges, and pirates food from other birds. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϴϴ BIRDS Federal Status State Status Henslow's Sparrow Ammodramus henslowii Wintering individuals (not flocks) found in weedy fields or cut-over areas where lots of bunch grasses occur along with vines and brambles; a key component is bare ground for running/walking. Interior Least Tern Sterna antillarum athalassos LE E Subspecies is listed only when inland (more than 50 miles from a coastline); nests along sand and gravel bars within braided streams, rivers; also know to nest on man-made structures (inland beaches, wastewater treatment plants, gravel mines, etc); eats small fish and crustaceans, when breeding forages within a few hundred feet of colony. Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus DL T Both subspecies migrate across the state from more northern breeding areas in US and Canada to winter along coast and farther south; subspecies (F. p. anatum) is also a resident breeder in west Texas; the two subspecies’ listing statuses differ, F.p. tundrius is no longer listed in Texas; but because the subspecies are not easily distinguishable at a distance, reference is generally made only to the species level; see subspecies for habitat. Red Knot Calidris canutus rufa T Red knots migrate long distances in flocks northward through the contiguous United States mainly April-June, southward July-October. A small plump-bodied, short-necked shorebird that in breeding plumage, typically held from May through August, is a distinctive and unique pottery orange color. Its bill is dark, straight and, relative to other shorebirds, short-to-medium in length. After molting in late summer, this species is in a drab gray-and-white non-breeding plumage, typically held from September through April. In the non-breeding plumage, the knot might be confused with the omnipresent Sanderling. During this plumage, look for the knot’s prominent pale eyebrow and whitish flanks with dark barring. The Red Knot prefers the shoreline of coast and bays and also uses mudflats during rare inland encounters. Primary prey items include coquina clam (Donax spp.) on beaches and dwarf surf clam (Mulinia lateralis) in bays, at least in the Laguna Madre. Wintering Range includes- Aransas, Brazoria, Calhoun, Cameron, Chambers, Galveston, Jefferson, Kennedy, Kleberg, Matagorda, Nueces, San Patricio, and Willacy. Habitat: Primarily seacoasts on tidal flats and beaches, herbaceous wetland, and Tidal flat/shore. Sprague's Pipit Anthus spragueii Only in Texas during migration and winter, mid-September to early April; short to medium distance, diurnal migrant; strongly tied to native upland prairie, can be locally common in coastal grasslands, uncommon to rare further west; sensitive to patch size and avoids edges. Western Burrowing Owl Athene cunicularia hypugaea Open grasslands, especially prairie, plains, and savanna, sometimes in open areas such as vacant lots near human habitation or airports; nests and roosts in abandoned burrows. Whooping Crane Grus americana LE E Potential migrant via plains throughout most of state to coast; winters in coastal marshes of Aransas, Calhoun, and Refugio counties. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϴϵ FISHES Federal Status State Status Shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus T Open, flowing channels with bottoms of sand or gravel; spawns over gravel or rocks in an area with a fast current; Red River below reservoir and rare occurrence in Rio Grande. MAMMALS Federal Status State Status Gray wolf Canis lupus LE E Extirpated; formerly known throughout the western two-thirds of the state in forests, brushlands, or grasslands. Plains spotted skunk Spilogale putorius interrupta Catholic; open fields, prairies, croplands, fence rows, farmyards, forest edges, and woodlands; prefers wooded, brushy areas and tallgrass prairie. Red wolf Canis rufus LE E Extirpated; formerly known throughout eastern half of Texas in brushy and forested areas, as well as coastal prairies. MOLLUSKS Federal Status State Status Louisiana pigtoe Pleurobema riddellii T Streams and moderate-size rivers, usually flowing water on substrates of mud, sand, and gravel; not generally known from impoundments; Sabine, Neches, and Trinity (historic) River basins. Sandbank pocketbook Lampsilis satura T Small to large rivers with moderate flows and swift current on gravel, gravel-sand, and sand bottoms; east Texas, Sulfur south through San Jacinto River basins; Neches River. Texas heelsplitter Potamilus amphichaenus T Quiet waters in mud or sand and also in reservoirs. Sabine, Neches, and Trinity River basins. Texas pigtoe Fusconaia askewi T Rivers with mixed mud, sand, and fine gravel in protected areas associated with fallen trees or other structures; east Texas River basins, Sulphur River, Cypress Creek, Sabine through Trinity rivers as well as San Jacinto River. REPTILES Federal Status State Status Texas garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis annectens Wet or moist microhabitats are conducive to the species occurrence, but is not necessarily restricted to them; hibernates underground or in or under surface cover; breeds March-August. Texas horned lizard Phrynosoma cornutum T Open, arid and semi-arid regions with sparse vegetation, including grass, cactus, scattered brush or scrubby trees; soil may vary in texture from sandy to rocky; burrows into soil, enters rodent burrows, or hides under rock when inactive; breeds March-September. dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϵϬ REPTILES Federal Status State Status Timber rattlesnake Crotalus horridus T Swamps, floodplains, upland pine and deciduous woodlands, riparian zones, abandoned farmland; limestone bluffs, sandy soil or black clay; prefers dense ground cover, i.e. grapevines or palmetto. PLANTS Federal Status State Status Auriculate false foxglove Agalinis auriculata Known in Texas from one late nineteenth century specimen record labeled -Benbrook-; in Oklahoma, degraded prairies, floodplains, fallow fields, and borders of upland sterile woods; in Arkansas, blackland prairie; annual; flowering August – October. Glen Rose yucca Yucca necopina Texas endemic; grasslands on sandy soils and limestone outcrops; flowering April-June. Hall's prairie clover Dalea hallii Global Rank: G3; In grasslands on eroded limestone or chalk and in oak scrub on rocky hillsides; perennial; flowering May-September; fruiting June-September. Osage Plains false foxglove Agalinis densiflora Global Rank: G3; Most records are from grasslands on shallow, gravelly, well drained, calcareous soils; prairies, dry limestone soils; annual; flowering August-October. Reverchon's curfpea Pediomelum reverchonii Global Rank: G3; Mostly in prairies on shallow rocky calcareous substrates and limestone outcrops; perennial; flowering June-September; fruiting June-July. Texas milk vetch Astragalus reflexus Global Rank: G3; In grasslands, prairies, and roadsides on calcareous and clay substrates; annual; flowering February-June; fruiting April-June. Topeka purple-coneflower Echinacea atrorubens Global Rank: G3; Occurring mostly in tallgrass prairie of the southern Great Plains, in blackland prairies but also in a variety of other sites like limestone hillsides; perennial; flowering January-June; fruiting January-May. *Globe Rank: NatureServe global conservation status ranks (G-ranks) reflect an assessment of the condition of the species or ecological community across its entire range. G3 is vulnerable: at moderate risk of extinction due to a restricted range, relatively few populations (often 80 or fewer), recent and widespread declines, or other factors. Definitions for The Terms Used Above Federal Status and State Status Description LE or LT Federally listed endangered or threatened DL or PDL Federally delisted or proposed for delisting E or T State listed endangered or threatened “blank” Species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) but with no regulatory listing status dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϭ Historic Sites in Tarrant County The importance of integrating historic property and cultural resource considerations into mitigation planning has been made all too apparent in losses that have occurred in recent disasters. Whether a disaster impacts a major community museum, a historic "main street," or collections of family photographs, the sudden loss of historic properties and cultural resources can negatively impact a community's character and economy, and can affect the overall ability of the community to recover from a disaster. According to the Texas Historic Sites Atlas, Tarrant County has 124 cemeteries, 32 museums, and 392 historical markers. There are also 6 state antiquities landmarks, 115 national register properties, and 6 courthouses. The following sites, from the National Register of Historic Places, are located within Tarrant County, are exposed to the identified hazards, and could potentially experience severe damage if directly impacted. These sites keep the history of the community alive. They are reminders of a jurisdiction’s culture and complexity. Once a piece of history is destroyed, it is lost forever. ¾Allen Chapel AME Church (added 1984 - - #84000169) 116 Elm Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Reed, William & Sons, Pittman, William Sidney Architectural Style: Other, Late Gothic Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾American Airways Hanger and Administration Building (added 2008 - - #08000317) 201 Aviation Way, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Epstein, A., Byrne, Thomas S. Inc. Architectural Style: Moderne Area of Significance: Transportation, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Local Historic Function: Transportation Historic Sub-function: Air-Related Current Function: Transportation Current Sub-function: Air-Related dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϮϵϮ ¾Anderson, Neil P., Building (added 1978 - - #78002981) 411 West 7th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hedrick, W.C., Construction, Sanguinett & Staats Architectural Style: Chicago Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Business Current Function: Commerce/Trade ¾Arlington Post Office (added 2000 - - #00000188); also known as Old Post Office 200 West Main Street, Arlington Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Public Building Administration, Federal Works Agency Architectural Style: Colonial Revival Area of Significance: Art, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974 Owner: Local Historic Function: Government Historic Sub-function: Post Office Current Function: Government Current Sub-function: Government Office ¾Atelier Building (added 1984 - - #84003976); also known as Edrington Bank; Cameron Alread Architect, Inc. 209 West 8th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Smith & Schenk Architectural Style: Other, Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Current Function: Commerce/Trade dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϯ ¾Austin, Stephen F., Elementary School (added 1983 - - #83003160) 319 Lipscomb Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats, Messer, Sanguinet & Messer Architectural Style: Romanesque Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business ¾Bedford School (added 1997 - - #97000851) 2400 School Lane, Bedford Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development, Education Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Local Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Recreation and Culture Current Sub-function: Museum ¾Benton, M. A., House (added 1978 - - #78002982) 1730 6th Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Person, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Late Victorian Historic Person: Benton, Ella Belle Significant Year: 1898 Area of Significance: Education, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Religion Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϰ ¾Blackstone Hotel (added 1984 - - #84001961) 601 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Mauran, Russell & Crowell Architectural Style: Modern Movement Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Hotel Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use ¾Botts--Fowler House (added 1999 - - #99000723) 115 North Fourth Avenue, Mansfield Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Bratton, Andrew "Cap" and Emma Doughty, House (added 2003 - - #03000432) 310 East Broad Street, Mansfield Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling, Specialty Store Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Bryce Building (added 1984 - - #84001963) 909 Throckmorton Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Person, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Bryce, William J. Architectural Style: Renaissance Historic Person: Bryce, William J. Significant Year: 1910 Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Business Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϱ ¾Bryce, William J., House (added 1984 - - #84001965); also known as Fairview 4900 Bryce Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Bryce, William J., Sanguinet, Marshall Architectural Style: Other, Renaissance Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Buchanan-Hayter-Witherspoon House (added 2003 - - #03000433) 306 E. Broad Street, Mansfield Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899, 1850-1874 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Buck Oaks Farm (added 2004 - - #87000995); also known as Raymond and Katherine Buck House 6312 White Settlement Road, Westworth Historic Significance: Person, Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Glasgow, Earl T. Architectural Style: Colonial Revival Historic Person: Buck, Raymond E. Significant Year: 1933, 1932 Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Federal Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Defense, Domestic Current Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϲ ¾Burnett, Burk, Building (added 1980 - - #80004151) 500--502 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Buchanan & Gilder, Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Other, Classical Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Financial Institution Current Function: Commerce/Trade ¾Central Handley Historic District (added 2002 - - #01001472) Roughly bounded by East Lancaster Avenue, Forest Avenue, Kerr Street, and Handley Drive, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: et.al., Adams, B.B. Architectural Style: Late Victorian, Early Commercial Area of Significance: Commerce, Community Planning and Development, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Government Historic Sub-function: Business, Post Office, Professional, Restaurant, Single Dwelling, Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Vacant/Not In Use Current Sub-function: Business, Restaurant, Specialty Store ¾Chorn, Lester H. and Mabel Bryant, House (added 2003 - - #03000434) 303 East Broad Street, Mansfield Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϳ ¾Cotton Belt Railroad Industrial Historic District (added 1997 - - #97001109) Along railroad tracks, roughly bounded by Hudgins, Dooley, and Dallas Streets, Grapevine Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architectural Style: No Style Listed Area of Significance: Industry, Transportation, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Industry/Processing/Extraction, Transportation Historic Sub-function: Manufacturing Facility, Rail-Related Current Function: Industry/Processing/Extraction, Recreation and Culture, Vacant/Not In Use Current Sub-function: Manufacturing Facility, Museum ¾Eddleman-McFarland House (added 1979 - - #79003009) ; also known as McFarland Home 1110 Penn Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Messer, Howard Architectural Style: Other, Late Victorian Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Social Current Sub-function: Civic ¾Eighth Avenue Historic District (added 2006 - - #06001065) Bounded by 8th Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue, 9th Avenue, and Pruitt Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Koeppe, Paul, Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Professional dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϴ ¾Electric Building (added 1995 - - #95000048); also known as Fort Worth Power and Light Building; Texas Electric Service C 410 West 7th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: et al., Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: Other, Art Deco Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Recreation and Culture Historic Sub-function: Business, Theater Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use ¾Elizabeth Boulevard Historic District (added 1979 - - #79003010) 1001--1616 Elizabeth Boulevard, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Ryan, John C. Architectural Style: Mission/Spanish Revival, Colonial Revival, Prairie School Area of Significance: Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Fairmount--Southside Historic District (added 1990 - - #90000490); also known as See Also: South Side Masonic Lodge; Benton, Meredith, House; J Roughly bounded by Magnolia, Hemphill, Eighth, and Jessamine, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals, Late Victorian Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Social Historic Sub-function: Business, Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Social Current Sub-function: Business, Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ Ϯϵϵ ¾Fairmount--Southside Historic District (Boundary Increase) (added 1998 - - #98001375); also known as See Also: Fairmount--Southside Historic District Roughly bounded by Magnolia, Hemphill, Allen, Travis and Murphy, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Davies, J.B. Architectural Style: Other, Classical Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Education Historic Sub-function: School, Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Education Current Sub-function: School, Specialty Store ¾Fairmount--Southside Historic District (Boundary Increase) (added 1999 - - #99000565) Roughly bounded by Magnolia, Hemphill, Allen, Travis and Morphy Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Davies, J.B. Architectural Style: Other, Classical Revival Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Education Historic Sub-function: School, Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Education Current Sub-function: School, Specialty Store ¾First Christian Church (added 1983 - - #83003812) 612 Throckorton Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Van Slyke & Woodruff Architectural Style: Beaux Arts, Renaissance Area of Significance: Architecture, Religion Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion, Social Current Sub-function: Civic, Religious Structure dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϬ ¾First National Bank Building (added 2009 - - #09000981); also known as Baker Building 711 Houston Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Person, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hedrick, Wyatt C., Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Skyscraper Historic Person: Loyd, Cpt. Martin B. Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Business Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business ¾Flatiron Building (added 1971 - - #71000964) 1000 Houston Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Person, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Chicago Historic Person: Saunders, Bacon Significant Year: 1907 Area of Significance: Architecture, Health/Medicine Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Health Care Historic Sub-function: Medical Business/Office Current Function: Commerce/Trade ¾Fort Worth Botanic Garden (added 2009 - - #08001400); also known as Harry J. Adams Memorial Garden 3220 Botanic Garden Boulevard, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hare and Hare, et al. Architectural Style: Renaissance Area of Significance: Landscape Architecture, Entertainment/Recreation Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Local Historic Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Education, Landscape, Recreation and Culture, Social Historic Sub-function: Clubhouse, Horticulture Facility, Outdoor Recreation, Park, Research Facility Current Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Education, Landscape, Recreation and Culture, Social Current Sub-function: Clubhouse, Horticulture Facility, Outdoor Recreation, Park, Research Facility dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϭ ¾Fort Worth Club Building--1916 (added 1998 - - #98000102); also known as Holmes Building; Winfree Building; Midcontinent Building; Ken 608-610 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Commerce, Social History Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Social Historic Sub-function: Business, Clubhouse, Organizational, Professional Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use ¾Fort Worth Elks Lodge 124 (added 1984 - - #84001969); also known as Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; YWCA of Fort Worth a 512 West 4th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Burne, Thomas C., Inc., Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: Other, Colonial Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Social Historic Sub-function: Clubhouse Current Function: Social Current Sub-function: Civic ¾Fort Worth High School (added 2002 - - #02001515); also known as Central No.19, Junior High; Jennings Avenue No. 40; 1015 South Jennings Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Waller and Field, Innis--Graham builder Architectural Style: Classical Revival Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϮ ¾Fort Worth Public Market (added 1984 - - #84001981); also known as Cadillac Plastics 1400 Henderson Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Quisle & Andrews, Noftsger, B. Gaylord Architectural Style: Mission/Spanish Revival, Other Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Specialty Store ¾Fort Worth Stockyards Historic District (added 1976 - - #76002067) Roughly bounded by 23rd, Houston, and 28th Streets, and railroad, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Mission/Spanish Revival Area of Significance: Agriculture, Architecture, Commerce, Industry Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Commerce/Trade, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Recreation and Culture Historic Sub-function: Animal Facility, Manufacturing Facility, Processing, Sport Facility Current Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Commerce/Trade, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Recreation and Culture Current Sub-function: Animal Facility, Manufacturing Facility, Processing, Sport Facility ¾Fort Worth United States Courthouse (added 2001 - - #01000437) 501 West 10th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Cret, Paul Phillippe, Clarkson, Wiley G., et al. Architectural Style: Moderne, Modern Movement Area of Significance: Art, Politics/Government, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Federal Historic Function: Government Historic Sub-function: Courthouse, Government Office Current Function: Government Current Sub-function: Courthouse, Government Office dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϯ ¾Grand Avenue Historic District (added 1990 - - #90000337) Roughly Grand Avenue from Northside to Park, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Prairie School, Bungalow/Craftsman, Tudor Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling ¾Grapevine Commercial Historic District (added 1992 - - #92000097) 404--432 South Main Street, Grapevine Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Other Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Government Historic Sub-function: Business, Department Store, Financial Institution, Post Office Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business, Restaurant, Specialty Store ¾Grapevine Commercial Historic District (Boundary Increase II) (added 2002 - - #02001569) 500-530 South Main Street, Grapevine Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Early Commercial Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Specialty Store dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϰ ¾Grapevine Commercial Historic District (Boundary Increase) (added 1997 - - #97000444) 300 and 400 blocks of South Main Street, Grapevine Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: No Style Listed Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Specialty Store ¾Guinn, James E., School (added 1998 - - #98000429) 1200 South Freeway, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Multiple Architectural Style: Classical Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Education Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Local Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use ¾Gulf, Colorado, and Santa Fe Railroad Passenger Station (added 1970 - - #70000760) 1601 Jones Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Beaux Arts Area of Significance: Transportation, Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Transportation Historic Sub-function: Rail-Related Current Function: Transportation Current Sub-function: Rail-Related dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϱ ¾Heritage Park Plaza (added 2010 - - #10000253); also known as Upper Heritage Park West Bluff Street at Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Halprin, Lawrence Area of Significance: Landscape Architecture Period of Significance: 1975-2000 Owner: Local Historic Function: Landscape Historic Sub-function: Park Current Function: Landscape Current Sub-function: Park ¾Hogg, Alexander, School (added 2002 - - #02001512); also known as District 11 School No. 11; Homes of Parker Commons 900 Saint Louis Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Innis--Graham Construction Company, Waller, M.L. Architectural Style: Beaux Arts Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling ¾Hotel Texas (added 1979 - - #79003011); also known as Fort Worth-Sheraton 815 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Marvan, Russell & Clowell, Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Other, Chicago, Renaissance Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce, Industry Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Hotel Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Hotel dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϲ ¾Hutcheson-Smith House (added 1984 - - #84001993) 312 North Oak Street, Arlington Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: Queen Anne, Stick/Eastlake Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Johnson-Elliott House (added 1984 - - #84001996); also known as Dr. Clay Johnson House 3 Chase Court, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Waller & Field Architectural Style: Prairie School, Beaux Arts Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling ¾Knights of Pythias Building (added 1970 - - #70000761); also known as Knights of Pythias Castle Hall 315 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Other Area of Significance: Architecture, Social History Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Social Historic Sub-function: Clubhouse Current Function: Social Current Sub-function: Clubhouse dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϳ ¾Kress Building (added 2007 - - #07000266); also known as Kress, S.H. and Co. Building 604 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Sibbert, Edward F. Architectural Style: Moderne Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Department Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Work In Progress Current Sub-function: Restaurant ¾Leuda--May Historic District (added 2005 - - #05000240) 301-311 West Leuda and 805-807 May Streets, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architectural Style: Prairie School, Colonial Revival Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling ¾M. G. Ellis School (1914) (added 1986 - - #83003161); also known as North Fort Worth Public School (1905) 213 Northeast 14th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Waller, Marion L. Architectural Style: Colonial, Renaissance Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϴ ¾Man, Ralph Sandiford and Julia Boisseau, House (added 2003 - - #03000435); also known as Ralph Sandiford Mann Homestead 604 West Broad Street, Mansfield Historic Significance: Person, Event Historic Person: Man, Ralph Sandiford Significant Year: 1865, 1868, 1880 Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1900-1924, 1875-1899, 1850-1874 Owner: Private Historic Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Domestic Historic Sub-function: Animal Facility, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Agriculture/Subsistence, Domestic Current Sub-function: Animal Facility, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling ¾Marine Commercial Historic District (added 2001 - - #01000102); also known as The Mercado Roughly defined by North Main Street, between North Side Drive and North 14th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Singleton, Frank J., et.al. Architectural Style: Early Commercial, Mission/Spanish Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private, Local Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Health Care, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Recreation and Culture, Social Historic Sub-function: Clubhouse, Department Store, Medical Business/Office, Processing Site, Single Dwelling, Specialty Store, Theater Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Vacant/Not In Use, Work In Progress Current Sub-function: Organizational, Processing Site, Restaurant, Specialty Store, Warehouse, Water Works ¾Markeen Apartments (added 2001 - - #01000470) 210--14 Saint Louis Avenue and 406--10 West Daggett Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Prairie School Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling Current Function: Work In Progress dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϬϵ ¾Marrow Bone Spring Archeological Site (added 1978 - - #78002980) Address Restricted, Arlington Historic Significance: Information Potential Area of Significance: Historic - Non-Aboriginal, Prehistoric Cultural Affiliation: NATIVE AMERICAN, AMERICAN Period of Significance: 5000-6999 BC, 1850-1874, 1000-2999 BC, 1000 AD-999 BC Owner: Local Historic Function: Domestic, Industry/Processing/Extraction Historic Sub-function: Manufacturing Facility, Village Site Current Function: Landscape Current Sub-function: Park ¾Masonic Widows and Orphans Home Historic District (added 1992 - - #91002022); also known as Masonic Home and School of Texas Roughly bounded by East Berry Street, Mitchell Boulevard, Vaughn Street, Wichita Street and Glen Garden Drive, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Greene, Herbert M., Clarkson, Wiley G. Architectural Style: Late Gothic Revival Area of Significance: Architecture, Social History Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Institutional Housing Current Function: Domestic, Education Current Sub-function: Institutional Housing, School ¾Montgomery Ward and Company Building (added 1998 - - #98001415); also known as Tindall Storage Warehouse 801 Grove Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Warehouse Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Warehouse dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϬ ¾Morning Chapel Colored Methodist Episcopal Church (added 1999 - - #99001049); also known as Morning Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church 901 East 3rd Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Meador, W.C. Architectural Style: Late Gothic Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾Near Southeast Historic District (added 2002 - - #02000405) Roughly bounded by New York Avenue, East Terrell Avenue, former I&GN Railway, Verbena Street, and north side of East Terrell Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Black, Commerce Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Local, Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Religion Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Religious Structure, Restaurant, Single Dwelling, Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Religion, Vacant/Not In Use Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Religious Structure, Restaurant, Single Dwelling, Specialty Store ¾North Fort Worth High School (added 1995 - - #94001627); also known as North Side High School; Fort Worth Technical High School 600 Park Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Buchanan, J.C., Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Prairie School Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Local Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϭ ¾Oakhurst Historic District (added 2010 - - #10000051) Roughly bounded by Yucca Avenue, Sylvania Avenue, Watauga Avenue, and Oakhurst Scenic Drive, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Oakhurst Land Co., Hare & Hare Architectural Style: Bungalow/Craftsman, Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals Area of Significance: Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private, Local Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Single Dwelling ¾Old Town Historic District (added 2000 - - #00000247) Roughly bounded by Sanford, Elm, North, Prairie and Oak Streets, Arlington Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Queen Anne, Colonial Revival Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Local, Private Historic Function: Domestic, Education, Landscape Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, School, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling, Street Furniture/Object Current Function: Domestic, Education, Landscape Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, School, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling, Street Furniture/Object ¾Original Town Residential Historic District (added 1998 - - #98000736); also known as College Heights Neighborhood Roughly bounded by Texas, Austin, Hudgins and Jenkins Streets, Grapevine Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Colonial Revival, Queen Anne, Other Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Multiple Dwelling, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϮ ¾Our Lady of Victory Academy (added 2004 - - #04000886); also known as Victory Arts Center 801 West Shaw Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats, et.al. Architectural Style: Late Gothic Revival Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Church Related Residence, Church School Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic Current Sub-function: Business, Multiple Dwelling, Professional ¾Our Mother of Mercy Catholic Church and Parsonage (added 1999 - - #99000882); also known as Sunshine Cumberland Presbyterian Church and Manse 1100 and 1104 Evans Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Denis, N.P. Architectural Style: Tudor Revival, Queen Anne Area of Significance: Architecture, Social History, Black Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic, Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾Our Mother of Mercy School (added 2006 - - #06000510); also known as Our Lady of Mercy School 801 Verbena Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Education, Black Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Local Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Church School Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϯ ¾Paddock Viaduct (added 1976 - - #76002068); also known as Main Street Bridge Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hannan-Heckley Bros., Brennke & Fay Architectural Style: No Style Listed Area of Significance: Transportation, Commerce, Engineering Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Local Historic Function: Transportation Historic Sub-function: Road-Related Current Function: Transportation Current Sub-function: Road-Related ¾Petroleum Building (added 2009 - - #09000982); also known as Life of America Building; Schick Building 210 West 6th Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: Skyscraper Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Business Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business ¾Pollock-Capps House (added 1972 - - #72001372) 1120 Penn Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Messer, Howard Architectural Style: Queen Anne Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Professional dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϰ ¾Ponton, Dr. Arvel and Faye, House (added 2006 - - #06001085) 1208 Mistletoe Drive, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hull Historical Restoration, Pelich, Joseph R. Architectural Style: Mission/Spanish Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Riverside Public School (added 1999 - - #99001624); also known as Corinth Baptist Youth Center 2629 LaSalle Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Black, Education Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Education Historic Sub-function: School Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾Rogers-O'Daniel House (added 1985 - - #85001484); also known as Pappy O'Daniel House 2230 Warner Road, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Person Historic Person: O'Daniel, Wilburt L. Area of Significance: Politics/Government Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϱ ¾Saint James Second Street Baptist Church (added 1999 - - #99000883); also known as Greater Saint James Missionary Baptist Church 210 Harding Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Singleton, Frank J., Powell, George R., et al. Architectural Style: Late Victorian Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾Sanger Brothers Building (added 1994 - - #94000542); also known as Sanger Brothers; J.C. Penney Building 410--412 Houston Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Wohlfield and Witt, Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: No Style Listed Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Department Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Department Store ¾Sanguinet, Marshall R., House (added 1983 - - #83003162) 4729 Collinwood Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet, Marshall R. Architectural Style: Bungalow/Craftsman Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϲ ¾Shaw, Thomas and Marjorie, House (added 1995 - - #95001029); also known as Site No. W-26, Fort Worth Southside 2404 Medford Court East, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Adams, Bert B. Architectural Style: Other Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Sinclair Building (added 1992 - - #91001913) 512 Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Friedman, Harry B., Clarkson, Wiley Gulick Architectural Style: Art Deco, Modern Movement Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Business Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business ¾South Center Street Historic District (added 2003 - - #03000334) 500-600 blocks of South Center Street, Arlington Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Bungalow/Craftsman Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϳ ¾South Main Street Historic District (added 2009 - - #09000984) 104, 108, 126 & 200 blocks South Main Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Other, Early Commercial Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Landscape Historic Sub-function: Hotel, Manufacturing Facility, Multiple Dwelling, Restaurant, Specialty Store, Street Furniture/Object Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Industry/Processing/Extraction, Landscape, Vacant/Not In Use, Work In Progress Current Sub-function: Business, Manufacturing Facility, Multiple Dwelling, Professional, Street Furniture/Object ¾South Side Masonic Lodge No. 1114 (added 1985 - - #85000048) 1301 West Magnolia, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Classical Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Social Historic Sub-function: Clubhouse, Specialty Store Current Function: Recreation and Culture Current Sub-function: Music Facility ¾Saint Mary of the Assumption Church (added 1984 - - #84001998) 501 West Magnolia Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet, Staats & Hedrick Architectural Style: Romanesque, Other Area of Significance: Architecture, Religion Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϴ ¾Saint Patrick Cathedral Complex (added 1985 - - #85000074); also known as Saint Patrick Church, Saint Ignatius Academy, and Saint Patrick Chur 1206 Throckmorton, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Kane, James J. Architectural Style: Gothic Revival, Other, Second Empire Area of Significance: Education, Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Church Related Residence, Church School, Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Church Related Residence, Religious Structure ¾Tabernacle Baptist Church (added 1999 - - #99001451); also known as Mount Pisgah Baptist Church 1801 Evans Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architectural Style: Classical Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Religion Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure Current Function: Religion Current Sub-function: Religious Structure ¾Tarrant County Courthouse (added 1970 - - #70000762) Bounded by Houston, Belknap, Weatherford, and Commerce Streets, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Gunn & Curtis Architectural Style: Late 19th and 20th Century Revivals, Renaissance Area of Significance: Politics/Government, Architecture Period of Significance: 1875-1899 Owner: Local Historic Function: Government Historic Sub-function: Courthouse Current Function: Government Current Sub-function: Courthouse dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϭϵ ¾Texas & Pacific Steam Locomotive No. 610 (added 1977 - - #77001477) Felix and Hemphill Streets, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Lima Locomotive Works Architectural Style: Other Area of Significance: Engineering, Transportation, Invention Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Transportation Historic Sub-function: Rail-Related Current Function: Transportation Current Sub-function: Rail-Related ¾Texas and Pacific Terminal Complex (added 1978 - - #78002983) Lancaster and Throckmorton Streets, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: Art Deco, Skyscraper Area of Significance: Art, Transportation, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Transportation Historic Sub-function: Rail-Related Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Transportation Current Sub-function: Rail-Related ¾US Post Office (added 1985 - - #85000855); also known as Fort Worth Main Post Office Lancaster and Jennings Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Hedrick, Wyatt C. Architectural Style: Classical Revival, Beaux Arts Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Federal Historic Function: Government Historic Sub-function: Post Office Current Function: Government Current Sub-function: Post Office dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϮϬ ¾Vandergriff Building (added 2010 - - #10000500); also known as Thannisch Chevrolet Building 100 East Division Street, Arlington Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Commerce Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Specialty Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Business ¾Vaught House (added 2005 - - #05000864) 718 West Abram Street, Arlington Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Specialty Store ¾Waggoner, W. T. Building (added 1979 - - #79003012) 810 Houston Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Chicago, Skyscraper Area of Significance: Architecture, Commerce, Industry Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Current Function: Commerce/Trade ¾Wallace--Hall House (added 2003 - - #03000436) 210 South Main Street, Mansfield Historic Significance: Event Area of Significance: Community Planning and Development Period of Significance: 1950-1974, 1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϮϭ ¾Westbrook, Roy A. and Gladys, House (added 2009 - - #08001300) 2232 Winton Terrace West, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Pelich, Joseph R. Architectural Style: Tudor Revival Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic, Landscape, Recreation and Culture Historic Sub-function: Garden, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling, Sport Facility Current Function: Domestic, Landscape, Recreation and Culture Current Sub-function: Garden, Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling, Sport Facility ¾Westover Manor (added 1988 - - #88002709); also known as Fort Worth Star Telegram 1930 Home Beautiful 8 Westover Road, Westover Hills Historic Significance: Event, Person, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Et al., Curtis, Victor Marr Architectural Style: Other, Tudor Revival Historic Person: Farrell, John E. Significant Year: 1930, 1936, 1929 Area of Significance: Architecture, Community Planning and Development, Industry Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Secondary Structure, Single Dwelling Current Function: Domestic Current Sub-function: Single Dwelling ¾Wharton-Scott House (added 1975 - - #75002003) 1509 Pennsylvania Avenue, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Sanguinet & Staats Architectural Style: Other, Colonial Revival, Beaux Arts Area of Significance: Architecture, Landscape Architecture Period of Significance: 1900-1924 Owner: Private Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Vacant/Not In Use dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϮϮ ¾Woolworth, F. W., Building (added 1994 - - #94001359) 501 Houston Street, Fort Worth Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Taylor, James T., Clarkson, Wiley G. Architectural Style: Classical Revival Area of Significance: Commerce, Architecture Period of Significance: 1925-1949 Owner: Private Historic Function: Commerce/Trade Historic Sub-function: Department Store Current Function: Commerce/Trade Current Sub-function: Specialty Store dĂƌƌĂŶƚŽƵŶƚLJ,ĂnjĂƌĚDŝƚŝŐĂƚŝŽŶĐƚŝŽŶWůĂŶ ϯϮϯ Natural Cooperative Soil Survey The following soil survey identifies the dwellings on concrete slabs in Tarrant County. These dwellings have the potential to be impacted by the identified hazards; particularly, expansive soils. Dwellings are single-family houses of three stories or less. 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