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09-24-18 TC Agenda PacketThe Regular Meeting of the Town of Westlake Town Council will begin immediately following the conclusion of the Town Council Work Session but not prior to the posted start time. Mission Statement Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent. Westlake, Texas – “One-of-a-kind community; natural oasis – providing an exceptional level of service.” Page 1 of 5 TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS Vision Statement An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. TOWN COUNCIL MEETING AGENDA September 24, 2018 1500 Solana Boulevard Building 7, Suite 7100 1st Floor, Council Chamber Westlake, TX 76262 Work Session: 6:00 p.m. Regular Session: 6:30 p.m. Page 2 of 5 Work Session 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. REVIEW OF CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS FOR THE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA. 3. DISCUSSION ITEMS a. Presentation and further discussion regarding a process for Capital Improvement Planning for Westlake Academy. b. Presentation and discussion by Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee (WPACC) representatives regarding status of Public Art Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process and WPACC work to date. c. Standing Item: Presentation and discussion of development projects per Staff report August 2018 including an Entrada report from the Developer and projects in Planned Development PD 3-5. d. Discussion regarding a replacement of resigning Town Council member. 4. EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada 5. RECONVENE MEETING 6. COUNCIL RECAP / STAFF DIRECTION 7. ADJOURNMENT Page 3 of 5 Regular Session 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ITEMS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST: Mayor and Council Reports on Items of Community Interest pursuant to Texas Government Code Section 551.0415 the Town Council may report on the following items: (1) expression of thanks, congratulations or condolences; (2) information about holiday schedules; (3) recognition of individuals; (4) reminders about upcoming Town Council events; (5) information about community events; and (6) announcements involving imminent threat to public health and safety. 3. CITIZEN COMMENTS: This is an opportunity for citizens to address the Council on any matter whether or not it is posted on the agenda. The Council cannot by law take action nor have any discussion or deliberations on any presentation made to the Council at this time concerning an item not listed on the agenda. The Council will receive the information, ask staff to review the matter, or an item may be noticed on a future agenda for deliberation or action. 4. CONSENT AGENDA: All items listed below are considered routine by the Town Council and will be enacted with one motion. There will be no separate discussion of items unless a Council Member or citizen so requests, in which event the item will be removed from the general order of business and considered in its normal sequence. a. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on August 27, 2018. b. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 10, 2018. c. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 19, 2018. d. Consider approval of Resolution 18-33, Approving a Negotiated Settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”) and Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division. e. Consider approval of Resolution 18-34, Approving a Signage and Lighting Plan for Phase I of the Charles Schwab Development. f. Consider approval of Resolution 18-35, Approving an Economic Development Agreement with the Marriott Solana Hotel. g. Consider approval of Ordinance 863, Amending Chapter 58, Peddlers and Solicitors. h. Consider approval of Ordinance 864, Amending Chapter 2 titled “Administration” by amending Section 2-181 and repealing Ordinance 832 adopting a Fee Schedule by adopting a new Fee Schedule. 5. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING AND CONSIDERATION OF ORDINANCE 865, APPROVING PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO ORDINANCE 202 APPROVING THE PD1 ZONING DISTRICT BY APPROVING A SITE PLAN AMENDMENT TO CONSTRUCT ADDITIONAL SURFACE PARKING LOTS FOR LOTS 3 AND 4, BLOCK 2, WESTLAKE/SOUTHLAKE PARK ADDITION NUMBER ONE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SOLANA BLVD. AND STATE HIGHWAY 114. 6. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING AND CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION 18-36, APPROVING A PRELIMINARY SITE EVALUATION FOR AN APPROXIMATELY Page 4 of 5 62.5-ACRE PORTION OF PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT 6 (PD6) ALSO KNOWN AS THE KNOLLS AT SOLANA. THE PROPERTY IS GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH OF SOLANA BLVD, WEST OF SAM SCHOOL RD, NORTH OF GLENWYCK FARMS AND EAST OF GRANADA. 7. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING AND CONSIDERATION OF ORDINANCE 866, ADOPTING THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE ESTIMATED BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018, ADOPTING THE PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 INCLUDING AN INVESTMENT POLICY, PAY PLAN POLICY, FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES, RESTRICTED, COMMITTED AND ASSIGNED FUND BALANCES, AND PROVIDING AUTHORIZATION TO THE TOWN MANGER TO APPROVE APPROPRIATED FUNDS UP TO $50,0000. 8. CONSIDERATION AND DISCUSSION OF A RESOLUTION 18-37, TO RATIFY THE PROPERTY TAX INCREASE AS REFLECTED IN THE FY 2018-2019 ANNUAL BUDGET. 9. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION OF ORDINANCE 867, LEVYING MUNICIPAL AD VALOREM (PROPERTY) TAXES FOR THE 2018 YEAR IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FISCAL YEAR 2018-19 PROPOSED BUDGET. 10. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION REGARDING THE LETTER OF RESIGNATION OF COUNCIL MEMBER WAYNE STOLTENBERG. 11. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION 18-38, APPOINTING A PERSON TO FILL THE UNEXPIRED TERM OF COUNCILMEMBER WAYNE STOLTENBERG. 12. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION 18-39, APPOINTING A COMMISSIONER AND ALTERNATE COMMISSIONER TO THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION. 13. EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada Page 5 of 5 14. RECONVENE MEETING 15. TAKE ANY ACTION, IF NEEDED, FROM EXECUTIVE SESSION ITEMS. 16. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS: Any Council member may request at a workshop and / or Council meeting, under “Future Agenda Item Requests”, an agenda item for a future Council meeting. The Council Member making the request will contact the Town Manager with the requested item and the Town Manager will list it on the agenda. At the meeting, the requesting Council Member will explain the item, the need for Council discussion of the item, the item’s relationship to the Council’s strategic priorities, and the amount of estimated staff time necessary to prepare for Council discussion. If the requesting Council Member receives a second, the Town Manager will place the item on the Council agenda calendar allowing for adequate time for staff preparation on the agenda item. 17. ADJOURNMENT ANY ITEM ON THIS POSTED AGENDA COULD BE DISCUSSED IN EXECUTIVE SESSION AS LONG AS IT IS WITHIN ONE OF THE PERMITTED CATEGORIES UNDER SECTIONS 551.071 THROUGH 551.076 AND SECTION 551.087 OF THE TEXAS GOVERNMENT CODE. CERTIFICATION I certify that the above notice was posted at the Town Hall of the Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd., Building 7, Suite 7100, Westlake, TX 76262, September 20, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. under the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551 of the Texas Government Code. _____________________________________ Kelly Edwards, TRMC, Town Secretary If you plan to attend this public meeting and have a disability that requires special needs, please advise the Town Secretary 48 hours in advance at 817-490-5710 and reasonable accommodations will be made to assist you. REVIEW OF CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS FOR THE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA. a. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on August 27, 2018. b. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 10, 2018. c. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 19, 2018. d. Consider approval of Resolution 18-33, Approving a Negotiated Settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”) and Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division. e. Consider approval of Resolution 18-34, Approving a Signage and Lighting Plan for Phase I of the Charles Schwab Development. f. Consider approval of Resolution 18-35, Approving an Economic Development Agreement with the Marriott Solana Hotel. g. Consider approval of Ordinance 863, Amending Chapter 58, Peddlers and Solicitors. h. Consider approval of Ordinance 864, Amending Chapter 2 titled “Administration” by amending Section 2-181 and repealing Ordinance 832 adopting a Fee Schedule by adopting a new Fee Schedule. Town Council Item # 2 – Review of Consent Items DISCUSSION ITEMS a. Presentation and further discussion regarding a process for Capital Improvement Planning for Westlake Academy. b. Presentation and discussion by Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee (WPACC) representatives regarding status of Public Art Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process and WPACC work to date. c. Standing Item: Presentation and discussion of development projects per Staff report August 2018 including an Entrada report from the Developer and projects in Planned Development PD 3-5. d. Discussion regarding a replacement of resigning Town Council member. Town Council Item #3 – Discussion Items estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Workshop - Discussion Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Presentation and Discussion Regarding Further Discussion of a Process for Capital Improvement Planning for Westlake Academy. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Curriculum Outcome Objective Planned / Responsible Development Academic Operations PYP / MYP / DP Improve the Efficiences of Operational Systems Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Informed & Engaged Citizens / Sense of Community Citizen, Student & Stakeholder Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase CSS Satisfaction Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Informed & Engaged Citizens / Sense of Community Municipal & Academic Operations High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Educate Stakeholders about our Development and Environmental Goals Time Line - Start Date: September 24, 2018 Completion Date: TBD Funding Amount: $85,000 Status - Not Funded Source - General Fund EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) The WA Campus Facility Master Plan (Plan) was discussed as to the possibility of funding an update to this Plan at the Budget Retreat last summer during preparation of the FY17-18 Budget. No funding was included in the FY 17-18 Budget to retain professional services to update this six-year old Plan, although the Council indicated willingness to consider funding it by approaching the Texas Student Housing Association (TSHA) for such funding. Prior to initiating such discussions with TSHA, Staff initiated a joint Town Council/Board of Trustees workshop discussion on this topic of updating this Plan which was held on February 5, 2018. The purpose of this discussion was to obtain consensus on the scope of services for updating the Plan prior to requesting any funding from the TSHA. Much discussion between Staff and the Council/Board ensued on February 5th, with a consensus that further discussion on this topic was needed. Further discussion was held at the Board’s May 7, 2018 workshop. At this May 7th workshop Staff presented a memorandum (attached) which contained recommendations for moving forward on capital improvement planning at WA by: • defining “immediate need” to identify WA capital project(s) that might be recommended to address that immediate need, • beginning to address medium and long-range projects via a process that considers medium and long-range facility planning within the context of both reviewing the existing Campus Facility Master Plan and any effort to re-visit and update that Plan, and • creating an intersection and reconciliation of any identified immediate need capital project with the Campus Facility Plan, either in its current form or as it may be revised through an update process. Additionally, Staff has been meeting since the May 7th workshop with a school planning/architectural firm, Stantec, about the services their firm could provide that would assist the Board/Council and Staff in this effort. Stantec was scheduled to present to the Board of Trustees’ workshop meeting for September 10th , however, that meeting was cancelled due to lack of a quorum. For that reason, representatives from Stantec will be present at this Town Council workshop to share their thoughts on recommended steps to move our process forward as well as services they provide clients to that end. RECOMMENDATION AND ATTACHMENTS 1. Memo dated 5 3 18 from Superintendent outlining a proposed process for moving forward on capital planning for Westlake Academy facilities. 2. Definition of “immediate need” as it relates to WA capital improvement planning as developed by the WA Instructional Leadership Team. 3. Condensed Statement of Qualifications and of Projects for Stantec. Page 1 of 4 MEMORANDUM Date: May 1, 2018 TO: Honorable Mayor and Town Council/Board of Trustees FROM: Tom Brymer, Town Manager/Superintendent SUBJECT: Capital Improvement/Facility Planning for Westlake Academy Background and Purpose of this Memorandum WA campus facility master planning was discussed at a joint Town Council/Board of Trustees workshop on February 5, 2018. Much discussion between Staff and the Council/Board ensued, with a consensus that further discussion on this topic was needed. Specifically, the discussion on February 5th with the Council/Board focused on the need and desire to re-address capital improvement planning for Westlake Academy. Presently we have a multi-year Westlake Academy (WA) Campus Facility Master Plan that was adopted by the Town Council on November 12, 2012 and by the Board of Trustees on November 5, 2012. Much time and effort as well as financial resources were invested in this Plan. Since it has been almost six years since it was approved and adopted, it is time to re-examine the Plan again, if for no other reason than to make sure it is still meeting the Town’s needs for its school, Westlake Academy. The purpose of this memorandum is to outline a proposed process for moving forward on capital planning for Westlake Academy facilities. CIP Process Generally and How WA Facility Planning Fits into It The purpose of the Town’s 5 Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is to be a proactive tool that identifies projects for serious consideration that involve investing in new infrastructure or investment in existing infrastructure. The CIP tool is intended to achieve the outcome of insuring that the Town is adequately planning for, and investing in, both its new and existing infrastructure. Identification of capital project needs is important, so they can be considered holistically in conjunction with the operating financial needs of the Town in the annual budget. This in turn allows the Council/Board to make balanced long-term decisions about both the Town’s services and its Page 2 of 4 infrastructure within the context of the Town’s financial requirements and financial condition. As a subsidiary capital improvement plan, this current WA Campus Facility Plan (Plan) identifies projects that may be needed over a defined planning period. The importance of the Plan cannot be overstated if for no other reason than it allows the Town to avoid planning the campus in an incremental as opposed to a long range, holistic fashion. Once the Plan identifies projects (through a lengthy vetting process involving Staff and the Council) and Council is agreed to begin tentatively considering them, these projects are then placed in the Town’s overall 5 Year Capital Improvement Plan. The Town’s overall 5 Year CIP, in addition to possible WA capital projects, contains a variety of other identified capital projects including streets and drainage projects, fire stations and other public buildings, as well as parks other public infrastructure. All this capital improvement planning must consider the timing of projects, their priority, as well as the sources and uses of the financial resources necessary to fund for them. Recommended Process for Westlake Academy Capital/Facility Planning Staff is recommending the Council/BOT’s consideration of a “three pronged” approach, with parallel pathways conducted concurrently which ultimately intersect, thus moving us forward in both the short and the long term. First Step - Define and Identify Immediate WA Facility Needs. This requires a definition that both the Staff and the Council/Board are in consensus with regarding the term “immediate need” in the context of planning WA facility needs. Leadership Team members at both WA and in the Municipal portion of the Town organization have been working on such a definition. It is: An immediate need for WA capital/facility planning is a facility need that, if unaddressed over the next two years, will create an inability to fulfill WA’s VVM while posing a substantial physical, social-emotional, and/or academic risk to the success of the academy staff and/or students. To determine WA’s critical mass the following criteria will be assessed using a risk-analysis model: compliance, cost, and quality of student learning. • Compliance includes federal and state guidelines, IB Standards and Practices, strategic plan, and directives from the Board of Trustees. Page 3 of 4 • Cost includes the actual financial outlay for each item being considered in addition to costs associated with alternative service delivery options. • Quality of student learning refers to the ability of the academy to meet with unique educational needs of all learners while ensuring successful implementation of the IB curriculum. Short term as used here would be a period from now through the next 2 years. This definition of an “immediate need” project must create a “distillation” process which results in what is basically a forced ranking, i.e. a project that is so critical that WA’s ability to deliver educational services at the level it now does, is clearly affected deleteriously. Further, the current WA facility plan would also need to be reviewed to see if any of the Phase 2 and 3 projects identified in it should be considered as immediate need projects. Second Step - Begin the Medium and Long-Term Facility Planning Process for WA while considering immediate need projects. This would involve the following steps: • Review of the Current WA Facility Plan- this review would have as its objective to identify which projects in the current Plan are still viewed as valid and which are not. • For those projects viewed as still valid, seek agreement on their timing. It is recommended a time frame category be assigned to these projects still viewed as valid. This could be done several ways, but often simpler is better when going through this exercise. For example, “medium term” projects could be those with a 3-5-year time frame while long-term projects could be those with a 5 year plus planning horizon. • Retaining services of a school demographic forecasting firm to review previous student population growth forecasts related to residential growth in Westlake and make new forecasts based on this Westlake residential growth. This effort is underway using SDS, a school demographics analysis and forecasting firm that was used for the current WA Campus Facility Plan. • Deciding to use the services of a qualified school facilities planning firm to assist in updating the WA Campus Facility Plan. These firms are often architectural firms that design school facilities. It is important that a selected firm understand WA in terms of the type of school it is and what differentiates WA. The scope of this engagement would need to be Page 4 of 4 refined, i.e. should the plan examine only what is being offered by WA today or take a more future focus in terms of educational programming that might be needed over the next 5-10 years? Is facility planning at WA only going to focus on buildings, or other facility related planning needs such as land? Third Step - Intersection and Reconciliation of Immediate Needs Projects with the Campus Facility Plan. This is especially important if the decision is made to update the Plan for medium and long-range projects so that any immediate need project(s) would not represent an impediment to the execution of longer term projects (or vice versa). This reconciliation would need to occur concurrent to and early in the medium and long-range project planning process so both processes could move forward in tandem and not conflict. Conclusion Any process for capital improvement planning has both pros and cons. The recommended process outlined here certainly can be argued to have its pros and cons as well. However, considering all the factors involved, this process has, in Staff’s view, the strongest ability to move us forward in a manner best suited to support the Town’s and WA’s vision, mission, and values. This process best addresses the need to properly plan for Westlake Academy’s facility needs both for the near term and over the next 5-10-year planning horizon. Staff does not recommend the “do nothing” option for reasons outlined in the memorandum as to why capital planning is done in the first place, i.e. assuring the intended outcome is achieved that the Town is adequately planning for, and investing in, both its new and existing infrastructure. 1Stantec // Westlake Academy Information PacketStantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet Professional History Founded in 1945, Stantec is a fully integrated architecture, planning, and engineering firm dedicated to education. Stantec has eight local Texas offices (4 of which are focused on educational architecture) and a history rich in education support. Not only have we worked with over 400 districts, charter schools, and private schools in the State of Texas, but we have designed over 1,550 projects worth over $9 billion for school clients across the nation. While many architectural firms occasionally design schools, few can draw on the rich experiences and invaluable lessons learned by designing schools and working with educators each and every day. Stantec takes pride in designing the best schools the nation has to offer its children as we truly believe that education is the foundation to society. Educational design has always been and always will be at the heart of our firm. Our Purpose We are architects, engineers, landscape architects, and interior designers who are also students, parents, and teachers. As members of the community, we’re personally invested in it’s future and strive to create learning environments that inspire and move it forward. We work to deliver inspiring and functional designs that stimulate intellect and motivate students, while positively contributing to the greater community. National Experience, Local Expertise The value of working with a leader in educational facility design is that you are assured of innovative design and exceptional results. We are experts at delivering our clients’ projects on -time and in-budget. Further, as specialists in education we focus our resources on developing innovative design solutions that draw upon the most successful strategies in K-12 education. These innovations support your efforts to more successfully advocate for students, deliver effective education, and operate your schools in a cost effective and efficient manner. Research + Benchmarking As a firm specializing in school architecture, Stantec emphasizes the importance of continued learning, especially in the rapidly changing world of educational planning and design. A key part of this learning process is the Research and Benchmarking program that focuses on particular building types and aspects of educational facility design. We make that investment to build knowledge within the firm to benefit our clients and their projects. The R+B program allows our team to capture, share, and leverage knowledge. At Stantec, we spend $1 million annually on internal research grants, and dedicate over 3,000 man hours each year to our R+B Practice. Firm Profile 2Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet 250+ Texas K12 Projects Within Last 3 Years Stantec has been dedicated to serving our educational partners since 1945. Building long lasting relationships with our clients is what we strive for - whether small renovation projects or large new construction projects, we give the same attention to all of our projects. Helping our clients achieve their educational and operational goals is our mission. In the past ten years, we have provided architectural services for 1,841 educational facility projects, included among these are over 800 projects for Texas school clients. From technology to athletics, fine arts to large group instruction, and the associated support spaces in these facilities, we understand how good design affects function, behavior and performance The DFW office of Stantec was opened in 1968 and has served many Texas school districts over the last 50 years. Engineering Firms BD&C 2015 Top K-12 Design Firms Architectural Record 2015 #1 400+ Number of Texas School Clients • Achievement Centers for Children • Aliquippa School District - Feasibility Study • Aquinas Academy - Gymnasium Addition • Athol Murray College of Notre Dame Off-Ice Hockey Training Facility • Beachwood City School District - Beachwood High School Renovation • Bellwood-Antis School District - Myers Elementary School • Bishop O’Connell High School Athletic Facilities Improvements • Blackhawk School District - Middle/Senior High School and Field Upgrades • Cambridge Montessori School Site Master Plan and Conceptual Study • Canon McMillan High School Athletic Facilities • Central Catholic High School - STEM Building • Central Valley School District - Central Valley Primary Center • Central Valley School District - Middle/High School • Central Valley School District - Middle/High School Athletic Field Facilities • Children of the Living Earth School • Children’s International School • Clay Academy • Columbus City Schools - Georgian Heights Elementary School • Conemaugh Valley School District • Conemaugh Valley School District - Conemaugh Valley Elementary School • Foothills Academy- Arch, ID • French American School of New York - Campus Plan • French American School of New York - Phase I • GEMS American School • GEMS Badrah School • GEMS Wellington Academy - Dubai Silicon Oasis • GEMS Wellington Primary School • Good Shepherd Catholic School - Arch. • Greiner Middle School (Arts Academy Addition) • Groton-Dunstable Regional School District - North Middle School • IDEA Public Charter School Health & Wellness Center • Ideaventions Academy 90+ Private School K-12 Clients 3Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet • La Salle College High School - Athletic Center • La Salle College High School - Cafeteria and Kitchen Renovation and Addition • La Salle College High School - McLean Hall • Luther College High School • Malvern Preparatory School, Center for the Performing and Creative Arts • Notre Dame College: Centre of Excellence in Learning and Teaching • O.V. Jewitt Community School • Orville H. Platt High School • P3 Sask Schools • Philipsburg Osceola School District Middle School • Point Park University - West Penn Hall Cinema Arts, Academic Thayer Hall, Library Programming, and Various Projects • Prestonwood Christian Academy • Roger E. Wellington Elementary School • Saint Joseph’s High School - Gymnasium Addition • Saint Joseph’s High School - Science Lab • Sandy Spring Friends School • Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology-Comprehensive Facilities Assessment • Sewickley Academy - Campus-Wide Improvements • South Butler County School District - South Butler Primary School & District Offices • St. Andrew’s Episcopal School - Kindergarten Center • St. Andrew’s School - Major Capital Improvements • St. Brendan Parish Center • St. Francis Central Coast Catholic High School • St. Gabriel Catholic School • St. Jerome Elementary (Panorama)- Arch, ID • St. John’s Ravenscourt (SJR) Addition and Renovations • St. Mary’s Academy Master Planning and Redevelopment • St. Mary’s University, Périgueux Hall • St. Sebastian Elementary (Chaparral)- Arch, ID • Strake Jesuit College Preparatory • The Lab School of Washington • The Neighborhood Academy • The Wellington School - Master Plan • Titusville Area School District - Pleasantville Elementary School • Tucson Unified School • University of Alberta Sector 12 Implementation Guidelines • Wendler Middle School Renovation Phase 2 • Wilmington Friends School Master Plan • Yuying Replacement Secondary School, Beijing Haidian District Education Commission • École Constable Edward Finney School • École Leila North Community School • École Monseigneur de Laval Pavillon Secondaire Renovations 4Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet Adrian Public Schools Airport Community Schools Alamo Heights ISD Aldine ISD Alief ISD Alvin ISD Amarillo ISD Argyle ISD Austin ISD Bandera ISD Beaumont ISD Bellville ISD Belton ISD Birdville ISD Boerne ISD Brazos ISD Brownsboro ISD Brownsville ISD Burleson ISD Caddo Mills ISD Calallen ISD Canadien ISD Carrizo Springs CiSD Carrllton-FB ISD Celina ISD Center Point ISD Central ISD Chapel Hill ISD Chisum ISD Clear Creek ISD Cleburne ISD College Station ISD Columbia-Brazoria ISD Comal ISD Comanche ISD Comfort ISD Conroe ISD Coppell ISD Corpus Christi ISD Crockett ISD Cy-Fair ISD Dallas ISD Del Valle ISD Denton ISD Dickinson ISD Duncanville ISD Eagle Pass ISD Eanes ISD Edinburg ISD Elgin ISD Ennis ISD Flatonia ISD Forney ISD Fort Bend ISD Fort Worth ISD Frenship ISD Frisco ISD Galena Park ISD Ganado USD Garland ISD Georgetown ISD Giddings ISD Grand Prarie ISD Grape Greek Pulliam ISD Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Greenville ISD Gregory Portland ISD Harlandale ISD Harlingen CISD Hays CISD Henrico ISD Hildalgo ISD Highland Park ISD Hitchcock ISD Houston ISD Huffman ISD Humble ISD Irving ISD Jourdanton ISD Judson ISD Katy ISD Keller ISD Kerrville ISD Kilgore ISD Killeen ISD Klein ISD La Feria ISD La Joya ISD Lago Vista ISD Lamar CISD LaMarque ISD Lancaster ISD Lewisville ISD Little Elm ISD Lockhart ISD Los Fresnos ISD Luling ISD Lytle ISD Manor ISD Mansfield ISD Marble Falls ISD Maypearl ISD McAllen ISD McKinney ISD Melissa ISD Mercedes ISD Midlothian ISD Midway ISD Montgomery ISD Moody ISD Needville ISD New Braufels ISD New Caney ISD New Waverly ISD Nixon-Smiley ISD North East ISD North Lamar ISD Northside ISD Northwest ISD Olathe USD Orangefield ISD Palacios ISD Pearland ISD Pflugerville ISD Pharr San Juan Alamo ISD Plainview ISD Plano ISD Port Isabel ISD Port Neches-Groves ISD Princeton ISD Prosper ISD Quinlan ISD Randolph Field ISD Rice ISD Richardson ISD Robstown ISD Rockwall ISD Round Rock ISD Salado ISD San Antonio ISD San Diego ISD San Felipe-Del Rio CISD Santa Fe ISD Sheldon ISD Sherman ISD Somverville ISD Sonora ISD South Texas ISD Southlake-Caroll ISD Southside ISD Spendora ISD Spring Branch ISD Spring ISD Springtown ISD Stafford MSD Sweeney ISD Temple ISD Texarkana ISD Tidehaven ISD Tomball ISD Tuloso Midway ISD Tyler ISD United ISD Van Vleck ISD Victoria ISD Wall ISD Waller ISD Waxahachie ISD Weslaco ISD West Oso ISD Whitesboro ISD Whitewright ISD Whitney ISD Willis ISD Wylie ISD Zapata County ISD A Sample of Texas School District Clients 5Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet LOCATION: Coppell, Texas SIZE: 95,633 SF COST: $20,210,000 CAPACITY: 735 SERVICES: Long Range Planning, Bond Planning, Architecture, Interior Design, Structural Engineering, Technology Design Richard J. Lee Elementary School Coppell ISD award-winning facility where grades are organized into smaller learning communities with a central collaboration space. Within each community, break-out spaces balance group and individualized learning opportunities. Furniture, technology, and an outdoor learning lab are just a few of the notable design features that promote learning everywhere, and support maximum flexibility for the learning environments. Designing one of the country’s first Net-Zero-Ready elementary schools where non-traditional learning environments can thrive was an amazing challenge that our team gladly accepted and executed for Lee Elementary School. This District was ready to transition from a traditional prototype to one that is flexible and 21st-century ready, and relied on our expertise to guide them, and their community through the entire process. The result is an Currently the highest performing school in the United States, Lee Elementary School’s Net-Zero energy usage provides an annual savings of $76,000, enabling the Dis- trict to relocate the savings back into the classroom. Stars of Distinction 2015 TASA/TASB Grand Prize Award 2016 Learning by Design Caudill Award 2015 TASA/TASB Net Zero School LEED Gold Highland Park Independent School District (HPISD) is a top performing district. Most of the schools in this affluent districts date back to the 1950’s and are well loved by their residents. However, a lot of their facilities have reached the end of their useful life, both from a facilities perspective, as well as an educational appropriateness view. HPISD has decided to replace 3 of their 4 Elementary Schools, and build an additional Elementary School. This is the Design Development renderings and plans of the new elementary school. Located in a very small site, just over four acres, the academic wing is 3 stories and parking is in a underground garage. LOCATION: Dallas, TX SIZE: 144,309 SF (including parking garage below grade) COST: $26,249,081 CAPACITY: 800 SERVICES: Architecture, Interior Design, MEP Engineering, Structural Engineering Elementary School #5 Highland Park ISD 7Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet LOCATION: Houston, Texas SIZE: 47,500 SF COST: $12,439,476 CAPACITY: 2,200 SERVICES: Long Range Planning, Bond Planning, Architecture, Interior Design, Structural Engineering, Technology Design Strake Jesuit College Preparatory with easy access to food services. Classrooms, studios, art labs, conference rooms, and the spirit store are housed in a three-story block with student common spaces integrated throughout. Acting not only as a destination for many student functions, the facility includes a bell tower, providing a prominent religious symbol visible throughout the grounds and identifying the primary point of entry to the central campus. Clean, simple and positioned at the very heart of campus, the Chapel’s interior makes its own architectural statement. Three existing stained glass windows from the original buildings on campus were relocated and utilized within the new Chapel to help weave the school’s history into the new design. “Light, airy and collegiate” were the first words used by Strake Jesuit staff to describe the design aspirations for this new facility. The main thrust of the design was to meet those goals, create an iconic image for a school which reflects their strong culture and tradition, and to boost campus and student connectivity. From the point of entry to the central campus, this design enhances critical school functions and reinforces the history and caliber of the Society of St. Ignatius and the Jesuit Community. The plan is visually very open with a central atrium connecting the new Student Center and Chapel to an existing 1950’s gym. Identifiable by its wood bow-string truss design, the gym was repurposed for the new 600+ seat student dining hall. The dining hall doubles as a special events assembly that can easily house 1000+ Golden Trowel Honor Award 2009 Associated Masonry Contractors of Houston Clay Academy is a college preparatory school where children are molded to achieve greatness through a focus on the “whole child”— spiritually, academically, athletically, artistically and technologically. Founded in 1998 by Bishop T.D. Jakes, of The Potter’s House of Dallas, Clay Academy currently serves Pre-K through ninth-grade students. In addition, Clay Academy plans to extend its program through the twelfth grade over the next few years. As the anchor and landmark for the Clay Academy campus, the 66,540 square foot main hall creates an identity and presence for the school within its community of Capella Park and the City of Dallas. The stately two-story structure has a vocabulary reminiscent of traditional Georgian architecture. It houses the campus administrative area, the campus community library, a lecture hall and educational spaces for upper school students. Those include classrooms, seminar rooms, learning labs with individual work areas for teachers and students, science labs, computer labs and a distance education lab. Phase Two of the facility includes finish out of the 26,090 square foot second floor of the building, a learning center, the campus gateway, an amphitheater and a media center. The construction of the second phase is scheduled around class times and will span several years. LOCATION: Dallas, TX SIZE: 44,450 SF (Phase 1) COST: $10,700,000 CAPACITY: 416 (Phase 1) SERVICES: Architecture, Interior Design, MEP Engineering, Structural Engineering Clay Academy The Potter’s House 9Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet LOCATION: Austin, Texas SIZE: 30,000 SF COST: $7,200,000 (Phase I) CAPACITY: 865 SERVICES: Master Planning, Programming, Architecture, Interior Design, Structural Engineering St. Gabriel’s Catholic School Phase I-II Cohesiveness was the main goal when designing the addition to St. Gabriel’s campus. The designer paid close attention to the materials used to ensure the addition was aesthetically consistent with the existing buildings. Daylighting was one of the vital aspects that drove the design from the beginning. To utilize outdoor space and remain budget conscious, an amphitheater was designed to create a physical and visual connection between indoors and outdoors. The addition utilized recycled materials, which teaches students good practice through sustainability. An outdoor science center for the lower school and green roof on the new addition were added, implementing student learning by growing native plants. Since 2004, Stantec has served St. Gabriel’s Catholic School. Currently, we are providing planning and design services for a 30,000 SF addition to the existing campus with light renovations of the entry and dining spaces. The new chapel will become the focus of the learning commons with a 30’ tall stained glass cross terminating a 200’ corridor. The learning stair spills into the chapel next to the media center. The design includes varied breakout spaces, LGI, new classrooms and a featured makerspace. The third floor administrative spaces have a balcony and views that overlook the Texas hill country. Completed in 2007, Stantec designed a new middle school building addition to the existing campus. Stantec rose to the challenge and met FASNY’s request to creatively develop an intelligent and sustainable design for their new school. Stantec was commissioned by the French American School of New York (FASNY) with the challenge to rethink their current plan focusing on intelligent, sustainable, integrated, compelling design with tight budgetary constraints. We met our client’s challenge, allowing the project to move forward with a design that embodies FASNY’s culture and vision for 21st century teaching and learning for the French Baccalaureate curriculum. Our integrated A/E team orchestrated a “Deep Dive” consisting of workshops with faculty, parents, students, administrators and trustees. These meetings allowed us to capture the essence of the project in a very short amount of time, allowing FASNY to maintain their aggressive planning and approvals schedule. The result is a design that allows the land to influence the placement of buildings to minimize construction impacts on the site and maintain existing land forms and mature trees. Flexible learning environments are planned for both interior and exterior spaces with strategic glazing and site lines to connect students to the exterior and put “learning on display”. Additionally, the structure and infrastructure is designed to allow FASNY to reconfigure the building for future curricular needs. LOCATION: Mamaroneck, New York SIZE: 112,000 SF COST: $47,000,000 SERVICES: Architecture, Planning, Interior Design, MEP Engineering, Structural Engineering French American School of New York 11Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet LOCATION: Olathe, Kansas SIZE: 375,000 SF COST: $75,000,000 CAPACITY: 2,500 SERVICES: Design Architect (In association with Hollis+Miller) Olathe West High School Olathe Unified School District distributed among four learning communities, with separate student neighborhoods and space for administration and support staff. The classrooms are oriented toward a more project-focused lesson plan and will be built with flexible furniture so they can be arranged for large and small group classes, including: • Active learning spaces for direct instruction. • Blended learning, flexible spaces for project-based lessons. • Maker spaces for hands-on classes. The high school also includes a performing arts center, complete with a large auditorium and a smaller black box theater called the flex theater. It also will have three gymnasium spaces and a number of practice fields for soccer, baseball, softball, football and tennis. Vision: Future learning and teaching is “driven by the student, facilitated by caring adults, supported by mentors and peers, with the parents and community as partners. Students explore and develop skills through inquiry and curiosity in a shell that blends context and outcomes. Olathe West is a three-story, 375,000 SF High School that focuses on 21st century learning, which emphasizes the use of technology; open, modular learning spaces; and collaboration among students. Olathe West is centered around a three-story entry area called the learning commons. That area will have student gathering spaces and will connect to the media center, which will be open rather than closed, and the four wings, called learning communities, where students will attend regular classes. The school is designed for 2,000 students that will be To continue Central Catholic’s tradition of academic excellence, we were engaged in 2013 to design a new STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) building. The 25,600 square foot facility encourages their current programs for Technology/Robotics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Math to integrate into a cohesive STEM curriculum. Promoting community within the school, the new classroom building connects the academic areas of the campus to the athletic buildings and fields. Science and faith is prominently featured in the building’s aesthetics. Central’s Catholic identity and the Church’s scientific contributions are apparent in the building’s design. Education happens outside of the classrooms and labs. The new STEM building is a practical example of technology and energy efficiency. Collaboration spaces allows students and faculty to interact outside the classrooms and labs. LOCATION: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SIZE: 25,646 SF COST: $12,029,715 SERVICES: Architecture, Interior Design, MEP Engineering, Structural Engineering Central Catholic High School STEM Building 13Stantec // Westlake Academy Information Packet LOCATION: Plano, Texas SIZE: 56,000 SF COST: $15,300,000 CAPACITY: 440 SERVICES: Architecture, Interior Design, MEP Engineering, Structural Engineering Prestonwood Christian Academy introduced between the new building and existing building that provides ample opportunities for numerous views to the water. In addition, this learning stair makes a strong connection from the Entry Lobby to the outdoor Dining Plaza located next to the water’s edge between the Dining Commons and the new Middle School building The Middle School educational program is organized around a central rectilinear flex and collaboration space. Classrooms, an Innovation Room, and a Makers Space surround a flex space providing an integrated learning commons for grades 5 and 6 on one floor, and grades 7 and 8 on the upper floor. The intent was to put education on display, both from an internal organizational perspective, and from the exterior which allows the Church campus as a whole to see education at work. Stantec was tasked with adding a new Middle School at Prestonwood Christian Academy, a part of Prestonwood Baptist Church in Plano, Texas. Stantec took to heart PCA’s desire to create a new “front door” for its educational academy -- A collection of undistinguished tilt-up concrete buildings housing an Upper School and a Young Adult Leadership Center. A new 2-story rectilinear Entry Lobby anchors the exterior entry court and connects the new Middle School to the Upper School and Leadership Center. This Entry Lobby introduces a crucial security point for the schools and contains a new campus bookstore and coffee bar. Stantec, as well as the Client, desired as much transparency for views from the new lobby and school as possible. Therefore, a new exterior Learning Stair is Page 1 of 2 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Workshop - Discussion Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Presentation and Discussion by Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee (WPACC) Representatives Regarding Status of Public Art Request for Qualifications (RFQ) Process and WPACC Work to Date. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Vision: An oasis of nautural beuty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. Citizen, Student & Stakeholder High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: June 19, 2017 Completion Date: On-going Funding Amount: TBD Status - Funded Source - Multiple Sources - see comments below EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) On February 27, 2017, after a lengthy process that included opportunity for public participation, the Town Council reviewed and adopted a new Public Art Plan. Staff then began working with the Town’s public art consultant to formulate next steps for implementing the Town’s Public Art Plan. This included creating a competition to ultimately obtain a public art piece which would be the first in the Town’s collection under this Public Art Program. To accomplish this first public art competition, it was proposed to the Council for it to appoint a Public Art Competition Advisory Page 2 of 2 Committee. This Committee was appointed, and their charge delineated, by the Town Council in a resolution on June 19, 2017. Since that the time the Westlake Public Art Competition Committee (WPACC or Committee) has been meeting and identifying the location of the Town’s first public art piece under the Town’s new Public Art Plan. Further, the WPACC has also been formulating the process for identifying artists, soliciting their qualifications, and selecting finalists for design of this first public art piece under the Town’s new Public Art Plan. The Committee is also heavily involved in identifying funding for this effort. At their January 29, 2018 workshop, the Council was given a presentation by Committee representatives to update the Town Council on their activities to date, as well as review the Request for Qualifications (RFQ) document, and RFQ process with the Council. The Council expressed consensus and agreement on the proposed RFQ process to date, however, it expressed its sense that funding for the artist honorarium(s) should come from donations, i.e. the same funding for the art piece selected via this competition process. Since then, the Committee has continued its work to refine the RFQ document as well as the RFQ process, and has obtained donations for artist honorarium(s). The Committee has developed a flow chart to outline the process that would be used to obtain this public art piece. This was presented at the Council’s April 30th workshop. At this workshop Committee members will present for Council input and direction the latest draft of the Request for Qualifications document that the WPACC has prepared to solicit artist qualifications for this artwork. RECOMMENDATION Hear an update from the Committee on their work since their last report to Council on April 30th and provide the Committee with feedback regarding the proposed RFQ document for solicitating qualifications from interested artists for this artwork to be located at the northwest corner of Dove Road and Davis Boulevard. ATTACHMENTS Draft RFQ document reflecting latest WPACC input and revisions. RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 1 of 10 Town of Westlake, Texas Public Art Request for Statement of Qualifications (RFQ) from interested artists: The Dove/ Davis Public Art Project Invitation The Town of Westlake, through its Westlake Public Arts Competition Advisory Committee hereinafter WPACC or Committee), is accepting qualifications from artists for a Public Art installation at the corner of Davis Boulevard (FM 1938) and Dove Road in Westlake, Texas. This is the first in a series of such pieces planned for the Town and will, therefore, set an artistic standard for future works. The selected artist will be asked to create a design and proposal for fabrication and installation of a major public artwork to be located on the site described below. The site is part of a larger tract shared with Westlake’s newest fire station, now under construction. Therefore, the selected artist will be required to coordinate their work with the project contractor and landscape architect in order to properly sequence implementation and appropriately integrate with the overall landscape design. Artists who have experience in the execution of projects with similar scope and requirements are urged to respond to this invitation. Budget The Budget for this project is tiered, so that qualified artists asked to provide a proposal can identify the funding requirement most appropriate for their concept. The Budget tiers established are: Tier 1: $450,000 Tier 2: $600,000 Tier 3: $850,000 The tiered structure allows the Committee to evaluate submissions of all artists in an objective manner, thus ensuring their decisions and recommendations are in the interest of the Town of Westlake, aesthetically and financially. Financing for the final selection will be achieved through an RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 2 of 10 independent funding campaign built around the work and targeted to potential donors and sponsors. Up to four (4) artists (hereinafter called semi-finalist) will be selected to conduct a site visit, develop a proposal, and return for interviews. Semi-finalists must confirm the tier(s) best suited to their proposal(s). Semi-finalists may submit a proposal for each and/or every tier, if they desire. Each of the semi-finalists will be offered a $5,000 honorarium to help cover costs associated with the site visit and proposal. After the Committee reviews the semi-finalists’ proposals, a finalist will be selected and offered a $10,000.00 honorarium to help cover costs associated with preparing a final design, presentations to the Town and travel associated thereto. Introduction – The Town of Westlake • Understanding past, present, emerging, and inherent conditions that shape and influence the future of Westlake. • The Town of Westlake comprises emerging commercial and residential areas juxtaposed with pastoral and open spaces Westlake is a growing, vibrant community with a unique identity located in the dynamic Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex on the high growth State Highway 114 corridor minutes away from the north entrance to DFW airport. The demographic of Westlake’s residents is one that is very high end as is the housing market. Westlake residents are very well educated and quite successful in their respective fields of employment. Westlake’s development standards are of the highest quality. Westlake is home to several top tier companies. With the recent announcement by the Charles Schwab Company and commencement of the construction of a major corporate office campus in Westlake, the Town now has a financial industry cluster located in its boundaries that also includes Fidelity Investments and Deloitte LLP. The environment in Westlake, culturally, governmentally, and business-wise, is a very sophisticated one. Further, it involves owning the only municipal charter schools in the State of Texas, Westlake Academy, a K-12 school featuring the International Baccalaureate curriculum. Westlake’s agricultural beginnings, its proximity to neighboring growth centers, and its location relative to the outward expansion of both Dallas and Fort Worth have contributed to the present character, setting, and identity of the Town as well as its commitments to development entitlements. These historic dynamics will continue to nurture further RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 3 of 10 development/ expansion/growth of the region and context surrounding Westlake. As surrounding change intensifies, internal change can become more pervasive and dramatic. Therefore, understanding the forces of change, the potential effects of change, and the time frame of change is critical to creating a plan that can manage/respond to change. Additional background information regarding the Town of Westlake is contained in the appendices to this RFP found on the Town of Westlake web page under public art. Vision & Mission Statements  Town of Westlake Vision & Mission Statement Vision Westlake is an oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. Mission On behalf of the citizens, the mission of the Town of Westlake is to be a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent.  Westlake Public Arts Competition Advisory Committee Vision & Mission Statement Vision “Expand the natural, cultural and aesthetic environment of the Town of Westlake with works of art that engage the senses, challenge the mind, enhance the beauty, and embrace the soul of the citizens of Westlake.” Mission “The Westlake Public Art Advisory Competition Committee is founded to establish a partnership between the Town of Westlake and distinguished representatives of the Regional Arts Community that will jointly pursue a Competition based Public Arts Program in Westlake RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 4 of 10 Texas which cultivates excellence in public art, nourishes and develops new and emerging talent, provides a venue for the recognition and promotion of such unique talent, and seeks masterpiece in public art works overall “ Goals, Themes and Scope of the Dove/Davis Project Goals of the Project Westlake is seeking a Public Art installation that: A. Builds upon the visual, locational, and public importance of this site, B. Manifests the site’s exceptional natural characteristics (reflecting the work’s association with the Town’s Open Space Core), and C. Allows public interaction that the artist deems appropriate for this project. Overarching themes in the artwork should encompass the mission of the Town of Westlake as well as the mission of the public arts initiative. The site is located at the corner of two major thoroughfares in the Town with three residential developments and corporate campuses close by. Therefore, the artwork will be visible from multiple vantage points, most critically from the street level, where it will be prominent to pedestrians and automobiles in the course of daily trip activity. In addition, the artwork should integrate with the varying natural assets of the site and take into consideration the on-site fire station, bio swale, tree-line, and pedestrian trail. The artist must respond to a graded terrain and take into consideration the function of the varying levels of water within the bio-swale. (See the attached site plan). Additionally, the artwork must take the following design aspirations into consideration: • Relevance – The artwork must be appropriate for the chosen location and for the mission of the Town • Sustainability – sustainable materials. • Originality – The artwork must be original and unique to Westlake • Durability and Permanence – resistance to theft and weathering as well as structural sustainability and ease of maintenance. • Setting – The artwork will reside in an open space and as such must seek to interpret the connection between this location and natural systems/conditions/features characteristic of the site. RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 5 of 10 The artwork will consider both available natural and artificial light sources and be viewable from multiple vantage points and elevations. Electricity and/or water may be provided for the artwork in consultation with the Town. Scope of work The scope of this project includes contracting with an Artist and/or Artist Team to design, fabricate, and oversee installation of a permanent artwork at the location described below. A successful design should take particular advantage of both the site public exposure as well as its attachment to the future open space core of the Town fabric and creatively interpret the natural associations that the site possesses. Responders to this RFQ are expected to make themselves familiar with the site per the information in this section of the RFQ and the RFQ as a whole, as well as any other supplemental informational sources about the site which they determine to obtain (example: on-line map resources and Town Web site including a Public Art Tab). RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 6 of 10 This site is located in a place of high visibility and community significance at the northwest corner of Davis Boulevard (FM 1938) and Dove Road (2 primary arterials of the Town of Westlake). In addition, joggers, bikers, and walkers frequent this location using the trail system adjacent to and circumscribing this location. There is an existing bio-swale at this location that serves the Town’s new Fire Station (adjacent to the art site). Site Description Because of the aforementioned major intersection, this artwork will have major public exposure. Dove Road/ Davis Blvd. intersection is a hub of local and regional movement, serving 50,000 cars a day by 2027. The site area available for the art installation is 1 acre and is part of: 1. A 1000 acre+ open space core: Identified in the Westlake Comprehensive Plan adopted in 2015 (see diagram below). This Open Space core is envisioned as the “seam” of public life where the relatively small residential population of the Town share activity with a large daytime population (working and shopping in the more than 20 million square feet of commercial zoning now in place). 2. A community fabric which hosts: A. Major Financial Service Companies (such as Charles Schwab, Fidelity Investments, and Sabre), B. Major land owners (such as Hillwood and Blackstone), C. Major educational institutions such as Westlake Academy and Deloitte University, and a residential build out potential of 7100 people. RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 7 of 10 3. A public improvement project: Including the new Fire Station, occupying the northerly portion of the larger 5-acre site (See diagram below) and street enhancements of Davis Blvd. 4. A natural drainage way: Through which storm water run-off flowing from points north and west of this site will flow to natural waterways located south and east (see diagram below) RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 8 of 10 5. A point of convergence: In the alignment of pedestrian trails of the Town. RFQ Requirements Qualification Process A shortlist of up to four (4) artists (hereinafter called semi-finalists) will be selected by the Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee (see membership on the Town of Westlake Web Site, Public art Tab) based on interest, suitability and/or experience. Semi-finalists will have an opportunity to discuss possibilities and goals with the Committee during a Skype interview. Semi-finalists will have approximately one (1) month to prepare a concept for consideration. Semi-finalists will be offered a $5,000 honorarium to help cover costs associated with the proposal, including travel. After review of the proposals, the Finalist will be invited for an interview. The Finalist will be required to present a PowerPoint presentation, samples of materials, timeline, budget and a narrative describing the inspiration for the design, the fabrication process and installation. The Finalist will RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 9 of 10 also submit maintenance requirements for their design. The Finalist will be offered a $10,000 honorarium to help cover costs associated with the detailed proposal (described above) including travel. The Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee will present the Finalist’s submission to the Town. Upon confirmation by the Town Council, the Finalist will enter into a contract with the Town of Westlake regarding coordination, fabrication, installation, payment schedule, and final acceptance by the Town. Artists must submit the following: • A curriculum vitae (CV), and • Up to ten (10) images of at least three (3) comparable projects with a project description of each, including budget, and • A summarization of achievement of the goals of their prior project, and • A description of any collaboration. A minimum of one (1) copy of the qualifications must be submitted as a hard copy, with required paperwork. An electronic copy (email or CD/flash drive) of the qualifications must also be submitted. The qualifications must be submitted to the address below, no later than February 10, 2019, Online Café Closed at midnight, CST. Town Manager Town of Westlake 1500 Solana Blvd. Bld. 7, Suite 7200 Westlake, Texas 76262 Questions Questions must be submitted electronically to the Westlake Public Art Competition Advisory Committee chairman at the following email address __________________. All questions and responses will be posted on the Project link under FAQ’S on the Public Art tab of the Town of Westlake’s website. Phone call and written questions will not be responded to. Please review the website FAQ’s before submitting. Questions must be received no later than ________________. Any questions received after this time and date will not receive a response. RFQ Draft 9 17 18 w/WPACC edits Draft 5 Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg 7, Suite 7200, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org Page 10 of 10 Tentative Schedule December 15, 2018 RFQ Open on Call for Entry (Café) February 10, 2019 Online Café Closed at midnight, CST. April 11, 2019 Shortlisted Artists notified May 11, 2019 Skype Interview to discuss ideas/goals July 9, 2019 Proposals Due August ?, 2019 Select a Finalist for Town Confirmation Sept. ?, 2019 Finalist Interview and confirmation by Westlake Town Council Nov. ?, 2019 Artist Contract Awarded March – June (pending), 2020 Art Installation (coordinated with the architect of the Fire Station) Legal Agreement This call is open to all artists or artist collaborations. The Town of Westlake, Texas reserves the right in its sole discretion to reject any or all applications, proposals, applicants, or projects, and to modify or terminate the application process or the selection process for any reason and with or without prior notice, unless otherwise required by applicable law. Applicant agrees that any and all materials submitted pursuant to this call for entry become the property of The Town of Westlake and shall not be returned to Applicant. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Applicant shall retain all copyright in the work which may be held by Applicant, subject to any laws that govern the Town of Westlake as a Texas municipality. To download the complete RFP and a sample contract, please go to the project page: ______________________________________________________________________ Development Snapshot August 2018 DENTON COUNTY TARRANT COUNTY CITY OF ROANOKE DENTON COUNTY TARRANT COUNTY CITY OF FORT WORTH TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN LIMIT TOWN OF TROPHY CLUB CITY OF SOUTHLAKE 170 114 377 377 170 114 5 2 3 4 MAP GUIDE 1. Entrada Retail Corner Sales Office, Starbucks, Tower 2. Terra Bella ResidenƟal Development 3. Carlyle Court ResidenƟal Development 4. Quail Hollow ResidenƟal Development 5. Granada ResidenƟal Development 6. Project Blizzard Mixed-Use Development 7. Schwab Corporate Campus Office Campus 8. Entrada Block E, I, & J ResidenƟal Townhomes 9. Fire/EMS StaƟon Government Facility 10. Entrada Restaurant Row Restaurant August 2018 This map is for information purposes only. DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES MAP CITY OF SOUTHLAKE CITY OF KELLER LEGEND Subdivision Roads Collector/Arterial Roads Highways Future Traffic Signal Completed Building Site Plan Submitted Building Permit Submitted Building Permit Issued 114 170 6 7 1 9 8 10 Development Activities Status—August 2018 Project No. Project Name Land Use Number of Lots/Units Size Development Status Percent Complete* Estimated Completion 1 Entrada Retail Corner Retail / Office 4 ~52,000 s.f. Retail Corner under construction; Starbucks/ Tower ready to issue 15% Fall 2019 2 Terra Bella Residential 28 54.7 acres 25/26 lots currently developed or under construction 86.54% N/A 3 Carlyle Court Residential 8 10.2 acres 7/8 lots currently developed or under construction 68.75% N/A 4 Quail Hollow Residential 96 188 acres 2/96 lots under construction 1.04% N/A 5 Granada Phase I Residential 41 85 acres Phase I has 38/41 lots currently developed or under construction 81.71% N/A Granada Phase II 43 Phase II has 20/43 lots currently developed or under construction 30.23% Project Blizzard Mix-Use N/A 45 acres Schwab Way under review; N/A N/A 6 Schwab Campus Phase 1 Office 4 buildings 2,600 car garage 1,420,000 s.f. total 33 acres Under construction 52.5% Summer 2019 7 8 Entrada Block E, I & J Residential J: 6 units I: 12 units E: 12/14 units J: 3,226 sf ea I: 2,769 sf ea E: 4,500 sf ea Block J has 6/6 lots currently under construction Block I has 12/12 lots currently under construction Block E has 12/14 lots currently under construction 4.66% Varies 9 Fire/EMS Station Civic Use N/A 5-acre site Under construction 60% Early 2019 10 Pedestrian Bridge / Restaurant Row Bridge / Restaurant 3 A: 15,422 sf B/C: 22,414 sf Under construction 10% 2019 * % Complete = (#of BP’s x 50%)/Total BP’s + (#CO’s x 50%)/Total CO’s ** Refer to Entrada Development Report for more info Entrada Retail Corner Terra Bella / Carlyle Court Quail Hollow Granada Project Blizzard / Charles Schwab Entrada Residential Fire Station Restaurant Row Residential Subdivision Buildout—August 2018 Subdivision Name Plat Date Total Lots Vacant Lots Size (Acres) Development Status Percent Complete Building Permits Issued Finals Issued Aspen Lane/Shelby Estates 4/7/1981 8 0 132.6 Built-out 100% 8 8 Carlyle Court 3/7/2016 8 1 10.2 Under development 68.75% 7 4 Entrada 12/14/2015 322 292 85.9 Under development 4.66% 30 0 Glenwyck Farms 3/13/2000 84 0 104.3 Built-out 100.00% 84 84 Granada Phase I 6/17/2013 41 3 84.3 Under development 81.71% 38 29 Granada Phase II 12/12/2016 43 23 30.23% 20 6 Knolls at Solana - 56 56 62.5 Conceptual 0.00% 0 0 Mahotea Boone 12/9/1977 14 0 31.6 Built-out 100.00% 14 14 Paigebrooke 3/8/2004 6 2 20.3 Under development 66.67% 4 4 Quail Hollow 3/28/2016 96 94 188.3 Under development 1.04% 2 0 Stagecoach 8/16/1971 47 6 55.5 Mostly built-out 86.17% 41 40 Terra Bella 11/11/2008 26 1 54.8 Under development 86.54% 25 20 Vaquero 3/27/2000 296 36 510 Mostly built-out 85.47% 260 246 Wyck Hill 4/3/1996 13 2 22.4 Mostly built-out 84.62% 11 11 Other/Miscellaneous - 21 2 - Mostly built-out 88.10% 19 18 1081 518 1362.7 48.43% 563 484 Block JBlock I Block I (Piedra Court)SP | Ord 847 | 2-26-18 Gas Well Pad Site SP | Ord 778 | 3-28-16 Block P Block M Block H Block G Block F Block L Sales Office Block D Primrose CVS Amphitheater SP | Ord 777 | 03-28-16 Restaurant Row SP | Ord 779 | 3-28-16 Block B Block J (Catalonia Court) SP | Ord 783 | 4-25-16 RP | Ord 791 | 8-22-16 Block E (Comillas Court) SP | Ord 837 | 9-11-17 RP | Res 18-10 | 2-26-18 CVS SP | Ord 762 | 12-14-15 FP | Ord 761 | 12-14-15 Primrose SP | Ord 763 | 12-14-15 FP | Ord 761 | 12-14-15 Retail Corner SP | Ord 771 | 2-22-16 RP | Ord 809 | 12-12-16 Town Hall RP | Ord 810 | 12-12-16 Block DPlaza Mayor SP | Ord 854 | 5-21-18 Chapel / Reception Hall SP | Ord 853 | 4-30-18 Phase 2 DP | Ord 830 | 06-19-17 Block E BUILDING LEGEND Site Plan Received Site Plan Approved Building Permit Received Building Under Construction Building CompletedBlock C Entrada Status Map — August 2018 Town of Westlake'sBuilding Permit - Monthly ReportMonth of August, 2018Project NumberProject TypeFull AddressPermit Issued DateBusiness NameDeclared ValuationSquare FeetADDNC - 18 - 0068Commercial AdditionPermit (C)2341 Highway 377Westlake, TX 7626208/27/2018Turnkey ConstructionCompany75000011843Commercial Addition Permit (C)Permits Issued:1RMDLC - 18 - 0213Commercial RemodelPermit (C)1301 Solana Blvd.BldgNo. 1 Suite 1530Westlake, TX 7626208/01/2018Silver LiningRestorations Group, LLC9500384Commercial Remodel Permit (C)Permits Issued:1ELECC - 18 - 0253Electrical Permit (C)44 GironaWestlake, TX 7626208/20/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes1500ELECC - 18 - 0254Electrical Permit (C)56 Girona Dr.Westlake, TX 7626208/20/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes1680Electrical Permit (C)Permits Issued:2FENCE - 18 - 0255Fence Permit / RetainingWall1876 Lakeshore Dr.Westlake, TX 7626208/22/2018Tejas Stone Works30000Fence Permit / Retaining WallPermits Issued:1MYGOV.USTown of Westlake | Building Permit - Monthly Report | Printed 09/03/2018 at 12:00 PMPage 1 of 3 GRADE - 18 - 0078Grading Permit1411 Post Oak Pl.Westlake, TX 7626208/03/2018Huckleberry BuildersGrading PermitPermits Issued:1IRR - 18 - 0226Irrigation Permit (R)2217 Barcelona Ct.Westlake, TX 7626208/01/2018MowMan Lawn Service6500Irrigation Permit (R)Permits Issued:1MISCC - 18 - 0252Miscellaneous Permit (C)1500 Solana Bldg No. 6Suite 6400Westlake, TX 7626208/21/2018Dallas Security Systems10000Miscellaneous Permit (C)Permits Issued:1SHELL - 18 - 0198New Commercial ShellBuilding (C)Restaurant Row B/C/D55 Tarragona Dr.Bldg No. B/C/DWestlake, TX 7626208/22/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes316150022414New Commercial Shell Building (C)Permits Issued:1SFR - 18 - 0059New Single Family HomePermit (R)24 Comillas Dr.Westlake, TX 7626208/08/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes7558205334SFR - 18 - 0060New Single Family HomePermit (R)26 Comillas Dr.Westlake, TX 7626208/08/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes6805805157SFR - 18 - 0061New Single Family HomePermit (R)28 Comillas Dr.Westlake, TX 7626208/08/2018Crescent EstatesCustom Homes6811205319MYGOV.USTown of Westlake | Building Permit - Monthly Report | Printed 09/03/2018 at 12:00 PMPage 2 of 3 SFR - 18 - 0202New Single Family HomePermit (R)2017 Valencia CoveWestlake, TX 7626208/01/2018Pentavia Custom Homes2000000.009321SFR - 18 - 0203New Single Family HomePermit (R)2206 Barcelona Ct.Westlake, TX 7626208/03/2018Calais Custom Homes1200000.0010631SFR - 18 - 0214New Single Family HomePermit (R)1904 Gaillardia Ct.Westlake, TX 7626208/15/2018Calais Custom Homes1.2000007662SFR - 18 - 0239New Single Family HomePermit (R)1645 Trace BellaWestlake, TX 7626208/30/2018MG Luxury Homes1.4600009665New Single Family Home Permit (R)Permits Issued:7POOL - 18 - 0227Pool Permit2006 Nighthawk Ct.Westlake, TX 7626208/03/2018Cunningham ClassicHomes28000470POOL - 18 - 0232Pool Permit1904 Little Bluestem Ct.Westlake, TX 7626208/03/2018Liquid Concept Pools30000300POOL - 18 - 0233Pool Permit2030 Granada Trl.Westlake, TX 7626208/07/2018J. Caldwell CustomPools750001038Pool PermitPermits Issued:3TOTALS:Square Footage:89,538.00(Avg.: 6,887.54)Total Projects:19Permits Issued:19MYGOV.USTown of Westlake | Building Permit - Monthly Report | Printed 09/03/2018 at 12:00 PMPage 3 of 3 d. Discussion regarding a replacement of resigning Town Council member. Town Council Item # 3d No supporting documentation EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada Town Council Item # 4 – Executive Session Town Council Item # 5 – Reconvene Council Meeting COUNCIL RECAP / STAFF DIRECTION Town Council Item # 6 – Council Recap / Staff Direction Town Council Item # 7 – Adjournment Work Session ITEMS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST: Mayor and Council Reports on Items of Community Interest pursuant to Texas Government Code Section 551.0415 the Town Council may report on the following items: (1) expression of thanks, congratulations or condolences; (2) information about holiday schedules; (3) recognition of individuals; (4) reminders about upcoming Town Council events; (5) information about community events; and (6) announcements involving imminent threat to public health and safety.  Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor/Board President Monday, October 1, 2018; 8:00 – 9:30 am Marriott Solana Hotel – Great Room  10th Annual Westlake Baja at Vaquero; Hosted by the WA Foundation Benefiting Westlake Academy Students & Staff Monday, October 1, 2018; Visit WestlakeAcademyFoundation.org for all the details Vaquero Club, 2300 Vaquero Club Drive  Board of Trustees Work Session/Meeting Tuesday, October 2, 2018* (Moved from Monday due to Baja) Westlake Town Hall, Solana Terrace-Bldg.7, Suite 7100 - Council Chambers  Planning & Zoning Work Session/Meeting Monday, October 8, 2018* Westlake Town Hall, Solana Terrace-Bldg.7, Suite 7100 - Council Chambers  Westlake Academy Danish & Dialogue w/school leaders Thursday, October 11, 2018; 8:00 am – 9:00 am WA Campus – Sam & Margaret Lee Fieldhouse Classroom -This month’s topic: IB Beyond the Classroom-International Mindedness in Action  Westlake Academy Homecoming & Games under the lights! Friday, October 12, 2018; Begins at 5:00 pm – JH & Varsity games WA Campus-Athletic Field; Visit WestlakeAcademy.org for more details  Public Art Competition Advisory Committee Meeting Monday, October 15, 2018; 11:00 – 1:00 pm* Westlake Council Chambers, Solana Terrace, Bldg. 7-Suite 7100, First Floor  The Fierce Color Run: 1M, 5K; Benefiting University of Florida Foundation Immunotherapy Program Saturday, October 20, 2018; 7:00 am – 11:00 am; Solana’s Plaza -Visit StandUpForTheirLives.org for more details about this memorial run in honor of Westlake’s own, & WA student, Sawyer Davidson  8th Annual Westlake Classic Car Show; Benefiting the Westlake Historical Preservation Society (WHPS); Visit the Town’s website calendar for more details: Westlake-TX.org Saturday, October 20, 2018; 11:00 am – 4:00 pm (Awards presentation begins at 3 pm) 2902 Sam School Road; East parking lot of Larry North Fitness/Solana Club  WA 11th Annual Monster Mash (Open to all families in Westlake-great fun for all ages) Hosted by Westlake Academy’s House of Commons (HOC; a PTO organization) Saturday, October 27, 2018; 4:30 pm – 10:00 pm WA Campus; Visit WA-HOC.org and/or WestlakeAcademy.org for details  Town Council Work Session/Meeting Monday, October 29, 2018* Westlake Town Hall, Solana Terrace-Bldg.7, Suite 7100 - Council Chambers *For meeting agendas and details on WA calendar events or Municipal calendar events, please visit the Westlake Academy website or the Town of Westlake website for further assistance. Town Council Item # 2 – Items of Community Interest CITIZEN COMMENTS: This is an opportunity for citizens to address the Council on any matter whether or not it is posted on the agenda. The Council cannot by law take action nor have any discussion or deliberations on any presentation made to the Council at this time concerning an item not listed on the agenda. The Council will receive the information, ask staff to review the matter, or an item may be noticed on a future agenda for deliberation or action. Town Council Item # 3 – Citizen Comments CONSENT AGENDA: All items listed below are considered routine by the Town Council and will be enacted with one motion. There will be no separate discussion of items unless a Council Member or citizen so requests, in which event the item will be removed from the general order of business and considered in its normal sequence. a. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on August 27, 2018. b. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 10, 2018. c. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on September 19, 2018. d. Consider approval of Resolution 18-33, Approving a Negotiated Settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”) and Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division. e. Consider approval of Resolution 18-34, Approving a Signage and Lighting Plan for Phase I of the Charles Schwab Development. f. Consider approval of Resolution 18-35, Approving an Economic Development Agreement with the Marriott Solana Hotel. g. Consider approval of Ordinance 863, Amending Chapter 58, Peddlers and Solicitors. h. Consider approval of Ordinance 864, Amending Chapter 2 titled “Administration” by amending Section 2-181 and repealing Ordinance 832 adopting a Fee Schedule by adopting a new Fee Schedule. Town Council Item # 4 – Consent Agenda Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 1 of 8 MINUTES OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS TOWN COUNCIL MEETING August 27, 2018 PRESENT: Mayor Laura Wheat and Council Members Alesa Belvedere, Carol Langdon, and Wayne Stoltenberg. Rick Rennhack arrived at 6:46 p.m. ABSENT: Michael Barrett OTHERS PRESENT: Town Manager Tom Brymer, Assistant Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Town Secretary Kelly Edwards, Town Attorney Stan Lowry, Director of Planning & Development Ron Ruthven, Building Official Pat Cooke, Development Coordinator Nick Ford, Fire Chief Richard Whitten, Deputy Fire Chief John Ard, Director of Public Works Jarrod Greenwood, Director of Facilities & Parks Troy Meyer, Director of Communications Ginger Awtry, Finance Supervisor Jaymi Ford, Communications Manager Jon Sasser, Director of Information Technology Jason Power, and Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Todd Wood. Work Session 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Wheat called the work session to order at 5:03 p.m. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Mayor Wheat led the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States and Texas flags. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 2 of 8 3. REVIEW OF CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS FOR THE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA. No additional discussion. Mayor Wheat then moved to item 5 of the work session, stating the Council would convene into executive session. 4. DISCUSSION ITEMS a. Standing Item: Presentation and discussion of development projects per Staff report July 2018 including an Entrada report from the Developer and projects in Planned Development PD 3-5. Mr. Mehrdad Moayedi, Centurion American, provided an update regarding Entrada. Discussion ensued regarding replacing the amphitheater with a conference center/exhibit hall, Hilton brand hotels, the condo building in the Plaza Mayor, retail corner construction delays, the Wedding Chapel, establishing agreements with restaurateurs, pedestrian bridge construction, and the requirement regarding the construction of all 3 buildings in the Plaza Mayor. Additional discussion ensued regarding the developer providing a formal letter requesting an amendment to the zoning ordinance, including financial and funding documents, for the development in conjunction and prior to Council considering any proposed changes to the zoning ordinance. Project Blizzard: May be under construction Spring of 2019. Fire Station: Installation of rock masonry, lane closures along Davis Blvd/FM 1938. for curb cuts, and a proposed move-in January 2019. Knolls: The conservation area documents will be considered with the development agreement and site evaluation plan. Spencer Ranch: The project is on hold due to unresolved issues with the property. b. Presentation and discussion regarding the renewal of the contract with the City of Keller for police services. Keller Police Chief Wilson and Assistant Town Manager DeGan provided an overview of the item. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 3 of 8 Discussion ensued regarding the addition of another motor officer, dangerous highway locations, the current number of officers serving the town, animal control issues, and golf cart driving issues. Mayor Wheat recessed the meeting at 7:46 p.m. Mayor Wheat reconvened the meeting at 8:00 p.m. c. Presentation and Discussion of the Proposed 2018-2019 Municipal Budget, Providing Any Updates and Additional Information to Council Prior to consideration of the Proposed Budget set for Adoption on September 24, 2018. Mayor Wheat moved to item 7 of the work session. 5. EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council convened into executive session at 5:04 p.m. The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - Project Pegasus - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada b. Section 551.074(a)(1): Deliberation Regarding Personnel Matters – to deliberate the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, of a public officer or employee: - Town Manager evaluation - Town Manager search process 6. RECONVENE MEETING Mayor Wheat reconvened the meeting at 6:13 p.m. Mayor Wheat moved back to item 4, discussion and item b of the work session. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 4 of 8 7. COUNCIL RECAP / STAFF DIRECTION Staff obtain Entrada financial and funding documents and a letter from the developer requesting an amendment to the zoning ordinance. 8. ADJOURNMENT Mayor Wheat adjourned the work session at 8:12 p.m. Regular Session 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Wheat called the regular session to order at 8:12 p.m. 2. ITEMS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST Director Awtry provided an overview of the upcoming events 3. CITIZEN COMMENTS No one addressed the Council. 4. CONSENT AGENDA a. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on June 18, 2018. b. Consider approval of the minutes from the meeting on August 15, 2018. c. Consider approval of Resolution 18-26, Approving a new branding initiative to include a new municipal logo and branding statement for the Westlake community. d. Consider approval of Ordinance 859, Approving a Right of Way License Agreement with Granada Home Owners Association for the installation, maintenance, and operation of wayfinding signage within Town of Westlake right of way along Solana Boulevard. e. Consider approval of Ordinance 860, Approving a Right of Way License Agreement with Vaquero Home Owners Association for the installation, maintenance, and operation of wayfinding signage within Town of Westlake right of way along FM 1938 and Dove Road. f. Consider approval of Resolution 18-27, Authorizing the Town Manager to enter into an agreement with Precision Landscape Management to provide landscaping service for the plant replacement for Davis Boulevard/FM 1938 from HWY 114 to Randol Mill Road and authorize the Town Manager to make funding changes via change order not to exceed $25,000 on this project. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 5 of 8 g. Consider approval of Resolution 18-28, Renewing the contract with the City of Keller for police services. h. Consider approval of Resolution 18-29, Authorizing the Town Manager to enter into an agreement with Business Interiors to provide and install the office and living quarters furniture for the Westlake Fire-EMS Station No. 1 project and authorize the Town Manager to make funding changes via change order not to exceed $25,000 on this project. i. Consider approval of Resolution 18-31, Appointing a board member to Texas Student Housing Authority and Texas Student Housing Corporation. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion to approve the consent agenda. Council Member Belvedere seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. 5. CONSIDERATION OF ORDINANCE 861, UPDATING THE SOLANA PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT SERVICE AND ASSESSMENT PLAN (SAP) AND ASSESSMENT ROLL. Mrs. Petty, P3 Works, provided an overview of the item. Discussion ensued regarding to property owners, sales of parcels, Exhibit A, and information contained within the report. MOTION: Council Member Stoltenberg made a motion to approve Ordinance 861. Council Member Langdon seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. 6. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION 18-30, DIRECTING PUBLICATION OF NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ISSUE COMBINATION TAX AND SURPLUS REVENUE CERTIFICATES OF OBLIGATION TO FUND THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE’S PROPORTIONAL COSTS RELATED TO THE ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION OF A REGIONAL 30” WATERLINE BY THE CITY OF FORT WORTH. Director Greenwood provided an overview of the items. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion to approve Resolution 18-30. Council Member Belvedere seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 6 of 8 7. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING AND CONSIDERATION OF ORDINANCE 862, AMENDING ORDINANCE 202 APPROVING THE PD1 ZONING DISTRICT BY REPEALING ORDINANCE 529, WHICH APPROVED TWO ADDITIONAL OFFICE BUILDINGS ON LOT 1R, BLOCK 1, WESTLAKE/SOUTHLAKE PARK ADDITION NUMBER ONE. Mayor Wheat read both items 7 and 8 of the agenda. Director Ruthven provided a presentation and overview of the items. Mayor Wheat opened the joint public hearing for item 7 and item 8. No one addressed the Council. Mayor Wheat closed the joint public hearing. MOTION: Council Member Stoltenberg made a motion to approve Ordinance 862. Council Member Rennhack seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. 8. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING AND CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION 18-32, APPROVING A REPLAT FOR A PLANNED DEVELOPMENT ZONING DISTRICT (PD) FOR AN APPROXIMATELY 71.78-ACRE PORTION OF PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT 1, PLANNING AREA 1 (PD 1-1). THE PROPERTY IS GENERALLY LOCATED WEST OF STATE HIGHWAY 114 AND NORTH OF SOLANA BLVD. MOTION: Council Member Belvedere made a motion to approve Resolution 18-32. Council Member Stoltenberg seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. 9. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION TO ACT ON FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019 PROPOSED TAX RATE, TAKE RECORD VOTE AND SET PUBLIC HEARING AND ADOPTION DATES. Staff provided a presentation and overview of the item including additional information as requested during the public forum. Discussion ensued regarding the effective rate, general fund operating forecast, the number of operating days, and roll back rate. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion that the Town of Westlake propose to adopt a Fiscal Year 2019 total Tax Rate of (not to exceed) $0.15600 which is higher than the Fiscal Year 2019 Effective Tax Rate of $0.13551, and call for two public hearings; the first public hearing to be held on September 10, 2018, at 7:30 p.m., and the second public hearing to be held on Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 7 of 8 September 19, 2018, at 7:30 p.m. Further, a record vote on the tax rate adoption will be held on September 24, 2018, at 6:30 p.m. All meetings will be held in the Town of Westlake 1st Floor Council Chamber at 1500 Solana Boulevard, Building 7, Suite 7100, Westlake, TX 76262. Council Member Stoltenberg seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. 10. EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council convened into executive session at 9:50 p.m. The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - Project Pegasus - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada b. Section 551.074(a)(1): Deliberation Regarding Personnel Matters – to deliberate the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, of a public officer or employee: - Town Manager evaluation - Town Manager search process 11. RECONVENE MEETING Mayor Wheat reconvened the meeting at 10:35 p.m. 12. TAKE ANY ACTION, IF NEEDED, FROM EXECUTIVE SESSION ITEMS. No necessary action. 13. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS No additional discussion required. Town Council Minutes 08/27/18 Page 8 of 8 14. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business before the Council, Mayor Wheat asked for a motion to adjourn the meeting. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Council Member Langdon seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 4-0. Mayor Wheat adjourned the meeting at 10:35 p.m. APPROVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 24, 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura Wheat, Mayor _____________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Town Council Minutes 09/10/18 Page 1 of 2 MINUTES OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS TOWN COUNCIL MEETING September 10, 2018 PRESENT: Mayor Laura Wheat and Council Members Carol Langdon, Rick Rennhack, and Wayne Stoltenberg. ABSENT: Alesa Belvedere and Michael Barrett OTHERS PRESENT: Town Manager Tom Brymer, Assistant Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Town Secretary Kelly Edwards, Director of Planning & Development Ron Ruthven, Building Official Pat Cooke, Development Coordinator Nick Ford, Fire Chief Richard Whitten, Deputy Fire Chief John Ard, Director of Public Works Jarrod Greenwood, Director of Facilities & Parks Troy Meyer, Director of Communications Ginger Awtry, Finance Supervisor Jaymi Ford, Director of Information Technology Jason Power, Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Todd Wood, and Management Intern Kirk McDaniel. Regular Session 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Wheat called the regular session to order at 7:35 p.m. 2. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING IN ACCORDANCE WITH STATE LAW. THIS ITEM IS THE FIRST OF TWO PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE. AS THE PROPOSED TAX RATE ($0.15600 PER $100) EXCEEDS THE EFFECTIVE TAX RATE ($0.13551 PER $100), TRUTH-IN-TAXATION REQUIRES THAT THE TOWN COUNCIL HOLD TWO PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE PROPOSAL. THE SECOND PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON SEPTEMBER 19, 2018, AT TOWN HALL. TOWN COUNCIL WILL VOTE ON THE TAX RATE DURING THE Town Council Minutes 09/10/18 Page 2 of 2 REGULAR MEETING ON SEPTEMBER 24, 2018. BOTH MEETINGS WILL TAKE PLACE AT TOWN HALL IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AT 1500 SOLANA BLVD., BLDG. 7, STE., 7100, WESTLAKE, TEXAS. Mayor Wheat asked Council to provide their input. Town Manager Brymer, Assistant Town Manager DeGan, and Director Greenwood provided a presentation and overview of the proposed property tax rate. Mayor Wheat recessed the meeting at 8:35 p.m. Mayor Wheat reconvened the meeting at 8:45 p.m. Discussion ensued regarding the money that the effective rate would generate, the Governor’s proposed plan for municipalities regarding property taxes, determining the appropriate number of operating days to maintain in the General Fund balance, Westlake’s portion of the total tax bill, and volatility of sales and use tax. Mayor Wheat opened the public hearing. No one addressed the Council. Mayor Wheat closed the public hearing. 3. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business before the Council, Mayor Wheat asked for a motion to adjourn the meeting. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Council Member Langdon seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 3-0. Mayor Wheat adjourned the meeting at 8:55 p.m. APPROVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 24, 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura Wheat, Mayor _____________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Town Council Minutes 09/10/18 Page 1 of 2 MINUTES OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS TOWN COUNCIL MEETING September 19, 2018 PRESENT: Mayor Laura Wheat and Council Members Michael Barrett, Alesa Belvedere, Carol Langdon, Rick Rennhack, and Wayne Stoltenberg. ABSENT: OTHERS PRESENT: Town Manager Tom Brymer, Assistant Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Town Secretary Kelly Edwards, Director of Planning & Development Ron Ruthven, Fire Chief Richard Whitten, Deputy Fire Chief John Ard, Director of Facilities & Parks Troy Meyer, Finance Supervisor Jaymi Ford, Director of Information Technology Jason Power, Communications Coordinator Jon Sasser, Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Todd Wood, and Management Intern Kirk McDaniel. Regular Session 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Wheat called the regular session to order at 7:31 p.m. 2. CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING IN ACCORDANCE WITH STATE LAW. THIS ITEM IS THE SECOND OF TWO PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE. AS THE PROPOSED TAX RATE ($0.15600 PER $100) EXCEEDS THE EFFECTIVE TAX RATE ($0.13551 PER $100), TRUTH-IN-TAXATION REQUIRES THAT THE TOWN COUNCIL HOLD TWO PUBLIC HEARINGS ON THE PROPOSAL. TOWN COUNCIL WILL VOTE ON THE TAX RATE DURING THE REGULAR MEETING ON SEPTEMBER 24, 2018. BOTH MEETINGS WILL TAKE PLACE AT TOWN HALL IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AT 1500 SOLANA BLVD., BLDG. 7, STE., 7100, WESTLAKE, TEXAS. Town Council Minutes 09/10/18 Page 2 of 2 Town Manager Brymer and Assistant Town Manager DeGan, provided a presentation and overview of the proposed property tax rate. Discussion ensued regarding fund balance if the Council had not pass a property tax in 2010 and to discuss reviewing fund balance policy in October. Mayor Wheat opened the public hearing. Brad Swearingen, 5933 Steve Court, spoke in support of the town and decision. Mayor Wheat closed the public hearing. 3. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business before the Council, Mayor Wheat asked for a motion to adjourn the meeting. MOTION: Council Member Rennhack made a motion to adjourn the meeting. Council Member Langdon seconded the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 5-0. Mayor Wheat adjourned the meeting at 7:41 p.m. APPROVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 24, 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura Wheat, Mayor _____________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Page 1 of 3 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Consent Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consideration of a Resolution Approving a Negotiated Settlement Between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”) and Atmos Energy Corporation, Mid-Tex Division (“Company”) Regarding the Company’s 2018 Rate Review Mechanism Filings; Declaring Existing Rates to be Unreasonable; Adopting Tariffs that Reflect Rate Adjustments Consistent with the Negotiated Settlement; Finding the Rates to be Set by the Attached Settlement Tariffs to be Just and Reasonable and in the Public Interest; Approving an Attached Exhibit Establishing a Benchmark for Pensions and Retiree Medical Benefits; Approving an Attached Exhibit Regarding Amortization of Regulatory Liability; Requiring the Company to Reimburse ACSC’s Reasonable Ratemaking Expenses; Determining that this Resolution was Passed in Accordance with the Requirements of the Texas Open Meetings Act; Adopting a Savings Clause; Declaring an Effective Date; and Requiring Delivery of this Resolution to the Company and the ACSC’s Legal Counsel. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Fiscal Responsibility Municipal & Academic Operations High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: September 24, 2018 Completion Date: September 24, 2018 Page 2 of 3 Funding Amount: N/A Status - Not Funded Source - N/A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) The Town of Westlake, along with 170 other similarly situated cities served by Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division (“Atmos Mid-Tex” or “Company”), is a member of the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”). The RRM Tariff was originally adopted by ACSC member cities in 2007 as an alternative to the Gas Reliability Infrastructure Program (“GRIP”), the statutory provision that allows Atmos to bypass the City’s rate regulatory authority to increase its rates annually to recover capital investments. The RRM Tariff has been modified several times since 2007. This 2018 RRM filing is the sixth RRM filing under the renewed RRM Tariff. On or about April 1, 2018, the Company filed a rate request of $42 million pursuant to the RRM Tariff adopted by ACSC members for the test year ending December 31, 2017. Application of the standards set forth in the ACSC’s RRM Tariff required the Company to reduce its request to $27.4 million. After the Company reviewed the ACSC consultant’s report, the Company offered to settle this rate case for a system-wide increase of $25.9 million. Following further negotiations, the ACSC Executive Committee agreed to recommend to ACSC members a system wide increase of $24.9 million that, when allocated to ACSC members, results in an increase of $17.8 million. The effective date of this recommended increase would be October 1, 2018. Most municipalities have retained original jurisdiction over gas utility rates and services within their corporate limits. The Atmos Cities Steering Committee ("ACSC") is composed of municipalities, including Westlake, in the service area of Atmos Energy Corporation, Mid-Tex Division regardless of whether original jurisdiction has been retained. Atmos is a monopoly public utility provider of natural gas. Because Atmos has no competitors, regulation of the rates it charges its customers in the only way that cities can insure that natural gas rates are equitable and competitive. Working as a coalition, via the Atmos Cities Steering Committee, to review the rates charged by Atmos, allows cities to accomplish more collectively than each city could do acting alone. Cities have more than 100 years’ experience in regulating natural gas rates in Texas. See attached the Staff Report for background on this Atmos rate case. RECOMMENDATION Staff concurs with and joins in the recommendation of the ACSC Executive Committee and its designated legal counsel and consultants, for the Town Council to approve this resolution and its attachments. Said resolution establishes and approves this negotiated rate settlement that resolves the Company’s 2018 RRM filing and implements this rate change as described in the attached Staff Report. ATTACHMENTS 1. Staff Report. 2. Proposed resolution. Page 3 of 3 3. Attachments to proposed resolution. 1 August 24, 2018 MODEL STAFF REPORT BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY The City, along with 171 other Mid-Texas cities served by Atmos Energy Corporation, Mid- Tex Division (“Atmos Mid-Tex” or “Company”), is a member of the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”). In 2007, ACSC and Atmos Mid-Tex settled a rate application filed by the Company pursuant to Section 104.301 of the Texas Utilities Code for an interim rate adjustment commonly referred to as a GRIP filing (arising out of the Gas Reliability Infrastructure Program legislation). That settlement created a substitute rate review process, referred to as Rate Review Mechanism (“RRM”), as a substitute for future filings under the GRIP statute. Since 2007, there have been several modifications to the original RRM Tariff. The most recent iteration of an RRM Tariff was reflected in an ordinance adopted by ACSC members earlier this year. On or about April 1, 2018, the Company filed a rate request pursuant to the RRM Tariff adopted by ACSC members. The Company claimed that its cost-of-service in a test year ending December 31, 2017, entitled it to additional system-wide revenues of $42.0 million. Application of the standards set forth in ACSC’s RRM Tariff required Atmos to reduce its request to $27.4 million. After review of the consultants’ report, the Company offered to settle for a system-wide increase of $25.9 million. Following further negotiations, ACSC’s Executive Committee agreed to recommend a system-wide rate increase of $24.9 million. That increase when allocated to ACSC members results in an increase of $17.8 million. The Effective Date for new rates is October 1, 2018. ACSC members should take action approving the Resolution before the end of September. 2 PROOF OF REVENUES Atmos generated proof that the rate tariffs attached to the Resolution will generate $24.9 million in additional revenues on a system-wide basis. That proof is attached as Attachment 1 to this Staff Report. ACSC consultants have agreed that Atmos’ Proof of Revenues is accurate. BILL IMPACT Given the fact that ACSC demanded that Atmos reflect reduced federal income taxes in its cost-of-service, as reflected in the RRM Tariff adopted earlier this year, Atmos reduced its rates in March. The rate increase associated with the Resolution is largely offset by the lowered federal income tax rates, such that out-of-pocket expense to consumers should be roughly the same under new rates as what was experienced by consumers last winter. A bill impact comparison is attached as Attachment 2. SUMMARY OF ACSC’S OBJECTION TO THE UTILITIES CODE SECTION 104.301 GRIP PROCESS ACSC strongly opposed the GRIP process because it constitutes piecemeal ratemaking by ignoring declining expenses and increasing revenues while rewarding the Company for increasing capital investment on an annual basis. The GRIP process does not allow any review of the reasonableness of capital investment and does not allow cities to participate in the Railroad Commission’s review of annual GRIP filings or allow recovery of Cities’ rate case expenses. The Railroad Commission undertakes a mere administrative review of GRIP filings (instead of a full hearing) and rate increases go into effect without any material adjustments. In ACSC’s view, the GRIP process unfairly raises customers’ rates without any regulatory oversight. In contrast, the RRM process has allowed for a more comprehensive rate review and annual evaluation of expenses and revenues, as well as capital investment. EXPLANATION OF “BE IT ORDAINED” PARAGRAPHS 1. This section approves all findings in the Resolution. 3 2. This section adopts the RRM rate tariffs and finds the adoption of the new rates to be just, reasonable, and in the public interest. 3. This section finds that existing rates are unreasonable. Such finding is a necessary predicate to establishment of new rates. The new tariffs will permit Atmos Mid-Tex to recover an additional $24.9 million on a system-wide basis. Settling Cities will be responsible for $17.8 million of the $24.9 million. 4. This section approves an exhibit that establishes a benchmark for pensions and retiree medical benefits to be used in future rate cases or RRM filings. 5. This section approves an exhibit to be used in future rate cases or RRM filings regarding recovery of regulatory liabilities, such as excess deferred income taxes. 6. This section requires the Company to reimburse the City for expenses associated with review of the RRM filing, settlement discussions, and adoption of the Resolution approving new rate tariffs. 7. This section repeals any resolution or ordinance that is inconsistent with the Resolution. 8. This section finds that the meeting was conducted in compliance with the Texas Open Meetings Act, Texas Government Code, Chapter 551. 9. This section is a savings clause, which provides that if any section is later found to be unconstitutional or invalid, that finding shall not affect, impair, or invalidate the remaining provisions of this Resolution. This section further directs that the remaining provisions of the Resolution are to be interpreted as if the offending section or clause never existed. 10. This section provides for an effective date upon passage. 11. This section directs that a copy of the signed Resolution be sent to a representative of the Company and legal counsel for ACSC. 4 CONCLUSION The Legislature’s GRIP process allowed gas utilities to receive annual rate increases associated with capital investments. The RRM process has proven to result in a more efficient and less costly (both from a consumer rate impact perspective and from a ratemaking perspective) than the GRIP process. Given Atmos Mid-Tex’s claim that its historic cost of service should entitle it to recover $42 million in additional system-wide revenues, the RRM settlement at $24.9 million reflects savings of $17.1 million. ACSC’s consultants produced a report indicating that Atmos had justified increased revenues of at least $21.7 million. Settlement at $24.9 million is fair and reasonable. The ACSC Executive Committee consisting of city employees of 18 ACSC members urges all ACSC members to pass the Resolution before September 30, 2018. New rates become effective October 1, 2018. 2557/30/7718885 Attachment 1 ATMOS ENERGY CORP., MID-TEX DIVISION PROPOSED TARIFF STRUCTURE (BEFORE RATE CASE EXPENSE RECOVERY) TEST YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2017 Line No.(a)(b)(c) (d) (e) (f)(g)(h)(i)(j)(k) 1 Proposed Change In Rates:24,900,000$ Schedule A 2 Proposed Change In Rates without Revenue Related Taxes:23,357,466$ Ln 1 divided by Tax factor on WP_F-5.1 3 4 5 6 Revenue Requirements Allocations 7 Residential 338,431,486$ 77.95% Per GUD 10170 Final Order 8 Commercial 84,223,622 19.40% Per GUD 10170 Final Order 9 Industrial and Transportation 11,490,316 2.65% Per GUD 10170 Final Order 10 Net Revenue Requirements GUD No. 10170 434,145,424$ 100.00% 11 12 13 14 15 16 Increase to Customer Classes per GUD 10170 Final Order:Customer Charges Rounded Off and residential base charge increase for 2018 limited to $0.60 per RRM tariff: 17 18 Customer Charges Current Prospective Revenues Customer Charges Proposed Change Proposed Change In Revenues Proposed Rates Proposed Revenues 19 20 Residential Base Charge 18.35$ 0.50$ 9,103,979$ Residential Base Charge 0.50$ 9,156,798$ 18.85$ 345,211,285$ 21 Residential Consumption Charge 0.13734$ 0.01118$ 9,103,979 Residential Consumption Charge 0.01112$ 9,051,844 0.14846$ 120,848,626 22 Commercial Base Charge 41.95$ 1.54$ 2,265,658 Commercial Base Charge 1.55$ 2,278,481 43.50$ 63,944,478 23 Commercial Consumption Charge 0.08746$ 0.00421$ 2,265,658 Commercial Consumption Charge 0.00419$ 2,253,573 0.09165$ 49,293,546 24 I&T Base Charge 752.00$ 32.12$ 309,095 I&T Base Charge 32.00$ 307,968 784.00$ 7,545,216 25 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 1 MMBTU 0.3172$ 0.0140$ 144,188 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 1 MMBTU 0.0140$ 144,244 0.3312$ 3,412,408 26 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 2 MMBTU 0.2322$ 0.0102$ 118,338 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 2 MMBTU 0.0103$ 118,980 0.2425$ 2,801,237 27 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 3 MMBTU 0.0498$ 0.0022$ 46,570 I&T Consumption Charge Tier 3 MMBTU 0.0022$ 46,631 0.0520$ 1,102,180 28 Total 23,357,466$ Total 23,358,519$ 594,158,976$ 29 WP_J-5 Page 2 of 7 Attachment 2 Line October 1, 2018 1 Rate R @ 45 Ccf CURRENT PROPOSED CHANGE 2 Customer charge 18.35$ 3 Consumption charge 45.0 CCF X 0.13734$ = 6.18 4 Rider GCR Part A 45.0 CCF X 0.28533$ = 12.84 5 Rider GCR Part B 45.0 CCF X 0.30630$ = 13.78 6 Subtotal 51.15$ 7 Rider FF & Rider TAX 51.15$ X 0.06604 = 3.38 8 Total 54.53$ 9 10 Customer charge 18.85$ 11 Consumption charge 45.0 CCF X 0.14846$ =6.68 12 Rider GCR Part A 45.0 CCF X 0.28533$ =12.84 13 Rider GCR Part B 45.0 CCF X 0.30630$ =13.78 14 Subtotal 52.15$ 15 Rider FF & Rider TAX 52.15$ X 0.06604 =3.44 16 Total 55.59$ 1.06$ 17 1.94% 18 19 Rate C @ 346.5 Ccf CURRENT PROPOSED CHANGE 20 Customer charge 41.95$ 21 Consumption charge 346.5 CCF X 0.08746$ = 30.31 22 Rider GCR Part A 346.5 CCF X 0.28533$ = 98.88 23 Rider GCR Part B 346.5 CCF X 0.22105$ = 76.60 24 Subtotal 247.74$ 25 Rider FF & Rider TAX 247.74$ X 0.06604 = 16.36 26 Total 264.10$ 27 28 Customer charge 43.50$ 29 Consumption charge 346.5 CCF X 0.09165$ =31.76 30 Rider GCR Part A 346.5 CCF X 0.28533$ =98.88 31 Rider GCR Part B 346.5 CCF X 0.22105$ =76.60 32 Subtotal 250.74$ 33 Rider FF & Rider TAX 250.74$ X 0.06604 =16.56 34 Total 267.30$ 3.20$ 35 1.21% ATMOS ENERGY CORP., MID-TEX DIVISION AVERAGE BILL COMPARISON - BASE RATES TEST YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2017 Attachment 2 36 Rate I @ 3907 MMBTU CURRENT PROPOSED CHANGE 37 Customer charge 752.00$ 38 Consumption charge 1,500 MMBTU X 0.3172$ = 475.80 39 Consumption charge 2,407 MMBTU X 0.2322$ = 558.79 40 Consumption charge 0 MMBTU X 0.0498$ =- 41 Rider GCR Part A 3,907 MMBTU X 0.2922$ = 1,141.41 42 Rider GCR Part B 3,907 MMBTU X 0.4881$ = 1,906.68 43 Subtotal 4,834.68$ 44 Rider FF & Rider TAX 4,834.68$ X 0.06604 = 319.28 45 Total 5,153.96$ 46 47 Customer charge 784.00$ 48 Consumption charge 1,500 MMBTU X 0.3312$ =496.80 49 Consumption charge 2,407 MMBTU X 0.2425$ =583.58 50 Consumption charge 0 MMBTU X 0.0520$ =- 51 Rider GCR Part A 3,907 MMBTU X 0.2922$ =1,141.41 52 Rider GCR Part B 3,907 MMBTU X 0.4881$ =1,906.68 53 Subtotal 4,912.47$ 54 Rider FF & Rider TAX 4,912.47$ X 0.06604 =324.42 55 Total 5,236.89$ 82.93$ 56 1.61% 57 Rate T @ 3907 MMBTU CURRENT PROPOSED CHANGE 58 Customer charge 752.00$ 59 Consumption charge 1,500 MMBTU X 0.3172$ = 475.80 60 Consumption charge 2,407 MMBTU X 0.2322$ = 558.79 61 Consumption charge 0 MMBTU X 0.0498$ =- 62 Rider GCR Part B 3,907 MMBTU X 0.4881$ = 1,906.68 63 Subtotal 3,693.27$ 64 Rider FF & Rider TAX 3,693.27$ X 0.06604 = 243.90 65 Total 3,937.17$ 66 67 Customer charge 784.00$ 68 Consumption charge 1,500 MMBTU X 0.3312$ =496.80 69 Consumption charge 2,407 MMBTU X 0.2425$ =583.58 70 Consumption charge 0 MMBTU X 0.0520$ =- 71 Rider GCR Part B 3,907 MMBTU X 0.4881$ =1,906.68 72 Subtotal 3,771.06$ 73 Rider FF & Rider TAX 3,771.06$ X 0.06604 =249.04 74 Total 4,020.10$ 82.93$ 75 2.11% Resolution 18-33 Page 1 of 3 RESOLUTION NO. 18-33 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPROVING A NEGOTIATED SETTLEMENT BETWEEN THE ATMOS CITIES STEERING COMMITTEE (“ACSC”) AND ATMOS ENERGY CORP., MID-TEX DIVISION REGARDING THE COMPANY’S 2018 RATE REVIEW MECHANISM FILINGS; DECLARING EXISTING RATES TO BE UNREASONABLE; ADOPTING TARIFFS THAT REFLECT RATE ADJUSTMENTS CONSISTENT WITH THE NEGOTIATED SETTLEMENT; FINDING THE RATES TO BE SET BY THE ATTACHED SETTLEMENT TARIFFS TO BE JUST AND REASONABLE AND IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST; APPROVING AN ATTACHED EXHIBIT ESTABLISHING A BENCHMARK FOR PENSIONS AND RETIREE MEDICAL BENEFITS; APPROVING AN ATTACHED EXHIBIT REGARDING AMORTIZATION OF REGULATORY LIABILITY; REQUIRING THE COMPANY TO REIMBURSE ACSC’S REASONABLE RATEMAKING EXPENSES; DETERMINING THAT THIS RESOLUTION WAS PASSED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEXAS OPEN MEETINGS ACT; ADOPTING A SAVINGS CLAUSE; DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE; AND REQUIRING DELIVERY OF THIS RESOLUTION TO THE COMPANY AND THE ACSC’S LEGAL COUNSEL. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake, Texas (“City”) is a gas utility customer of Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division (“Atmos Mid-Tex” or “Company”), and a regulatory authority with an interest in the rates and charges of Atmos Mid-Tex; and WHEREAS, the Town is a member of the Atmos Cities Steering Committee (“ACSC”), a coalition of similarly-situated cities served by Atmos Mid-Tex (“ACSC Cities”) that have joined together to facilitate the review of, and response to, natural gas issues affecting rates charged in the Atmos Mid-Tex service area; and WHEREAS, ACSC and the Company worked collaboratively to develop a new Rate Review Mechanism (“RRM”) tariff that allows for an expedited rate review process by ACSC Cities as a substitute to the Gas Reliability Infrastructure Program (“GRIP”) process instituted by the Legislature, and that will establish rates for the ACSC Cities based on the system-wide cost of serving the Atmos Mid-Tex Division; and WHEREAS, the RRM tariff was adopted by the City in a rate ordinance earlier this year; and WHEREAS, on about April 1, 2018, Atmos Mid-Tex filed its 2018 RRM rate request with ACSC Cities based on a test year ending December 31, 2017; and WHEREAS, ACSC coordinated its review of the Atmos Mid-Tex 2018 RRM filing through its Executive Committee, assisted by ACSC’s attorneys and consultants, to resolve issues identified in the Company’s RRM filing; and Resolution 18-33 Page 2 of 3 WHEREAS, the Executive Committee, as well as ACSC’s counsel and consultants, recommend that ACSC Cities approve an increase in base rates for Atmos Mid-Tex of $24.9 million on a system-wide basis ($17.8 million of which is applicable to ACSC members); and WHEREAS, the attached tariffs (Exhibit A) implementing new rates are consistent with the recommendation of the ACSC Executive Committee, are agreed to by the Company, and are just, reasonable, and in the public interest; and WHEREAS, the Exhibit A rate tariffs incorporate the federal income tax rates that became effective January 1, 2018; and WHEREAS, the settlement agreement sets a new benchmark for pensions and retiree medical benefits (Exhibit B) and WHEREAS, the settlement agreement establishes an amortization schedule for regulatory liability (Exhibit C); and WHEREAS, the RRM Tariff contemplates reimbursement of ACSC’s reasonable expenses associated with RRM applications; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: Section 1. That the findings set forth in this Resolution are hereby in all things approved. Section 2. That the Town Council finds that the settled amount of an increase in revenues of $24.9 million on a system-wide basis represents a comprehensive settlement of gas utility rate issues affecting the rates, operations, and services offered by Atmos Mid-Tex within the municipal limits arising from Atmos Mid-Tex’s 2018 RRM filing, is in the public interest, and is consistent with the City’s authority under Section 103.001 of the Texas Utilities Code. Section 3. That the existing rates for natural gas service provided by Atmos Mid-Tex are unreasonable. The new tariffs attached hereto and incorporated herein as Exhibit A, are just and reasonable, and are designed to allow Atmos Mid-Tex to recover annually an additional $24.9 million in revenue on a system-wide basis over the amount allowed under currently approved rates. Such tariffs are hereby adopted. Section 4. That the ratemaking treatment for pensions and retiree medical benefits in Atmos Mid-Tex’s next RRM filing shall be as set forth on Exhibit B, attached hereto and incorporated herein. Section 5. That amortization of regulatory liability shall be consistent with the schedule found in attached Exhibit C attached hereto and incorporated herein. Resolution 18-33 Page 3 of 3 Section 6. That Atmos Mid-Tex shall reimburse the reasonable ratemaking expenses of the ACSC in processing the Company’s 2018 RRM filing. Section 7. That to the extent any resolution or ordinance previously adopted by the Council is inconsistent with this Resolution, it is hereby repealed. Section 8. That the meeting at which this Resolution was approved was in all things conducted in strict compliance with the Texas Open Meetings Act, Texas Government Code, Chapter 551. Section 9. That if any one or more sections or clauses of this Resolution is adjudged to be unconstitutional or invalid, such judgment shall not affect, impair, or invalidate the remaining provisions of this Resolution, and the remaining provisions of the Resolution shall be interpreted as if the offending section or clause never existed. Section 10. That consistent with the Town Ordinance that established the RRM process, this Resolution shall become effective from and after its passage with rates authorized by attached tariffs to be effective for bills rendered on or after October 1, 2018. Section 11. That a copy of this Resolution shall be sent to Atmos Mid-Tex, care of Chris Felan, Vice President of Rates and Regulatory Affairs Mid-Tex Division, Atmos Energy Corporation, 5420 LJB Freeway, Suite 1862, Dallas, Texas 75240, and to Geoffrey Gay, General Counsel to ACSC, at Lloyd Gosselink Rochelle & Townsend, P.C., 816 Congress Avenue, Suite 1900, Austin, Texas 78701. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Exhibit A Rate Tariffs Effective October 1, 2018 Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:R - RESIDENTIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 12 Application Applicable to Residential Customers for all natural gas provided at one Point of Delivery and measured through one meter. Type of Service Where service of the type desired by Customer is not already available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements between Company and Customer may be required prior to service being furnished. Monthly Rate Customer's monthly bill will be calculated by adding the following Customer and Ccf charges to the amounts due under the riders listed below: Charge Amount Customer Charge per Bill $18.85 per month Rider CEE Surcharge $ 0.03 per month' Total Customer Charge $18.88 per month Commodity Charge - All Ccf $0.14846 per Ccf Gas Cost Recovery: Pius an amount for gas costs and upstream transportation costs calculated in accordance with Part (a) and Part (b), respectively, of Rider OCR. Weather Normalization Adjustment: Pius or Minus an amount for weather normalization calculated in accordance with Rider WNA. Franchise Fee Adjustment: Plus an amount for franchise fees calculated in accordance with Rider FF. Rider FF is only applicable to customers inside the corporate limits of any incorporated municipality. Tax Adjustment: Plus an amount for tax calculated in accordance with Rider TAX. Surcharges: Plus an amount for surcharges calculated in accordance with the applicable rider(s). Agreement An Agreement for Gas Service may be required. Notice Service hereunder and the rates for services provided are subject to the orders of regulatory bodies having jurisdiction and to the Company's Tariff for Gas Service. ^Reference Rider CEE - Conservation and Energy Efficiency as approved in GUD 10170. Surcharge billing effective July 1, 2018. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:C - COMMERCIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 13 Application Applicable to Commercial Customers for all natural gas provided at one Point of Delivery and measured through one meter and to Industrial Customers with an average annual usage of less than 30,000 Ccf. Type of Service Where service of the type desired by Customer is not already available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements between Company and Customer may be required prior to service being furnished. Monthly Rate Customer's monthly bill will be calculated by adding the following Customer and Ccf charges to the amounts due under the riders listed below: Charge Amount Customer Charge per Bill $ 43.50 per month Rider CEE Surcharge $ (0.03) per month' Total Customer Charge $ 43.47 per month Commodity Charge - All Ccf $ 0.09165 per Ccf Gas Cost Recovery: Plus an amount for gas costs and upstream transportation costs calculated in accordance with Part (a) and Part (b), respectively, of Rider GCR. Weather Normalization Adjustment: Plus or Minus an amount for weather normalization calculated in accordance with Rider WNA. Franchise Fee Adjustment: Plus an amount for franchise fees calculated in accordance with Rider FF. Rider FF is only applicable to customers inside the corporate limits of any incorporated municipality. Tax Adjustment: Plus an amount for tax calculated in accordance with Rider TAX. Surcharges: Plus an amount for surcharges calculated in accordance with the applicable rider(s). Agreement An Agreement for Gas Service may be required. Notice Service hereunder and the rates for services provided are subject to the orders of regulatory bodies having jurisdiction and to the Company's Tariff for Gas Service. ' Reference Rider CEE - Conservation and Energy Efficiency as approved in GUD 10170. Surcharge billing effective July 1, 2018. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 14 Application Applicable to Industrial Customers with a maximum daily usage (MDU) of less than 3,500 MMBtu per day for all natural gas provided at one Point of Delivery and measured through one meter. Service for Industrial Customers with an MDU equal to or greater than 3,500 MMBtu per day will be provided at Company's sole option and will require special contract arrangements between Company and Customer. Type of Service Where service of the type desired by Customer is not already available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements between Company and Customer may be required prior to service being furnished. Monthly Rate Customer's monthly bill will be calculated by adding the following Customer and MMBtu charges to the amounts due under the riders listed below: Charge Amount Customer Charge per Meter $ 784.00 per month First 0 MMBtu to 1,500 MMBtu $ 0.3312 per MMBtu Next 3,500 MMBtu $ 0.2425 per MMBtu All MMBtu over 5,000 MMBtu $ 0.0520 per MMBtu Gas Cost Recovery: Plus an amount for gas costs and upstream transportation costs calculated in accordance with Part (a) and Part (b), respectively, of Rider OCR. Franchise Fee Adjustment: Plus an amount for franchise fees calculated in accordance with Rider FF. Rider FF is only applicable to customers inside the corporate limits of any incorporated municipality. Tax Adjustment: Plus an amount for tax calculated in accordance with Rider TAX. Surcharges: Plus an amount for surcharges calculated in accordance with the applicable rider(s). Curtailment Overpull Fee Upon notification by Company of an event of curtailment or interruption of Customer's deliveries. Customer will, for each MMBtu delivered in excess of the stated level of curtailment or interruption, pay Company 200% of the midpoint price for the Katy point listed in Platts Gas Daily published for the applicable Gas Day in the table entitled "Daily Price Survey." Replacement Index In the event the "midpoint" or "common" price for the Katy point listed in Platts Gas Dally in the table entitled "Daily Price Survey" is no longer published, Company will calculate the applicable imbalance fees utilizing a daily price index recognized as authoritative by the natural gas industry and most closely approximating the applicable index. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 15 Agreement An Agreement for Gas Service may be required. Notice Service hereunder and the rates for services provided are subject to the orders of regulatory bodies having jurisdiction and to the Company's Tariff for Gas Service. Special Conditions In order to receive service under Rate I, Customer must have the type of meter required by Company. Customer must pay Company all costs associated with the acquisition and installation of the meter. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 16 Exhibit A The rates were effective for the following Cities on 3/15/2018: ABILENE ADDISON ALBANY ALLEN ALVARADO ANGUS ANNA ARGYLE ARLINGTON AUBREY AZLE BEDFORD BELLMEAD BENBROOK BEVERLY HILLS BLOSSOM BLUE RIDGE BOWIE BOYD BRIDGEPORT BROWNWOOD BUFFALO BURKBURNETT BURLESON CADDO MILLS CANTON CARROLLTON CEDAR HILL CELESTE CELINA CENTERVILLE CISCO CLARKSVILLE CLEBURNE CLYDE COLLEGE STATION COLLEYVILLE COLORADO CITY COMANCHE COOLIDGE COPPELL CORINTH CRANDALL CROWLEY DALWORTHINGTON GARDENS DENISON DENTON DESOTO DRAPER AKA CORRAL CITY DUNCANVILLE EASTLAND EDGECLIFF VILLAGE EMORY ENNIS EULESS EVERMAN FAIRVIEW FARMERS BRANCH FARMERSVILLE FATE FLOWER MOUND FOREST HILL FORNEY FORT WORTH FRISCO FROST GAINSVILLE GARLAND GARRETT GRAND PARAIRIE GRAPEVINE GUNTER HALTOM CITY HARKER HEIGHTS HASKELL HASLET HEWITT HIGHLAND PARK HIGHLAND VILLAGE HONEY GROVE HURST IOWA PARK IRVING JUSTIN KAUFMAN KEENE KELLER KEMP KENNEDALE KERRVILLE KILLEEN KRUM LAKE WORTH LAKESIDE LEWISVILLE LINCOLN PARK (ANNEXED WITH LITTLE ELM) LITTLE ELM LORENA MADISONVILLE MALAKOFF MANSFIELD MCKINNEY MELISSA MESQUITE MIDLOTHIAN MURPHY NEWARK NOCONA NORTH RICHLAND HILLS NORTH LAKE OAK LEAF OVILLA PALESTINE PANTEGO PARIS PARKER PECAN HILL PETROLIA PLANO PONDER POTTSBORO PROSPER QUITMAN RED OAK RENO (PARKER COUNTY) RHOME RICHARDSON RICHLAND RICHLAND HILLS RIVER OAKS ROANOKE ROBINSON ROCKWALL ROSCOE ROWLETT Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 17 Cities with Rate Effective 3/15/2018 (Continued) ROYSE CITY SACHSE SAG IN AW SANSOM PARK SEAGOVILLE SHERMAN SNYDER SOUTHLAKE SPRINGTOWN STAMFORD STEPHENVILLE SULPHUR SPRINGS SWEETWATER TEMPLE TERRELL THE COLONY TROPHY CLUB TYLER UNIVERSITY PARK VENUS VERNON WACO The rates were effective for the following Cities on 4/01/2018: ABBOTT ALBA ALMA ALVORD ANNONA ANSON ARCHER CITY ATHENS AURORA AUSTIN AVERY BAIRD BALCH SPRINGS BALLINGER BANDERA BANGS BARDWELL BARRY BARTLETT BARTONVILLE BELLEVUE BELLS BELTON BENJAMIN BERTRAM BLACKWELL BLANKET BLOOMING GROVE BLUE MOUND BLUM BOGATA BONHAM BREMOND BRONTE BROWNSBORO BRUCEVILLE-EDDY BRYAN BUCKHOLTS BUFFALO GAP BURNET BYERS CALDWELL CALVERT CAMERON CAMPBELL CARBON CASHION COMMUNITY CEDAR PARK CHANDLER CHICO CHILDRESS CHILLICOTHE CLIFTON COCKRELL HILL COLEMAN COLLINSVILLE COMMERCE COMO COOPER COPPER CANYON COPPERAS COVE CORSICANA COVINGTON COYOTE FLATS CRAWFORD CROSS ROADS CUMBY DAWSON DECATUR DELEON WATAUGA WAXAHACHIE WESTLAKE WESTOVER HILLS WHITE SETTLEMENT WHITESBORO WICHITA FALLS WOODWAY WYLIE DEPORT DETROIT DODD CITY DOUBLE OAK DUBLIN EARLY ECTOR EDOM ELECTRA EMHOUSE EUSTACE EVANT FAIRFIELD FERRIS FRANKLIN FRANKSTON FREDERICKSBURG GATESVILLE GEORGETOWN GLEN ROSE GLENN HEIGHTS GODLEY GOLDTHWAITE GOODLOW GORDON GOREE GORMAN GRANBURY GRAND VIEW GRANGER GREENVILLE GROESBECK GUSTINE HAMLIN HAMILTON Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 18 Cities with Rate Effective 4/01/2018 (Continued) HAWLEY HEARNE HEATH HEBRON HENRIETTA HICKORY CREEK HICO HILLSBORO HOLLAND HOLLIDAY HOWE HUBBARD HUTCHINS HUTTO IMPACT IREDELL ITALY ITASCA JEWETT JOSEPHINE JOSHUA KERENS KNOLLWOOD KNOX CITY KOSSE KURTEN LACY-LAKEVIEW LADONIA LAKE DALLAS LAKEPORT LAMPASAS LANCASTER LAVON LAWN LEANDER LEONA LEONARD LEXINGTON LINDSAY LIPAN LITTLE RIVER ACADEMY LLANO LOMETA LONE OAK LONGVIEW LORAINE LOTT LUEDERS MABANK MALONE MANOR MARBLE FALLS MARLIN MART MAYPEARL MCGREGOR MCLENDON-CHISHOLM MEGARGEL MERIDIAN MERKEL MEXIA MIDWAY MILES MILFORD MILLSAP MOBILE CITY MOODY MORAN MORGAN MUENSTER MUNDAY MURCHISON NEVADA NEW CHAPEL HILL NEWCASTLE NOLANVILLE NORMANGEE NOVICE OAK POINT OAKWOOD O'BRIEN CO-OP GIN OGLESBY OLNEY PALMER PARADISE PECAN GAP PENELOPE PFLUGERVILLE PILOT POINT PLEASANT VALLEY POINT POST OAK BEND POWELL POYNOR PRINCETON PUTNAM QUANAH QUINLAN RANGER RAVENNA RENO (LAMAR COUNTY) RETREAT RICE RIESEL RIO VISTA ROBERT LEE ROBY ROCHESTER ROCKDALE ROGERS ROSEBUD ROSS ROTAN ROUND ROCK ROXTON RULE RUNAWAY BAY SADLER SAINT JO SAN ANGELO SAN SABA SANCTUARY SANGER SANTA ANNA SAVOY SCURRY SEYMOUR SHADY SHORES SOMERVILLE SOUTH MOUNTAIN SOUTHMAYD STAR HARBOR STOCKTON BEND STRAWN STREETMAN SUN VALLEY SUNNYVALE TALTY TAYLOR TEAGUE TEHUACANA THORNDALE THORNTON THRALL THROCKMORTON TIOGA TOCO Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:1 - INDUSTRIAL SALES APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 19 Cities with Rate Effective 4/01/2018 (Continued) TOM BEAN TRENT TRENTON TRINIDAD TROY TUSGOLA TYE VALLEY MILLS VALLEY VIEW VAN ALSTYNE WALNUT SPRINGS WEINERT WEST WESTWORTH VILLAGE WHITEHOUSE WHITEWRIGHT WHITNEY WILMER WINDOM WINTERS WIXON VALLEY WOLFE CITY WORTHAM YANTIS Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 16 Application Applicable, in the event that Company has entered into a Transportation Agreement, to a customer directly connected to the Atmos Energy Corp., Mid-Tex Division Distribution System (Customer) for the transportation of all natural gas supplied by Customer or Customer's agent at one Point of Delivery for use in Customer's facility. Type of Service Where service of the type desired by Customer is not already available at the Point of Delivery, additional charges and special contract arrangements between Company and Customer may be required prior to service being furnished. Monthly Rate Customer's bill will be calculated by adding the following Customer and MMBtu charges to the amounts and quantities due under the riders listed below: Charge Amount Customer Charge per Meter $ 784.00 per month First 0 MMBtu to 1,500 MMBtu $0.3312 per MMBtu Next 3,500 MMBtu $ 0.2425 per MMBtu All MMBtu over 5,000 MMBtu $ 0.0520 per MMBtu Upstream Transportation Cost Recovery: Plus an amount for upstream transportation costs in accordance with Part (b) of Rider OCR. Retention Adjustment: Plus a quantity of gas as calculated in accordance with Rider RA. Franchise Fee Adjustment: Plus an amount for franchise fees calculated in accordance with Rider FF. Rider FF is only applicable to customers inside the corporate limits of any incorporated municipality. Tax Adjustment: Plus an amount for tax calculated in accordance with Rider TAX. Surcharges: Plus an amount for surcharges calculated in accordance with the applicable rider(s). Imbalance Fees All fees charged to Customer under this Rate Schedule will be charged based on the quantities determined under the applicable Transportation Agreement and quantities will not be aggregated for any Customer with multiple Transportation Agreements for the purposes of such fees. Monthly Imbalance Fees Customer shall pay Company the greater of (i) $0.10 per MMBtu, or (ii) 150% of the difference per MMBtu between the highest and lowest "midpoint" price for the Katy point listed in Platts Gas Daily in the table entitled "Daily Price Survey" during such month, for the MMBtu of Customer's monthly Cumulative Imbalance, as defined in the applicable Transportation Agreement, at the end of each month that exceeds 10% of Customer's receipt quantities for the month. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION RRC Tariff No: ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 17 Curtailment Overpull Fee Upon notification by Company of an event of curtailment or interruption of Customer's deliveries, Customer will, for each MMBtu delivered in excess of the stated level of curtailment or interruption, pay Company 200% of the midpoint price for the Katy point listed in Platts Gas Daily published for the applicable Gas Day in the table entitled "Daily Price Survey." Replacement Index In the event the "midpoint" or "common" price for the Katy point listed in Platts Gas Dally in the table entitled "Daily Price Survey" is no longer published. Company will calculate the applicable imbalance fees utilizing a daily price index recognized as authoritative by the natural gas industry and most closely approximating the applicable index. Agreement A transportation agreement is required. Notice Service hereunder and the rates for services provided are subjeot to the orders of regulatory bodies having jurisdiction and to the Company's Tariff for Gas Service. Special Conditions In order to receive service under Rate T, customer must have the type of meter required by Company. Customer must pay Company all costs associated with the acquisition and installation of the meter. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 18 Exhibit A The rates were effective for the following Cities on 3/15/2018: ABILENE ADDISON ALBANY ALLEN ALVARADO ANGUS ANNA ARGYLE ARLINGTON AUBREY AZLE BEDFORD BELLMEAD BENBROOK BEVERLY HILLS BLOSSOM BLUE RIDGE BOWIE BOYD BRIDGEPORT BROWN WOOD BUFFALO BURKBURNETT BURLESON CADDO MILLS CANTON CARROLLTON CEDAR HILL CELESTE CELINA CENTERVILLE CISCO CLARKSVILLE CLEBURNE CLYDE COLLEGE STATION COLLEYVILLE COLORADO CITY COMANCHE COOLIDGE COPPELL CORINTH CRANDALL CROWLEY DALWORTHINGTON GARDENS DENISON DENTON DESOTO DRAPER AKA CORRAL CITY DUNCANVILLE EASTLAND EDGECLIFF VILLAGE EMORY ENNIS EULESS EVERMAN FAIRVIEW FARMERS BRANCH FARMERSVILLE FATE FLOWER MOUND FOREST HILL FORNEY FORT WORTH FRISCO FROST GAINSVILLE GARLAND GARRETT GRAND PARAIRIE GRAPEVINE GUNTER HALTOM CITY HARKER HEIGHTS HASKELL HASLET HEWITT HIGHLAND PARK HIGHLAND VILLAGE HONEY GROVE HURST IOWA PARK IRVING JUSTIN KAUFMAN KEENE KELLER KEMP KENNEDALE KERRVILLE KILLEEN KRUM LAKE WORTH LAKESIDE LEWISVILLE LINCOLN PARK (ANNEXED WITH LITTLE ELM) LITTLE ELM LORENA MADISONVILLE MALAKOFF MANSFIELD MCKINNEY MELISSA MESQUITE MIDLOTHIAN MURPHY NEWARK NOCONA NORTH RICHLAND HILLS NORTHLAKE OAK LEAF OVILLA PALESTINE PANTEGO PARIS PARKER PECAN HILL PETROLIA PLANO PONDER POTTSBORO PROSPER QUITMAN RED OAK RENO (PARKER COUNTY) RHOME RICHARDSON RICHLAND RICHLAND HILLS RIVER OAKS ROANOKE ROBINSON ROCKWALL ROSCOE ROWLETT Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 19 Cities with Rate Effective 3/15/2018 (Continued) ROYSE CITY SACHSE SAG! N AW SANSOM PARK SEAGOVILLE SHERMAN SNYDER SOUTHLAKE SPRINGTOWN STAMFORD STEPHENVILLE SULPHUR SPRINGS SWEETWATER TEMPLE TERRELL THE COLONY TROPHY CLUB TYLER UNIVERSITY PARK VENUS VERNON WACO The rates were effective for the following Cities on 4/01/2018: ABBOTT ALBA ALMA ALVORD ANNONA ANSON ARCHER CITY ATHENS AURORA AUSTIN AVERY BAIRD BALCH SPRINGS BALLINGER BANDERA BANGS BARDWELL BARRY BARTLETT BARTONVILLE BELLEVUE BELLS BELTON BENJAMIN BERTRAM BLACKWELL BLANKET BLOOMING GROVE BLUE MOUND BLUM BOGATA BONHAM BREMOND BRONTE BROWNSBORO BRUCEVILLE-EDDY BRYAN BUCKHOLTS BUFFALO GAP BURNET BYERS CALDWELL CALVERT CAMERON CAMPBELL CARBON CASHION COMMUNITY CEDAR PARK CHANDLER CHICO CHILDRESS CHILLICOTHE CLIFTON COCKRELL HILL COLEMAN COLLINSVILLE COMMERCE COMO COOPER COPPER CANYON COPPERAS COVE CORSICANA COVINGTON COYOTE FLATS CRAWFORD CROSS ROADS CUMBY DAWSON DECATUR DELEON WATAUGA WAXAHACHIE WESTLAKE WESTOVER HILLS WHITE SETTLEMENT WHITESBORO WICHITA FALLS WOODWAY WYLIE DEPORT DETROIT DODD CITY DOUBLE OAK DUBLIN EARLY ECTOR EDOM ELECTRA EMHOUSE EUSTACE EVANT FAIRFIELD FERRIS FRANKLIN FRANKSTON FREDERICKSBURG GATESVILLE GEORGETOWN GLEN ROSE GLENN HEIGHTS GODLEY GOLDTHWAITE GOODLOW GORDON GOREE GORMAN GRANBURY GRANDVIEW GRANGER GREENVILLE GROESBECK GUSTINE HAMLIN HAMILTON Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 20 Cities with Rate Effective 4/01/2018 (Continued) HAWLEY HEARNE HEATH HEBRON HENRIETTA HICKORY GREEK HICO HILLSBORO HOLLAND HOLLIDAY HOWE HUBBARD HUTCHINS HUTTO IMPACT IREDELL ITALY ITASCA JEWETT JOSEPHINE JOSHUA KERENS KNOLLWOOD KNOX CITY KOSSE KURTEN LACY-LAKEVIEW LADONIA LAKE DALLAS LAKEPORT LAMPASAS LANCASTER LAVON LAWN LEANDER LEONA LEONARD LEXINGTON LINDSAY LIPAN LITTLE RIVER ACADEMY LLANO LOMETA LONE OAK LONGVIEW LORAINE LOTT LUEDERS MABANK MALONE MANOR MARBLE FALLS MARLIN MART MAYPEARL MCGREGOR MCLENDON-CHISHOLM MEGARGEL MERIDIAN MERKEL MEXIA MIDWAY MILES MILFORD MILLSAP MOBILE CITY MOODY MORAN MORGAN MUENSTER MUNDAY MURCHISON NEVADA NEW CHAPEL HILL NEWCASTLE NOLANVILLE NORMANGEE NOVICE OAK POINT OAKWOOD O'BRIEN CO-OP GIN OGLESBY OLNEY PALMER PARADISE PECAN GAP PENELOPE PFLUGERVILLE PILOT POINT PLEASANT VALLEY POINT POST OAK BEND POWELL POYNOR PRINCETON PUTNAM QUANAH QUINLAN RANGER RAVENNA RENO (LAMAR COUNTY) RETREAT RICE RIESEL RIO VISTA ROBERT LEE ROBY ROCHESTER ROCKDALE ROGERS ROSEBUD ROSS ROTAN ROUND ROCK ROXTON RULE RUNAWAY BAY SADLER SAINT JO SAN ANGELO SAN SABA SANCTUARY SANGER SANTA ANNA SAVOY SCURRY SEYMOUR SHADY SHORES SOMERVILLE SOUTH MOUNTAIN SOUTHMAYD STAR HARBOR STOCKTON BEND STRAWN STREETMAN SUN VALLEY SUNNYVALE TALTY TAYLOR TEAGUE TEHUACANA THORNDALE THORNTON THRALL THROCKMORTON TIOGA TOCO Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RRC Tariff No: RATE SCHEDULE:T - TRANSPORTATION APPLICABLE TO: ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION EXCEPT THE CITY OF DALLAS AND UNINCORPORATED AREAS EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 10/01/2018 PAGE: 21 Cities with Rate Effective 4/01/2018 (Continued) TOM BEAN TRENT TRENTON TRINIDAD TROY TUSGOLA TYE VALLEY MILLS VALLEY VIEW VAN ALSTYNE WALNUT SPRINGS WEINERT WEST WESTWORTH VILLAGE WHITEHOUSE WHITEWRIGHT WHITNEY WILMER WINDOM WINTERS WIXON VALLEY WOLFE CITY WORTHAM YANTIS Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RIDER:WNA - WEATHER NORMALIZATION ADJUSTMENT APPLICABLE TO:ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION UNDER THE RRM TARIFF EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 11/01/2018 PAGE: Provisions for Adjustment The Commodity Charge per Ccf (100 cubic feet) for gas service set forth in any Rate Schedules utilized by the cities of the Mid-Tex Division service area for determining normalized winter period revenues shall be adjusted by an amount hereinafter described, which amount is referred to as the "Weather Normalization Adjustment." The Weather Normalization Adjustment shall apply to all temperature sensitive residential and commercial bills based on meters read during the revenue months of November through April. The five regional weather stations are Abilene, Austin, Dallas, Waco, and Wichita Falls. Computation of Weather Normalization Adjustment The Weather Normalization Adjustment Factor shall be computed to the nearest one-hundredth cent per Ccf by the following formula: WNAF Where I WNAFI Rj HSFj NDD ADD Blj (HSFi (NDD-ADD)) Ri (BLi (HSFj X ADD) ) any particular Rate Schedule or billing classification within any such particular Rate Schedule that contains more than one billing classification Weather Normalization Adjustment Factor for the i^*^ rate schedule or classification expressed in cents per Ccf Commodity Charge rate of temperature sensitive sales for the i^^ schedule or classification. heat sensitive factor for the i^*^ schedule or classification divided by the average bill count in that class billing cycle normal heating degree days calculated as the simple ten-year average of actual heating degree days. billing cycle actual heating degree days. base load sales for the i^l^ schedule or classification divided by the average bill count in that class The Weather Normalization Adjustment for the jth customer in ith rate schedule is computed as: WNAi= WNAFi X qy Where qy is the relevant sales quantity for the jth customer in ith rate schedule. Res 18-33 MID-TEX DIVISION ATMOS ENERGY CORPORATION RIDER:WNA-WEATHER NORMALIZATION ADJUSTMENT APPLICABLE TO:ALL CUSTOMERS IN THE MID-TEX DIVISION UNDER THE RRM TARIFF EFFECTIVE DATE:Bills Rendered on or after 11/01/2018 PAGE: Base Use/Heat Use Factors Residential Commercial Weather Station Abilene Base use Ccf 9.77 Heat use Ccf/HDD 0.1201 Base use Ccf 99.33 Heat use Ccf/HDD 0.5737 Austin 10.38 0.1493 201.46 0.8942 Dallas 13.17 0.2062 183.71 1.0046 Waco 9.26 0.1323 124.57 0.6398 Wichita Falls 11.62 0.1278 114.97 0.5226 Weather Normalization Adjustment (WNA^ Report On or before June 1 of each year, the company posts on its website at atmosenergy.com/mtx-wna, in Excel format, a Weather Normalization Adjustment (WNA) Report to show how the company calculated Its WNAs factor during the preceding winter season. Additionally, on or before June 1 of each year, the company files one hard copy and an Excel version of the WNA Report with the Railroad Commission of Texas' Gas Services Division, addressed to the Director of that Division. Res 18-33 Exhibit B Pensions and Retiree Medical Benefits Res 18-33 Executive BenefitPian (e) ATMOS ENERGY CORP., MID-TEX DIVISIONPENSIONS AND RETIREE MEDICAL BENEFITS FOR CITIES APPROVALTEST YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2017Shared ServicesMid-Tex DirectLineNo.DescriptionPensionAccount PlanPost-EmploymentBenefit PlanPensionAccount PianSuppiementalPost-EmploymentBenefit PianAdjustmentTotai(a)(b)(c)(d)(f)(9)12Fiscal Year 2018 Wiilis Towers Watson Report, as adjustedAllocation to Mid-Tex$ 4,082,90643.65%$ 2,703,89843.55%$ 6,964,30771.24%$ 188,360100.00%$ 3,724,16871.24%34Fiscal Year 2018 Actuariaily Determined Benefit Costs (Ln 1 x Ln 2)O&M and Capital Allocation Factor$ 1,778,092100.00%$ 1,177,539100.00%$ 4,961,241100.00%$ 188,360100.00%$ 2,653,027100.00%5Fiscai Year 2018 Willis Towers Watson Benefit Costs To Approve(Excluding Removed Cost Centers) (Ln 3 x Ln 4)$ 1,778,092$ 1,177,539$ 4,961,241$ 188,360$ 2,653,027$ 10,758,2606789Summary of Costs to Approve (1):1011O&M Expense Factor (WP_F-2.3, Ln 2)80.15%80.15%40.05%19.03%40.05%12131415Total Pension Account PlanTotal Post-Employment Benefit PlanTotal Supplemental Executive Benefit Plan$ 1,425,108$ 943,775$ 1,987,133$ 35,837$ 1,062,621$ 3,412,2412,006,39635,83716Total (Ln13 + Ln14 + Ln15)$ 1,425,108$ 943,775$ 1,987,133$ 35,837$ 1,062,621$ 5,454,474171819202122Note:1. Mid-Tex is proposing that the fiscai year 2018 Wiilis Towers Watson actuariai amounts shown on WP_F-2.3 and WP_F-2.3.1, be approved by the RRM Cities as thebenchmark amounts to be used to calcuiate the regulatory asset or liability for future periods. The Company is requesting that the benchmark amount approved by theRRM Cities for future periods include only the expense amount. The amount attributable to capital would continue to be recorded to utility plant through the overheadprocess as described in the CAM.Res 18-33 Exhibit C Amortization of Regulatory Liability Res 18-33 ATMOS ENERGY CORP., MID-TEX DIVISIONRATE BASE ADJUSTMENTSTEST YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2017AMORTIZATION OF REGULATORY LIABILITYLineNo.Year EndedDec. 31Beginning of YearRate BaseAdjustmentAmountAnnualAmortization (1)End of YearRate BaseAdjustmentAmountBalance as ofDecember 31,2017(a)(b)(c)(d)12017$289,813,47922018 $289,813,479 $12,075,562277,737,91832019277,737,91812,075,562265,662,35642020265,662,35612,075,562253,586,79552021253,586,79512,075,562241,511,23362022241,511,23312,075,562229,435,67172023229,435,67112,075,562217,360,11082024217,360,11012,075,562205,284,54892025205,284,54812,075,562193,208,986102026193,208,98612,075,562181,133,425112027181,133,42512,075,562169,057,863122028169,057,86312,075,562156,982,301132029156,982,30112,075,562144,906,740142030144,906,74012,075,562132,831,178152031132,831,17812,075,562120,755,616162032120,755,61612,075,562108,680,055172033108,680,05512,075,56296,604,49318203496,604,49312,075,56284,528,93219203584,528,93212,075,56272,453,37020203672,453,37012,075,56260,377,80821203760,377,80812,075,56248,302,24722203848,302,24712,075,56236,226,68523203936,226,68512,075,56224,151,12324204024,151,12312,075,56212,075,56225204112,075,56212,075,562(0)Z.O27Note:281. The annual amortization of a 24 year recovery period is based on the(e)289,813,479Res 18-33 Page 1 of 3 ESTLAKE TOWN COUNCIL TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Consent Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consider recommendation of a resolution for a Lighting and Signage Site Plan for an approximately 33-acre portion of Planned Development District 3, Planning Area 5B (PD 3-5B). The property is generally located south of State Highway 170, north of JT Ottinger Road, and west of Westlake Parkway. STAFF CONTACT: Nick Ford, Development Coordinator Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Planned / Responsible Development Citizen, Student & Stakeholder High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) In May 2017, the Town Council approved the site plan for Phase I of the Charles Schwab Corporate Campus through Ordinance 827 with conditions. As conditions of the ordinance, a signage plan for and lighting plans were to be approved by the Town Council before the issuance of any permits to authorize vertical construction on the Phase 1 portion of the campus. However, in the Town’s efforts to expedite the process, building permits authorizing vertical construction for Phase 1 of the Schwab Campus were issued in October 2017. As construction has progressed on Phase 1 and a Phase 2 Site Plan of the Schwab Campus is lingering, town staff has asked for the Lighting and Signage plans to move forward as soon as possible and before an issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy for any one building. The goal for these plans is to meld with the eventual Phase 2 campus of Charles Schwab and also Hillwood’s mixed-use development to the north of the campus. Page 2 of 3 LIGHTING PLAN The lighting plan submitted for the Phase 1 portion of the Charles Schwab Campus includes the location of all proposed lighting fixtures on the campus, renderings, photometric and the appearances of the lighting fixtures. The key to this lighting plan is to find a close balance that provides adequate lighting for Schwab employees to feel secure at night, but also meet the Town’s Dark Sky regulations of maintaining lower light levels than most surrounding cities. Charles Schwab has provided five different types of site lighting that includes a variety of uses such as Roadway & Pedestrian Pole Lights (SL1/2), Event Lighting (SL5), Bollard Lighting (SL3), Tree up-lighting (SL4), and Interior/Exterior Garage Lighting. Staff recommends approval of the proposed lighting plan. SIGNAGE PLAN The signage plan submitted for the Phase 1 portion of the Charles Schwab Campus includes the location of all proposed signage on the campus, renderings, materials, and dimensions of each sign. The goal of this signage plan is to provide for entryway monument signage, building signage and directional/wayfinding signage for both vehicular and pedestrian traffic within the Phase 1 campus. In addition to the above, the objective is to also blend the signage with the rural atmosphere of the Town and the modern ranch aesthetic that Charles Schwab has chosen for their Phase 1 campus. Because of this, the materials that were used on the Phase 1 buildings, currently under construction, reflect the same materials to be used on the campus signage. This includes materials such as the natural stone and the aluminum wood panels that can be found on all buildings. Staff recommends approval of the proposed signage plan. * Note: Off-site monument signage (e.g. freeway sign in Ord 770) and signs located in the Charles Schwab ROW will be determined in the future as Charles Schwab and Hillwood work together to produce a plan that fits the locations and blending vernacular for both developments. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends approval of this item. ATTACHMENTS 1. Vicinity Map 2. Resolution for Consideration Page 3 of 3 Attachment 1: Project Vicinity Map Resolution 18-34 Page 1 of 3 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 18-34 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, APPROVING A LIGHTING AND SIGNAGE PLAN FOR PHASE 1 OF CHARLES SCHWAB, AN APPROXIMATELY 33-ACRE PORTION OF PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT 3, PLANNING AREA 5B (PD 3-5B). THE PROPERTY IS GENERALLY LOCATED SOUTH OF STATE HIGHWAY 170, NORTH OF JT OTTINGER ROAD, AND WEST OF WESTLAKE PARKWAY. WHEREAS, the Planned Development District 3, Planning Area 5B (PD3-5B) was established by Ordinance 770 on February 22, 2016; and WHEREAS, the concept plan for Phase 1 of Charles Schwab was established by Ordinance 826 on May 22, 2017 with conditions; and WHEREAS, the site plan for Phase 1 of Charles Schwab was established by Ordinance 827 on May 22, 2017 with conditions; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town of Westlake Town Council does hereby approve the proposed site plans for Charles Schwab Phase 1 Lighting & Signage, attached as Exhibit “A”. SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 18-34 Page 2 of 3 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Resolution 18-34 Page 3 of 3 EXHIBITS EXHIBIT A CHARLES SCHWAB PHASE 1 LIGHTING & SIGNAGE PLAN Resolution 18-34 SITESITE LIGHTING PLAN PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 REF. SIGNAGE CONCEPT PACKAGE FOR MONUMENT SIGN LIGHTING REF. SIGNAGE CONCEPT PACKAGE FOR MONUMENT SIGN LIGHTING DOWNLIGHTING AT LAND BRIDGE * COLOR TEMPERATURE OF ALL SITE LIGHTING TO BE 4000 K *COLOR TEMPERATURE OF ALL SITE LIGHTING TO BE 3,000 K CHARLES SCHWAB WESTLAKE CORPORATE CAMPUS PHASE 2 CONCEPT PLAN SUBMISSION JULY 20TH, 2018 FIXTURES SHOWN HEREIN ARE FOR AESTHETIC AND PERFORMANCE INTENT. EXACT MANUFACTURER OF FIXTURES PROCURED MAY VARY. *SITEPHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 DFW-G2GARAGE LIGHTING FIXTURE –TYPICAL LEVEL PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 DFW-G2GARAGE LIGHTING –TYPICAL LEVEL PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 DFW-G2GARAGE FIXTURE TYPES –ROOF LEVEL PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 SITENIGHT VIEW FROM NORTHEAST PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 DFW-G2NIGHT VIEW OF DFW-G1 FROM SCHWAB WAY PHASE I LIGHTING PLAN SUBMITTAL JUNE 29, 2018 SCHWAB LAKE EDG A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AA A A A A AA A A A A A A A A A AA A A B B B B B B B B B B B B B BBBBBB B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B BBBB B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B BBBB B B B B B B B B B B BB B B B B B C C C A MH: 15 MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A A MH: 15 MH: 15 A A MH: 15 MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A A MH: 15 A MH: 15 MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 15 A MH: 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0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Luminaire Schedule Calculation Summary Calculation Grid Location Calc. Height (Ft.)Units Avg Max Min Avg/Min Symbol Type PROPERTY_Planar 0 Fc 0.28 7.0 0.0 N.A. Qty DRIVEWAY 1 Fc 1.37 3.7 0.1 13.70 DRIVEWAY 2 Manufacturer / Catalog Number Total Lumen Output Total Input Watts Fc 1.01 3.0 0.3 3.37 DRIVEWAY 3 Light Lost Factor User Defined Factor Fc 1.85 3.9 0.1 18.50 DRIVEWAY 5 Fc 1.39 3.5 0.0 N.A. A 46 BEGA-77950 4530 57 0.808 1.000 B 86 BEGA-77825 1833 20 0.808 1.000 C 3 BEGA-77953 9060 114 0.808 1.000 PARKING Fc 1.52 3.9 0.2 7.60 WALKWAY 1 Fc 2.15 3.0 0.7 3.07 WALKWAY 2 Fc 1.01 2.6 0.0 N.A. DRIVEWAY 1 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.37 Maximum = 3.7 Minimum = 0.1 Avg/Min Ratio = 13.70 Max/Min Ratio = 37.00PARKING Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.52 Maximum = 3.9 Minimum = 0.2 Avg/Min Ratio = 7.60 Max/Min Ratio = 19.50 WALKWAY 2 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.01 Maximum = 2.6 Minimum = 0.0 Avg/Min Ratio = 0.00 Max/Min Ratio = 0.00 WALKWAY 1 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 2.15 Maximum = 3.0 Minimum = 0.7 Avg/Min Ratio = 3.07 Max/Min Ratio = 4.29 DRIVEWAY 2 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.01 Maximum = 3.0 Minimum = 0.3 Avg/Min Ratio = 3.37 Max/Min Ratio = 10.00 DRIVEWAY 3 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.85 Maximum = 3.9 Minimum = 0.1 Avg/Min Ratio = 18.50 Max/Min Ratio = 39.00 DRIVEWAY 5 Illuminance (Fc) Average = 1.39 Maximum = 3.5 Minimum = 0.0 Avg/Min Ratio = 0.00 Max/Min Ratio = 0.00 Notes: 1. Surface reflectances: Ceiling/Wall/Floor - 80/50/20. 2. Calculation values shown at 2'-6" A.F.F. 3. Mounting heights: As shown. 4. Luminaire description does not necessarily reflect specification model number. Contact salesperson for verification. 5. Sylvania lamp data used unless otherwise noted. LED luminaire uses integrated photometric lamp data, which is provided by manufacturer. 6. Lighting power density is calculated based on estimated ballast/driver energy consumption. Engineer to verify. PROJECT: CHARLES SCHWAB SALESPERSON: MIKE MORIN SCALE:1" = 40' CALC BY: JL FILE: 170316-CHARLES SCHWAB-V3 17-03-16 Page 1 of 1 O1 CHARLES SCHWAB DFW CAMPUS JULY 24, 2018 ARCHITECTURAL REFERENCE..........3 SITE + VISION.....................................6 SIGNAGE PALETTE INSPIRATION......9 SIGNAGE CONCEPTS........................12 O3 ARCHITECTURAL REFERENCE O4 ARCHITECTURAL RENDERINGS O4 O5 ELEVATIONS O5 O6 SITE + VISION O7 CIRCLE T A 2,500-acre mixed-use, master planned community in Westlake, Texas, Circle T Ranch® presents the corporate campus, championship golf and recreational component to Alliance- Texas. With more than 700 acres of open space and golf, Circle T Ranch showcases some of the most picturesque land in the state. The Town of Westlake was recently ranked the nation’s most affluent community by Forbes. O7 O8 MODERN RANCH AUTHENTIC ELEGANT INVITING STURDY REINVENTED AGRARIAN TRANSPARENT O8 O9 SIGNAGE PALETTE INSPIRATION O10 MODERN RANCH WARM CLASSIC CONTEMPORARY SLIGHTLY RUSTIC O10 O11O11 MODERN RANCH WARM CLASSIC CONTEMPORARY SLIGHTLY RUSTIC O12 SIGNAGE CONCEPT FRONT VIEW - MONUMENT SIGN OPTION 2 SCALE: 1/2" = 1'-0" SIDE VIEW - MONUMENT SIGN OPTION 2 SCALE: 1/2" = 1'-0" 7'-6"10'-0"1'-9"6'-3"4 O25 PRIMARY VEHICULAR DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE SECONDARY VEHICULAR DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGESIDE VIEW SIDE VIEW PARKING EXIT114 WEST GUEST PARKING EXIT114 EAST GUEST PARKING EXIT114 EAST PARKING EXIT114 WEST AUTHORIZED VEHICLES ONLY Painted aluminum logo applied to face of sign Quality powder coating aluminum panels with push-thur acrylic to be illuminated at night Quality powder coating aluminum panels with push- thru acrylic to be illuminated at night Painted aluminum sign frame Natural stone to match architectural stone 3'-0"9" 2'-6"4'-6"4 1/2"6'-8"SIGNAGE CONCEPT ONE VEHICULAR DIRECTIONALS O28 Charles Schwab WAY Future Circle ROAD Front View Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"1 Side View Scale: 1/2" = 1'-0"2 4'-2"7"Framed painted aluminum sign panel with reflective vinyl letters applied to face REGULATORY & STREET SIGNAGE O29 DFW 1 - EAST ELEVATION 8'-2"8'-2" O31 E.2 E.4 E.5 E.7 E.5 E.5 E.5 E.5 E.5 E.6 E.6 E.6 E.6 E.6E.6 E.6 E.5 E.5 E.2 E.3 E.4 E.5 E.6 E.7 PRIMARY MONUMENT SECONDARY MONUMENT VEHICULAR DIRECTIONALS SECONDARY VEHICULAR DIRECTIONALS PEDESTRIAN DIRECTIONALS BUILDING IDENTITY DFW 1 DFW 2 DFW A EXTERIOR SIGN LOCATION PLAN SIGNAGE IN SCHWAB WAY MEDIAN TO BE SUBMITTED AND REVIEWED SEPARATELY AT A LATER DATE O32 THANK YOU! Page 1 of 3 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Consent Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consideration of a Resolution Approving an Economic Development Agreement between the Town of Westlake and the Marriott Solana Hotel. STAFF CONTACT: Debbie Piper, Finance Director Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Fiscal Responsibility Fiscal Stewardship Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Business Outreach Program Time Line - Start Date: October 1, 2018 Completion Date: September 30, 2019 Funding Amount: $130,000 Status - Funded Source - VAF (Hotel Tax) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) This proposed twelve (12) month economic development grant agreement includes both the “Shuttle Bus Transportation Cost” as well as the “Incentive Program”. If approved, this would be the ninth consecutive year that the Town has partnered with the Marriott Solana Hotel regarding the “Incentive Program”. Prior to this, the Town participated in only the Hotel’s shuttle bus system costs. Below is a description of both portions of this proposed economic development grant that would disburse hotel/motel occupancy tax funds from the Town to the Marriott Solana. Page 2 of 3 • Shuttle Bus Transportation Cost Participation. An amount of $80,000 has been proposed in FY 18-19 budget for the Town’s participation in a portion of the operating cost of Marriott providing shuttle bus service to its guests. This is the same amount adopted in the prior year. Marriott Solana management has shared with Council in previous meetings the importance this shuttle bus service has to this property maintaining its competitive position in the local market, particularly competing with the Hilton at Southlake Town Center and the Marriott at the Texas World Speedway. Marriot Solana management has emphasized repeatedly to Council that this shuttle bus service is essential for this property to succeed; both in terms of keeping its existing business bookings and in terms of growing its income stream by marketing to new businesses. In addition to providing shuttle services to and from DFW airport for Marriott Solana guests, this bus service also provides hotel guests with transportation to area shopping/entertainment venues (Southlake Town Center) and corporate training centers. • Group Business Incentive Program. This portion of the agreement is $50,000 and has been proposed in the FY 18-19 budget. Staff has worked with the Marriott Solana Hotel manager on this economic development agreement in prior years. Based on conversations with Marriott management, the request was made in the prior year and approved by Council to include a $2,500 maximum payment based on food and beverage revenue in addition to the $5,000 maximum payment based on room night revenue already in place. o Proposed group business shall book a minimum of $5,000 in room night revenue. o A maximum of $7,500 is available to each group; however, the amount provided is based on the following process: • 10% of the room night revenue calculates the amount allowed, up to a maximum of $5,000. • 10% of the food and beverage revenue calculates the amount allowed, up to a maximum of $2,500. • The Town of Westlake shall receive sponsor recognition in all correspondence and at the meeting/convention in an appropriate manner. The total anticipated expenditure for the “Incentive Program” is $50K for FY 2017-18. This proposed grant agreement is a reinvestment in the tourist sector of the Town’s economic development efforts (an allowed use under State law for these hotel occupancy tax funds) which will allow the Marriott Solana to more effectively compete in a recovering, but still very competitive hotel market. This proposed agreement continues the requirement for performance measures to be included in required quarterly reports submitted by the Marriott Solana to the Town. These reports will be important for evaluating the success and impact of this economic development grant on: 1.) maintaining this important Town revenue stream and 2.) growing this revenue stream in a challenging and highly competitive economic environment. In is important to recognize that, under State law, this is a grant of public dollars for economic development purposes. As such, this agreement also includes “claw back” provisions that, should the Town determine that the Marriott has not spent these grant funds for their intended purpose, the Town can require that those funds be repaid with interest. Additionally, if it is determined that the group business program is not achieving its objective, the Staff will notify both the hotel’s Page 3 of 3 management and the Council to take steps to address its performance or recommend the program not be renewed upon expiration of the grant agreement, although this has not been the case to date. The Town receives 7% of the 13% hotel/motel occupancy tax allowed by State law. The FY 17-18 budget contains an estimated receipt of $853,640 of which $780K is likely to be from the Marriott. This represents approximately 5% of the total municipal operating revenue stream and is derived primarily from the Town’s only hotel, the Marriott Solana. The remaining estimated $73,640 is received from Deloitte University. Of the total $73,640, only 50% is retained by the Town due to an economic development agreement. Total budgeted for FY 18-19 is $845,000 of which $779,720 is estimated for the Marriott with the remaining balance of $65,280 being received from Deloitte University. Again, only 50% of the $65,280 is retained by the Town due to an economic development agreement. In the past, the Town has utilized hotel/motel occupancy tax funds for many important programs including funding costs related to special events such as Arbor Day, Decoration Day, as well as the MasterWorks outdoor concert series at Solana. Additionally, because Westlake has broader statutory authority under State law than most cities to spend hotel/motel occupancy tax funds for any municipal purpose, the Town has used these funds to cover costs of various municipal operational costs. The Town Council adopted an updated economic development policy in 2016 (Resolution 16-30). This proposed agreement comports to that policy. Further, this economic development agreement fits with the Town’s Adopted Strategic Plan Vision Points. RECOMMENDATION Recommend adoption of the resolution approving this economic development grant agreement ATTACHMENTS Resolution approving this Economic Development Grant Agreement between the Town and the Marriott Solana with the Agreement attached as “Schedule A”. A power point presentation from Juan Calderon, General Manager of the Marriott, will be sent under separate cover. Resolution 18-35 Page 1 of 13 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION 18-35 A RESOLUTION BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPROVING AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH THE MARRIOTT SOLANA. WHEREAS, the Westlake Town Council, in its current Strategic Plan, has identified “Fiscal Responsibility” as a Vision Point as well as “Financial Stewardship” as a Perspective that must be addressed to move the Town towards this Vision Point; and, WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake sales and use taxes are an important revenue source to support its general operations; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to have new and existing businesses that maintain and grow their sales and use tax streams, which in turn, enhances the Town’s financial position and sustainability per its Strategic Plan; and WHEREAS, the Town Council acknowledges that the Town’s Visitors Association Fund is a key component of its financial structure and that an economic development grant to the Marriott Solana Hotel will help solidify and maintain that structure; and, WHEREAS, Town has an updated economic development policy adopted by Resolution 16-30 and that this proposed economic development agreement with the Marriott Solana meets those policy guidelines and meets the requirements of State law for municipalities to grant 380 economic development grants to businesses located in their boundaries; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: THAT, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: THAT, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, hereby approves the Economic Development Grant Agreement with the Marriott Solana attached hereto as Exhibit “A”; and further authorizes the Town Manager to execute said agreement on behalf of the Town of Westlake. Resolution 18-35 Page 2 of 13 SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2018. _____________________________ Laura Wheat, Mayor ATTEST: ________________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ________________________________ L Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Resolution 18-35 Page 3 of 13 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AGREEMENT This ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AGREEMENT (“Agreement”) is entered into by and between the TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS (the “Town”), a Type-A general law municipal corporation organized under the laws of the State of Texas, and MARRIOTT HOTEL SERVICES, INC. D/B/A DALLAS/FORT WORTH MARRIOTT SOLANA, (“Marriott:), a Hotel. The Town and Marriott are collectively referred to as the “Parties”. RECITALS The Town and Marriott hereby agree that the following statements are true and correct and constitute the basis upon which the Town and Marriott have entered into this Agreement: A. Marriott operates a 294 (288 plus 6 suites) room, full-service hotel located at 1301 Solana Blvd. Building #3, Westlake, Texas, (the “Hotel”) The Hotel provides a valuable catalyst for visitors, tourism, and economic development to the Town. B. To increase visitors and tourism, and to maximize the economic benefits that the Hotel can bring to the Town, the Town and Marriott desire to enter into this Agreement. C. In accordance with Resolution No. 16-30, adopted by the Town Council on August 22, 2016, attached hereto as Exhibit “A” and hereby made a part of this Agreement for all purposes, the Town has established an economic development incentive policy and program pursuant to which the Town will, on a case-by-case basis, offer economic incentive packages authorized by Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code, Article III, Section 52-a of the Texas Constitution, and other applicable laws, that include monetary loans and grants of public money, as well as the provision of personnel and services of the Town, to businesses and entities that the Town Council determines will promote State or local economic development and stimulate business and commercial activity in the Town in return for verifiable commitments from such businesses or entities to cause specific infrastructure, employment and other public benefits to be made or invested in the Town (the “380 Program”). D. The Town Council has determined that by entering into this Agreement, the potential increase of visitors and tourism and economic benefits that will accrue to the Town under the terms and conditions of this Agreement are consistent with the Town’s economic development objectives and the 380 Program and will further the goals for positive economic growth, visitors and tourism in the Town. This Agreement is authorized by Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code and the 380 Program. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual benefits and promises contained herein and for other good and valuable consideration, the receipt and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the Parties agree as follows: Resolution 18-35 Page 4 of 13 AGREEMENT 1. INCORPORATION OF RECITALS. The Town Council has found at a duly-called and legally-noticed public meeting through the adoption of Town Resolution No. 18-35 attached hereto as Exhibit “B” and hereby made a part of this Agreement for all purposes, and the Town and Marriott hereby agree, that the recitals set forth above are incorporated herein and true and correct and form the basis upon which the Parties have entered into this Agreement. 2. DEFINITIONS. In addition to terms defined in the body of this Agreement, the following terms shall have the definitions ascribed to them as follows: 380 Program has the meaning ascribed to it in Recital C. Affiliate means all entities, incorporated or otherwise, under common control with, controlled by or controlling Marriott. For purposes of this definition, “control” means fifty percent (50%) or more of the ownership determined by either value or vote. Program Grants means the annual allowable economic development grants paid (whether in one or multiple installments) by the Town to Marriott in accordance with this Agreement and as part of the 380 Program. Program Source Funds means an amount of Town funds legally available for inclusion in a Program Grant that is payable to Marriott in a given Program Year, which shall be derived from hotel occupancy taxes generated by the Hotel and received by the Town pursuant to Chapter 351 of the Texas Tax Code, or other legally available funds of the Town. Program Year means the Town’s fiscal year (i.e. October 1 through September 30th) in which the Town is obligated pursuant to this Agreement to pay Marriott a Program Grant, beginning with the first fiscal year following the execution of this Agreement. Quarterly Report has the meaning ascribed to it in Section 4.2. Records have the meaning ascribed to it in Section 4.3. Term has the meaning ascribed to it in Section 3. Town of Westlake Hotel Support Program has the meaning ascribed to it in Section 4.1. Resolution 18-35 Page 5 of 13 3. TERM. This Agreement shall be effective as of the date of execution by the Parties (the “Effective Date”) and, unless terminated earlier in accordance with this Agreement, shall expire one (1) year from the Execution Date. 4. TOWN AND MARRIOTT’S OBLIGATIONS AND COMMITMENTS. 4.1. Town of Westlake Hotel Support Program The total amount to be granted by the Town to Marriott under the terms of this Agreement for the Town of Westlake Hotel Support Program shall not exceed $130,000 with said Town of Westlake Hotel Support Program, consisting of the following: a. Group Booking Incentives, the requirements for which are attached hereto as Exhibit “C” and hereby made a part of this Agreement for all purposes (the “Hotel Support Agreement”) and details the obligations of Marriott to receive, and the Town to grant, the Program Grants from the Program Source Funds during the Program Year related to group bookings at the Hotel. The purpose of this component of the Town’s Hotel Support Program shall be to increase new group bookings for the Hotel and to not incur a decrease in overall group meeting business (i.e. all group bookings at the Hotel both of new group business and repeat group business), thus increasing economic development through tourism and business development activity in the Town. The Group Booking Incentives provided by the Town under this Agreement to the Hotel shall not exceed $50,000 during the term of this Agreement. b. Transportation Costs, for which a total sum of $80,000 shall be provided by the Town under this Agreement to cover a portion of the operating cost for bus transportation services provided by the Marriott for guests of the Hotel. Funds disbursed by the Town under this component of the Town’s Hotel Support Program shall be made at the end of each Town fiscal year quarter following submission by Marriott, and acceptance by the Town, of the Quarterly Report for the preceding quarter. The purpose of this component of the Town’s Hotel Support Program is to enhance the Marriott’s ability to increase room nights and retain existing room nights at the Hotel (as reported in Section 4.2 below), thus increasing economic development through tourism and business development activity in the Town. At all times during the term, the name “Westlake, Texas” shall be visibly reflected and marked on both sides of any shuttle buses or vehicles used by the Hotel. Resolution 18-35 Page 6 of 13 4.2. Reports and Filings. On a quarterly basis during the Term, Marriott shall submit a written report to the Town specifically delineating its compliance with this Agreement (the “Quarterly Report”). The Town Manager shall receive the Quarterly Report no later than thirty (30) days from the end of each quarter. Said Quarterly Report will contain, as a minimum, the following performance measure information for the reporting period for the Town to measure the effectiveness of its investment in this grant of public funds to Marriott for this Hotel: • Total funds paid to date aggregate under this Agreement during the contract term to Marriott regarding group incentives of the Town’s Hotel Support Program described in Section 4.1 of this Agreement • Total funds spent to date by Marriott for the activities and purposes set out in Section 4.1 of this Agreement • Increases in average daily occupancy at the Hotel • Decreases in average daily occupancy at the Hotel • Number of room nights generated by new group bookings at the Hotel • Number of room nights generated by repeat group business, bookings at the Hotel, number of bus transportation trips daily to DFW Airport for guests at the Hotel • The number of new group bookings made for the Hotel during the reporting period and the number of repeat group business bookings made for the Hotel during the reporting period. • A brief description of marketing/sales efforts made during the reporting period for the Hotel including: o the number and type of new group sales prospects identified, targeted, and group sales closed by Marriott sales staff during the reporting period o the number and type of new group sales made by contacts from outside the Hotel Marriott • Average number of bus transportation trips daily to off-premise meeting locations for guests at the Hotel • Average number of bus transportation trips daily to other off-premise locations (entertainment, shopping, etc.) for guests at the Hotel • Operating costs incurred by the Hotel during the quarter for shuttle bus transportation services 4.3. Audits. Per the requirements of State law and the Town ordinance establishing the Town’s hotel-motel occupancy tax, the Town will have the right throughout the Term to audit any and all financial and business records of Marriott that relate to the performance of this Agreement and any other documents necessary to evaluate Marriott’s compliance with this Agreement or with the goals set forth in this Agreement, including, but not limited to construction documents and invoices (collectively “Records”). Marriott shall make all Resolution 18-35 Page 7 of 13 Records available to the Town at the Hotel or at another location in the Town acceptable to both parties following reasonable advance notice by the Town and shall otherwise cooperate fully with the Town during any audit. 5. DEFAULT, TERMINATION AND FAILURE BY MARRIOTT TO MEET VARIOUS DEADLINES AND COMMITMENTS. 5.1. Continuous Operation. Following the Completion Date, if Marriott fails to continuously operate a full-service hotel at 1301 Solana Blvd. Building #3, Westlake, Texas, 76262, the Town shall have the right to terminate this Agreement by providing written notice to Marriott without further obligation to Marriott hereunder. 5.2. Failure to Pay Town Taxes or Fees. An event of default shall occur under this Agreement if any legally-imposed Town taxes or fees owed on, or generated by, the hotel become delinquent and Marriott or the Affiliate does not either pay such taxes or follow the legal procedures for protest and/or contest of any such taxes. In this event, the Town shall notify Marriott in writing and Marriott shall have sixty (60) calendar days to cure such default. If the default has not been fully cured by such time, the Town shall have the right to terminate this Agreement immediately by providing written notice to Marriott and shall have all other rights and remedies that may be available to it under the law or in equity. 5.3 Violations of Town Code, State or Federal Law. An event of default shall occur under this Agreement if any written citation is issued to Marriott or an Affiliate due to the occurrence of a violation of a material provision of the Town Code at the Hotel (including, without limitation, any violation of the Town’s Building or Fire Codes and any other Town Code violations related to the environmental condition of the Hotel; or to matters concerning the public health, safety or welfare) and such citation is not paid or the recipient of such citation does not properly follow the legal procedures for protest and/or contest of any such citation. An event of default shall occur under this Agreement if the Town is notified by a governmental agency or unit with appropriate jurisdiction that Marriott or an Affiliate, or any successor in interest thereto, any third party with access to the Hotel pursuant to the express or implied permission of Marriott or an Affiliate, or any a successor in interest thereto, is in violation of any material state or federal law, rule or regulation on account of the Hotel, improvements on the Hotel or any operations thereon (including, without limitation, any violations related to the environmental condition of the Hotel; the environmental condition other land or waters which is attributable to operations on the Hotel; or to matters concerning the public health, safety or welfare). Upon the occurrence of such default, the Town shall notify Marriott in writing and Marriott shall have (i) thirty (30) calendar days to cure such default or (ii) if Marriott has diligently pursued cure of the default but such default is not reasonably curable within thirty (30) calendar days, then such amount of time that the Town reasonably agrees is necessary to cure such default. If the default has not been fully cured by such time, the Town shall have the right to terminate this Agreement immediately by providing written Resolution 18-35 Page 8 of 13 notice to Marriott and shall have all other rights and remedies that may be available to under the law or in equity. 5.4. Unauthorized Use of Funds and Requirement for Repayment to Town. If, during an audit by the Town under the provisions of this Agreement, the Town determines that the proceeds of this grant have not been utilized by Marriott for the purposes outlined in this Agreement, Marriott will be given thirty (30) calendar days to cure (following written notice from the Town) and, if Marriott fails to cure per the written notice from the Town, Marriott shall immediately remit to the Town the entire amount under this Agreement paid by the Town to Marriott during the reporting period during which the Town has identified that Marriott was not in compliance with the terms of this Agreement. If said amount is not remitted to the Town within 30 calendar days from the end of the cure period, that amount demanded for repayment to the Town plus six (6) percent simple interest on the repayment amount shall be due, in full, to the Town. For the purposes of this Section, Simple Interest” is defined as a rate of interest applied to the aggregate amount of the Program Grants paid by the Town to Marriott during the reporting period in which Marriott was in violation of this Agreement. 5.5. Failure to Submit Reports. Without limiting the application of Section 5.6, if Marriott fails to submit any report required by and in accordance with Section 4.2, the Town’s obligation to pay any Program Grants at the time, if any, shall be suspended until Marriott has provided and is current on all reports. 5.6. General Breach. Unless stated elsewhere in this Agreement, Marriott shall be in default under this Agreement if Marriott breaches any term or condition of this Agreement. In the event that such breach remains uncured after thirty (30) calendar days following receipt of written notice from the Town referencing this Agreement (or, if Marriott has diligently and continuously attempted to cure following receipt of such written notice but reasonably requires more than thirty (30) calendar days to cure, then such additional amount of time as is reasonably necessary to effect cure, as determined by both parties mutually and in good faith), the Town shall have the right to terminate this Agreement immediately by providing written notice to Marriott. 6. NO INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR OR AGENCY RELATIONSHIP. It is expressly understood and agreed that Marriott shall not operate as an independent contractor or as an agent, representative or employee of the Town. Marriott shall have the exclusive right to control all details and day-to-day operations relative to the Hotel Support Program and shall be solely responsible for the acts and omissions of its officers, agents, servants, employees, contractors, subcontractors, licensees and invitees. Marriott acknowledges that the doctrine of respondent superior will not apply as between the Town and Marriott, its officers, Resolution 18-35 Page 9 of 13 agents, servants, employees, contractors, subcontractors, licensees, and invitees. Marriott further agrees that nothing in this Agreement will be construed as the creation of a partnership or joint enterprise between the Town and Marriott. 7. INDEMNIFICATION. MARRIOTT, AT NO COST OR LIABILITY TO THE TOWN, AGREES TO DEFEND, INDEMNIFY AND HOLD THE TOWN, ITS OFFICERS, AGENTS, ATTORNEYS, SERVANTS AND EMPLOYEES, HARMLESS AGAINST ANY AND ALL CLAIMS, LAWSUITS, ACTIONS, COSTS AND EXPENSES OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THOSE FOR PROPERTY DAMAGE OR LOSS (INCLUDING ALLEGED DAMAGE OR LOSS TO MARRIOTT’ BUSINESS AND ANY RESULTING LOST PROFITS) AND/OR PERSONAL INJURY, INCLUDING DEATH, THAT MAY RELATE TO, ARISE OUT OF OR BE OCCASIONED BY (i) MARRIOTT’ BREACH OF ANY OF THE TERMS OR PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT; OR (ii) ANY ACT OR OMISSION OR INTENTIONAL MISCONDUCT OF MARRIOTT, ITS OFFICERS, AGENTS, ASSOCIATES, EMPLOYEES, CONTRACTORS (OTHER THAN THE TOWN, OR ITS EMPLOYEES, OFFICERS, AGENTS, ASSOCIATES, CONTRACTORS OR SUBCONTRACTS), OR SUBCONTRACTORS DUE OR RELATED TO OR ARISING FROM OPERATION AND CONDUCT OF THE HOTEL SUPPORT PROGRAM OR OTHERWISE TO THE PERFORMANCE OR OBLIGATIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT. 8. NOTICES. All written notices called for or required by this Agreement shall be addressed to the following, or such other party or address as either party designates in writing, by certified mail, postage prepaid, or by hand delivery: Town: Marriott: Town of Westlake Marriott Dallas/Fort Worth Solana Attn: Town Manager Attn: General Manager 1500 Solana Blvd, Bldg. 7, Suite 7200 1301 Solana Blvd, Bldg. #3 Westlake, Texas 76262 Westlake, Texas 76262 With Copies to (which shall not constitute notice): Boyle & Lowry, L.L.P. Attn: L. Stanton Lowry 4201 Wingren Dr., Suite 108 Irving, Texas 75062 Resolution 18-35 Page 10 of 13 9. ASSIGNMENT AND SUCCESSORS. Marriott may at any time assign, transfer or otherwise convey any of its rights or obligations under this Agreement to an Affiliate without the approval of the Town so long as Marriott, the Affiliate and the Town first execute an agreement approved by the Town Council of the Town of Westlake under which the Affiliate agrees to assume and be bound by all covenants and obligations of Marriott under this Agreement. Otherwise, Marriott may not assign, transfer or otherwise convey any of its rights or obligations under this Agreement to any other person or entity without the prior consent of the Town Council, conditioned on (i) the prior approval of the assignee or successor and a finding by the Town Council that the proposed assignee or successor is financially capable of meeting the terms and conditions of this Agreement and (ii) prior execution by the proposed assignee or successor of a written agreement with the Town under which the proposed assignee or successor agrees to assume and be bound by all covenants and obligations of Marriott under this Agreement. Any attempted assignment without the Town Council’s prior consent shall constitute a breach and be grounds for termination of this Agreement and following receipt of written notice from the Town to Marriott. Any lawful assignee or successor in interest of Marriott of all rights under this Agreement shall be deemed “Marriott” for all purposes under this Agreement. 10. COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS, ORDINANCES, RULES AND REGULATIONS. This Agreement will be subject to all applicable Federal, State and local laws, ordinances, rules and regulations, including, but not limited to, all provisions of the Town’s codes and ordinances, as amended. 11. GOVERNMENTAL POWERS. It is understood that by execution of this Agreement, the Town does not waive or surrender any of it governmental powers or immunities that are outside of the terms, obligations, and conditions of this Agreement. 12. NO WAIVER. The failure of either party to insist upon the performance of any term or provision of this Agreement or to exercise any right granted hereunder shall not constitute a waiver of that party’s right to insist upon appropriate performance or to assert any such right on any future occasion. 13. VENUE AND JURISDICTION. If any action, whether real or asserted, at law or in equity, arises based on any provision of this Agreement, venue for such action shall lie in state courts located in Tarrant County, Texas or the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas – Fort Worth Division. This Agreement shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Texas. 14. NO THIRD-PARTY RIGHTS. Resolution 18-35 Page 11 of 13 The provisions and conditions of this Agreement are solely for the benefit of the Town and Marriott, and any lawful assign or successor of Marriott, and are not intended to create any rights, contractual or otherwise, to any other person or entity. 15. FORCE MAJEURE. It is expressly understood and agreed by the Parties to this Agreement that if the performance of any obligations hereunder is delayed by reason of war, civil commotion, acts of God, inclement weather, or other circumstances which are reasonably beyond the control or knowledge of the party obligated or permitted under the terms of this Agreement to do or perform the same, regardless of whether any such circumstance is similar to any of those enumerated or not, the party so obligated or permitted shall be excused from doing or performing the same during such period of delay, so that the time period applicable to such requirement shall be extended for a period of time equal to the period such party was delayed. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, it is specifically understood and agreed that Marriott’ failure to obtain adequate financing to complete the Required Improvements by the Completion Deadline shall not be deemed to be an event of force majeure and that this Section 15 shall not operate to extend the Completion Deadline in such an event. 16. INTERPRETATION. In the event of any dispute over the meaning or application of any provision of this Agreement, this Agreement shall be interpreted fairly and reasonably, and neither more strongly for or against any party, regardless of the actual drafter of this Agreement. 17. SEVERABILITY CLAUSE. It is hereby declared to be the intention of the Parties that sections, paragraphs, clauses and phrases of this Agreement are severable, and if any phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this Agreement shall be declared unconstitutional or illegal by the valid judgment or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, such unconstitutionality or illegality shall not affect any of the remaining phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs or sections of this Agreement since the same would have been executed by the Parties without the incorporation in this Agreement of any such unconstitutional phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section. It is the intent of the Parties to provide the economic incentives contained in this Agreement by all lawful means. 18. CAPTIONS. Captions and headings used in this Agreement are for reference purposes only and shall not be deemed a part of this Agreement. Resolution 18-35 Page 12 of 13 19. ENTIRETY OF AGREEMENT. This Agreement, including any exhibits attached hereto and any documents incorporated herein by reference, contains the entire understanding and agreement between the Town and Marriott, and any lawful assign and successor of Marriott, as to the matters contained herein. Any prior or contemporaneous oral or written agreement is hereby declared null and void to the extent in conflict with any provision of this Agreement. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary herein, this Agreement shall not be amended unless executed in writing by both parties and approved by the Town Council of the Town in an open meeting held in accordance with Chapter 551 of the Texas Government Code. 20. COUNTERPARTS. This Agreement may be executed in multiple counterparts, each of which shall be considered an original, but all of which shall constitute one instrument. EXECUTED as of the last date indicated below: TOWN OF WESTLAKE: ______________________________ ______________________________ a Texas________________________ By: By: Thomas E. Brymer ______________________________ Town Manager ______________________________ Date: Date: APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGALITY: By: L. Stanton Lowry Town Attorney Resolution 18-35 Page 13 of 13 EXHIBITS “A” – Town of Westlake Resolution No. 16-30 “B” – Town of Westlake Resolution No. 18-35 “C” – Town of Westlake Hotel Support Program re: Group Booking Incentives for 2018-2019 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 16-30 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, ADOPTING AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVE POLICY. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake, Texas, relies upon the generation of Sales and Use Taxes for basic city operations; and WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake aggressively pursues sales tax producing enterprises that meet the Town's high development standards; and WHEREAS, Chapter 312 of the Texas Tax Code requires that guidelines and criteria be adopted by the Town Council before entering into any Economic Development Agreement that provides reimbursement of taxes; and WHEREAS, Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code allows the Town Council to create policies for economic development and any related grants or incentives. WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town of Westlake Town Council does hereby approves the proposed policy, attached as Exhibit "A", Town of Westlake Economic Development Incentive Policy and directs the Town Manager to immediately submit an Economic Development Agreement to the Town Council consistent with the terms of this policy. SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 16-30 Page 1 of 5 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 22" DAY OF AUGUST, 2016. ATTEST: 4rf. Laura L. Wheat, Mayor hd-y-\ 4; KellyEdwar&' Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer,'*' anageg 04'•.‘‘'\ WFST APPROVED AS TO FORM: p it 7&7 L. Sta on Lowry, own Attorney 7-EX P`' ,o Resolution 16-30 Page 2 of 5 Exhibit A Town of Westlake Economic Development Incentive Policy Section I. General Purpose and Objectives The Town of Westlake, Texas, ("Town") is committed to the promotion and retention of high quality development in all parts of the Town as part of an overall effort to improve the quality oflifeforitsresidents. Since these objectives can be served, in part, by the expansion of its commercial business, retail, and mixed use base, the Town will, on a case-by-case basis, give consideration to providing tax abatements, economic development grants, loans, and other incentives (collectively referred to as "Incentives") as may be allowed by law as stimulation for selected economic development within the community. It is the policy of the Town that consideration will be provided in accordance with the criteria set forth in this document. Nothing within this policy shall imply or suggest that the Town is under any obligation to provide Incentives to any applicant. All applicants ("Applicants") for any Incentives shall be considered on a case-by-case basis. Section IL Applicability This Economic Development Incentive Policy (the "Policy") establishes guidelines and criteria for Incentives as allowed for by the provisions of Chapter 312 of the Texas Tax Code, and other economic grants, loans, or incentives as authorized by Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code, the Development Corporation Act, Article 5190.6, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., Article III, Section 52-a of the Texas Constitution, and other applicable laws. Any Incentive approved by the Town's Town Council ("Town Council") pursuant to the Policy must be memorialized in an agreement to be executed and approved by the Town and applicant (the Incentive Agreement"). Section III. Tax Abatement Criteria A. Any application for tax abatement shall be reviewed and approved or disapproved by the Town Council and, if applicable, consider the recommendations of the Westlake Development Corporation and/or the Westlake 4A Corporation. In general, the application will be considered based upon the following: The `value added' to the community by the Applicant's proposed project; The likelihood of the development of the proposed project without abatements; The comparison of the use of abatements versus the use of other potential incentives. B. Specific considerations for approving tax abatement applications will be based upon the degree to which the proposed project: Resolution 16-30 Page 3 of 5 Furthers the goals and objectives of the Town as expressed in the Town's Comprehensive Plan, Planned Development District Ordinances, and infrastructure plans; Impacts the Town's costs and ability to provide municipal services; Impacts the local environment, housing market, and available infrastructure; Offers potential for long term payback in tax and/or other revenues for the Town's investment; Potentially stimulates other desirable economic development within the Town. C. Term of the Abatement — A tax abatement may be granted for a maximum of ten (10) years. The term of the abatement may be granted for a lesser number of years depending upon the anticipated `value added' to the Town. Section IV. Value of the Project The amount of the Incentive will be determined by the Town Council based upon the merits of the economic development project (the "Project"), including, but not limited to, the factors referenced in paragraph III. B. (above) and the following specific economic considerations: total capital investment; added employment; generation of other tax revenues. Incentives may be granted only for the additional value of eligible property improvements described in the Project and listed in the executed tax abatement agreement. Target thresholds are established as expected qualifying levels for abatement consideration as indicated in paragraphs A and B as follows: A. For New Businesses or Development - The Project must be reasonably expected to produce an added value of five million dollars ($5,000,000) in real and personal property improvements within the Town of Westlake; or to create a minimum of 200 full-time jobs, or to generate annual sales tax revenues to the Town of at least $100,000. B. For Expansion or Modernization of Existing Businesses or Development — The Project must be reasonably expected to produce an added value of two million dollars ($2,000,000) in real and personal property improvements within the Town, or to create a minimum of 100 full time jobs, or to generate additional annual sales tax revenues to the Town of at least$50,000. Section V. Inspection, Verification and Incentive Modification The terms of an Incentive Agreement shall include the Town's right to: a) require the submission of an annual certification of compliance for the property receiving an Incentive; (b) conduct an on-site inspection of the project in each'year during the life of the Incentive to verify compliance with the terms of the Agreement and the Policy; and(c) reduce or Resolution 1 6-3 0 Page 4 of 5 eliminate the Incentive if the applicant has failed to comply with the requirements of the Incentive Agreement. Section VI. Evaluation Upon completion of the Project, the Town shall no less than annually evaluate each Project receiving an abatement to insure compliance with the terms of the agreement. Any incidents of non-compliance will be reported to all affected taxing units. Section VII. Severability and Limitation In the event that any section, clause, sentence, paragraph or any part of this Policy shall, for any reason, be adjudged by any court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect, impair, or invalidate the remainder of the guidelines and criteria in this Policy. Section VIII. Expiration and Modification This Policy is effective upon the date of its adoption and will remain in force for two years, at which time Incentive Agreements created pursuant to its provisions will be reviewed by the Town Council to determine whether the objectives of the Policy are being achieved. Based upon that review, this Policy may be modified, renewed or eliminated. However, any Incentive Contracts created pursuant to this Policy will remain in effect according to their respective terms without regard to any change to this Policy unless mutually agreed by the parties. Section IX. Economic Development Grants, Loans, and Other Incentives A. Any application for economic development grants, loans, and other incentives shall be reviewed and approved or disapproved by the Town Council. In the review process, the Town Council will, if applicable, consider the recommendations of the Westlake Development Corporation and/or the Westlake Type 4A Corporation. Any such economic development grants, loans, and other incentives may come from any one or combination of the following: Grants or loans as authorized by Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code; The general Sales and Use taxes of the Town; Sales and Use taxes collected pursuant to section Type 4A of Article 5190.6, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat.; and/or Any other lawful source of revenue of the Town including, but not limited to, bond or other debt financing which further the purpose of economic development. B. To be eligible to apply and qualify for consideration of any grants, loans, and other incentives under this Section, the applicant must submit documentation, and enter into an Incentive Agreement, which indicates the specific details of the Project and compliance with the Policy. Resolution 16-30 Page 5 of 5 Page 1 of 2 Resolution 18-35 Exhibit “C” TOWN OF WESTLAKE HOTEL SUPPORT PROGRAM Description: A cooperative marketing program designed to assist the Dallas/Fort Worth Marriott Solana Hotel in securing group and convention business. The groups can be new business or groups that have previously met at the hotel but are considering other hotels. Guidelines: Requests for funds shall be submitted at the bid time, not after the group has made their decision to book at the host hotel. Applications may be submitted for groups/conventions that take place in the current fiscal year (October 1 - September 30) or future years. • Proposed group business shall book a minimum of $5,000 in room night revenue. • A maximum of $7,500 is available to each group; however, the amount provided is based on the following process: o 10% of the room night revenue calculates the amount allowed, up to a maximum of $5,000. o 10% of food and beverage revenue calculates the amount allowed, up to a maximum of $2,500. • The Town of Westlake shall receive sponsor recognition in all correspondence and at the meeting/convention in an appropriate manner. • Upon completion of the event or meeting, a completed Post Meeting Summary is required prior to the release of full financial assistance. The report will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Town of Westlake Funds participation, as well as review future participation. • Annually, the Marriott Solana will generate a Town of Westlake Funds report to the Town Manager, or his designee, showing the dollars expended and the direct room nights generated via this important resource. Procedures: The Application shall include the following information before it will be reviewed: Hotel Information: Date of Application, Name of Host Hotel Sales Manager and Phone Number. Group Information: Group Name, Contact Name, Address, Phone Number, Program Dates, Estimated Room Nights, Estimated Room Night Revenue, Estimated Catering Revenue, Estimated Outlet Revenue. Miscellaneous Information: Additional information pertinent to the group. Signatures: The Application shall be signed by the host hotel Sales Manager and Director of Sales prior to it being submitted for approval. The Application shall be approved by the Town of Westlake within ten days providing that all of the requested information is received. Once the Application has been approved, the signed application will be sent back to the requesting Sales Manager at the host hotel. The host hotel shall provide the Town of Westlake with a copy of the contract at the time it is signed by the group. Funds shall not be available if this information is not received at least ten days prior to the group/convention. The Town of Westlake may choose to send a welcome letter to the group and offer to provide community brochures or other information to the group/convention attendees. Since funds are reserved for every Application that is approved, the host hotel shall inform the Town of Westlake with written authorization to release the funds should a group choose another destination. Page 2 of 2 Resolution 18-35 Submit Application and Correspondence to: The Town of Westlake Attn: Debbie Piper, Finance Director 1500 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 7, Suite 7200 Westlake, TX 76262 817 490 5712 Phone 817 430 1812 Fax Disbursement of Funds: At the time of invoice, the host hotel shall submit the following information: 1. A computerized report documenting the actual room nights booked by the group and verification of the actual room night revenue. The disbursement of funds may be reduced based on the program guidelines if the group generated less room night revenue than was originally stated on the Application, 2. Samples of the Town of Westlake's sponsor recognition. Page 1 of 2 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Consent Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, August 27, 2018 TOPIC: Consideration of an Ordinance to revise Chapter 58 of the Code of Ordinances Providing for Regulations for Door-to-Door Solicitations and Itinerant/Transient Vendors and Merchants STAFF CONTACT: Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Vision: An oasis of nautural beuty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. Citizen, Student & Stakeholder Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: September 24, 2018 Completion Date: N/A Revenue Amount: N/A Status - Funded Source - N/A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) In order to ensure our community maintains the quality of life expectations for our residents, we have reviewed our Ordinance as it pertains to solicitors and itinerant merchants. Based on discussions with our Town Attorney, it is recommended that Chapter 58 of our Code of Ordinances be updated with the verbiage contained in the attached document. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends approval of the Ordinance. Page 2 of 2 ATTACHMENTS Ordinance Ordinance 863 Page 1 of 10 TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 863 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE AMENDING THE CODE OF ORDINANCES CHAPTER 58, PROVIDING FOR REGULATIONS FOR DOOR-TO- DOOR SOLICITATIONS; PROVIDING FOR ITINERANT MERCHANTS OR TRANSIENT VENDORS OF MERCHANDISE; PROVIDING A PENALTY UP TO $500.00 PER VIOLATIONS; PROVIDING A CUMULATIVE CLAUSE; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PROVIDING A SAVINGS CLAUSE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake, Texas (“Town”), is a general law municipality and is authorized to enact regulations as necessary to protect the health, safety and welfare of the public and, may enact ordinances relative to its citizens’ health, safety, and welfare that are not inconsistent with the Constitution and laws of the State; and WHEREAS, it is the intent of the Westlake Town Council (“Town Council”) to regulate door-to-door solicitation and vendors on private property and along public roadways in a manner to protect the health, safety, and welfare of its residents, while at the same time maintaining the First Amendment right to communicate through that medium; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds and determines regulating door-to-door solicitation and vendors serves the Town’s interests in preventing crime and protecting the privacy of its residents; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds and determines that establishing a curfew on door- to-door solicitation is important to the Town’s overall safety plan; and WHEREAS, the Town Council seeks to regulate the practice of going in and upon private premises in the Town by solicitors, itinerant merchants or transient vendors of merchandise, not having been requested or invited to do so by the owner or occupant of the private premises, for the purpose of soliciting orders for the sale of goods, wares and merchandise and/or disposing of and/or peddling or hawking such goods, wares and merchandise; and WHEREAS, the Town Council seeks to regulate the location of solicitors, itinerant merchants or transient vendors in and along public roadways in the Town for the purpose of promoting the public’s health, safety and welfare; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds and determines that the regulations provided in this ordinance allow its Police to focus its operations on crime-related activity during the evening, night, and early morning hours when calls for service naturally increase; and WHEREAS, the curfew established by this ordinance is intended enhance residents’ comfort level and safety and reduce unnecessary calls for service; and Ordinance 863 Page 2 of 10 WHEREAS, the Town Council finds and determines that the purpose of this ordinance is to maximize the effectiveness of the Town’s rules and regulations regarding health, safety, and welfare, while accommodating protected activities such as free speech; and WHEREAS, the Town Council endeavors to allow its residence the ability to choose to be free from interruption at home and to have comfort that unknown persons will not disturb them while at home with their families; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that simply posting “no-solicitation” or similar signs alone is inadequate to protect its citizens from undue annoyance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the regulations provided by this ordinance are necessary to promote the Town’s legitimate and compelling interests and are provided without reference to the content of any message; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the regulations provided by this ordinance are provided without reference to the content of any message; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the Town has a legitimate and compelling interest in protecting the privacy of its residents in a most important place, the homestead; and WHEREAS, the Town Council determines that preserving the sanctity of the home, including the right to be free from unwanted and unwelcome intrusion, is a compelling governmental interest; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the Town has a legitimate and compelling interest in preventing undue annoyance of its residents; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the Town has a legitimate and compelling interest in protecting its residents from crime; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds door-to-door activities pose an inherent risk of crime, especially after dusk; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that curfew regulations limiting the hours and days when a person may conduct door-to-door solicitation on private property are necessary to prevent undue annoyance of its residents and to protect the sanctity of citizens’ homes; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that curfew regulations limiting the hours and days when a person may conduct door-to-door solicitation on private property are necessary to prevent crime to property and persons and to protect the health and safety of persons engaged in such activity; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds the regulations of this ordinance do not prevent door-to-door activity and that ample alternative channels of communication exist beyond the curfew requirements, including solicitation via telephone and other electronic communication, Ordinance 863 Page 3 of 10 public solicitation outside of the privacy of citizens’ doorsteps, and solicitation via direct mail, television, radio, and internet; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that an unanticipated visit by a stranger on citizens’ doorsteps is capable of causing fear or suspicion or anxiety resulting in an unnecessary call for service; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds the regulations provided in this ordinance are an integral component of the Town’s safety plan and that crime prevention efforts would be less effective without the provisions of this ordinance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that regulations requiring persons who engage in door-to-door contact with its citizens to obtain a permit are necessary to prevent crime to property and persons; and WHEREAS, the Town Council is authorized by law to adopt the provisions contained herein, and has complied with all the prerequisites necessary for the passage of this Ordinance; and WHEREAS, all statutory and constitutional requirements for the passage of this ordinance have been adhered to, including but not limited to the Open Meetings Act. WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Town Staff, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, is of the opinion that it is in the best interests of the town and its citizens that the amendments should be approved and adopted. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That the findings stated hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are hereby adopted as findings of fact and as a part of the operative provisions hereof. SECTION 2: That the Town of Westlake Code of Ordinances, Chapter 58 is amended and replaced, and shall read as follows: Chapter 58 – DOOR-TO-DOOR SOLICITATION AND HANDBILL DISTRIBUTION, ITINERANT MERCHANTS AND TRANSIENT VENDORS ARTICLE I – IN GENERAL Sec. 58-1 Purpose. The purpose of this article is to provide for the general health, public safety and welfare, comfort, convenience and protection of the Town and the residents of the Town by: Ordinance 863 Page 4 of 10 (1) creating a permit procedure so that solicitors and handbill distributors register with the Town in order to assist crime detection efforts and deter deceptive practices and fraud; (2) prohibiting door-to-door solicitation and canvassing activity at residences during the times when such activity is most intrusive and disruptive to citizens' privacy; and (3) prohibiting itinerant merchants and transient vendors from operating along and within public rights-of-way and, otherwise, on private property without the written permission of the property owner; and (4) regulating the manner in which any solicitation activity, canvassing activity or handbill distribution may occur to promote good order, prevent litter and protect citizens from aggressive and intimidating practices. Sec. 58-2 Definitions. The following words and phrases, when used in this ordinance, shall have the meanings: 1. “Charitable purpose” shall mean philanthropic, religious, or other nonprofit objectives, including the benefit of poor, needy, sick, refugee, or handicapped persons; the benefit of any church or religious society, sect, group, or order; the benefit of a patriotic or veterans' association or organization; the benefit of any fraternal, social, or civic organization, or the benefit of any educational institution. "Charitable purpose" shall not be construed to include any direct benefit to the individual making the home solicitation, to include the benefit of any political group, or political organization, which is subject to financial disclosure under state or federal law. 2. “Commercial home solicitation” or “soliciting” means the solicitation at a residence through the attempt or act of asking, bartering, or communicating in any manner for the purpose of selling or offering to sell goods, services, or realty for a for-profit purpose, which includes promoting, advertising, receiving or obtaining money, gifts or items of value for said individual or group of individuals, or for-profit organization, club, company, corporation. 3. “Do not solicit list” is defined as a list, developed and maintained by the Town Manager or his/her designee, of residences where the property owner or occupant has indicated that they do not wish to be solicited. 4. “Dusk” means thirty (30) minutes after sunset. 5. “Handbill” means and includes any printed or written matter, any sample or device, circular, leaflet, pamphlet, paper, booklet, or any other printed or otherwise reproduced original, or copies of any matter or literature. Ordinance 863 Page 5 of 10 6. “Handbill distribution” is defined as traveling by any means, going door-to-door, house-to-house or building-to-building to distribute or leave on or at each premises handbill for any purpose. 7. “Itinerant Merchant” means any person and/or entity who engages in, does, or transacts any temporary or transient business, for the purpose of carrying on such business, occupies any location for a period of less than six months and without a Certificate of Occupancy. 8. “Transient Vendor” means any person and/or entity who engages in, does, or transacts any temporary or transient business, primarily from a motor vehicle, trailer, manufactured housing, van, automobile or other type of structure or vehicle capable of being transported on the streets or highways of the town, for the purpose of carrying on such business, occupies any location for a period of not less than 30 minutes but not more than two hours, Sec. 58-3 Commercial home solicitation and handbill distribution on private property. (a) No person shall conduct commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution upon residential property without displaying a valid, unexpired written permit as required by this chapter. (b) No person conducting home solicitation or handbill distribution shall approach any part of a residence other than the front door. (c) It shall be unlawful for any person conducting handbill distribution to distribute, deposit, place, throw, scatter, or cast any handbill upon any residential property except: (1) By handing or transmitting such handbill directly to the owner or occupant then present in or upon such private premises; or (2) By placing or depositing such handbill in a manner to secure and prevent such handbill from being blown or drifting about such premises, except that mailboxes may not be used when prohibited by federal postal laws or regulations. (d) It shall be unlawful for any person to engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution at a private property if requested by anyone thereon not to do so. (d) It shall be unlawful for any person to engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution at a private property if there is placed on such premises in a conspicuous place upon or near the main entrance to the residence or property, a weatherproof sign, not less than three (3) inches by four (4) inches in size bearing the words "no trespassing," "no peddlers," "no advertisements," "no solicitation," "no handbills," or any similar notice indicating in any manner that the occupants of such premises do not desire to have visitors engaging in commercial solicitation or handbill distribution on their premises. Ordinance 863 Page 6 of 10 (e) It shall be unlawful for any person to engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution on a residential property that is listed on the “do-not-solicit list” as defined by this chapter. Sec. 58-4 Do-Not-Solicit List. (a) The Town Manager or his/her designee, is authorized to develop and maintain a list of residences where commercial home solicitation is prohibited and such list shall be referred to as the "do-not-solicit list." (b) Any property owner or occupant may elect to add or remove his or her residence to or from the do-not-solicit list through the procedures developed by the Town. The property owner or occupant making such a request will be required to affirm that he or she is an owner or occupant of the residence, and is making the request on their behalf and on behalf of any other occupant at that address. (c) The Town Manager or his/her designee shall make the do-not-solicit list available on the Town’s website and to any person upon request. (d) The Town shall provide a copy of the do- not- solicit list to each person issued a permit under this article. (e) Solicitation of any residence on the “do not solicit list” shall be grounds for the immediate revocation of the solicitor’s permit. Sec. 58-5 Time Restrictions. (a) No Person shall engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution prior to 9:00 a.m. or after dusk Monday through Saturday. (b) No Person shall engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution on Sunday. (c) No Person shall engage in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution on any federally designated holiday. Sec. 58-6 Itinerant Merchants and Transient Vendors. (a) The practice of going in and upon private premises in the town by itinerant merchants or transient vendors of merchandise, not having been requested or invited to do so by the owner or occupant of the private premises, for the purpose of soliciting orders for the sale of goods, wares and merchandise and/or disposing of and/or peddling or hawking such goods, wares and merchandise is hereby prohibited. (b) It is hereby prohibited for any transient vendor or itinerant merchant to sell, offer for sale, or exhibit for the purpose of taking orders for sale therefor, any food or food products, beverages, Ordinance 863 Page 7 of 10 good, wares, merchandise, services, or to solicit charitable contributions on or along the side of any public roadway or within the public right-of-way of roadway located within the Town. (c) In the event that any activity prohibited by this section is authorized by another ordinance, resolution or action of the Town Council in conflict with this section, said ordinance, resolution or action of the Town Council shall prevail as specified and authorized therein. Sec. 58-7 Penalty. Any person, firm, or corporation violating any of the provisions of this Chapter shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine in a sum not to exceed $500.00 for each offense, and a separate offense shall be deemed committed each day during or on which a violation occurs or continues. Secs. 58-7 – 58-25 Reserved. ARTICLE II – PERMIT Sec. 58-26 – Applicability The following shall be exempt from the permitting requirements of this Article: 1. religious organizations exclusively for the distribution of literature and other items for the purpose of proselytizing; 2. persons engaged in anonymous political speech; 3. persons going door-to-door for a charitable purpose; 4. with the exception of Section 58-6(b), sales made under the authority of a contractual relationship with the owners or occupants of a private residences; 5. any operation, which is exempted by state or federal statute from this ordinance, is exempt only to the extent of such applicable exemption; and Sec. 58-27 Permit Application. (a) A person who conducts commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution within the Town shall first complete a permit application as required by this Article. (b) A separate permit shall be required for every person involved in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution. (c) A separate permit shall be required for each company or entity involved in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution. Ordinance 863 Page 8 of 10 (d) No one permit will be valid for multiple people, companies, or entities. (e) A permit under this Article will be valid for the duration of the current calendar year. (f) The application shall contain or be submitted with the following information: (1) The full name, date of birth, phone number and permanent and (if different) current address of the applicant; (2) A valid state driver's license number or a state-approved identification card number (the Police Department will make a photocopy and attach to the application) of the applicant; (3) The desired calendar year in which the applicant will be engaging in commercial home solicitation or handbill distribution activities; (4) The name, address and telephone number of the person, company or entity that is employing the applicant to distribute handbills, if applicable; (5) If a vehicle or vehicles are used to conduct the solicitation or handbill distribution activity, a description of each vehicle, its license plate number and vehicle identification number; the name and license number of the driver who will operate each vehicle, and adequate proof under state law that each driver maintains financial responsibility for the vehicle they will operate shall be attached to the application; (6) The nature of the solicitation or handbill distribution activity (i.e. the merchandise to be sold or offered for sale; or the nature of the services to be furnished; or the type of pamphlets or handbills to be distributed); (7) The names of all cities in which the applicant has conducted solicitation or handbill distribution in the past six months; (8) Whether the applicant will receive a payment for goods or services at the time of solicitation or will demand, accept or receive payment or the deposit of money in advance of final delivery, and if so, the amount sought or the basis for calculation of such payment; (9) If the applicant, or the applicant's employer or principal has pled guilty, or nolo contendere to, or has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor involving fraud, deceit, theft, embezzlement, burglary, larceny, fraudulent conversion, misrepresentation, or misappropriation of property within ten years preceding the date of application, a description of each such conviction or plea, the name of the court and jurisdiction in which the complaint or indictment was filed and the date of the offense; (10) If the applicant, or the applicant's employer or principal is a person against whom a civil judgment or administrative decision based upon fraud, deceit, theft, embezzlement, burglary, larceny, fraudulent conversion, misrepresentation, or misappropriation of Ordinance 863 Page 9 of 10 property has been entered or ordered within ten years preceding the date of application, a description of judgment or action, the case or cause number, if any, and the court or administrative agency that rendered the judgment or decision. (g) It shall be the responsibility of an applicant to update the information provided on application for a handbill distribution permit as such information may change. (h) A permit will not be issued if an applicant answers subsections (f)(9) and (f)(10) in the affirmative. Sec. 58-27 Permit – Approval, Denial, Revocation, and Appeal (a) After review of the permit application and within ten (10) business days of the receipt of the application, the Town Manager’s designee, shall either issue a permit, as provided in this ordinance, or notify the person applying that the application does not comply with the requirements of this ordinance, specifying why the application is incomplete, or otherwise does not comply. (b) Any permit under this article may be denied or revoked if the permit applicant or holder is convicted of a violation of any provisions of this chapter or has knowingly made a false material statement in the application. (c) The permittee shall have ten (10) calendar days after receipt of a notice of revocation or denial in which to file a notice of appeal to the Town Manager’s office relative to the order denying or revoking the permit. If notice is received within the ten (10) day period, the Manager or his/her designee shall make an inquiry and determine whether the applicant’s permit was wrongfully revoked or denied and will schedule a hearing with the applicant within 10 business days after the Town Manager receipt of the applicant’s appeal. The applicant will be notified of the time, date, and place of such hearing. After the hearing, the decision will be made in writing affirming or reversing the revocation or denial. (d) An appeal from a revocation issued under the provisions of this article stays the revocation until the appeal proceedings are complete. SECTION 3: That this Ordinance shall be cumulative of all other Town Ordinances and all other provisions of other Ordinances adopted by the Town which are inconsistent with the terms or provisions of this Ordinance are hereby repealed. SECTION 4: That any person, firm or corporation violating any of the provisions or terms of this ordinance shall be subject to the same penalty as provided for in the Code of Ordinances of the Town of Westlake, and upon conviction shall be punishable by a fine not to exceed the sum of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) for each offense. Each day that a violation is permitted to exist shall constitute a separate offense. SECTION 5: It is hereby declared to be the intention of the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, that sections, paragraphs, clauses and phrases of this Ordinance are severable, and if any phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this Ordinance shall be declared legally Ordinance 863 Page 10 of 10 invalid or unconstitutional by the valid judgment or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, such legal invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect any of the remaining phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs or sections of this Ordinance since the same would have been enacted by the Town Council of the Town of Westlake without the incorporation in this Ordinance of any such legally invalid or unconstitutional, phrase, sentence, paragraph or section. SECTION 6: This ordinance shall take effect immediately from and after its passage as the law in such case provides. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. _____________________________ ATTEST: ____________________________ Laura Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney ESTLAKE TOWN COUNCIL TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Consent Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consider an ordinance amending Chapter 2 “Administration” updating the Fee and Use schedule for the Town of Westlake. STAFF CONTACT: Nick Ford, Development Coordinator Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Mission: Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesess with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost- effective, & transparent. Citizen, Student & Stakeholder High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Update Development Regulations EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) Every fiscal year, the Town of Westlake will reevaluate the fee schedule for building permits, development fees, and other miscellaneous fees. As the Town Council may recall, the most recent comprehensive update for the fee schedule was adopted on August 28, 2017 under Ordinance 832. Noticeable changes from the previous fee schedule are listed below: • Increase to residential building permit fees; • Increase to commercial building permit fees; • Increase to fire inspection fees for residential permits; • Increase to fire review/inspection fees for commercial permits; • Increase to planning fees; • Increase to engineering plan review fees; RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends approval of this ordinance. ATTACHMENTS 1. Fee Schedule Benchmarks 2. Ordinance XXX Amending the Fees and Use Schedule FEE TYPE WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 DIFFERENCE % DIFF ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB KELLER AVG CITY AVG % DIFF Residential Permit Fees 13,600.00$ 15,300.00$ 1,700.00$ 12.50%7,433.75$ 6,850.00$ 4,656.20$ 7,433.75$ 6,593.43$ 132.05% Residential Inspection 2,448.00$ 3,825.00$ 1,377.00$ 56.25%-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 0.00% Residential Plan Review 2,448.00$ 3,825.00$ 1,377.00$ 56.25%4,831.94$ -$ -$ -$ 4,831.94$ -20.84% Fire Review / Inspection 275.00$ 375.00$ 100.00$ 36.36%-$ -$ -$ 7,433.75$ 7,433.75$ -94.96% Total 18,771.00$ 23,325.00$ 4,554.00$ 24.26%12,265.69$ 6,850.00$ 4,656.20$ 14,867.50$ 18,859.11$ FEE TYPE WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 DIFFERENCE % DIFF ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB KELLER AVG CITY AVG % DIFF Commercial Permit Fees 302,430.80$ 332,361.00$ 29,930.20$ 9.90%166,208.75$ 302,430.80$ 157,230.00$ 166,208.75$ 198,019.58$ 67.84% Commercial Plan Review 196,580.02$ 216,034.65$ 19,454.63$ 9.90%108,035.69$ -$ 55,030.50$ 108,035.69$ 90,367.29$ 139.06% Commercial Inspection 43,200.00$ 67,500.00$ 24,300.00$ 56.25%-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 0.00% Fire Review / Inspection 2,200.00$ 26,000.00$ 23,800.00$ 1081.82%-$ -$ -$ 274,244.44$ 274,244.44$ -90.52% Total 544,410.82$ 641,895.65$ 97,484.83$ 17.91%274,244.44$ 302,430.80$ 212,260.50$ 548,488.88$ 562,631.30$ FEE TYPE WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 DIFFERENCE % DIFF ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB KELLER AVG CITY AVG % DIFF Commercial Permit Fees 11,010.00$ 12,241.00$ 1,231.00$ 11.18%5,133.75$ 11,010.00$ 11,010.00$ 5,133.75$ 8,071.88$ 51.65% Commercial Plan Review 7,156.50$ 7,956.65$ 800.15$ 11.18%3,336.94$ -$ 3,853.50$ 3,336.94$ 3,509.13$ 126.74% Commercial Inspection 2,592.00$ 4,050.00$ 1,458.00$ 56.25%-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 0.00% Fire Review / Inspection 275.00$ 500.00$ 225.00$ 81.82%-$ -$ -$ 8,470.69$ 8,470.69$ -94.10% Total 21,033.50$ 24,747.65$ 3,714.15$ 17.66%8,470.69$ 11,010.00$ 14,863.50$ 16,941.38$ 20,051.69$ FEE TYPE WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 DIFFERENCE % DIFF ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB KELLER AVG CITY AVG % DIFF Preliminary Site Evaluation 1,890.00$ 2,100.00$ 210.00$ 11.11%310.00$ 325.00$ 415.00$ 320.00$ 342.50$ 513.14% Concept Plan 1,890.00$ 2,100.00$ 210.00$ 11.11%-$ 210.00$ 200.00$ -$ 205.00$ 924.39% Development Plan 1,890.00$ 2,100.00$ 210.00$ 11.11%-$ 210.00$ -$ -$ 210.00$ 900.00% Site Plan 1,890.00$ 2,100.00$ 210.00$ 11.11%400.00$ 315.00$ 515.00$ 310.00$ 385.00$ 445.45% Zoning Request 1,890.00$ 2,100.00$ 210.00$ 11.11%260.00$ 215.00$ 315.00$ 360.00$ 287.50$ 630.43% Final Plat 990.00$ 1,100.00$ 110.00$ 11.11%310.00$ 435.00$ 415.00$ 320.00$ 370.00$ 197.30% Minor Plat 990.00$ 1,100.00$ 110.00$ 11.11%260.00$ 255.00$ -$ -$ 257.50$ 327.18% Replat 990.00$ 1,100.00$ 110.00$ 11.11%260.00$ 435.00$ 315.00$ 420.00$ 357.50$ 207.69% Amended Plat 990.00$ 1,100.00$ 110.00$ 11.11%260.00$ 325.00$ 265.00$ 320.00$ 292.50$ 276.07% Residential | 8,500SF | $1,500,000 Value New Commercial | 150,000SF | $45,000,000 Value Commercial Remodel | 9,000SF | $900,000 Value Planning | 1 acre site $0 $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB Residential Permit Fees Residential Permit Fees Residential Inspection Residential Plan Review Fire Review / Inspection $0 $100,000 $200,000 $300,000 $400,000 $500,000 $600,000 $700,000 WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB New Commercial Fees Commercial Permit Fees Commercial Plan Review Commercial Inspection Fire Review / Inspection $0 $5 $10 $15 $20 $25 $30 WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB Thousands Commercial Remodel Fees Commercial Permit Fees Commercial Plan Review Commercial Inspection Fire Review / Inspection $0 $3 WESTLAKE FY 17-18 WESTLAKE FY 18-19 ROANOKE SOUTHLAKE TROPHY CLUB Thousands Planning Fees Amended Plat Replat Minor Plat Final Plat Zoning Request Site Plan Development Plan Concept Plan Preliminary Site Evaluation Ordinance 864 Page 1 of 3 TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 864 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE AMENDING CHAPTER 2 TITLED “ADMINISTRATION” BY AMENDING SECTION 2-181 AND REPEALING ORDINANCE 832 ADOPTING THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE FEE SCHEDULE BY ADOPTING A NEW FEE SCHEDULE; PROVIDING A PENALTY; PROVIDING A CUMULATIVE CLAUSE; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PROVIDING A SAVINGS CLAUSE; AUTHORIZING PUBLICATION; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake, Texas is a general law Town; and WHEREAS, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake finds it necessary for the public health, safety and welfare that development occur in a controlled and orderly manner; and WHEREAS, the Town Council adopted the most current fee schedule for the Town of Westlake on August 28, 2017 under Ordinance 832; and WHEREAS, Ordinance 832 repealed and replaced all previous development fees of the Town of Westlake into one consolidated schedule; and WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, it is of the opinion that it is in the best interests of the town and its citizens that the amendments to Chapter 2 “Administration” should be approved and adopted by Ordinance. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That all matters stated in the preamble are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That Chapter 2, “Administration” Article 5 “Finance” Division 2 “Fees and Use Schedule”, amending Sec. 2-181. - Schedule of fees and charges. The fees and use charges authorized by the Town of Westlake are as follows: “Exhibit A”. SECTION 3: That all provisions of Chapter 2 not hereby amended shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 4: That this Ordinance shall be cumulative of all other Town Ordinances and all other provisions of other Ordinances adopted by the Town which are inconsistent with the terms or provisions of this Ordinance are hereby repealed. Ordinance 864 Page 2 of 3 SECTION 5: That any person, firm or corporation violating any of the provisions or terms of this ordinance shall be subject to the same penalty as provided for in the Code of Ordinances of the Town of Westlake, and upon conviction shall be punishable by a fine not to exceed the sum of Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00) for each offense. Each day that a violation is permitted to exist shall constitute a separate offense. SECTION 6: It is hereby declared to be the intention of the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, that sections, paragraphs, clauses and phrases of this Ordinance are severable, and if any phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this Ordinance shall be declared legally invalid or unconstitutional by the valid judgment or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, such legal invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect any of the remaining phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs or sections of this Ordinance since the same would have been enacted by the Town Council of the Town of Westlake without the incorporation in this Ordinance of any such legally invalid or unconstitutional, phrase, sentence, paragraph or section. SECTION 7: This ordinance shall take effect immediately from and after its passage as the law in such case provides. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. _____________________________ ATTEST: Laura Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Ordinance 864 Page 3 of 3 EXHIBITS EXHIBIT A FEE SCHEDULE FY18 Building Permit Fees 2018 Municipal Fee Schedule Town of Westlake Town of Westlake 10/1/18 www.westlake-tx.org Ordinance 864 Building Permit Fees 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Building Permit Fees ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 Residential Building Permits ................................................................................................................................................ 2 Commercial Building Permits .............................................................................................................................................. 3 Contractor Registration ........................................................................................................................................................ 4 Additional Permits ................................................................................................................................................................ 4 Sign Permits ........................................................................................................................................................................ 5 Building Inspection Fees ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 Certificate of Occupancy ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 Planning and Zoning Fees ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Plats ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Zoning .................................................................................................................................................................................. 6 Miscellaneous Planning ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 Public Works Fees ................................................................................................................................................................ 7 Backflow Services ............................................................................................................................................................... 7 Engineering Plan Review .................................................................................................................................................... 7 Network Nodes .................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Easements ........................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Construction Inspection Fee ................................................................................................................................................ 8 Fire Services .......................................................................................................................................................................... 9 Inspection and Review Fees ............................................................................................................................................... 9 Event Based Fees ............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Hazardous Materials ............................................................................................................................................................ 9 Storage Tanks ................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Miscellaneous Fees ........................................................................................................................................................... 10 Ambulance and EMS Fees ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Footnotes ........................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Gas Well & Oil Fees ............................................................................................................................................................ 12 Gas Well Pad Site Permit and Fees .................................................................................................................................. 12 Gas Well Permits and Fees ............................................................................................................................................... 12 Pipeline Related Permits and Fees ................................................................................................................................... 13 Fee Tables ............................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Table 1: Commercial Building Permits .............................................................................................................................. 14 Table 2: Residential Remodels .......................................................................................................................................... 14 Table 3: Commercial Fire Plan Review / Inspection Fees ................................................................................................ 15 Table 4: Residential Foundation Repair ............................................................................................................................ 15 Table 5: Single Trade Fees for New Construction ............................................................................................................ 15 Ordinance 864 Building Permit Fees 2 BUILDING PERMIT FEES RESIDENTIAL B UILDING PERMITS New Single Family Residential Fee Component Fee Calculation New SFR Permit Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .01 New SFR Plan Review Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 New SFR Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Public Works Inspection Fee $300.00 Residential Fire Inspection Fee $375.00 Grading / Excavation Fee $600.00 Erosion Control Fee $1,500.00 Duct Bank Fee $3,100.00 Mechanical Fees See Table 5 Electrical Fees See Table 5 Plumbing Fees See Table 5 Residential Addition / Accessory Fee Component Fee Calculation Residential Addition / Accessory Permit Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .01 Residential Addition / Accessory Plan Review Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Residential Addition / Accessory Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Residential Fire Inspection Fee $375.00 Mechanical Fees See Table 5 Electrical Fees See Table 5 Plumbing Fees See Table 5 Residential Remodel Fee Component Fee Calculation Residential Remodel Permit Fee See Table 2 Residential Remodel Plan Review Fee Residential Remodel Permit Fee × .65 Residential Remodel Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Mechanical Fees See Table 5 Electrical Fees See Table 5 Plumbing Fees See Table 5 Ordinance 864 Building Permit Fees 3 COMMERCIAL B UILDING PERMITS New Commercial Building / Shell Building Fee Component Fee Calculation Commercial Permit Fee See Table 1 Commercial Plan Review Fee Commercial Permit Fee × .65 Commercial Structural Plan Review Fee Actual Cost Incurred + 10% Administrative Costs Commercial Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Commercial Fire Review / Inspection Fee See Table 3 Public Works Inspection Fee $300.00 Duct Bank Fee $3,100.00 Erosion Control Fee $1,500.00 Grading / Excavation Fee $600.00 + $100.00 / acre Mechanical Fees See Table 5 Electrical Fees See Table 5 Plumbing Fees See Table 5 Commercial Remodel / Addition / Accessory / Repair / Finish-Out Fee Component Fee Calculation Commercial Permit Fee See Table 1 Commercial Plan Review Fee Commercial Permit Fee × .65 Commercial Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 Commercial Fire Review / Inspection Fee See Table 3 Mechanical Fees See Table 5 Electrical Fees See Table 5 Plumbing Fees See Table 5 Ordinance 864 Building Permit Fees 4 CONTRACTOR REGISTRATION Contractor Registration Fees1 General Contractor $250.00 Backflow Tester2 $125.00 Electrical No fee Irrigator $250.00 Mechanical $250.00 Plumbing No fee Pool $250.00 Roof $250.00 Sign $250.00 1 Contractors must register with the Town of Westlake every two years 2 Backflow Testers must register with the Town of Westlake annually ADDITIONAL P ERMITS Single Trade Permits Mechanical 1% of valuation with $200 min Electrical 1% of valuation with $200 min Plumbing 1% of valuation with $200 min Roofing / Re-roofing 1% of valuation with $200 min Other Permits Access Control $200.00 Antenna $400.00 Construction Trailer – on site $200.00 Construction Trailer – off site See Specific Use Permit Demolition $200.00 Drive Approach / Sidewalk / Curb Cut $200 without Drainage $500 with Drainage Duct Bank $3,100.00 Grading / Excavating1 $600 – Residential $600 + $100 per acre – Commercial Erosion Control $1,500.00 Fences / Retaining Walls 1% valuation with $200 min Floodplain Development $1,000.00 Fountain / Water Feature / Fire Feature (24" or less in depth) $300.00 Irrigation / Sprinkler $300.00 Miscellaneous Permits 1% of valuation with $200 min Moving (any building on any Town street) $450.00 plus all direct and indirect costs incurred by the Town Pool / Spa 1% of valuation with $2,000 min Ordinance 864 Building Permit Fees 5 Other Permits Residential Foundation Repair See Table 4 ROW Construction (excluding franchised utilities)1 $600.00 Solar Panels 1% of valuation with $200 min Special Event $250.00 Temporary Electrical Pole $75.00 Tent Permit $200.00 Tree Removal / Mitigation $100.00 per caliper inch Water Well $1,000.00 1Engineering Plan Review Fees may apply in addition depending on type of construction SIGN P ERMITS Sign Permits1 Commercial Signs - other than ground-based signs 1% of valuation with $200 min Temporary & Construction Signs $100.00 Monument Signs / Ground-based signs 1% of valuation with $200 min Wayfinding Signs $150.00 Business Banner Signs $200.00 1Fees are calculated per the number of signs requested in an application BUILDING I NSPECTION FEES Building Inspection Fees Building Inspection Fee Building Square Footage × $180.00 × .0025 After Hours Inspections $150 per hour, two hour minimum Reinspection Fee1 $200 after third inspection Work Covered Prior to Required Inspection $350.00 Additional Inspections not Identified $300.00 1For any required inspection (plumbing rough, framing, etc.) a reinspection fee will be assessed after the second failed inspection and every failure thereafter. No inspections will be performed until all reinspection fees are paid. CERTIFICATE OF OCCUPANCY Certificate of Occupancy Change of Name $250.00 Change of Owner $250.00 Clean & Show $250.00 New Tenant $250.00 Temporary Certificate of Occupancy $150.00 Ordinance 864 Planning and Zoning Fees 6 PLANNING AND ZONING FEES PLATS Plats Amended Plat* $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Final Plat* $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Minor Plat* $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Plat Vacation $750.00 Preliminary Site Evaluation* $2,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Replat* $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre 1Fees are prorated per acre ZONING Zoning Concept Plan1 $2,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Development Plan1 $2,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Site Plan1 $2,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Zoning Change1 $2,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Amendment to Code of Ordinances / Comprehensive Plan1 $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Concept / Development / Site Plan Amendment(s) 1 $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Landscape / Architectural Review Fee1 $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Outdoor Lighting Compliance Review Fee1 $1,000.00 plus $100.00 per acre Specific Use Permit $2,000.00 Variance Request $1,000.00 Zoning Verification Letter $100.00 1Fees are prorated per acre MISCELLANEOUS P LANNING Miscellaneous Planning Fees Development Agreement Processing Fee $2,000.00 Subdivision Name Change See Amended Plat Fee Street Name Change $1,000.00 plus cost of new street signage Address Change $500 Consultants for inspections or plan review utilized for specific specialized projects Actual Cost Incurred + 10% Administrative Costs Any revision not specifically listed that goes through legislative approval $500.00 Public Art Per Development Agreement Traffic Impact Analysis Review Actual Cost Incurred + 10% Administrative Costs Ordinance 864 Public Works Fees 7 PUBLIC WORKS FEES BACKFLOW S ERVICES Backflow Fees Backflow Tester Registration1 $125.00 Assembly Registration $25.00 Customer Service Inspection $125.00 Customer Service Reinspection $125.00 1Backflow testers must register annually ENGINEERING P LAN REVIEW Engineering Plan Review Fees1 First Review Fees $1,000 + $150 per sheet Third and Subsequent Review Fees $750 + $100 per sheet 1Engineering Plans include plans such as grading, drainage, water, sewer, and right-of-way improvements. NETWORK NODES Network Node (Small Cell) Fees Network Cell Node Fee $10 per page, maximum of $500 EASEMENTS Easements Easement Abandonment See Amended Plat Fee Easement / ROW Encroachment See Amended Plat Fee Ordinance 864 Public Works Fees 8 CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION FEE Construction Inspection Fee for Subdivision Improvements Construction Inspection Fee1 6% of certified construction costs Construction Inspection Overtime $150 per hour, two hour minimum 1The inspection fee will be six percent (6%) of certified construction costs of the land development (including, but not limited to, public and private improvements such as streets and roads, drainage, parking lots, fire water systems, walls, fences, site grading, water features, parks, open space corridors, required landscaping, irrigation, sidewalks, trails, etc., but not including building construction) for subdivisions or re-subdivision. Estimated Inspection fees are to be paid prior to permitting and/or commencement of work on the proposed improvements and the balance based upon certified construction costs prior to acceptance of improvements or issuance of building permits. The construction inspection fee is in addition to any other fees listed herein. Ordinance 864 Fire Services 9 FIRE SERVICES INSPECTION AND REVIEW FEES Inspections / Reviews After hour inspections $75.002 Fire Alarm System Review4 See Footnotes 4 Residential Fire Plan Review / Inspection Fee $375.00 Commercial Fire Plan Review / Inspection Fee See Table 3 Fire Sprinkler System Review4 See Footnotes 4 Private Agency License Inspection/Certification $50.00 Re-inspection for fire alarm systems $75.001 Re-inspection for new construction $75.001 Re-inspection for sprinkler systems $75.001 Water System Analysis/Test for Fire Suppression Systems $25.00 EVENT BASED FEES Event Fees Carnivals and Fairs $50.001 Fireworks (certified events only) $150.001 Personnel stand-by – Fire Watch $35.003 Personnel stand-by – Special Event $35.003 Pyrotechnic – Special events material $500.001 Special Event $250.00 Temporary Electrical Pole $75.00 Tent Permit $200.00 HAZARDOUS M ATERIALS Hazardous Materials Compressed Gas $100.00 Cryogens $250.00 Dry Cleaning Operations – flammable/combustible liquids $75.00 Dry Cleaning Operations – non-flammable liquids $50.00 Fumigation or thermal insecticidal fogging $250.00 Hazardous Materials – Storage, dispense, use of $50.00 Hazardous Materials Mitigation3,4 See Footnotes 3,4 Highly Toxic Pesticides – Storage, use of $50.00 High-Piled Combustible Storage $50.00 Ordinance 864 Fire Services 10 Hazardous Materials LPG 2,000 < WGC $100.00 LPG 200-1,999 WGC $75.00 LPG 25-199 WGC $25.00 LPG fueled vehicles or equipment in assembly buildings $50.00 STORAGE TANKS Storage Tank Fees Aboveground Storage Tanks (AGST) $150.00 Changing UST or AGST contents $100.00 Underground Storage Tanks (UST) $150.00 UST and AGST removal or temporary out of service $50.00 MISCELLANEOUS FEES Miscellaneous Fees Emergency Medical Services – services and expendables4 See Footnotes4 Asbestos removal $100.00 Battery Systems $250.00 Burn Permit – Non-resident $50.00 Burn Permit – Resident No Charge Candles and open flame in assembly areas $50.00 Explosives or Blasting Agents – Use $150.001 Hot works operations $50.00 Malls – covered $75.001 Motor vehicle fueling dispensing station $50.00 Radioactive Materials $500.00 Trench Burning – Clearing Land or Rubbish $150.00 AMBULANCE AND EMS FEES Ambulance and EMS Fees ALS I $500.00 ALS II $700.00 BLS Emergency $400.00 Mileage $.10 per mile Ordinance 864 Fire Services 11 FOOTN OTES Footnotes 1If required, additional cost for personnel may be charged. Additional cost for expendable equipment and necessary apparatus may be incurred. 2Two (2) hour minimum. If required, addition cost for personnel may be charged. Additional cost for expendable equipment and necessary apparatus may be incurred. 3Cost is per hour per personnel utilized. Additional cost for expendable equipment and necessa ry apparatus may be incurred. 4Cost based on third party or contracted services provider fees. Based on agreement with the Town, fees may be paid directly to the third party or contracted services provider. Ordinance 864 Gas Well & Oil Fees 12 GAS WELL & OIL FEES GAS W ELL P AD S ITE P ERMIT AND FEES Gas Well Pad Site Permit and Fees Gas Well Pad Site Permit Application Fee (one- time initial, per pad site fee) $30,000.00 Approved Gas Well Pad Site Permit Annual Review & Renewal Fee $5,000.00 Fire Fighter Training & Equipment Fee (one-time initial, per approved pad site fee) $10,000.00 Setback Reduction Request/Property Owner Title Verification Fee $5,000.00 or actual cost, whichever is greater GAS W ELL P ERMITS AND FEES Gas Well Permits and Fees Gas Well Permit Application Fee (one-time initial, per well fee) $10,000.00 Gas Well Permit Amendment Application & Review Fee $2,500.00 Gas Well Certificate of Completion & Completion Inspection Fee $1,500.00 Tank Battery Completion & Annual Permit/Inspection Fee $1,000.00 Annual Approved Gas Well Permit Review, Inspection, & Permit Renewal Fee $1,500.00 Initial/Annual Insurance & Surety Review Fee (per approved gas well permit) $1,000.00 Annual Fire Fighter Training & Equipment Fee (per approved gas well permit) $2,000.00 Annual Safety/Hazardous Materials Plans & Reports Compliance Review Fee $1,0001 Well Re-working Permit Fee $5,0001 Gas Well Permit Transference Processing Fee $5,0001 Gas Well Permit Extension Processing Fee $5,0001 Well Abandonment Permit Application & Inspection Fee $2,5001 Road Maintenance Agreement Review & Inspection Fee $5,0001 1Per approved gas well permit Ordinance 864 Gas Well & Oil Fees 13 PIPELINE RELATED P ERMITS AND FEES Pipeline Related Permits and Fees2 New Pipeline Construction Permit & Inspection Fee $5,000.00 New Pipeline Certificate of Completion & Inspection Fee $1,500.00 New Pipeline ROW/Street/Road/Easement Crossing License (per crossing) $2,000.00 Initial/Annual Insurance & Surety Review Fee (per approved pipeline permit) $1,000.00 Annual Safety Report Compliance Review Fee (per approved pipeline permit) $1,000.00 Annual Pipeline Permit & License Renewal Fee (per new pipeline permit) $2,000.00 Inactive Pipeline Permit Application & Inspection Fee $2,500.00 Idled Pipeline Permit Application & Inspection Fee $2,500.00 Idled Pipeline Permit Reactivation Inspection Fee $2,500.00 Seismic Testing Permit Fee $500.00 Technical Advisor Fees Actual costs plus 10% administrative fee 2All permits, fees, and/or licenses in this section are for initial installation of a new pipeline. Any extensions of this pipeline will be considered a ne w pipeline and subject to all applicable permits Ordinance 864 Fee Tables 14 FEE TABLES TABLE 1: COMMERCIAL B UILDING PERMITS Total Valuation Fee1 $1.00 to $1,000.00 $150.00 $1,001.00 to $5,000.000 $150.00 for the first $1,000.00 plus $7.25 for each additional $100.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $5,000.00 $5,001.00 to $25,000.00 $440.00 for the first $5,000.00 plus $31.10 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $25,000.00. $25,001.00 to $50,000.00 $1,062.00 for the first $25,000.00 plus $23.75 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $50,000.00. $50,001.00 to $100,000.00 $1,656.00 for the first $50,000.00 plus $16.50 for each additional $1,000.00, or fraction thereof, up to and including $100,000.00. $100,001.00 to $500,000.00 $2,481.00 for the first $100,000.00 plus $13.20 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $500,000.00. $500,001.00 to $1,000,000.00 $7,761.00 for the first $500,000.00 plus $11.20 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $1,000,000.00. 1,000,001.00 and up $13,361.00 for the first $1,000,000.00 Plus $7.25 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof. 1If total fees exceed declared valuation only fees from this table will apply TABLE 2: RESIDENTIAL REMODELS Total Valuation Fee1 $1.00 to $1,000.00 $150.00 $1,001.00 to $5,000.000 $150.00 for the first $1,000.00 plus $7.25 for each additional $100.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $5,000.00 $5,001.00 to $25,000.00 $440.00 for the first $5,000.00 plus $31.10 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $25,000.00. $25,001.00 to $50,000.00 $1,062.00 for the first $25,000.00 plus $23.75 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $50,000.00. $50,001.00 to $100,000.00 $1,656.00 for the first $50,000.00 plus $16.50 for each additional $1,000.00, or fraction thereof, up to and including $100,000.00. $100,001.00 to $500,000.00 $2,481.00 for the first $100,000.00 plus $13.20 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $500,000.00. $500,001.00 to $1,000,000.00 $7,761.00 for the first $500,000.00 plus $11.20 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof, up to and including $1,000,000.00. 1,000,001.00 and up $13,361.00 for the first $1,000,000.00 Plus $7.25 for each additional $1,000.00 or fraction thereof. 1If total fees exceed declared valuation only fees from this table will apply Ordinance 864 Fee Tables 15 TABLE 3: COMMERCIAL FIRE PLAN REVIEW / INSPECTION FEES Square Feet Fee 0 to 10,000 square feet $500.00 10,001 to 100,000 square feet $500.00 for the first 10,000 square feet plus $0.20 / square foot 100,001 to 300,000 square feet $18,500.00 for the first 100,000 square feet plus $0.15 / square foot 300,001 to 500,000 square feet $48,500.00 for the first 300,000 square feet plus $0.10 / square foot 500,001+ square feet $68,500.00 for the first 500,000 square feet plus $0.05 / square foot TABLE 4: RESIDENTIAL F OUNDATION REPAIR Square Feet Fee 0 to 5,000 square feet $250.00 5,001 to 10,000 square feet $350.00 10,001+ square feet $500.00 TABLE 5: SINGLE TRADE FEES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION Square Feet Fee 0 to 5,000 square feet $250.00 5,001 to 10,000 square feet $500.00 10,001+ square feet $750.00 Ordinance 864 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Conduct a public hearing and consideration of Ordinance XXX approving proposed amendments to Ordinance 202 approving the PD1 zoning district by approving a site plan amendment to construct additional surface parking lots for Lots 3 and 4, Block 2, Westlake/Southlake Park Addition Number One located at the southwest corner of Solana Blvd. and State Highway 114. STAFF CONTACT: Ron Ruthven, Director of Planning and Development Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Mission: Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesess with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost- effective, & transparent. Citizen, Student & Stakeholder High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) Ty Lee, Quadrant Investment Properties, LLC, representing the property owner, HMC Solana, LLC, is requesting an amendment to the existing site plan for “The Plaza” portion of the Solana development located at the southwest corner of SH 114 and Solana Blvd. The applicant is requesting the amendment in order to expand the existing surface parking in the development. EXISTING CONDITIONS The subject properties are currently zoned Planned Development District Number 1-1 (PD1-1) and are currently developed as The Plaza portion of the larger Solana development. The principal land uses on the subject properties are office and retail uses dispersed among 4 separate buildings. The Marriott Hotel and Boy Scouts of America office buildings, integrated into The Plaza development, are not included as part of this request and are located on separate parcels under separate ownership. SOLANA HISTORY The subject properties were originally developed in 1988 as part of the larger Solana development. The Solana includes The Terrace, which originally was built for IBM and where the Westlake Town Hall is located, The Plaza and The Vista across SH 114 in Southlake. The Plaza was designed as a collaborative effort between renowned Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta and landscape architect Peter Walker among others. Upon its completion in 1988, the development received recognition from several prominent publications including the New York Times (attached) for its unique design. With the exception of some landscape changes to the central plaza, minor structural alteration, signage enhancements and a color scheme change in 2016, The Plaza has largely remained unchanged since 1988. Though the development has a nationally recognized unique and distinctive design, it contains no written design guidelines that provide specific design provisions such the design guidelines for the Entrada development. PD1-1 SITE PLAN APPROVAL PROCESS Ordinance 202, which approved the PD1 (later changed to PD1-1) zoning district, does not require a concept plan or development plan. Rather, the original site plan exhibits attached to Ordinance 202 are deemed by said ordinance to satisfy the requirement of a concept plan. Therefore, any amendment to the site plans requires an amendment to Ordinance 202 whereby the original site plan exhibits are amended. PROPOSED SITE PLAN AMENDMENT The applicant proposes to add 210 additional surface parking spaces at the following locations: 1. Along SH 114 behind the existing wall on the east side of the development. Includes 52 new spaces 2. Along Sam School Road on the west side of the development in two separate areas located on the north and south sides of the driveway from Sam School Road. Includes 100 new spaces. 3. Within the interior plaza area. Includes 58 new spaces. The new parking spaces would be composed of brick pavers similar to the existing parking in The Plaza. Parking Supply Analysis. The applicant is proposing to add the additional parking in order to improve overall office occupancy. The Plaza currently contains 1,221 parking spaces including 174 off-site parking spaces located on the fitness center property. The off-site spaces are reserved for The Plaza by a separate instrument parking agreement. The total parking for The Plaza is composed of a mix of structured parking, located underneath the east and south buildings, and surface parking. The surface parking located closest to the main buildings in the development is primarily utilized by the retail and hotel customers while the off-site and structured parking areas are primarily utilized by office workers. The existing parking supply is largely unchanged from the parking provided for the original development in 1988. However, based on the parking supply requirements contained in the zoning regulations, The Plaza is currently under parked by 126 spaces. The following is a breakdown of the existing parking supply: The Plaza at Solana Existing Parking Demand versus Supply Existing Gross Floor Area Parking Required by Chapter 102 Office (1 space per 300 sq.ft.) 317,503 sq.ft. 1,058 spaces Retail (1 space per 200 sq.ft.) 33,800 sq.ft. 169 spaces Restaurant (1 space per 100 sq.ft.) 12,000 sq.ft. 120 spaces TOTAL Required 1,347 spaces TOTAL Existing 1,221 spaces Total Deficit -126 spaces It is important to note that the above analysis does not include the Boy Scouts of America building and the Marriott Solana hotel, which are located on separately owned parcels but share the same parking supply nonetheless. Therefore, at full occupancy, the development does not contain enough existing parking supply to meet demand. Parking Lot Closest to SH 114. The parking lot adjacent to SH 114 shows an access point into the adjacent parking garage and a new driveway that provides access to a future SH 114 service road. At the earliest, any new SH 114 service road would not be completed until 2021. Therefore, primary access to this lot would initially come from the adjacent parking garage. Staff recommends that any future driveway construction from the future SH 114 service road utilize the shortest possible route such that the least amount of trees are removed and that the final alignment and driveway access require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. Central Plaza Changes. The interior plaza feature, which is the namesake for The Plaza, was originally developed with a Peter Walker design that was subsequently changed in 2016 to the current design. The current design contains landscaping interspersed with decomposed granite trails, and, according to the attached plans, is proposed to change as follows: • Two additional rows of parking would be added north of the existing parking located to north of the central plaza. This would result in removing some grass and ornamental trees • Three additional rows of parking would be added south of the existing parking located to the south of the central plaza. This would result in the removal of a grassy with trees and two decomposed granite trails that cross each other through the grass and trees. • The central plaza, which is surrounded by existing parking, would not be further reduced in area. However, the landscaping is proposed to change to a mix of decomposed granite, “decorative aggregate”, grass and other unspecified hardscape improvements. This area would contain a future public art feature. In terms of total open space in The Plaza, the proposed parking additions would serve to reduce the total percentage of open space from 48% to 40%. By comparison, The Terrace contains 45% of open space. In terms of feasibility for events and public gatherings, the proposed design and addition of parking allows for additional impervious surface area to place tents, trailers, food trucks and other temporary features while also serving to provide more of a coherent focus on the central plaza area as opposed to three separate plaza areas. A public art feature would also serve to add a “placemaking” element to the central plaza that does not currently exist. Landscaping. The applicant has provided a comprehensive landscape plan and tree survey as part of the request. Section 98-Vegetation in the Code of Ordinances requires all new parking lots to meet stringent landscaping standards. However, when the Solana was constructed in 1988, the existing landscape standards did not exist and, consequently, the existing surface parking lots do not comply with the current provisions. Therefore, as part of the request, the applicant is requesting two specific waivers to the landscaping requirements in the Code of Ordinances: Requested Waiver #1: Section 98-102(C) – Landscape Treatment of Town Edge Zones. “(c) Landscape treatment of town edge zones. (1) Alternative treatments. Town edge open space zones may be treated in one of two ways: by earth berm, or forested edge, as set out in subsections (c)(2) and (c)(3) of this section. (2) Earth berm. a. State Highway 114 and 170. On State Highway 114 and 170 the earth berm may vary in width and height, and shall have a maximum 5:1 slope from the property line to the ridge line and a maximum 3:1 slope from the ridge line to the setback line. The berm shall be a minimum height of 11 feet. b. Highway 377. On Highway 377 the earth berm may vary in width and height, and shall have a maximum 5:1 slope from the property line to the ridge line and a maximum 3:1 slope from the ridge line to the backside of the easement. The berm shall be a minimum height of six feet. c. Wildflowers. Wildflowers shall be planted along earth berms consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. d. Trees. Trees shall be planted along the earth berm consistent with the Comprehensive Plan in the following manner: 1. Quantity. There shall be a minimum of 17 trees per 10,000 square feet of the area measured from the top of the berm to the edge of the town edge open space zone closest to the interior of the lot. 2. Size. Sixty percent of the trees shall be a minimum three-inch caliper, and 40 percent shall be a minimum two-inch caliper. (3) Forested edge. As an alternative to creating an earth berm, a forested edge may be created which includes: a. A minimum of 17 trees per 10,000 square feet over the entire town edge open space zone per size and proportion described in subsection (c)(2)d of this section. b. Wildflowers must be provided over 25 percent of the town edge open space zone adjacent to the highway.” Requested Waiver #2: Section 98-106(C)2 – Parking Lot Landscaping, Landscape requirements, tree density “(2) Tree density. There shall be a minimum of one tree per parking space in all parking areas. These trees may be planted within each parking area or within the parking lot edge area. No parking space may be greater than 15 feet from a tree.” As stated in the attached application, the applicant is requesting the waivers for the following reasons: “due to site constraints, it is not possible to provide all of the required parking lot trees within the new parking areas shown on the site plan; however, we are proposing parking lot landscaping that is consistent with the existing parking lot landscaping in Solana today.” Staff agrees with the above statement. Given that the landscaping request is consistent with the existing landscaping in The Plaza, staff recommends approval of the waivers subject to larger tree plantings in parking lot areas as detailed in the recommendations below such that the new trees provide more leaf mass and shade aesthetic to the development. Lighting. As required by code, the applicant has submitted a lighting and photometric plan. The plan shows general compliance with the Town’s outdoor lighting regulations in Section 102-206 of the Code of Ordinances. The plan shows five separate fixture types to be installed in the new parking areas. Of the five, four are new types that do not currently exist in The Plaza. These fixture types, however, do exist across Solana Blvd., in The Terrace development and were installed with the addition of the new parking garage in 2016. Of the five types, the fixture type that currently exists in The Plaza is labeled as “SC1”. This fixture type is a common fixture across the Solana development including the medians of Solana Blvd. Given the nature of the upper shield, it tends to disperse light downward in a more efficient fashion with lower intensity bulbs than do the other fixtures. Therefore, given the consistency of style in the Solana development and the illumination efficiency, staff recommends that these fixtures be utilized more than the other proposed fixtures in the development with particular focus on the central plaza area. Staff also recommends that the height of light poles be restricted to a maximum of 15 feet consistent with the existing light poles in The Plaza. In summary staff recommendations on lighting are as follows: 1. All lighting shall, at a minimum, comply with the outdoor lighting provisions contained in Chapter 102 of the Code of Ordinances. 2. Illumination levels for each individual fixture shall not exceed the current average illumination levels of existing outdoor lighting in the development. 3. Light temperature shall not exceed 3,000 Kelvin. 4. Lighting poles shall not exceed 15 feet in height. 5. Lighting fixtures utilized in the central plaza area shall be either the SC1 fixtures as shown on the photometric plan or lit bollards similar to the bollard lights utilized in The Terrace. 6. Prior to issuance of the building permit, a final photometric plan shall be submitted demonstrating compliance with these conditions and shall require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. PUBLIC NOTIFICATION A total of 16 public hearing notices were sent to property owners within the PD1-1 zoning district and a minimum of 200 feet from the PD1-1 zoning district. Notice of the public hearing was published in the Fort Worth Star Telegram. To date no correspondence has been received. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION On September 17, 2018 the Planning and Zoning Commission voted to recommend approval by a vote of (5-0) subject to the following conditions: • The additional parking spaces (35 total) proposed on the southern portion of the central plaza area closest to the Marriott Solana Hotel, collectively labeled by the Commission as “Area D”, be omitted from the proposed site plan amendment. • That the proposed site plan amendment include the staff recommendations contained in the agenda briefing. These conditions has been added to the draft ordinance. SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATION The applicant is requesting the additional parking simply to better market the property for future office tenants thereby increasing the value of the development. As stated above, The Plaza contains a very unique architectural and design style that is the archetype of the larger Solana development. Unfortunately, when the Solana was built, no specific design guidelines were recorded or approved. Therefore, given the rarity of design and architectural significance of the development, staff agrees that maintenance of design fidelity is a top priority for the community with regard to The Plaza. Staff believes that the proposed parking addition in combination with the additional recommended conditions listed below will be consistent with the current design. However, staff also believes that any future requests for additional parking should be in the form of additional on-site structured parking in concert with the original design motif. Staff recommends approval subject to the following conditions: 1. Variances to Section 98-102(C) and 98-106(C)2 in the Code of Ordinances are hereby approved subject to: a. All Red Oaks, Live Oaks and Pine trees shown on the landscape plan shall be planted with a minimum caliper width of 6 inches as measured a minimum of 4 feet above grade. b. All protected trees removed shall require mitigation per the requirements of Chapter 98. b. Notwithstanding the above provisions, all landscaping shall, at a minimum, comply with the submitted landscape plan and the Code of Ordinances. 2. Proposed lighting is approved subject to: a) All lighting shall, at a minimum, comply with the outdoor lighting provisions contained in Chapter 102 of the Code of Ordinances. b) Illumination levels for each individual fixture shall not exceed the current average illumination levels of existing outdoor lighting in the development. c) Light temperature shall not exceed 3,000 Kelvin. d) Lighting poles shall not exceed 15 feet in height. e) Lighting fixtures utilized in the central plaza area shall be either the SC1 fixtures as shown on the photometric plan or lit bollards similar to the bollard lights utilized in The Terrace. f) Prior to issuance of the building permit, a final photometric plan shall be submitted demonstrating compliance with these conditions and shall require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. 3. All parking lot surfaces shall be composed of brick pavers and shall match the existing pavers in the development. 4. Future driveway construction and access to the easternmost parking lot from the future SH 114 service road shall utilize the shortest possible route such that the least amount of trees are removed. Final alignment and driveway access shall require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. 5. Pending final determinations of any encroachments into the 100 year flood plain and/or waters of the United States, prior to the issuance of the building permit, the westernmost parking additions shall require further engineering studies and approvals if required by the Town Engineer. 6. A public art feature shall be placed in the central plaza area as noted on the site plan. The final public art piece shall require the approval of the public art competition committee. These conditions are reflected in the draft ordinance in addition to the Planning and Zoning Commission recommendation. ATTACHMENTS 1. Location and Site Map 2. Developer Exhibit: Application and Correspondence Received from Applicant 3. Developer Exhibit: Color Site Plan Exhibit 4. Developer Exhibit: Detailed Site Plan 5. Developer Exhibit: Landscape Plans and Tree Survey 6. Developer Exhibit: Lighting and Photometric Plan 7. Staff Exhibit: Ordinance 202 8. Staff Exhibit: 1989 New York Times Article on Solana 9. Staff Exhibit: Early Plaza at Solana Photos 10. Draft Ordinance P D 1—1 Subject ProperƟes “The Plaza” LocaƟon Map T H E T E R R A C E T H E V I S T A Site Map—The Plaza MarrioƩ Solana Boy Scouts Subject ProperƟes Fitness Center Off‐Site Parking Lot Structured Parking ._. ,QUADRA T M INVES ME PROPERT ES August 2 , 2018 Mayor and Members of the Town Council and Planning and Zoning Commission c/oRon Ruthven, AICP Director of Planning and Development Town of Westlake 1500 Solana Blvd ., Bldg. 7, #7200 Westlake , TX 7 6262 Re: Variances Requested Dear Mayor and Members of the Town Council and Planning and Zoning Commission, In connection with the Solana Plaza site plan submittal , the applicant seeks approval of the following two landscaping related variances for the reasons stated below: 1. Section 98-106 , which requires that one tree be planted per parking space, and that no parking space be greater than 15 feet in distance from a tree. Variance Justification: This is an existing development that was not subject to this landscaping requirement, and does not currently comply with this ordinance. The pending site plan request merely reconfigures parking within the plaza area, and adds parking to meet the demands of prospective tenants. It is in everyone's best interest that the existing building vacancy rates be reduced, and the key to producing that result is adding parking as shown on the pending site plan. The proposed parking cannot be provided if any existing or proposed parking lots will be forced into compliance with this significant tree planting requirement. It is physically impossible to design this parking to meet tenant demands and all other zoning requirements (including significant roadway setbacks), and at the same time , plant one tree per parking space in a manner that provides adequate space for each tree to grow and be maintained in a healthy state over time. It would be possible to move improvements closer to roadways with a setback variance , which would make room for trees to be planted, however, it is our understanding that the town wishes to maintain the minimum roadway setbacks. Given the site constraints and the fact that we are trying to redevelop parking for an existing development, it is not feasible to provide all of the required trees. We have proposed trees in every location where our landscape architect advises they can be maintained in a healthy state over time , and the landscaping is consistent with the existing Solana development. 2. Section 98-102 , which imposes the open space/town edge landscaping requirement that 17 trees be planted for every 10 ,0000 square feet of open space. T 214 .855 .2948 F 214.85S .8 8S8 3102 OAK LAWN AVE . SUITE 210 DALLAS , TEXAS 75219 WWW . QUA ORA NT I NV EST M ENTPROPERTIES .CO M Color Site Plan Exhibit Detailed Site Plan D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T.LOT 3BLOCK 212.718 ACRES(554,000 SQ. FT.)INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T. = 76°03'05"R = 90.00'L = 119.46'CB = S 78°43'03" ECD = 110.88' = 01°05'21"R = 2928.00'L = 55.66'CB = N63°48'04"ECD = 55.66'CD = 359.18'CB = S 46°13'46" EL = 359.24'R = 5709.58' = 03°36'18" = 07°20'24"R = 974.93'L = 124.90'CB = S 44°21'44" ECD = 124.81'CD = 404.36'CB = N 32°04'17" WL = 406.45'R = 1155.00' = 20°09'45"CD = 333.77'CB = N 67°36'48" EL = 333.95'R = 2928.00'= 06°32'05"INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T.7.711 ACRES(335,904 SQ. FT.)PARK ADDITION No. 1VOLUME 388-214,PAGES 78 & 79P.R.T.C.T.OVERALL SITE PLANDRAWN BY:DATE:DESIGNED BY:CHECKED BY:PROJ. NO.:SHEET:R308252.0208/29/2018DATEREVISIONNO. THE PLAZA AT SOLANA HZIHZIHZI1 SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL 08/29/18 Detailed Site Plan DNUPDNUPOFFICEBLDG 1EXISTPARKINGOFFICEBLDG 2SOLANA BLVDSTATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP3211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1SITE PLAN - PARKING LAYOUTSITE PLAN -PARKING LAYOUTAP101Detailed Site Plan OFFICEBLDG 1EXISTPARKINGUPDN223273211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1EAST LOT PARKING LAYOUT PLANEAST LOT PARKINGLAYOUT PLANAP102SHEET LEGEND#NOTE: THE CONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTLAYOUTS SHOWN ON THIS DRAWING ARE PROVIDEDAS AN EXHIBIT TO A SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL PACKAGEDEVELOPED BY OTHERS. THE PURPOSE OF THESECONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTS IS TO SHOWTHE LOCATION OF NEW PARKING LOTS, GENERALPARKING LAYOUT AND PRELIMINARY NUMBER OFPARKING SPACES. PLEASE REFER TO SITE PLANSUBMITTAL DRAWINGS FOR ADDITIONALINFORMATION REGARDING THE PROPOSED SITEIMPROVEMENTS.Detailed Site Plan UPDNUPVEHICLEACCESS RAMP9% SLOPE8661410DNUPVEHICLEACCESS RAMP14661010103211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1WEST LOT 4A PARKING LAYOUT PLANN O R T H2WEST LOT 4B PARKING LAYOUT PLANWEST LOT 4A & 4BPARKING LAYOUTPLANAP103SHEET LEGENDNOTE: THE CONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTLAYOUTS SHOWN ON THIS DRAWING ARE PROVIDEDAS AN EXHIBIT TO A SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL PACKAGEDEVELOPED BY OTHERS. THE PURPOSE OF THESECONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTS IS TO SHOWTHE LOCATION OF NEW PARKING LOTS, GENERALPARKING LAYOUT AND PRELIMINARY NUMBER OFPARKING SPACES. PLEASE REFER TO SITE PLANSUBMITTAL DRAWINGS FOR ADDITIONALINFORMATION REGARDING THE PROPOSED SITEIMPROVEMENTS.#Detailed Site Plan Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Landscape Plans and Tree Survey Lighting and Photometric Plan ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, AMENDING THE TOWN'S COMPREHENSIVE ZONING ORDINANCE NO. 200, BY CREATING PLANNED DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT NO. 1 ("PD111), ESTABLISHING THE APPLICABLE STANDARDS WITHIN PD1 AND SETTING OUT THE BOUNDARIES OF PD1 UPON THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS; PROVIDING FOR INTERPRETATION, PURPOSE AND CONFLICT; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PROVIDING A PENAL CLAUSE; AND MAKING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, Ordinance No. 200, the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance for the Town of Westlake, provides for numerous zoning categories including planned development districts; and WHEREAS, the property included within PD1 has been developed as a planned office park with hotel and retail uses; and WHEREAS, the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Westlake is desirous of creating "PD1" to permit both the existing development within PD1 and additional development within PD1; and WHEREAS, the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Westlake, after considering the recommendations of the Planning and Zoning Commission, made after holding of public hearings as provided by ordinance, and after issuing notices and affording every person whose property was affected or who had any interest in the matter a free and fair opportunity to be heard, finds that it will promote the public health, safety, morals and welfare of the present and future residents of Westlake to establish the "PD1" zoning district; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: PART I The recitals set forth above are hereby incorporated herein, adopted by the Town and declared to be true and correct. PART II That Ordinance No. 200, the Comprehensive Zoning ordinance of 1992, is hereby amended, as envisioned by such ordinance, by adding Planned Development District No. 1 (11PD111) within the propertydescribedinExhibit "A", attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference for all purposes, to the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. PD1 will be subject to the following zoning provisions. ORDINANCE d:\if1852\mtp\ordinance.8 Section 1. Principal Uses Permitted. No building, structure or premises shall be used other than for the following purposes, together with the ancillary and accessory uses specified in Section 2: A. Office buildings for business and professional use, including, but not limited to, administrative, executive, engineering, accounting, scientific, research and development, educational, marketing, information processing, computers, statistical and financial purposes, provided such use shall notinvolveanymachineryorprocess which pollutes the environment, including without limitation those which emit dust, smoke, odor, fumes, noise, vibrations or the like; B. Educational facilities and temporary accommodationsforemployees, customers, and visitors to such educational facilities; C. Hotel and conferencing facilities; D. Retail uses including but not limited to, medical and dental clinics, cafeterias, restaurants, travel agencies, banks and other financial institutions, hair salons, jewelry stores, child care centers, dry cleaners, and other uses permitted under the retail category of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance of 1992, as amended; E. Institutional and/or Governmental Uses; and F. Sports and health club. Section 2. Accessory Uses Permitted. No accessory uses shallbepermittedinPD1otherthanbuildingsandusesaccessorytoa principal use, including, but not limited to, the following. 1. off street parking and off street loading space as required; 2. storage and maintenance facilities; 3. utility services and facilities; 4. gatehouses, bus stops, pedestrian shelters and any similar structures; 5. caretaker houses; 6. signs, subject to illumination and other standards; 7. obelisks; ORDINANCE d:\Jf1852\mtp\ordinance.8 buildings. 8. fire station, police station, or other security Section 3. Dimensional standards and requirements. The following dimensional standards and requirements shall apply: A. The minimum required lot area shall be five (5) acres. B. The maximum percent of PD1 to be occupied by ( i ) principal use buildings shall be ten percent (10%) of the land area as defined below), excluding court yards, atria, etc. not enclosed within the buildings. Parking garages shall not be included in the calculation of density or site coverage. For these purposes PD1 shall be deemed to have 251.757 acres of land area which is its original acreage before donations for roadways except for right of way within PD1 donated for S.H. 114. C. The minimum size of any front, side or rear yard for principal and accessory use buildings shall be: 1. One hundred (100) feet from any public road, street or highway, except for the building located immediatelyadjacenttotheintersectionofSamSchoolRoadandKirkwood Boulevard, for which building the setback shall be eighty (80) feet; 2. The minimum setback from State Highway 114 shall be two hundred (200) feet; 3. Five hundred (500) feet from any residentially zoned area; or 4. Otherwise setbacks shall be one hundred (100) feet for side yards. Setbacks shall be one hundred (100) feet for rear yards except for Lots 1R and 2R of the Addition. D. Utility service facilities, playground restrooms and storerooms, bus stops, gate houses, signs and similar types of minor accessory structures, may be located in the required yard areas provided that the height and location of such structures shall be approved as part of a site plan or in the building permit process. Below grade parking structures may also be located in the yard areas subject to approval as part of a site plan. E. The maximum permitted building height for any principal or accessory building shall not exceed seven hundred 700) feet mean sea level. F. Any lot within PD1 may have more than one (1) principal use building on such lot. ORDINANCE d:\jf1852\mtp\ordinance.8 Section 5. Requirement of a Comprehensive Site Plan, etc. Notwithstanding any provisions in the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance No. 200 addressing the form of site plans, the comprehensive site plans for all the area covered by PD1, which are attached hereto as Exhibits "B", "C", "D" and "E" (collectively, the "Site Plans" or individually a "Site Plan") are hereby reapproved by the Town of Westlake and declared to be in conformance with the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance No. 200. The Site Plans for Westlake/ Southlake Park, an addition to the Town of Westlake as filed in Volume 388-214, Pages 78- 79 of the Map and Plat Records of Tarrant County, Texas,as modified by plat filed in Cabinet A. Slide 283, of the Map and Plat Records of Tarrant County, Texas (the "Addition") permit not less than the approximate land coverage for principal use buildings as set forth in Exhibit F" attached hereto and approximate gross building square footages as set forth in Exhibit "G" attached hereto, both of which exhibits are incorporated herein by reference for all purposes. Any development within PD1 not materially in accordance with the Site Plans will require the submission and approval of a new comprehensive site plan for such additional or substantially changed development provided in no event shall the site coverage byprincipalbuildingsbemorethantenpercent (10%) as set forth in Section 3B above. Any requirement of a concept plan shall be deemed satisfied by the Site Plans. Any requirement of a development schedule shall be required only in connection with any future request for a building permit. No preliminary service plan will be required since water and sewer service is already provided by Trophy Club Municipal Utility District No. 1 (the "MUD"), and police, fire and ambulance services are provided either by Tarrant County, the MUD or the City of Southlake. Section 6. Landscaping. Landscaping and irrigation of PD1shallbegenerallyinaccordancewithbuildingplansapprovedbytheTownfromtimetotime. Any material change in such landscaping and irrigation of PD1 not in accordance with approved building plans shall be subject to the Town's applicable landscape ordinances and regulations. Section 7. Service Road. The width of the service road providing access for trucks and other deliveries to the back of the hotel and office building located at Seven Village Circle may befifteenfeet (15' ) in width, notwithstanding any contrary provisioninOrdinanceNo. 155. Section 8. Development Agreement. A development agreement will be required prior to issuance of any future building permit(s). Section 9. Conformance with Town' s Comprehensive Plan. Present development within PD1 conforms to the requirements of the Town's Comprehensive Plan as adopted by Ordinance No. 199. ORDINANCE d:\1f1852\mtp\ordinance.8 Section 10. Approval of Existing Plat As Amended. The plat, as amended, for the Addition as referenced in Section 5 above is hereby unconditionally approved. Section 11. Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. Except as amended by this ordinance, the Town's Comprehensive ZoningOrdinanceof1992, as amended, shall govern property zoned PD1. PART III It is hereby declared to be the intention of the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Westlake, that sections, paragraphs, sentences, clauses and phrases of this ordinance are severable, and if any phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this ordinance shall be declared unconstitutional by the valid judgment or decree of any court of competent jurisdiction, such unconstitutionality shall not affect any of the remaining phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs or sections of this ordinance since the same would have been enacted by the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Westlake without the incorporation in this ordinance of any such unconstitutional phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section. PART IV This ordinance shall become effective immediately upon its passage and is ACCORDINGLY SO ORDAINED, PASSED AND APPROVED this day of November1992 A.D. DALE ILL. WHIM, -MAYOR TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS ATTEST: TOWN SECRETARY TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS APPROVED AS TO LEGAL FORM: TOWN ATTORNEY TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS ORDINANCE do\jf1852\mtp\ordinence.8 EXHIBIT "A" DESCRIPTION OF LAND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION Being a tract of land in the C. M. Throop Survey, Abstract No. 1510, the U. P. Martin Survey, Abstract No. 1015, the T. U. Mann Survey, Abstract No. 1107, the J. E. Martin Survey, Abstract No. 1134, and theW. Medlin Survey, Abstract No. 1958, all located in northern TarrantCounty, Texas. This tract of land embraces all of those tracts of landdescribedindeedstoInternationalbusinessMachinesCorporationandrecordedinVolume737E, Page 1742, Volume 7824, Page 2033, Volume 7376, Page 1779, Volume 7359, Page 1579, Volume 7362. Page 1168, Volume 7362, Page 1164, and Volume 7376, Pace 2043. It includes portions of thosetractsoflanddescribedindeedstoInternationalBusinessMachinesCorporationandrecordedinVolume7376, Page 1765, Volume 7376. Page1737, Volume 7376, Page 2067. and Volume 7422. Page 2157 (embraces TractTwo). All deeds are recorded in County Records, Tarrant County, Texas. Said tract is more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a steel fence post set in concrete in the southwest richt-of-way of State Highway No. 114 at highway station 56+Z'I.87 andbeingananglepoint in the right-of-way of State Highway No. 114; THENCE S 360 32' 25" E, at 116.54 feet pass the centerline ofPeytonvilleRoad (County Road No. 3088), at 232.93 feet pass a highwaymonumentatananglepointintheright-of-way of State Highway No. 114, and continue on with the southwest right-of-way of State Highway hlo. 114, a total distance of 2913.13 feet to a 5/8" iron pin with capstamped "Garter & Burcess" set at the southeast corner of Tract Two asdescribedinVolume7422, Page 2157; THENCE N $8Q 29' 50" W. at 110.41 feet pass a 5/8" iron pin found and continue on a total distance of 907. 77 feet to a 5/ 8" iron pin foundbyafencepostatthemosteasterlynortheastcornerofthetractdescribedinVolume7824, Page 2033; THENCE S O00 17' 58" k', 197.59 feet to a 5/ 8" iron pin found by afencecorneratthesoutheastcornerofthetractdescribedinVolume7824, Page 2033; THENCE S 860 22' -05" W, 518.25 feet to a h" iron pin found in theeasterlyright-of-way of Peytonville Road; THENCE N 190 09' 01" k', with the easterly right-of-way ofPeytonvilleRoad, 393.02 feet to a 5/8" iron pin with cap stampedCarter & Burgess" set at the southwest corner of the tract described inVolume737E, Page 1779; EXHIBIT "A" C&B No. 8466402 7/15/85 THENCE S 82" 45' 45" k, at 21.53 feet pass a We nail found in thecenterlineofPeytonvilleRoad, at 52.28 feet Dass the westerly ricnt-of-wayofPeytonvilleRaaf, and continue on a total distance of 439.73 feet tc a3/8 inch iron pin in concrete found by a fence post in the south line of atractaescrinedinVolume737E, Page 2087; THENCE 5 890 33' 4E" K, 1,466.76 feet to a fence corner at the south- west corner of the tract oescribed in Volume 7376, Page 2087; THENCE. N 000 47' 24" E, 460.91 feet to a 5/8 inch iron pin with capstamped "Carter $ Burgess" set by a fence Post at the Southeast corner of the tract described in Volume 7376, Page 2043 and from which a one inchpipefoundbearsN00° 47' 24" E, 2.21 feet; THENCE N 890 57' 44" k', 1,774.98 feet to a 5/ 6 inch iron pin with cap t stamped "Carter 6 Burgess" set; THENCE North, 1,882.23 feet to a 5/8 inch iron pin with cap stampedCarterSBurgess" set; THENCE N 52° 00' 00" E, 1,000.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron pin with capstamped "Garter 8 burgess" set; THENCE East, 2,141.45 feet to a 5/8 inch iron pin with cap stamnedCarter & Burgess" set, said pin being in the aforementioned southwest ricnt- of-way line of State Highway No. 114; - THENCE 5 36° 32' 25' along said right-of-way line P50.14 feet to thePOINTOFBEGINNING, containing 255.930 acres of land. ISD.1 APPROXIMATE LAND OVERAGEPRINCIPALUSEBUILDINGS November 18, 1992 Approximate Building Footprints Lot 1, Block 1 (Existing) 242,000 Lot 2, Block 1 (Future) 191,0100 Lot 1, Block 2 7 Village Circle ( Existing) 32,000 9 Village Circle (Existing) 28,000 Boy Scouts (Existing) 11,000 Village Center Retail (Existing) 32,000 Village Center Expansion (Future) 61,0()0 Hotel Existing Bp,OW Future 13,E Sports Club 0 Existing 30,000 R Future 5,wo Total 706,0010 SF Land SF = 251.747 ac x 43,560 = 10,9W,099 SF Coverage of Principal Use Buildings = 705,0001 f 10,W,099 = 6.43% EXHIBIT 'F' PD -1 APPROXIMATE GAGS$ BUILDING SQUARE P+l OTAGES Nouembsr 16, 1852 Lot 1, Block 1 Existing Buildings Lot 2, Black 2 Lot 1, Block 3 Existing Sports Club Expansion Total Block 2, Lot 2R Existing Hotel i Expansion Total Block 2, Lot 1 R 7 and 9 Village Circle Office Buildings 2 W. Kirkwood (Boy Scouts) Village Center Retail Village Center Expansion Total I F "qc- UZ 1,225,000 1,225,000 875,000 875,000 r1r EXHIBIT "G' cif i'1'r' OFFICE Z ON SITE PLAN "J 3o -r Da114S Marriou . e.:.... rrsYar -"'4 SWry QIiWNYw a. YI lAI 11rWMN d4i.4 1p d CwN Dyy4r awayAfBrb ba rrarl srao.r lY Carli bRiw d,9vb Mf gls I I1 1 yyI I Kel LL AmagmT w..s I 1 ior rf IY iltlW[M Wr4A a' i SITE PLAN.-` a.. Alol 4 m:l wrxrnu f W l K d 77 ads q/ I I CDOFzIE:) 202 EMIHIT "Eo AM SATE PLAN https://nyti.ms/29yZ4yc ARCHIVES | 1989 By PAUL GOLDBERGER The first sign that Solana is not like other suburban office parks is the three 100- foot-tall pylons - one magenta, one purple, one yellow - that stand in the rolling Texas prairie like pieces of a gargantuan building toy left in a thousand-acre backyard. The pylons announce Solana's presence from a mile down the freeway, and they foretell the nature of its architecture, a series of stucco-clad buildings with intense, rich color and a surprisingly urbane presence. Solana, which means ''sunny place'' in Spanish, looks from a distance as if it might be a resort, not a suburban office and retail complex: its buildings are all low, and its 900-acre site is lushly landscaped. But this place is not, in fact, part of the new trend toward making suburban offices so sybaritic that they resemble getaway islands; Solana is quite rigorous in its design, and for all its elaborate landscaping and lively architecture it actually has more of the qualities of a true village than almost any other suburban development of the last few years. This is a place whose design begins to address the critical problems of suburban office parks everywhere: how to deal honestly with the infuriatingly necessary automobile, and how to create a convincing and meaningful sense of place. The complex, which is eight miles northwest of the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, was built as a joint venture between Maguire Thomas Partners, a Los Angeles development firm that has established itself as one of the nation's most aggressive builders of serious architecture, and the I.B.M. Corporation, which has leased most of the office space built in Solana's first phase, completed last year, as a computer and marketing center. I.B.M., a longtime architectural patron in its own right, worked closely with the architects from the start. The architects for Solana were Romaldo Giurgola of the New York firm of Mitchell/ Giurgola, who designed a set of six five-story buildings, two parking garages, a cafeteria and a computer center, all for I.B.M.; and Ricardo Legorreta of Legorreta Arquitectos of Mexico City, who designed a marketing center for I.B.M., the signpost pylons, and the so-called village center, which now contains two small office buildings but by mid-1990 will include a hotel, restaurants and a national training center for the Boy Scouts. The master plan was the work of the architect Barton Myers, and the landscaping was done by Peter Walker and Martha Schwartz. Mr. Legorreta's pylons are not as pure a piece of sculpture as they might at first seem to be. For the Texas roadscape is filled with pylons, most of which support signs for car dealerships and fast-food restaurants, and the motorist driving along Texas freeways is used to seeing a forest of tall, thin objects. What Mr. Legorreta has done is abstract these pylons, turn them into visual events in themselves rather than supports for signs, and give them the vibrant palette of Mexico. In a single gesture he has given Solana a piece of monumental civic sculpture, an identifiable landmark, and an object that relates both to the suburban sprawl of Texas and to the larger architectural traditions of the Southwest. The pylons are the first sign that this is not a typical place. The second is the redesign of the bridges and underpasses leading into the complex from Highway 114. The Texas highway department allowed Mr. Legorreta to replace the standard bridge over the underpass with a stark, clean structure of rust-colored stucco walls, to which he added free-standing stucco gateways to and from the complex in the same color. The effect is stunning: driving down the highway ramp and entering the complex becomes a real architectural experience: a passage from the outside, which is the highway, through a vestibule, which is the space between the bridge and the gateways, to the inside, which is the rest of Solana. Here, being in a car does not destroy architectural experience, as it usually does; it heightens it. For this experience has been designed in recognition of a blunt reality that is too often denied: people will receive their first impressions from inside their cars. The pylons, the freestanding stucco walls, and the heavy use of reflecting pools in the landscaping all call to mind the great Mexican architect Luis Barragan, who was Mr. Legorreta's mentor. Ricardo Legorreta's career in Mexico has relied heavily on Barragan's powerful and stark work, which Mr. Legorreta has reinterpreted at commercial scale, weakening it slightly but generally staying true to its spirit. (It is worth noting that Romaldo Giurgola, who designed other sections of Solana, occupies a similar position vis-a-vis Louis Kahn, an architect as worshiped in the United States as Barragan was in Mexico.) Mr. Legorreta's buildings for the village center are fairly simple structures, sheathed in rusty red or pale yellow stucco, with crisply articulated square windows. The ungainly diagonal walls that Mr. Legorreta occasionally uses are gimmicky, but in general the buildings continue the tone of the pylons and entry gateways: they make us think in terms of primal building elements, of walls and masses and doorways. And most important, the various buildings come together in a villagelike grouping around a central paved plaza with fountains and trees that, when finished, may be one of the few places that manage to evoke a traditional village square without being hopelessly cute or sentimental. Mr. Legorreta's most ambitious building architecturally is the sprawling complex he designed as I.B.M.'s marketing center. A structure of pale yellow stucco and magenta concrete grids, it is entered through a 40-foot-high barrel-vaulted room painted a deep, rich blue, as much a chapel as an entry hall. The rest of the building consists of boxlike wings set around arcades and garden courtyards, each landscaped by Peter Walker as a slightly different abstract composition of water, trees and stone. The gardens at their best are potent testaments to the power of landscape design to work in genuine collaboration with architecture. Employee parking is hidden around the back in garage structures that are integrated with the architecture, so as to keep most cars out of sight. The aim was similar in the complex of six identical buildings Mr. Giurgola designed: the cars are mainly hidden away in parking structures, although nearly everything else about Mr. Giurgola's section of this project is different. Where Mr. Legorreta's buildings are casual, almost rambling, Mr. Giurgola's are formal and ordered, if rather too mannered. The six five-story buildings, each roughly square in shape, are set close together so that they appear almost as a single large mass, as if they were a great chateau. The surrounding landscape was designed by Mr. Walker to reflect the traditional prairie; it is sprawling, in deliberate contrast to the tight order of the structures themselves and to the spaces between the six identical buildings, which are intended to function as pedestrian streets. Making this complex more chateaulike still, the approach is via a formal drive that cuts through the center of a large, symmetrical plaza that is flanked by two parking structures. Putting the garages in front rather than in back is a gesture that both acknowledges the reality of the automobile and attempts to tame it; unfortunately, it is seriously compromised by the decision to use part of the plaza for outdoor parking, meaning that cars, which the garages were built to hide, become visible anyway. A victory for convenience over architectural ambition, but one of the few at Solana - a development that, in general, stands as one of the few suburban projects anywhere to offer intensity of architectural experience without descending into irrelevance and pretension. The TimesMachine archive viewer is a subscriber-only feature. We are continually improving the quality of our text archives. Please send feedback, error reports, and suggestions to archive_feedback@nytimes.com. 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Y _ r, i r" ' 9.- - r s r : 4'. ;' i'; r - 7lls r'1,.+ j, e 1. t f ,, i . , r§ _ aa ' a . t, Early Plaza at Solana Photos Early Plaza at Solana Photos Early Plaza at Solana Photos Early Plaza at Solana Photos Early Plaza at Solana Photos Ordinance 865 Page 1 of 4 TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 865 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE 202, AS AMENDED; APPROVING A SITE PLAN AMENDMENT FOR LOTS 3 AND 4, BLOCK 2, WESTLAKE/SOUTHLAKE PARK ADDITION NUMBER ONE; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PROVIDING FOR A SAVINGS CLAUSE; PROVIDING FOR A PENALTY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake, Texas is a general law municipality; and WHEREAS, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake finds it necessary for the public health, safety and welfare that development occur in a controlled and orderly manner; and WHEREAS, on November 16, 1992 the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 202 establishing the PD1 zoning district; and WHEREAS, Section 5 of Ordinance 202 states that “any development within PD1 not materially in accordance with the Site Plans [adopted by Ordinance 202] will require the submission and approval of a new comprehensive site plan for such additional or substantially changed development…”; and WHEREAS, Section 5 of Ordinance 202 further states that “any requirement of a concept plan shall be deemed satisfied by the Site Plans.; and WHEREAS, on August 27, 2007, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 529, which amended Ordinance 202 by approving a comprehensive site plan amendment to allow for two additional buildings; and WHEREAS, on March 10, 2008, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 588, which amended Ordinance 202 and approved various amendments to development provisions; and WHEREAS, on January 7, 2013, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 691, which amended Ordinance 202 and approved the partition of PD1 into three separate planning areas known as PD1-1, PD1-2 and PD1-3; and WHEREAS, Upon the passage of Ordinance 691, Ordinance 202 was not repealed; and WHEREAS, on June 15, 2015, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 751, which amended Ordinance 202 by approving a comprehensive site plan amendment; and Ordinance 865 Page 2 of 4 WHEREAS, on January 25, 2016, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 767, which amended certain PD1-1 development regulations and amended Ordinance 691; and WHEREAS, on March 28, 2016, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 774, which further amended certain PD1-1 development regulations and amended Ordinance 691; and WHEREAS, on August 27, 2018, The Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas approved Ordinance 862, which amended Ordinance 202 by repealing Ordinance 529; and WHEREAS, Ordinance 691 and Ordinance 202 serve to regulate the PD1-1 zoning district as amended; and WHEREAS, the property owner has an submitted application seeking to amend Ordinance 202 in order to approve a comprehensive site plan amendment to construct additional surface parking on Lots 3 and 4, Block 2, Westlake/Southlake Park Addition Number One; and WHEREAS, following provision of proper legal notice, including written notice to owners within the PD1-1 zoning district and within 200 feet of the subject property, published notice and posted notice in accordance with the Texas Open Meetings Act of public hearing, a public hearing was held on September 24, 2018, by the Town Council; and WHEREAS, upon the recommendation of the Planning and Zoning Commission on September 17, 2018, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas is of the opinion that it is in the best interests of the Town and its citizens that the comprehensive site plan amendment be approved. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That the recitals set forth above are hereby incorporated herein, adopted by the Town and found to be true and correct. SECTION 2: That Ordinance 202, as amended, of the Town of Westlake, Texas be amended by approving a comprehensive site plan amendment on Lots 3 and 4, Block 2, Westlake/Southlake Park Addition Number One as depicted on Exhibit A and Exhibit B subject to the following conditions: 1. Variances to Section 98-102(C) and 98-106(C)2 in the Code of Ordinances, as shown in Exhibit B, are hereby approved subject to: a. All Red Oaks, Live Oaks and Pine trees shown on the landscape plan shall be planted with a minimum caliper width of 6 inches as measured a minimum of 4 feet above the surrounding grade. Ordinance 865 Page 3 of 4 b. All protected trees removed shall require mitigation per the requirements of Chapter 98. c. Notwithstanding the above provisions, all landscaping shall, at a minimum, comply with the submitted landscape plan and the Code of Ordinances. 2. Proposed lighting is approved subject to: a) All lighting shall, at a minimum, comply with the outdoor lighting provisions contained in Chapter 102 of the Code of Ordinances. b) Illumination levels for each individual fixture shall not exceed the current average illumination levels of existing outdoor lighting in the development. c) Light temperature shall not exceed 3,000 Kelvin. d) Lighting poles shall not exceed 15 feet in height. e) Lighting fixtures utilized in the central plaza area shall be either the SC1 fixtures as shown on the photometric plan or lit bollards similar to the bollard lights utilized in The Terrace. f) Prior to issuance of the building permit, a final photometric plan shall be submitted demonstrating compliance with these conditions and shall require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. 3. All parking lot surfaces shall be composed of brick pavers and shall match the existing pavers in the development. 4. Future driveway construction and access to the easternmost parking lot from the future SH 114 service road shall utilize the shortest possible route such that the least amount of trees are removed. Final alignment and driveway access shall require the final approval of the Town Manager or their designee. 5. Pending final determinations of any encroachments into the 100 year flood plain and/or waters of the United States, prior to the issuance of the building permit, the westernmost parking additions shall require further engineering studies and approvals if required by the Town Engineer. 6. A public art feature shall be placed in the central plaza area as noted on the site plan. The final public art piece shall require the approval of the public art competition committee. 7. The additional parking spaces (35 total) proposed on the southern portion of the central plaza area closest to the Marriott Solana Hotel, labeled as “Prop. Parking brick pavers (35 spaces)” on Sheet C101 of Exhibit B, are hereby omitted from this site plan amendment. Any future constriction of said parking spaces shall require additional approval of a site plan amendment. Ordinance 865 Page 4 of 4 SECTION 3: Sections, paragraphs, sentences, phrases, clauses and words of this Ordinance are severable, and if any section, paragraph, sentence, phrase, clause or word in this Ordinance or application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid or unconstitutional by a Court of competent jurisdiction, such holding shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this ordinance, and the Town Council hereby declares that it would have passed such remaining portions of this Ordinance despite such invalidity, which remaining portions shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 4: This Ordinance shall be cumulative of all other ordinances of the Town affecting the regulations of land and zoning and shall not repeal any of the provisions of those ordinances except in those instances where the provisions of those Ordinances are in direct conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance. SECTION 5: It shall be unlawful for any person to violate any provision of this Ordinance, and any person violating or failing to comply with any provision hereof shall be fined, upon conviction, in an amount not more than Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000) and a separate offense shall be deemed committed each day during or on which a violation occurs or continues. SECTION 6: This ordinance shall take effect immediately from and after its passage as the law in such case provides. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. _____________________________ ATTEST: Laura Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney P D 1—1 Subject ProperƟes “The Plaza” LocaƟon Map T H E T E R R A C E T H E V I S T A Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T.LOT 3BLOCK 212.718 ACRES(554,000 SQ. FT.)INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T. = 76°03'05"R = 90.00'L = 119.46'CB = S 78°43'03" ECD = 110.88' = 01°05'21"R = 2928.00'L = 55.66'CB = N63°48'04"ECD = 55.66'CD = 359.18'CB = S 46°13'46" EL = 359.24'R = 5709.58' = 03°36'18" = 07°20'24"R = 974.93'L = 124.90'CB = S 44°21'44" ECD = 124.81'CD = 404.36'CB = N 32°04'17" WL = 406.45'R = 1155.00' = 20°09'45"CD = 333.77'CB = N 67°36'48" EL = 333.95'R = 2928.00'= 06°32'05"INST. NO. D216001903P.R.T.C.T.7.711 ACRES(335,904 SQ. FT.)PARK ADDITION No. 1VOLUME 388-214,PAGES 78 & 79P.R.T.C.T.OVERALL SITE PLANDRAWN BY:DATE:DESIGNED BY:CHECKED BY:PROJ. NO.:SHEET:R308252.0208/29/2018DATEREVISIONNO. THE PLAZA AT SOLANA HZIHZIHZI1 SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL 08/29/18 Ordinance 865 D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)D N U P DNUP SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )STATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP(R-O-W VARIES)SOLANA BLVD (R -O -W VAR IES )SAM SCHOOL ROAD(70' R-O-W)DRAINAGE PLANDRAWN BY:DATE:DESIGNED BY:CHECKED BY:PROJ. NO.:SHEET:R308252.0208/29/2018DATEREVISIONNO. THE PLAZA AT SOLANA HZIHZIHZI1 SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL 08/29/18 Ordinance 865 DNUPDNUPOFFICEBLDG 1EXISTPARKINGOFFICEBLDG 2SOLANA BLVDSTATE HIGHWAY 114 ENTRANCE RAMP3211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1SITE PLAN - PARKING LAYOUTSITE PLAN -PARKING LAYOUTAP101Ordinance 865 OFFICEBLDG 1EXISTPARKINGUPDN223273211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1EAST LOT PARKING LAYOUT PLANEAST LOT PARKINGLAYOUT PLANAP102SHEET LEGEND#NOTE: THE CONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTLAYOUTS SHOWN ON THIS DRAWING ARE PROVIDEDAS AN EXHIBIT TO A SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL PACKAGEDEVELOPED BY OTHERS. THE PURPOSE OF THESECONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTS IS TO SHOWTHE LOCATION OF NEW PARKING LOTS, GENERALPARKING LAYOUT AND PRELIMINARY NUMBER OFPARKING SPACES. PLEASE REFER TO SITE PLANSUBMITTAL DRAWINGS FOR ADDITIONALINFORMATION REGARDING THE PROPOSED SITEIMPROVEMENTS.Ordinance 865 UPDNUPVEHICLEACCESS RAMP9% SLOPE8661410DNUPVEHICLEACCESS RAMP14661010103211 Internet BlvdSuite 220Frisco, TX 75034P 214.619.0700WGI ®West Lake, Texas1301 Solana Blvd.DRAWING NO.DRAWING TITLEDESCRIPTIONPROJECT MGR.DATEDESIGN ENG.DRAWN BYThe Drawings are the property of CarlWalker, Inc. and are not to be reused orreproduced without written permissionfrom Carl Walker, Inc.PROJECT NO.23169263.02GAW.MLL..ISSUED FORDATE08-29-2018P R E L I M I N A R Y - N O T F O R C O N S T R U C T I O N Texas Registered Engineering Firm F-15085SITE PLAN SUBMITTALPlaza at SolanaOWNER:HMC Solana,LLCTHIS DOCUMENT WASPRODUCED UNDER THEAUTHORITY OF FABIOSERRATO, P.E. 122670 ON08-29-2018 AND IS RELEASEDAS A CONCEPTUAL DESIGNFOR NEW PARKINGIMPROVEMENTS. THISDOCUMENT IS NOT TO BEUSED FOR BIDDING, PERMITAND CONSTRUCTIONPURPOSES.N O R T H1WEST LOT 4A PARKING LAYOUT PLANN O R T H2WEST LOT 4B PARKING LAYOUT PLANWEST LOT 4A & 4BPARKING LAYOUTPLANAP103SHEET LEGENDNOTE: THE CONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTLAYOUTS SHOWN ON THIS DRAWING ARE PROVIDEDAS AN EXHIBIT TO A SITE PLAN SUBMITTAL PACKAGEDEVELOPED BY OTHERS. THE PURPOSE OF THESECONCEPTUAL PARKING IMPROVEMENTS IS TO SHOWTHE LOCATION OF NEW PARKING LOTS, GENERALPARKING LAYOUT AND PRELIMINARY NUMBER OFPARKING SPACES. PLEASE REFER TO SITE PLANSUBMITTAL DRAWINGS FOR ADDITIONALINFORMATION REGARDING THE PROPOSED SITEIMPROVEMENTS.#Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Ordinance 865 Page 1 of 3 ESTLAKE TOWN COUNCIL TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Conduct a public hearing and consideration of a resolution approving a Preliminary Site Evaluation for an approximately 62.5-acre portion of Planned Development District 6 (PD6) also known as the Knolls at Solana. The property is generally located South of Solana Blvd, West of Sam School Rd, North of Glenwyck Farms and East of Granada. STAFF CONTACT: Nick Ford, Development Coordinator Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Planned / Responsible Development Citizen, Student & Stakeholder High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) On February 26, 2018, the Town Council approved the rezoning of a 62.5-acre 56-lot residential development known as the Knolls at Solana (PD6). Per the requirements set out in Section 1.C of Exhibit B “Development Standards” in Ordinance 846 one of the items that must happen prior to any land disturbance activities is a submittal of Preliminary Site Evaluation that must receive approval. In addition, prior to the approval of the Preliminary Site Evaluation, the developer must submit a development agreement and final design guidelines for final approval by the Town Council. The Preliminary Site Evaluation is a survey that provides the proposed layout of the subdivision such as property boundaries, easement locations, streets, utilities, drainage and other required information for the development. This allows town staff to evaluate the proposed development for conformity with requirements, plans, policies and conditions prior to the submittal of a Final Plat. Page 2 of 3 In this case open space lots, conservation easements, public parkland dedication, streets, residential lots, access easements and many more items are identified. A preliminary site evaluation is required for all major subdivisions prior to the construction of improvements. The Preliminary Site Evaluation conforms to the concept plan as provided in Ordinance 846. Unlike a Final Plat, the Preliminary Site Evaluation does not need to be recorded with the county. The next step after approval of the Preliminary Site Evaluation (and other necessary items) is to submit a Final Plat of the development to be recorded with the county. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION On August 13, 2018, the Planning and Zoning Commission voted to recommend approval of this item by a vote of (4-0). RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends approval of this item. ATTACHMENTS 1. Vicinity Map 2. Preliminary Site Evaluation for Consideration Page 3 of 3 Attachment 1: Project Vicinity Map Resolution 18-36 Page 1 of 3 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 18-36 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS APPROVING A PRELIMINARY SITE EVALUATION FOR A 62.531 ACRE TRACT OF LAND NAMED THE KNOLLS AT SOLANA. WHEREAS, the Planning and Zoning Commission held a public on August 13, 2018 and voted unanimously to recommend approval of the preliminary site evaluation; and, WHEREAS, the Knolls at Solana residential development was approved by the Town Council by Ordinance 846 on February 26, 2018; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town of Westlake Town Council of Westlake, Texas, after considering the recommendation for approval from the Planning and Zoning Commission on August 13, 2018, does hereby approve the preliminary site evaluation as found in the attached document as Exhibit “A”. SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 18-36 Page 2 of 3 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Resolution 18-36 Page 3 of 3 EXHIBITS EXHIBIT A The Knolls at Solana Preliminary Site Evaluation Resolution 18-36 Resolution 18-36 Page 1 of 3 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 11, 2017 TOPIC: Conduct a Public Hearing and Consideration of an Ordinance, Adopting the Town of Westlake Estimated Budget for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2017, Adopting the Proposed Budget for the fiscal Year ending September 30, 2018 including an Investment Policy, Pay Plan Policy, Fiscal and Budgetary Policies, Restricted, Committed and Assigned Fund Balances, and Providing Authorization to the Town Manger to approve appropriated funds up to $50,000. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager Debbie Piper, Finance Director Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Fiscal Responsibility Fiscal Stewardship Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Maintain Receipt of Various Financial Awards for both Municipal and Academic Services Time Line - Start Date: October 1, 2017 Completion Date: September 30, 2018 Funding Amount: $40,201,219 Status - Funded Source - Multiple Sources - see comments below EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) The trend (of the last two (2) fiscal years) for growth in Westlake shows no sign of abating. Short of a cooling of the local or national economy (or both), major corporations and their employees continue to relocate to the DFW metroplex and our SH 114 corridor continues to reflect that economic growth. This is also true for expansion of existing companies and businesses in the Metroplex. So, we are now launched into a “sea of change”. Hence, this year’s budget theme of “Maintaining our Vision in a Sea of Change” The FY 17/18 amended budgeted amount totals $38,273,317 for all funds (including a planned use of Page 2 of 3 $8,158,769 of transfers in from fund balance primarily for capital projects). The proposed FY 18/19 budget amount totals $38,549,106 for all funds which is approximately a 1% increase of $275,789 from the estimated FY 17/18 budget. • Payroll and Related is budgeted at $4.5M; a 7% increase of $287K o Market band adjustments of $191K; based on most recent salary surveys from HR dept. o One-time Performance Pay of $50K is included. o Transition Court Judge from contract service to part time employee $18K o Savings from replacing full time Marshal position with two part-time Marshals. ($66K) o Employee Insurance reflects $31K increase. Due to plan increase of 20% and changes to employee coverage of approved positions in the prior year that were unfilled. o Transition part time Facilities Clerk to full-time employee $26K (majority is insurance) o Cost to replace and train Municipal Accounting Technician II at $11K o Transition Management Intern from .25 position to .50 position $9K o Increase car allowances $4.4K o Add phone allowances $3.6K o Add On-call pay to public works employees $6.3K • All payroll and related expenditures are paid via the General Fund. Portions of these expenditures are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitors Association Fund. o Total payroll transfers in are $1.1M  Utility Fund - $521K  Visitors Association Fund - $525K • Operations and Maintenance is budgeted at $14.3M; an 8% increase of $1.0M. o Debt Service Payments increased $845K o Economic Development increased $98K; due to a new sales tax abatement. o Payroll Transfer Out increased $58K; due to market band adjustments, performance pay and other related costs noted in the payroll section above. o Rent & Utilities increased $146K; based on tiered schedule for the new town hall building. o Service expenditures decreased $(140K); Local PID fund consultant fees decreased. o Supply expenditures increased $7.1K; fire dept increased to medical supplies, cleaning supplies and computer equipment. Since our presentation at the workshop in August of 2018, the following changes are notable as it relates to the budget numbers discussed at that time. Staff reviewed our service delivery programs and the cost associated with each line-item and adjusted the workshop numbers based on this review as well as the inclusion of direction by the Council. Below is a summary of the variances from the workshop to the proposed budget for FY 18-19 (municipal funds only): • Net Change to Fund Balance for FY 2018-2019 Page 3 of 3 o $2.3M at Workshop o $1.8M at Adoption o Net decrease to fund balance of $416,104K • Revenues and other sources increased $637K - (Major changes are reflected below) o Charges for Services increased $699K  water revenue increased $571K and sewer revenue increased $128K based on current year revenues. o Transfers In decreased $225K;  the Capital Projects Fund 410 transfers in from the General Fund were decreased $229K; General Fund transfers in from the Utility Fund were increased $4.5K • Expenditures and other uses increased $1.2M - (Major changes are reflected below) o Service expenditures increased $1.2M;  the largest part is in the Utility Fund and is due to the billing inaccuracies which have prevented staff from forecasting sanitary sewer flows billed by the City of Southlake. Additionally, these flows have been previously planned to be transferred to TRA; however, the meter station required is on hold until an agreement can be reached with the Trophy Club MUD regarding the placement of the new meter station outside of the easement for the MUD. Due to the uncertainty in prior years, this amount has been carried forward for FY 18-19. It is the hope of staff that this will occur in the coming fiscal year and transfer of the billing from the City of Southlake to TRA will be completed. o Transfers Out decreased $225K;  General Fund transfers out to the Capital Projects Fund 410 were decreased $229K;  Utility Fund transfers out to the General Fund were increased $4.5K RECOMMENDATION This Public Hearing has been advertised as required by law. The recommendation is to first conduct and close the Public Hearing, followed by Council discussion as needed. Additionally, it is recommended to adopt the FY 2018/19 municipal budget as proposed and approve the estimated FY 2017/18 amended budget. ATTACHMENTS Proposed FY 2018/19 Municipal Budget Ordinance Ordinance 866 Page 1 of 2 TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 866 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, REVISING THE BUDGET FOR THE 2017-2018 FISCAL YEAR; ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2018 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2019 INCLUDING INVESTMENT POLICY, PAY PLAN POLICY, FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES, RESTRICTED, COMMITTED AND ASSIGNED FUND BALANCES; PROVIDING AUTHORIZATION TO THE TOWN MANGER TO APPROVE APPROPRIATED FUNDS UP TO $50,000; PROVIDING THAT THE BUDGET TO BE KEPT IN CITY SECRETARY’S OFFICE; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, public notice of a public hearing on the proposed annual budget, stating the date, time, and place and subject matter of the public hearing, was given as required by the laws of the State of Texas and; and WHEREAS, a public hearing was duly held and all interested persons were given an opportunity to be heard for or against any item therein on September 24, 2018; and, WHEREAS, as required by Texas Local Government Code 102.002, the budget officer has prepared a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Ordinance is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety SECTION 2: That the Town Council hereby adopts the revised budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2017 and ending September 30, 2018 as shown within Exhibit “A.” SECTION 3: That the Town Council does hereby approve the proposed Municipal Budget attached as Exhibit “A”, adopting the budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2018 and ending September 30, 2019. SECTION 4: That the Town Council hereby gives the Town Manager authorization to approve any appropriated funds up to the amount of $50,000. Ordinance 866 Page 2 of 2 SECTION 5: That a copy of the official adopted 2018-2019 budget document shall be kept on file in the office of the Town Secretary. SECTION 6: If any portion of this Ordinance shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: ________________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor _______________________________ _________________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: _____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney The Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Blvd, Suite 7200 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Fiscal Year 2018-2019 Investing in our Community Investing in our Vision This page is intentionally blank TOWN OF WESTLAKE FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019 ANNUAL BUDGET This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year’s adopted budget by approximately $272,358 (does not include any prior year payments and penalties), which is a 17.10% increase from last year's budget. The property tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year is $50,499. PROPERTY TAX RATE COMPARISON Tax Rate Adopted FY 17/18 Proposed FY 18/19 Property Tax Rate $0.13615/100 $0.15600/100 Effective Tax Rate $0.13615/100 $0.13551/100 Effective Maintenance & Operations Tax Rate $0.12899/100 $0.11152/100 Debt Rate $0.02482/100 $0.02399/100 Rollback Tax Rate $0.17252/100 $0.15618/100 MUNICIPAL DEBT OBLIGATIONS The total debt obligation secured by property taxes for various projects totals $287,699. • 2011 CO payment for street projects of $117,796 • 2013 GO Refunding payment of $169,903 for Arts & Science Center construction. The debt payment for the Science Center was originally paid from the Visitors Association Fund. 1 The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) has presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the Town of Westlake for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2017. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan, and as a communication device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. G.F.O.A. DISTINGUISHED BUDGET A WARD October 1, 2017 2 VISION STATEMENT & POINTS We are Leaders A premiere place to live, leadership in Public education, corporate and Governmental partnerships, and high development standards. A Sense of Place Distinctive neighborhoods, architecturally vibrant corporate campuses, grazing longhorns, soaring red-tailed hawks, meandering roads and trails, lined with natural stone and native oaks. A Caring Community Informed residents, small town charm and values, historical preservation. Service Excellence Public service that is responsive and professional, while balancing efficiency, effectiveness and financial stewardship. Exemplary Governance Town officials, both elected and appointed, exhibit respect, stewardship, vision, and transparency. An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive developments, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. 3 VALUE STATEMENTS Transparent / Integrity-driven Government  Fiscal Responsibility  Family Friendly & Welcoming  Educational Leaders  Sense of Community  Innovation  Strong Aesthetic Standards  Informed & Engaged Citizens  Preservation of our Natural Beauty  Planned / Responsible Development  MISSION STATEMENT Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent. MISSION TAG LINE THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE Distinctive by Design 4 WESTLAKE ELECTED COUNCIL MEMBERS Laura Wheat Mayor lwheat@westlake-tx.org Carol Langdon Mayor Pro-Tem clangdon@westlake-tx.org Michael Barrett Council Member mbarrett@westlake-tx.org Alesa Belvedere Council Member abelvedere@westlake-tx.org Rick Rennhack Council Member rrennhack@westlake-tx.org Wayne Stoltenberg Council Member wstoltenberg@westlake-tx.org WESTLAKE BOARDS & COMMISSIONS Westlake Historical Preservation Society  Westlake Academy Foundation  Planning & Zoning Commission  Texas Student Housing Authority  4B Economic Development Board  Arbor Day Advisory Committee  Public Arts Committee  5 WESTLAKE ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL T OWN M ANAGER’S O FFICE Tom Brymer Town Manager tbrymer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 Amanda DeGan Asst. Town Manager adegan@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5715 T OWN S ECRETARY’S O FFICE Kelly Edwards Town Secretary kedwards@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5710 Tanya Morris Assistant tmorris@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5741 F INANCE D EPARTMENT Debbie Piper Director dpiper@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5712 Jaymi Ford Supervisor jford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5721 Marlene Rutledge Academic Technician mrutledge@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5737 Melinda Brown Municipal Technician mbown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5728 M UNICIPAL C OURT Jeanie Roumell Administrator jrooumell@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5746 Martha Solis Lead Clerk msolis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5748 Shelby Orasanu Deputy Clerk sorasanu@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5747 Vickie Brown Court Clerk vbrown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5724 Warren Bradley Judge wbradley@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5746 C OMMUNICATIONS AND C OMMUNITY A FFAIRS Ginger Awtry Director gawtry@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5710 Jon Sasser Manager jsasser@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5736 H UMAN R ESOURCES AND A DMINISTRATIVE S ERVICES Todd Wood Director twood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5711 Blair Wilson Generalist bwilson@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5734 P ARKS & R ECREATION AND F ACILITIES M AINTENANCE Troy Meyer Director tmeyer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5735 P LANNING A ND D EVELOPMENT Ron Ruthven Director rruthven@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5739 Pat Cooke Inspector pcooke@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5726 Nick Ford Coordinator nford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5742 Dottie Samaniego Permit Clerk dsamaniego@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5745 P UBLIC W ORKS Jarrod Greenwood Director jgreenwood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 Paul Andreason Technician pandreason@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5731 Diana Orender Coordinator dorender@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5732 Kory Kittrell Project Manager kkittrell@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 E MERGENCY S ERVICES Richard Whitten Fire Chief rwhitten@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5785 John Ard Fire Marshal jard@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5783 I NFORMATION T ECHNOLOGY Jason Power Director jpower@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5750 Duston McCready Network Administrator dmccready@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5749 Ray Workman Coordinator rworkman@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5751 Mitch Wells Technician mwells@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5752 6 T OWN OF W ESTLAKE M ONDAY S EPTEMBER 24, 2018 T RANSMITTAL L ETTER 1 A LL F UNDS O VERVIEW 2 G ENERAL F UND 3 E NTERPRISE F UNDS 4 I NTERNAL S ERVICE F UNDS 5 S PECIAL R EVENUE F UNDS 6 D EBT S ERVICE F UNDS 7 W ESTLAKE A CADEMY 8 C APITAL P ROJECT F UNDS 9 C APITAL I MPROVEMENTS 10 L ONG T ERM P LANNING 11 M UNICIPAL P OLICIES 12 7 This page is intentionally blank 8 9 Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter September 24, 2018 Honorable Mayor and Town Council: On behalf of the Town of Westlake’s Department Directors and our staff teams, I am pleased to present the Proposed FY 2018-19 Budget for the Town Council’s consideration. This year’s budget theme is “Investing in our Community. Investing in our Vision”. For the past several budget seasons, we have identified a theme to help communicate the budget message along with the measured growth and development of our community. Shown below are the most recent themes: FY2016-17 “FORGING WESTLAKE: MANAGING THE IMPACT OF GROWTH” This fiscal year’s budget emphasized moving from implementing our new Comp Plan, to inculcating it into our budget with sufficient resources to properly administer our planning and development review services in a way that more effectively deals proactively with the impact of growth in all the Town’s services. FY 2015-16 “FORGING WESTLAKE: WRITING THE NEXT CHAPTER” The first fiscal year where we began to utilize our new Comprehensive Plan (Comp Plan), Forging Westlake, to plan for our growth. FY 2014-15 “COMMUNITY GROWTH ON THE HORIZON” Recognizing the growth that was about to occur and identifying ways to address potential expansions. In keeping with this tradition, we have identified this year’s theme as a continuation of the impact development has had in Westlake and the need to reinvest in the community to ensure we maintain our values and provide exceptional customer service. 10 Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter I. Recent Trends & an Overview of our Community As mentioned previously, our community continues to experience growth as evidenced by increased interest from prospective stakeholders looking to call Westlake ‘home’. This places us in a pivotal position to help shape the future of the Town in keeping with our Comprehensive and Strategic Plans and directives from the Council. We have been fortunate to recently partner with Charles Schwab to locate a regional facility within our community and have approved a new residential development, “The Knolls” along Solana Boulevard. These improvements, paired with our new Fire – EMS station continue to place us on a path of development, which has been carefully managed to support the Council’s Vision for our municipality. The adherence to our community values, Vision statement, Comprehensive Plan, stakeholder feedback, and distinctive design standards have helped create a community that is reflective of our newly presented municipal tagline – “Distinctive by Design”. Our budget theme for this fiscal year further supports those efforts through recommended reinvestment in our service delivery methods, community, vision, infrastructure, and our staff teams. II. Our Value Proposition Westlake’s value proposition is found in the excellent municipal and academic services that are provided to our residents – all at an exceptional price! We have historically maintained the lowest ad valorem tax rate in the Metroplex and should the Council adopt the proposed rate, we will remain in the bottom 5% of rates across the state of Texas. Our community has high expectations for service delivery – both in accessibility, responsiveness, financial stewardship, amenities, distinctive developments, open spaces and education. Those points are born out in the results we receive in our DirectionFinders citizen surveys, through our Parent surveys, and in the academic achievements of our students. In order to maintain the high- quality services our stakeholders expect, this budget recommends an Investment in our Community and an Investment in our Vision through: • Our people and our daily service delivery • Our infrastructure • Our exemplary school III. Challenges and Fiscal Indicators Challenges remain for us as we look out over the next several years to maintain the value proposition found within Westlake. The areas of focus for our organization during the coming year will include: continued oversight of proposed and in-progress development projects, mobility, fiscal stewardship, enhanced communications with our residents, the continued safety and security of our community, and overall regional growth. This approach will assist us in providing a firm foundation for service delivery and protect the vision the Council established for Westlake. 11 Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter Some of our local challenges include: Traffic Demands for Mobility both within Westlake and throughout the region – As our community evolves staff will keep a close eye on partnerships and/or opportunities that will help foster mobility within the community without compromising the design standards and expectations of our residents. East / West traffic continues to be an area of concern along with the ability of our surrounding highway capacity for transient vehicles. Population growth in both commercial and residential communities – since the inception of a professional staff team in 2001, our daytime population has increased by an estimated 316%, while our permanent (nighttime) population has increased by 337%. Both of these factors cause an increased drive for service delivery and impact the way our community develops. It is important that we continue to monitor our growth trends and focus on delivering the high quality services our residents expect. Focus on both residential and commercial developments to comply with our design standards – with the new commercial development of Charles Schwab and the progress being made in the Entrada mixed-use development, staff will continue to work to ensure we are creating and maintaining the relationships necessary to bring these projects to life as the Council has directed. In the residential arena, we have The Knolls that we expect to break ground in the next fiscal year and we will work with the developer on this project. As we look to regional or state issues and opportunities, we will monitor these issues among others: Pending ad valorem property tax cap proposed by the Governor – as presented, the proposal would restrict the Council’s ability to respond locally to the needs of our community. Staff will continue to monitor any legislation put forward for consideration and advise both the com munity and the Council as updates or changes occur. Water usage and demand – our staff team will continue to work with the city of Southlake and the Trophy Club MUD to address the new meter station challenges to bring this project to a close. We will also be working on the Phase 2 waterline construction that will help secure our current and future water needs for Westlake. IV. Budget Preparation and Recommendations With the presentation of the budget, staff is recommending an increase in the ad valorem assessment from the effective rate of $0.13551 to $0.15600. The additional revenue generated, should the Council approve the increase, would help balance our on -going expenditures with our on-going revenue. The proposed budget would fund our current levels of service without any significant expansion in costs to the General Fund, which are not mandated by the state, required through contractual obligations, or self-funded. Staff also performed an in-depth review of the budget to ensure that we had identified all revenue streams and minimized the impact of commitments to the General Fund. The table below indicates the majority of our categories are: 12 Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter Expenditures On-going One-time Total Payroll & Related $ 276,422 $ 61,439 $ 337,861 Service Level Adjustments 14,504 14,504 Facility Related 261,853 261,853 Development Related 335,510 335,510 Miscellaneous 65,000 65,000 Grand Total $ 552,779 $ 461,949 $ 1,014,728 - Payroll costs reflect an increase based on our annual salary survey and Council policy - On-going Service Level Adjustments (SLA’s) which are minimal (less than $15K) - Lease costs for Town Hall space booked for the full fiscal year and increased maintenance costs for the new Fire-EMS facility - Development costs identified and proposed for funding through one-time money As contained in Council policy, the majority of the revenue funds that would be considered one - time in frequency are transferred out to the Conduit Funds we use to help provide for the replacement of vehicles, address any major maintenance and repairs, or to fund projects in our Capital Improvements Program (CIP). The proposed budget would retain approximately $335,500 of the anticipated one-time revenue to cover costs associated with development and inspection fees that are also considered one-time or infrequent in nature. As a staff team, we believe the proposed budget positions us to continue to meet the service level expectations of the Council and our stakeholders. Our organization provides an excellent array of municipal and academic benefits for those who call Westlake ‘home’ t hrough the utilization of our financial policies, strategic plan, Comprehensive Plan and feedback from our community. All while supporting the vision the Council has set for the community. That vision is: Westlake is an oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever-expanding urban landscape. My thanks to our Councilmembers, our great Leadership Team and Finance Department staff for their commitment to Westlake in helping to ensure our community is “Distinctive by Design”. Thomas E. Brymer Town Manager 13 This page is intentionally blank 14 15 A L L F U N D S - A L L S O U R C E S Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax 4,950,000$ 4,950,000$ 5,600,000$ 650,000$ 13% #Property Tax 1,476,616 1,622,109 1,990,235 368,126 23% #Charge for Services 3,795,515 4,585,075 4,585,075 - 0% #Hotel Tax 845,000 853,642 853,642 - 0% #Beverage Tax 62,500 62,500 62,500 - 0% #Franchise Fees 983,815 983,815 983,815 - 0% #Permits and Fees 244,020 269,303 269,303 - 0% #Permits and Fees Building 2,201,246 2,151,178 4,357,571 2,206,393 103% #Permits and Fees Utility 168,865 268,115 274,441 6,326 2% #Fines & Forfeitures 809,880 715,545 715,545 - 0% #Investment Earnings 111,965 340,261 340,261 - 0% #Contributions 928,000 716,630 209,540 (507,090) -71% #Misc Income 102,470 175,557 132,832 (42,725) -24% #Total Revenues 16,679,892 17,693,730 20,374,760 2,681,030 15% #Transfers In 4,831,642 3,858,169 5,137,805 1,279,636 33% #Other Sources - - 5,987,134 5,987,134 100% #Total Other Sources 4,831,642 3,858,169 11,124,939 7,266,770 188% #GF Academic Revenues 8,584,100 8,477,645 8,847,829 370,184 4% #GF Academic Other Sources 60,000 85,000 76,000 (9,000) -11% #Total Academic 8,644,100 8,562,645 8,923,829 361,184 4% #TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 30,155,634$ 30,114,544$ 40,423,528 10,308,984$ 34% EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES #Payroll Salaries 3,821,261$ 3,824,761$ 3,994,572$ 169,811$ 4% #Payroll Transfer In (1,055,775) (1,055,775) (1,114,192) (58,417) 6% #Payroll Insurance medical/dental/life 599,995 599,995 780,269 180,274 30% #Payroll Taxes workers comp/unemployment 51,180 51,180 43,482 (7,698) -15% #Payroll Taxes social security/medicare 292,253 292,253 305,506 13,253 5% #Payroll Retirement TMRS/ICMA 495,955 495,955 486,093 (9,862) -2% #Total Payroll and Related 4,204,869 4,208,369 4,495,731 287,362 7% #Debt Service 4,494,622 4,211,834 5,057,296 845,462 20% #Economic Development 234,640 238,940 336,940 98,000 41% #Payroll Transfer Out 1,055,775 1,055,775 1,114,192 58,417 6% #Rent & Utilities 661,604 872,565 1,019,069 146,504 17% #Repair & Maintenance 407,830 385,567 383,289 (2,278) -1% #Services 4,571,056 6,047,324 5,906,728 (140,596) -2% #Supplies 263,402 258,901 266,100 7,199 3% #Travel & Training 216,110 220,533 222,903 2,370 1% #Total Operations & Maintenance 11,905,039 13,291,438 14,306,516 1,015,078 8% #TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 16,109,908 17,499,807 18,802,247 1,302,440 7% #Maintenance & Replacement 532,000 383,625 1,079,475 695,850 181% #Capital Outlay 57,470 56,970 66,765 9,795 17% #Capital Project Funds 10,288,000 7,934,673 4,676,681 (3,257,992) -41% #Total Capital 10,877,470 8,375,268 5,822,921 (2,552,347) -30% #Transfers Out 4,831,642 3,858,169 5,137,805 1,279,636 33% #Other Uses - - - - 0% #Total Other Uses 4,831,642 3,858,169 5,137,805 1,279,636 33% #GF Academic Expenditures 8,322,199 8,455,072 8,710,132 255,060 3% #GF Academic Other Uses 60,000 85,000 76,000 (9,000) -11% #Total Academic 8,382,199 8,540,072 8,786,132 246,060 3% #TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 24,091,311 20,773,509 19,746,858 (1,026,651) -5% #TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER SOURCES 40,201,219 38,273,317 38,549,106 275,789 1% SUMMARY #NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (10,045,585) (8,158,769) 1,874,422 10,033,195 123% #Beginning Fund Balance (Municipal)27,778,377 27,778,377 19,597,032 (8,181,345) -29% Beginning Fund Balance (Academic)939,271 939,271 961,844 22,573 2% #FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 28,717,648 28,717,648 20,558,876 (8,158,772) -28% #FUND BALANCE, ENDING 18,672,063$ 20,558,879$ 22,433,298$ 1,874,422$ 9% vs 16 General Fund Enterprise Funds Internal Service Funds Special Revenue Funds Debt Service Funds Capital Project Funds Westlake Academy TOTAL General Sales Tax $ 3,900,000 $ - $ - $ 1,700,000 $ - $ - $ - $ 5,600,000 2 Property Tax 1,733,356 - - - 256,878 - - 1,990,235 3 Charge for Services - 4,585,075 - - - - - 4,585,075 4 Hotel Tax - - - 853,642 - - - 853,642 5 Beverage Tax 62,500 - - - - - - 62,500 6 Franchise Fees 983,815 - - - - - - 983,815 7 Permits and Fees Other 263,303 - 6,000 - - - - 269,303 8 Permits and Fees Building 4,357,571 - - - - - - 4,357,571 9 Permits and Fees Utility - 274,441 - - - - - 274,441 9 Fines & Forfeitures 715,545 - - - - - - 715,545 10 Investment Earnings 178,955 57,765 21,480 14,881 - 67,180 - 340,261 11 Contributions 12,240 - - 197,300 - - - 209,540 12 Misc Income 39,785 23,460 - 69,587 - - - 132,832 13 Total Revenues 12,247,070 4,940,741 27,480 2,835,410 256,878 67,180 - 20,374,760 14 Transfers In 66,539 - 1,476,065 - 2,405,901 1,189,300 - 5,137,805 15 Other Sources - 2,600,000 - - - 3,387,134 - 5,987,134 16 Total Other Sources 66,539 2,600,000 1,476,065 - 2,405,901 4,576,434 - 11,124,939 17 GF Academic Revenues - - - - - - 8,847,829 8,847,829 18 GF Academic Others Sources - - - - - - 76,000 76,000 19 Total Academic - - - - - - 8,923,829 8,923,829 20 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 12,313,609$ 7,540,741$ 1,503,545$ 2,835,410$ 2,662,779$ 4,643,614$ 8,923,829$ 40,423,528$ 21 Payroll Salaries 3,994,572 - - - - - - 3,994,572 22 Payroll Transfer In (1,114,192) - - - - - - (1,114,192) 23 Payroll Insurance 780,269 - - - - - - 780,269 24 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 43,482 - - - - - - 43,482 25 Payroll Taxes SS/Medicare 305,506 - - - - - - 305,506 26 Payroll Retirement 486,093 - - - - - - 486,093 27 Total Payroll & Related 4,495,731 - - - - - - 4,495,731 # Debt Service 351,680 2,015,626 - - 2,689,990 - - 5,057,296 # Economic Development - - - 336,940 - - - 336,940 # Payroll Transfer Out - 559,024 - 555,167 - - - 1,114,192 # Rent & Utilities 760,911 177,544 - 80,614 - - - 1,019,069 # Repair & Maintenance 220,224 163,065 - - - - - 383,289 # Services 2,252,408 3,321,194 - 329,516 3,610 - - 5,906,728 # Supplies 247,298 7,040 - 11,762 - - - 266,100 # Travel & Training 209,064 7,920 - 5,919 - - - 222,903 #Total Operations & Maintenance 4,041,584 6,251,414 - 1,319,918 2,693,600 - - 14,306,516 #TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 8,537,315 6,251,414 - 1,319,918 2,693,600 - - 18,802,247 # Maintenance & Replacement - - 1,079,475 - - - - 1,079,475 # Capital Outlay 35,710 31,055 - - - - - 66,765 # Capital Project Funds - - - - - 4,676,681 - 4,676,681 #Total Capital 35,710 31,055 1,079,475 - - 4,676,681 - 5,822,921 # Transfers Out 3,491,966 81,539 - 1,564,300 - - - 5,137,805 # Other Uses - - - - - - - - #Total Other Uses 3,491,966 81,539 - 1,564,300 - - - 5,137,805 # GF Academic Expenditures - - - - - - 8,710,132 8,710,132 # GF Academic Others Uses - - - - - - 76,000 76,000 #Total Academic - - - - - - 8,786,132 8,786,132 #TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 3,527,676 112,594 1,079,475 1,564,300 - 4,676,681 8,786,132 19,746,858 #TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 12,064,992$ 6,364,008$ 1,079,475$ 2,884,218$ 2,693,600$ 4,676,681$ 8,786,132$ 38,549,106$ #NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 248,618 1,176,733 424,070 (48,808) (30,821) (33,067) 137,697 1,874,422 PY Beginning Fund Balance 10,242,277 886,329 1,053,144 1,301,443 11,961 14,283,223 939,271 28,717,648 PY Revenues/Transfers (estimated) 9,304,946 4,934,415 901,480 2,793,335 2,709,153 908,570 8,562,645 30,114,544 PY Expenses/Transfers (estimated) (10,330,613) (5,420,005) (383,625) (2,919,470) (2,690,293) (7,989,238) (8,540,072) (38,273,317) #BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 9,216,613 400,739 1,570,999 1,175,308 30,821 7,202,555 961,844 20,558,876 #ENDING FUND BALANCE 9,465,231$ 1,577,472$ 1,995,069$ 1,126,499$ -$ 7,169,488$ 1,099,541$ 22,433,298$ A L L F U N D S - A L L S O U R C E S SUMMARY REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 17 TOTAL AMOUNT ONE-TIME ON-GOING Sales & Use Tax 10.8%$1,050,000 $1,050,000 $0 Property Tax 3.8%$368,126 $0 $368,126 Building Permits and Fees 22.7%$2,206,393 $2,206,393 $0 Permit Fees Utility 1.0%$99,326 $0 $99,326 Other Sources 61.7%$5,987,134 $5,987,134 $0 $9,710,979 $9,243,527 $467,452 percentage 95%5% TOTAL AMOUNT ONE-TIME ON-GOING Market Adjustment 4.1%$191,314 $0 $191,314 Performance Pay 1.1%$50,000 $50,000 $0 Additional Positions 0.6%$26,296 $0 $26,296 Other Employee Changes -1.0%-$47,670 $11,439 -$59,109 TOTAL $219,940 $61,439 $158,501 percentage 28%72% Debt Payments 18.7%$865,105 $807,529 $57,576 Economic Development 4.3%$200,000 $200,000 $0 Payroll Transfers 1.5%$67,284 $0 $67,284 Rent & Utilities 3.2%$149,543 $0 $149,543 Services 2.4%$110,500 $92,500 $18,000 TOTAL $1,392,432 $1,100,029 $292,403 percentage 79%21% Capital Projects 47.1%$2,177,051 $2,177,051 $0 Capital Outlay 0.1%$5,000 $5,000 $0 M&R Projects 18.0%$832,475 $774,000 $58,475 TOTAL $3,014,526 $2,956,051 $58,475 percentage 98%2% 4,626,898$ 4,117,519$ 509,379$ percentage 89%11% TOTAL AMOUNT ONE-TIME ON-GOING $5,084,080 $5,126,009 -$41,925 percentage 101%-1% SERVICE LEVEL ADJUSMENT TYPE Payroll & Related Costs Operating Expenditures Capital Projects TOTAL ALL EXPENDITURES NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE does not include transfers out Revenues SUMMARY of ALL SLA FUND CHANGES SERVICE LEVEL ADJUSMENT TYPE does not include transfers in BY GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT TYPE TOTAL ALL REVENUES 18 ACCOUNT NUMBER ACCT DESCRIPTION SLA AMOUNT ONE TIME ON-GOING Fund/Dept 1 100-31310-10-000 Sales Tax Revenue GF 1,050,000 1,050,000 - 100.10 2 100-31315-10-000 Property Tax Revenue 368,126 - 368,126 100.10 3 100-32210-12-000 Building Permit Revenues 2,206,393 2,206,393 - 100.12 4 500-36300-16-000 Duct Bank Permit Fees 89,900 - 89,900 500.16 5 500-36200-16-000 Duct Bank Leases 9,426 - 9,426 500.16 6 500-33501-16-000 Bond Proceeds - TXWDB 2,600,000 2,600,000 - 500.16 7 410-33501-00-000-0000 Bond Proceeds 3,387,134 3,387,134 - 410.00 8 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $9,710,979 $9,243,527 $467,452 9 100-41110-00-000 Market Adjustments 191,314 - 191,314 100.00 10 100-41110-00-000 Performance Pay One Time 50,000 50,000 - 100.00 11 100-41110-17-000 Facilities Clerk to Full Time 26,296 - 26,296 100.17 12 100-41110-00-000 Maintain Current (insurance)31,225 - 31,225 100.00 13 100-41110-11-000 Management Intern (acct for full wages in 2019)9,024 - 9,024 100.11 14 100-41110-15-000 Court Judge (acct for full wages in 2019)18,743 - 18,743 100.15 15 100-41110-15-000 Replace Full Time Marshal with two part time (66,356) - (66,356) 100.15 16 100-41110-16-000 Public Works - On Call Pay & Phone Allowances 8,857 - 8,857 100.16 17 100-41110-18-000 Accountant Replacement/Training 11,439 11,439 - 100.18 18 100-41110-00-000 Car Allowance Increases 5,647 - 5,647 100.12 19 100-41110-00-000 PAYROLL TRANSFERS IN FROM UF AND VA (66,249) - (66,249) 100.17 20 TOTAL PAYROLL AND RELATED $219,940 $61,439 $158,501 21 500-48809-16-000 DS Fort Worth Water 807,529 807,529 - 500.16 22 301-48840-10-000 Bond Principal 21,520 - 21,520 500.16 23 500-48830-16-000 DS Texas Water Dev Board 36,056 - 36,056 500.16 24 210-46527-10-000 ED - Schwab Sales Tax 200,000 200,000 - 200.10 25 500-42699-10-000 Payroll Transfer Out to GF 37,169 - 37,169 500.16 26 220-42699-10-000 Payroll Transfer Out to GF 30,116 - 30,116 220.10 27 100-44410-10-000 Office Rent GF portion 35,945 - 35,945 100.10 28 100-46205-14-000 Water Service - Fire Station 5,050 - 5,050 100.14 29 100-46220-14-000 Electric Service - Fire Station 5,570 - 5,570 100.14 30 100-46225-14-000 Gas Service - Fire Station 5,288 - 5,288 100.14 31 500-44410-10-000 Office Rent UF portion 48,845 - 48,845 500.16 32 220-44410-10-000 Office Rent VA portion 48,845 - 48,845 220.10 33 100-43345-14-000 Contracted Services Fire Dept 35,000 35,000 - 100.14 34 100-46165-15-000 Court Technology - Self Funded 25,000 25,000 - 100.15 35 100-43345-17-000 Janitorial Service - Fire Station 5,000 - 5,000 100.17 36 100-43348-17-000 Landscape - Fire Station 13,000 - 13,000 100.17 37 220-43531-22-000 Marketing & Promotions 32,500 32,500 220.22 38 TOTAL OPEARATING EXPENDITURES $1,392,432 $1,100,029 $292,403 39 410-73000-16-000-000040 Sam School Road R&D 281,960 281,960 - 410.16 40 410-73000-16-000-000060 Pearson Lane R&D 404,125 404,125 - 410.16 41 410-73000-16-000-000075 Flashing Crosswalk Lights 80,000 80,000 - 410.16 42 410-74400-16-000-000020 FM1938 Town Improvements 170,000 170,000 410.16 43 410-73000-16-000-000078 Solana Pavement Repair 90,000 90,000 - 410.16 44 410-73000-16-000-000079 Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface 54,450 54,450 - 410.16 45 410-73000-16-000-000080 FM1938 Pavement Repairs 80,000 80,000 - 410.16 46 410-73000-17-000-000077 WA-Pond Repairs 82,000 82,000 - 410.17 47 410-74400-19-000-000042 Trail Connection at 114/Solana 30,000 30,000 - 410.19 48 410-74400-19-000-000053 Trail - Dove/Pearson/Aspen 290,016 290,016 - 410.19 49 410-74400-19-000-000067 Wayfinding Signage 229,500 229,500 - 410.19 50 410-74400-20-000-000081 IT-Fiber Connectivity 300,000 300,000 - 600.20 51 412-43245-00-000 Consultant Fees 85,000 85,000 - 412.00 52 100-47411-16-000 Salt and Sand Spreader 5,000 5,000 - 100.16 53 510-44114-16-000-000014 Sewer Easement Cleaning Machin 90,000 90,000 - 510.16 54 510-44119-16-000-000015 Repaint Ground Storage Tank 45,000 45,000 510.16 55 510-44123-16-000-000005 Pump Station Equipment 90,000 90,000 - 510.16 56 600-43405-20-000-000033 IT-Server Replacements 15,000 15,000 - 600.20 57 600-43405-20-000-000020 IT-Servers & Network Storage 25,000 25,000 - 600.20 58 600-45305-20-000-000028 IT-Phone System/Peripheal Devices 60,000 60,000 - 600.20 59 600-43405-20-000-000027 IT-Network Equipment 115,000 115,000 - 600.20 60 605-47410-14-000 FD-Ambulance M&R 260,000 260,000 - 605.14 61 600-43347-17-000-000024 WA - 15 Ton Split HVAC System 7,500 - 7,500 600.17 62 600-44306-17-000-000015 WA - Parking Lot R&M 25,000 25,000 - 600.17 63 600-44311-17-000-000040 WA - Playground Equipment 5,000 5,000 - 600.17 64 600-45904-17-000-000036 WA - Plumbing R&M 6,225 - 6,225 600.17 65 600-45908-17-000-000008 WA - Carpet Flooring 10,000 10,000 .600.17 66 600-45908-17-000-000010 WA - Lights R&M 7,250 - 7,250 600.17 67 600-45908-17-000-000017 WA - Refurbish Classrooms 9,000 9,000 - 600.17 68 600-45908-17-000-000023 WA - Interior Building R&M 9,500 - 9,500 600.17 69 600-47411-17-000-000055 Town Man Lift 25,000 25,000 - 600.17 70 600-47415-17-000-000045 WA - Interior Building 8,000 - 8,000 600.17 71 600-43340-26-000-000007 Town - Irrigation R&M 5,000 - 5,000 600.26 72 600-43347-26-000-000032 Town - HVAC System R&M 5,000 - 5,000 600.26 73 600-45908-26-000-000010 Town - Light R&M 10,000 - 10,000 600.26 74 TOTAL CAPITAL AND M&R PROJECTS $3,014,526 $2,956,051 $58,475 75 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE $5,084,080 $5,126,009 -$41,925 SLA DETAIL (one-time & on-going revenues & expenditures) 219 Section 2 Variance from Workshop Variance from Council Retreat for FY 2017-18 Estimated • Net Change to Fund Balance o $(7.7M) at Workshop o $(8.2M) at Adoption o Net decrease to fund balance of $446K • Revenues and other sources increased $511K o Charges for Services increased $699K;  this is due to Utility Fund water revenue increase of $571K and sewer revenue increase of $128K. o Transfers In decreased $299K;  Capital Projects Fund 410 transfers in from the General Fund were decreased $337K  General M&R Fund 600 transfers in from General Fund increased $37K. • Expenditures and other uses increased $957K o Service expenditures increased $1.2M  the largest part is due to the billing inaccuracies which have prevented staff from forecasting sanitary sewer flows billed by the City of Southlake. Additionally, these flows have been previously planned to be transferred to TRA; however, the meter station required is on hold until an agreement can be reached with the Trophy Club MUD regarding the placement of the new meter station outside of the easement for the MUD. o Transfers Out decreased $299K;  General Fund transfers out to Capital Projects Fund 410 were decreased $337K;  General Fund transfers out to General M&R Fund 600 increased $37K. Variance from Council Retreat for FY 2018-19 Proposed • Net Change to Fund Balance o $2.3M at Workshop o $1.7M at Adoption o Net decrease to fund balance of $553K 20 Section 2 Variance from Workshop • Revenues and other sources increased $636K o Charges for Services increased $699K  water revenue increased $571K and sewer revenue increased $128K based on current year revenues. o Transfers In decreased $225K;  the Capital Projects Fund 410 transfers in from the General Fund were decreased $229K; General Fund 100 transfers in from the Utility Fund were increased $4.5K • Expenditures and other uses increased $1.2M o Service expenditures increased $1.2M;  the largest part is due to the billing inaccuracies which have prevented staff from forecasting sanitary sewer flows billed by the City of Southlake. Additionally, these flows have been previously planned to be transferred to TRA; however, the meter station required is on hold until an agreement can be reached with the Trophy Club MUD regarding the placement of the new meter station outside of the easement for the MUD. Due to the uncertainty in prior years, this amount has been carried forward for FY 18-19. It is the hope of staff that this will occur in the coming fiscal year and transfer of the billing from the City of Southlake to TRA will be completed. o Transfers Out decreased $225K;  General Fund transfers out to the Capital Projects Fund 410 were decreased $229K;  Utility Fund transfers out to the General Fund were increased $4.5K Total change to Fund Balance from Council Workshop • Net Decrease of $1.0M 21 Section 2 Variance from Workshop EXTERNAL DESCRIPTION FY 17/18 Estimated Budget Change Amount FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Change Amount Total Change To Fund Balance Property Tax $37,105 $125,383 $162,488 Charge for Services 699,860 699,860 1,399,720 Hotel Tax 42 42 84 Permits and Fees Other 9,558 9,558 19,116 Fines & Forfeitures (25) (25) (50) Investment Earnings 24,116 24,116 48,232 Miscellaneous Income 40,272 3,172 43,444 Transfers In (299,557) (225,120) (524,677) TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES $ 511,371 $ 636,986 $1,148,357 - Debt Service $4,420 $ - 4,420 Rent & Utilities 208,601 (3,395) 205,206 Repair & Maintenance 3,884 205,200 209,084 Services 1,164,955 1,171,180 2,336,135 Supplies (14,318) (10,117) (24,434) Travel & Training (6,388) (6,008) (12,395) Capital Outlay (5,520) (980) (6,500) Maintenance & Replacement (98,375) 60,025 (38,350) Transfers Out (299,557) (225,120) (524,677) TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES $ 957,704 $1,190,786 $ 2,148,490 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE $(446,333) $(553,800) $ (1,000,133) 22 Section 2 Property Tax Overview $0.16010$0.15684$0.15684$0.15634$0.15634$0.15634$0.13695$0.13615$0.156002011 actual 2012 actual 2013 actual 2014 actual 2015 actual 2016 actual 2017 actual 2018 actual 2019 proposed Property Tax Rate per $100 Assessed Valuation (shown in millions) 0.46200 0.45144 0.42750 0.37512 0.33304 0.28927 0.15600 Southlake Trophy Club Keller Roanoke Haslet Grapevine Westlake This Town has assessed a property tax since FY2011-12. The ad valorem tax rate per $100 of assessed valuation is proposed to increase by $0.01985 for the FY 2018-19 to the proposed tax rate of $.15600 (just under the calculated rollback rate of $.15618). As a reminder, the effective tax rate is the total tax rate calculated to raise the same amount of property tax revenue for the Town from the same properties. FY 17/18 Adopted Tax Rate FY 17/18 Proposed Tax Rate Change Amount M&O $ 0.11133 $ 0.13201 $ 0.02068 I&S $ 0.02482 $ 0.02399 $(0.00083) $0.13615 $ 0.15600 $0.01985 . The total debt obligation secured by property taxes for various projects totals $287,699. • 2011 CO payment for street projects of $117,796 • 2013 GO Refunding payment of $169,903 for Arts & Science Center construction. The debt payment for the Science Center was originally paid from the Visitors Association Fund. Based on July 2018 certified values, the Town’s “net taxable value” increased by $68,089,024 over the prior year adjusted information for FY 17-18. This is attributable to • 11% increase in residential • 1% increase in commercial • 3% increase in personal Proposed 2018 Rate .15600 This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year’s adopted budget by approximately $272,358 which is a 17.10% increase from last year's budget. The property tax revenue to be raised from new property tax roll this year is $50,499. 23 Based on July Report FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed 1,025,535,296$ 1,090,892,532$ 1,209,948,755$ 1,227,858,917$ 1,248,082,317$ 1,274,372,828$ 1,393,675,563$ 1,500,997,347$ 1,613,210,908$ amount change 65,357,236$ 119,056,223$ 17,910,162$ 20,223,400$ 26,290,511$ 119,302,735$ 107,321,784$ 112,213,561$ percent change 6%11%1%2%2%9%8%7% $ cumulative chg 65,357,236$ 184,413,459$ 202,323,621$ 222,547,021$ 248,837,532$ 368,140,267$ 475,462,051$ 587,675,612$ % cumulative chg 6%18%20%22%24%36%46%57% Based on "Estimated Net Taxable Value " July report FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed Total Taxable Values 796,958,772$ 937,254,545$ 856,969,250$ 889,054,513$ 920,188,732$ 943,308,794$ 1,124,442,640$ 1,207,702,471$ 1,275,791,495$ amount change 140,295,773$ (80,285,295)$ 32,085,263$ 31,134,219$ 23,120,062$ 181,133,846$ 83,259,831$ 68,089,024$ percent change 18%-9%4%4%3%19%7%6% $ cumulative chg 140,295,773$ 60,010,478$ 92,095,741$ 123,229,960$ 146,350,022$ 327,483,868$ 410,743,699$ 478,832,723$ % cumulative chg 18%8%12%15%18%41%52%60% Residential 454,890,952$ 463,311,801$ 473,314,728$ 494,062,920$ 530,229,036$ 575,082,645$ 698,417,863$ 767,773,180$ 855,993,179$ amount change 8,420,849$ 10,002,927$ 20,748,192$ 36,166,116$ 44,853,609$ 123,335,218$ 69,355,317$ 88,219,999$ percent change 2%2%4%7%8%21%10%11% $ cumulative chg 8,420,849$ 18,423,776$ 39,171,968$ 75,338,084$ 120,191,693$ 243,526,911$ 312,882,228$ 401,102,227$ % cumulative chg 2%4%9%17%26%54%69%88% Commercial 354,362,708$ 398,732,749$ 309,259,502$ 288,880,663$ 288,318,142$ 313,905,939$ 319,566,649$ 334,367,110$ 337,279,443$ amount change 44,370,041$ (89,473,247)$ (20,378,839)$ (562,521)$ 25,587,797$ 5,660,710$ 14,800,461$ 2,912,333$ percent change 13%-22%-7%0%9%2%5%1% $ cumulative chg 44,370,041$ (45,103,206)$ (65,482,045)$ (66,044,566)$ (40,456,769)$ (34,796,059)$ (19,995,598)$ (17,083,265)$ % cumulative chg 13%-13%-18%-19%-11%-10%-6%-5% Personal 73,238,159$ 86,462,635$ 102,298,461$ 115,051,251$ 110,305,420$ 86,780,414$ 129,527,089$ 112,515,566$ 116,007,662$ amount change 13,224,476$ 15,835,826$ 12,752,790$ (4,745,831)$ (23,525,006)$ 42,746,675$ (17,011,523)$ 3,492,096$ percent change 18%18%12%-4%-21%49%-13%3% $ cumulative chg 13,224,476$ 29,060,302$ 41,813,092$ 37,067,261$ 13,542,255$ 56,288,930$ 39,277,407$ 42,769,503$ % cumulative chg 18%40%57%51%18%77%54%58% Ag Properties 263,775$ 263,775$ 269,301$ 274,698$ 257,671$ 246,487$ 219,661$ 208,877$ 203,351$ Based on July Report FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed New Residential 19,299,376$ 14,557,925$ 17,679,732$ 18,340,000$ 28,002,713$ 39,358,755$ 56,221,461$ 29,301,506$ 30,734,175$ amount change (4,741,451)$ 3,121,807$ 660,268$ 9,662,713$ 11,356,042$ 16,862,706$ (26,919,955)$ 1,432,669$ percent change -25%21%4%53%41%43%-48%5% $ cumulative chg (4,741,451)$ (1,619,644)$ (959,376)$ 8,703,337$ 20,059,379$ 36,922,085$ % cumulative chg -25%-8%-5%45%104%191% New Commercial 2,905,474$ 63,612,427$ 24,418,346$ 1,148,172$ -$ -$ -$ 13,586,641$ 2,201,041$ amount change 60,706,953$ (39,194,081)$ (23,270,174)$ (1,148,172)$ -$ -$ 13,586,641$ (11,385,600)$ percent change 2089%-62%-95%-100%0%100%200%300% $ cumulative chg 60,706,953$ 21,512,872$ (1,757,302)$ (2,905,474)$ (2,905,474)$ (2,905,474)$ 10,681,167$ (704,433)$ % cumulative chg 2089%740%-60%-100%-100%-100%368%-24% Based on July Report FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed Avg Market Value 1,354,987$ 1,359,897$ 1,365,344$ 1,416,737$ 1,472,247$ 1,492,650$ 1,803,855$ 1,758,822$ 1,814,031$ amount change 4,910$ 5,447$ 51,393$ 55,510$ 20,403$ 311,205$ (45,033)$ 55,209$ percent change 0.36%0.40%3.76%3.92%1.39%20.85%-2.50%3.14% $ cumulative chg 4,910$ 10,357$ 61,750$ 117,260$ 137,663$ 448,868$ 403,835$ 459,044$ % cumulative chg 0%1%5%9%10%33%30%34% Based on July Report FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed Avg Taxable Value 1,152,595$ 1,163,219$ 1,166,338$ 1,203,398$ 1,247,251$ 1,270,576$ 1,425,943$ 1,451,120$ 1,510,238$ Tax Payment 1,845$ 1,460$ 1,463$ 1,510$ 1,560$ 1,589$ 1,562$ 1,581$ 1,885$ amount change (386)$ 4$ 46$ 50$ 29$ (27)$ 18$ 304$ percent change -20.91%0.27%3.18%3.31%1.87%-1.69%1.17%19.25% APPRAISED VALUES AVERAGE MARKET VALUE PER HOME AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX NINE YEAR ANALYSIS Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Homestead exemption 20% Over 65 exemption - $10,000 AD VALOREM TAX PAYMENT ON AVERAGE HOME VALUE (w/homestead exemption) NEW NET TAXABLE VALUE NET TAXABLE VALUES (these values will not always total due to incomplete accounts, cases before ARB, etc) 24 AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX NINE YEAR ANALYSIS Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Homestead exemption 20% Over 65 exemption - $10,000 FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed Total Revenue 1,257,246$ 1,442,069$ 1,366,542$ 1,353,355$ 1,432,916$ 1,479,452$ 1,577,814$ 1,585,004$ 1,864,852$ amount change 184,823$ (75,527)$ (13,187)$ 79,561$ 46,536$ 98,362$ 7,191$ 279,848$ percent change 14.70%-5.24%-0.96%5.88%3.25%6.65%0.46%17.66% New Residential 30,898$ 22,833$ 27,729$ 28,764$ 43,779$ 61,533$ 76,995$ 39,894$ 47,945$ amount change (8,066)$ 4,896$ 1,036$ 15,015$ 17,754$ 15,462$ (37,101)$ 8,051$ percent change -26.10%21.44%3.73%52.20%40.55%25.13%-48.19%20.18% New Commercial 4,652$ 99,770$ 38,298$ 1,801$ -$ -$ -$ 18,498$ 3,434$ amount change 95,118$ (61,472)$ (36,497)$ (1,801)$ -$ -$ 18,498$ (15,065)$ percent change 2044.82%-61.61%-95.30%-100.00%0.00%100.00%200.00%300.00% Raised from New 35,550$ 122,602$ 66,027$ 30,565$ 43,779$ 61,533$ 76,995$ 58,392$ 51,379$ Raised from Existing 1,221,696$ 1,319,467$ 1,300,516$ 1,322,790$ 1,389,137$ 1,417,919$ 1,500,818$ 1,526,612$ 1,813,473$ FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed General Fund 0.15620$ 0.13835$ 0.14197$ 0.13907$ 0.13710$ 0.13947$ 0.12882$ 0.11133$ 0.13201$ Debt Service 0.00390 0.01849 0.01487 0.01777 0.01924 0.01687 0.00813 0.02482 0.02399 TOTAL TAX RATE 0.16010$ 0.15684$ 0.15684$ 0.15684$ 0.15634$ 0.15634$ 0.13695$ 0.13615$ 0.15600$ amount change (0.00326) - - (0.00050) - (0.01939) (0.00080) 0.01985 percent change -2.04%0.00%0.00%-0.32%0.00%-12.40%-0.58%14.58% FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed General Fund 97.56%88.21%90.52%88.67%87.69%89.21%94.06%81.77%84.62% Debt Service 2.44%11.79%9.48%11.33%12.31%10.79%5.94%18.23%15.38% TOTAL 100%100%100%100%100%100%100%100%100% FY10/11 Actual FY11/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Actual FY17/18 Estimated FY18/19 Proposed General Fund 1,226,689$ 1,271,975$ 1,236,978$ 1,198,373$ 1,256,795$ 1,318,059$ 1,482,625$ 1,318,825$ 1,577,153$ Debt Service 30,558$ 170,094$ 129,565$ 154,982$ 176,121$ 161,393$ 95,189$ 266,179$ 287,699$ TOTAL 1,257,246$ 1,442,069$ 1,366,542$ 1,353,355$ 1,432,916$ 1,479,452$ 1,577,814$ 1,585,004$ 1,864,852$ amount change 184,823$ (75,527)$ (13,187)$ 79,561$ 46,536$ 98,362$ 7,191$ 279,848$ percent change 14.70%-5.24%-0.96%5.88%3.25%6.65%0.46%17.66% TOTAL TAX REVENUE GENERATED TAX REVENUE BY FUND TYPE TAX RATE DISTRIBUTION AMOUNT TAX RATE DISTRIBUTION PERCENT 25 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated Full-Time Regular Wages 3,408,814$ 3,408,814$ 3,472,786$ 63,972$ 2% Full-Time Overtime Wages 133,131 133,131 121,725 (11,406) -9% Part-Time Regular Wages 231,976 231,976 290,025 58,049 25% Premium Pay 13,560 13,560 21,476 7,916 58% Auto Allowance 26,100 29,600 34,800 5,200 18% Cell Phone Allowance 7,680 7,680 11,760 4,080 53% Performance Pay - - 42,000 42,000 100% Operating Xfr in for PR Costs (1,055,775) (1,055,775) (1,114,192) (58,417) 6% 2,765,486 2,768,986 2,880,380 111,394 4% Medical Insurace 544,606 544,606 711,266 166,660 31% Dental Insurance 29,115 29,115 32,862 3,747 13% LTD/AD&D/Life Insurance 26,274 26,274 36,141 9,867 38% 599,995 599,995 780,269 180,274 30% Social Security 236,919 236,919 247,663 10,744 5% Medicare 55,334 55,334 57,843 2,509 5% Unemployment Taxes 8,790 8,790 9,517 727 8% Worker's Compensation 42,390 42,390 33,966 (8,424) -20% 343,433 343,433 348,989 5,556 2% TMRS 468,685 468,685 461,823 (6,862) -1% ICMA 457 Plan 27,270 27,270 24,270 (3,000) -11% 495,955 495,955 486,093 (9,862) -2% 4,204,869$ 4,208,369$ 4,495,731$ 287,362$ 7% Transfer from Visitor Fund to GF 518,510$ 518,510$ 555,167$ 36,657$ 7% Transfer from Utility Fund to GF 482,700 482,700 559,024 76,324 16% 1,001,210$ 1,001,210$ 1,114,192$ 112,982$ 11% 5,206,079$ 5,209,579$ 5,609,923$ 400,344$ 8% vs Payroll & Related Program Summary Fiscal Year 2018/2019 TRANSFERS INTO GENERAL FUND TOTAL PAYROLL IMPACT Total Base Wages Total Retirement TOTAL GENERAL FUND IMPACT Total Insurance Total Taxes 26 Section 2 Personnel Summary Overview Personnel staffing levels for the Town of Westlake are presented in full-time equivalents (FTE) positions. For example, a position staffed for 40 hours per week for 52 weeks per year (2,080 hours) equals one full-time equivalent position. For firefighter/paramedic positions, an FTE is based on 2,912 hours per year, or an average of 56 hours per week is used. An FTE position of .50 refers to a position that is funded for 1,040 hours per year (2,080 x .50). The personnel count includes vacant positions. PAYROLL & RELATED COSTS • Budgeted to be $4.495M; a 7% increase of $287K from prior year estimated of $4.208M TOTAL MARKET INCENTIVE STAFF STAFF CAR PHONE ON CALL INCREASES ADJUST PAY ADDS CHGS ALLOW ALLOW PAY Market Adjustments $ 191,314 $ 191,314 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Performance Pay One Time 51,036 - 51,036 - - - - - Court Judge 18,743 - - 18,743 - - - - Replace Marshal (66,356) - - - (66,356) - - - Maintain Current Insurance 31,225 - - - 31,225 - - - Facilities Clerk to Full Time 26,296 - - - 26,296 - - - Acct Replacement/Training 11,439 - - - 11,439 - - - Management Intern 9,024 - - - 9,024 - - - Building Official 1,444 - - - - 1,444 - - Public Works Director 1,221 - - - - 1,221 - - Assistant Town Manager 1,216 - - - - 1,216 - - Facilities/Parks Director 611 - - - - 611 - - Town Secretary 1,155 - - - - - 1,155 - Public Works Technician 4,346 - - - - - 1,172 3,174 Public Works Project Manager 4,511 - - - - - 1,337 3,174 $ 287,225 $ 191,314 $ 51,036 $ 18,743 $ 11,628 $ 4,492 $ 3,664 $ 6,348 • Market band adjustments of $191K; based on most recent salary surveys from HR dept. • One-time Performance Pay of $51K is included. • Transition Court Judge from contract service to part time employee $18K • Savings from replacing full time Marshal position with two part time Marshals. ($66K) • Employee Insurance reflects $31K increase. Due to plan increase of 20% and changes to employee coverage because of approved positions in the prior year that were unfilled. • Transition part time Facilities Clerk to full-time employee $26K (majority is insurance cost) • Cost to replace and train Municipal Accounting Technician II at $11K • Management Intern (account for full wages in FY2019) $9K • Increase car allowances $4.4K • Add phone allowances $3.6K • Add On-call pay to public works employees $6.3K • All payroll and related expenditures are paid via the General Fund. Portions of these expenditures are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitors Association Fund. o Total payroll transfers in are $1.114M • Utility Fund - $521K • Visitors Association Fund - $525K 27 Dept Position FY 17-18 Estimated FY 18-19 PROPOSED change FY 19-20 Projected FY 20-21 Projected FY 21-22 Projected FY 22-23 Projected 10 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE Administrative Assistant 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - - - - 11 TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE Town Manager 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant Town Manager 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Part-Time Interns 0.25 0.25 - 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 2.75 2.75 - 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 - - - - 12 PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT Planning & Development Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Development Coordinator 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Chief Building Official 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Permitting Clerk 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 - 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 - - - - 13 TOWN SECRETARY'S OFFICE Town Secretary 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Administrative Assistant 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 1.50 1.50 - 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 - - - - 14 FIRE/EMS DEPARTMENT Fire Chief 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Fire Marshal/Deputy Chief 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Lt. Firefighter/Paramedics 3.00 3.00 - 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Clerk/Admin Assistant - - - 0.50 0.50 1.00 1.00 Fire Inspector/Pub Ed Sp - - - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 Driver Engineers - - - - - 3.00 3.00 Firefighter/Paramedics 10.50 10.50 - 12.00 16.00 17.00 20.00 15.50 15.50 - 18.50 23.50 28.00 31.00 3.00 5.00 4.50 3.00 15 MUNICIPAL COURT OFFICE Court Administrator 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Clerk 1.00 - (1.00) - - - - Lead Clerk - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Marshal Full time 1.00 - (1.00) - - - - Marshal Part Time 1 - 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 Marshal Part Time 2 - 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.10 Court Judge 0.25 0.25 - 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Clerk 1 Part Time 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Clerk 2 Full Time 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 4.25 3.50 (0.75) 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 - - - - 16 PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE Public Works Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Utility Technician 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Utility Billing Coordinator 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Project Manager 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 - 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 - - - - Current Year Staffing not reflected in long term forecast PERSONNEL STAFFING by DEPARTMENT & POSITION GROWTH MODEL STAFFING 28 Dept Position FY 17-18 Estimated FY 18-19 PROPOSED change FY 19-20 Projected FY 20-21 Projected FY 21-22 Projected FY 22-23 Projected Current Year Staffing not reflected in long term forecast PERSONNEL STAFFING by DEPARTMENT & POSITION GROWTH MODEL STAFFING 17 FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Facilities Maintenance Director 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Part-Time Summer Technicians 0.25 0.25 - 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Clerk/Admin Assistant 0.50 1.00 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 1.75 0.50 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 - - - - 18 FINANCE OFFICE Finance Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Finance Supervisor 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accounting Tech - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accounting Tech Municipal 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accounting Tech Academic 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 4.00 - 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 1.00 - - - 19 PARKS & RECREATION OFFICE Parks & Recreation Director 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - - - - 20 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Information Technology Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 IT Position - - - - - 1.00 1.00 Network Administrator 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 2.00 3.00 3.00 - - 1.00 - 21 HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICE Human Resources Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 HR Generalist 1 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 HR Generalist 2 - - - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 - 1.00 - - 22 COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE Communications Director 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Manager 1.00 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant - - - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Marketing - - - - 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 - 2.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 0.50 1.00 - - Grand Total All Positions 44.75 44.50 (0.25) 49.00 56.00 61.50 64.50 Additional Fire Dept Staffing 3.00 5.00 4.50 3.00 All Other Staffing Levels 1.50 2.00 1.00 - TOTAL FORECASTED INCREASE 4.50 5.00 4.50 3.00 additional employees not reflected in long term forecast 15.5 4.5 20.0 Total 29 Assistant .50 C ITIZENS OF W ESTLAKE Finance ASSISTANT TOWN MANAGER Fire Chief Human Resources Public Works Planning & Development Town Secretary Supervisor Deputy Clerk Marshal Communications Information Technology Police Services (contracted thru the City of Keller) Manager TOWN MANAGER & Facilities Maintenance .50 Lieutenants (3) 2 Part Time Court Clerks Court Administrator PT Firefighter Paramedics 24 HR Generalist Academic Acctg Tech II WA Technician Advisory Boards And Committees Town Attorney Court Judge Texas Student Housing Deputy Chief Fire Marshal 1 Technician UB Coordinator Building Inspector Permit Clerk P&D Coordinator Municipal Acctg Tech II Intern .50 This organizational chart is a visual depiction of the way work is distributed within the Town of Westlake. It is also meant to be a tool to help enhance our working relationship with our customers, students and stake-holders, and to clear channels of communications to better accomplish our goals and objectives. Assistant .50 M AYOR AND T OWN C OUNCIL PW Inspector Project Manager WA SUPERINTENDENT continued on next page Parks and Recreation .50 FT Firefighter Paramedics 9 WA Coordinator WA Technician Network Manager Assistant 30 WA SUPERINTENDENT BOARD OF TRUSTEES WESTLAKE ACADEMY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR continued from previous page Executive Director W.A. Foundation Assistant This organizational chart is a visual depiction of the way work is distributed within Westlake Academy Heads of Department Grade Level Team Leads SPED CoordinatorPrimary Principal Primary Assistant Principal Primary Curriculum Coordinator Primary Counselor Primary Faculty and Staff Librarian Technology Coordinator Secondary Principal Secondary Counselor College Counselor MYP/DP Faculty and Staff Registrar Administrative Staff Secondary Assistant Principal Athletic Dir. Student Life Coordinator MYP/DP Curriculum Coordinators This chart is meant to be a tool to help enhance our working relationship with our customers, students and stake-holders, and to clear channels of communications to better accomplish our goals and objectives. SPED Faculty and Staff 31 This page is intentionally blank 32 33 General Fund 100 Program Summary Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated General Sales Tax 3,510,500$ 3,510,500$ 3,900,000$ 389,500$ 11% Property Tax 1,205,205 1,325,125 1,733,356 408,231 31% Beverage Tax 62,500 62,500 62,500 - 0% Franchise Fees 983,815 983,815 983,815 - 0% Permits & Fees Other 238,020 263,303 263,303 - 0% Permits & Fees Building 2,201,246 2,151,178 4,357,571 2,206,393 103% Fines & Forfeitures Court 809,880 715,545 715,545 - 0% Investment Earnings 43,100 178,955 178,955 - 0% Contributions - 12,240 12,240 - 0% Misc Income 18,560 39,785 39,785 - 0% Total Revenues 9,072,826 9,242,946 12,247,070 3,004,124 33% Transfers In 50,000 62,000 66,539 4,539 7% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Sources 50,000 62,000 66,539 4,539 7% TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 9,122,826$ 9,304,946$ 12,313,609$ 3,008,663$ 32% Payroll Salaries 3,821,261$ 3,824,761$ 3,994,572$ 169,811$ 4% Payroll Insurance (medical/dental/life)599,995 599,995 780,269 180,274 30% Payroll Taxes (workers comp/unemployment)51,180 51,180 43,482 (7,698) -15% Payroll Taxes (social security/medicare)292,253 292,253 305,506 13,253 5% Payroll Retirement (TMRS/ICMA)495,955 495,955 486,093 (9,862) -2% Payroll Transfers In (1,055,775) (1,055,775) (1,114,192) (58,417) 6% Total Payroll and Related 4,204,869 4,208,369 4,495,731 287,362 7% Debt 351,680 351,680 351,680 - 0% Repair & Maintenance 242,580 218,502 220,224 1,722 1% Rent & Utilities 445,316 654,497 760,911 106,414 16% Services 2,048,966 2,216,439 2,252,408 35,969 2% Supplies 246,152 240,099 247,298 7,199 3% Transfer Out to Debt Service 1,472,568 1,174,669 1,005,901 (168,768) -14% Travel & Training 204,430 206,694 209,064 2,370 1% Total Operations & Maintenance 5,011,692 5,062,579 5,047,485 (15,094) -0.3% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 9,216,561 9,270,948 9,543,216 272,268 3% Capital Outlay 31,690 21,915 35,710 13,795 63% Capital Projects - - - - 0% Total Capital 31,690 21,915 35,710 13,795 63% Transfer Out to CP 1,015,324 300,000 1,025,000 725,000 242% Transfer Out to GMR 300,000 387,750 1,000,799 613,049 158% Transfer Out to VMR - 350,000 460,266 110,266 32% Total Other Uses 1,315,324 1,037,750 2,486,065 1,448,315 140% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,347,014 1,059,665 2,521,775 1,462,110 138% TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 10,563,575 10,330,613 12,064,992 1,734,378 17% EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (1,440,749) (1,025,667) 248,618 1,274,285 124% FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 10,242,277 10,242,277 9,216,610 (1,025,667) -10% FUND BALANCE, ENDING 8,801,528 9,216,610 9,465,228 248,618 3% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 304,504 304,504 304,504 - 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 8,497,025$ 8,912,106$ 9,160,724$ 248,618$ 3% Daily Operating Expenditures 25,251$ 25,400$ 26,146$ 746$ 3% Operating Days 337 351 350 (1) 0% C Court Technology 100 10112 15 000 60,823$ 60,823$ 60,823$ -$ 0% C Court Security 100 10113 15 000 117,771 117,771 117,771 - 0% C Court Efficiency 100 10116 15 000 9,787 9,787 9,787 - 0% R Reforestation 100 10110 00 101 61,415 61,415 61,415 - 0% R Street Escrow (TB/RA)100 10110 00 102 54,707 54,707 54,707 - 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 304,504$ 304,504$ 304,504$ -$ 0% vs REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS 34 Section 3 General Fund Overview REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Total General Fund revenues and other sources are budgeted to be $12.3M. This represents a 32% increase of $3M from prior year estimated of $9.3M. General Sales and Use Tax • Budgeted to be $3.9M; an 11% increase of $389K; prior year estimated $3.5M o Increase due primarily to economic development agreement. o Sales taxes are collected on the sale of goods and services within the Town as authorized by the State of Texas. o The maximum sales tax allowed in the State of Texas is 8.25% per dollar on all taxable goods and services. 6.25% per dollar is kept by the State; municipalities receive a maximum of 2%. Funds are collected by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and remitted to the Town monthly. o An amount equal to 1.50% of taxable sales is appropriated to the Town’s General Fund. This total includes .50% that is received for property tax reduction. o The Town also receives an additional .50% sales tax that is recorded in the 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund. Property Tax • Budgeted to be $1.7M; a 31% increase of $408K; prior year estimated $1.3M o Total Tax rate increase from $0.13615 to $0.15600 per $100 valuation Beverage Tax • Budgeted to remain flat at $62K o The Town collects a 14% gross receipt tax on mixed beverages. o Of this percentage, 10.7% of gross liquor receipts are remitted to the Town, and the remaining 3.3% is retained by the State of Texas. Franchise Taxes • Budgeted to remain flat at $983K o Fees are collected from utilities and telecommunications companies that use Town right-of-way. o A flat rate is charged to both telephone operators (adjusted annually) and Tri-County Electric based on the number of access lines and services rendered, respectively. Permits and Fees Other • Budgeted to remain flat at $263K o Include fees charged by the Town for gas wells, EMS revenues, review and renewal fees, developments fees and contractor registration fees. 35 Section 3 General Fund Overview Permits and Fees Buildings • Budgeted to be $4.3M; a 103% increase of $2.2M; prior year estimated $2.1M o Based on continuing growth in residential and commercial construction. o General Fund portion of Residential building permit fees increased $126K; the majority of this increase is due to anticipated fees from Entrada. o General Fund portion of Commercial building permit fees increased $2.08M; the majority of this increase is to overall anticipated building construction permit fees. Fines and Forfeitures (Court) • Budgeted to remain flat at $715K o Revenue generated from the Municipal Court is based on citations and warrants issued. o The Keller Police Department will continue to provide police services for Westlake. Investment Earnings • Budgeted to remain flat at $178K Contributions • Budgeted to remain flat at $12K Miscellaneous Income • Budgeted to remain flat at $39K o Includes fees charged by the Town for facility rentals, sales of surplus/scrap items, insurance refunds and equity returns. Transfers In • Budgeted to be $66K; a 7% increase of $4.5K; prior year estimated $62K o transfer in from the Utility fund for one-time impact fees EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Total General Fund operating expenditures and other uses are budgeted at $12M. This represents a 17% increase of $1.7M from prior year estimated of $10.3M. Payroll & Related – Base Salaries, Taxes, Insurance and Retirement • Budgeted to be $4.4M; a 7% increase of $287K; prior year estimated $4.2M o Market band adjustments of $191K are reflected and based on most recent salary surveys performed by the HR dept. (GF portion is $153K) o Performance Pay of $50K is included (GF portion is $42K) 36 Section 3 General Fund Overview o Employee Insurance reflects a 30% ($180K) increase. Due to plan increase of 20% and anticipated changes to employee coverage of approved positions in the prior year that were unfilled. o Payroll Transfers in increased $58K. o Transition Court Judge from contract service to part time employee $18K o Transition part time Facilities Clerk to full-time employee $26K (mostly insurance) o Cost to replace and train Accountant Technician II $11K o Increase car allowances & phone allowances $7K o Add On-call pay to public works employees $6K Operations and Maintenance Expenditures • Budgeted to be $5.0M; a .3% decrease of $15K; prior year estimated $5.1M o Repair & Maintenance increased$1.7K o Rent & Utilities increased $106K; based on tiered schedule for the new town hall building. o Services expenditures increased $35K; fire dept increase to medical supplies, cleaning supplies and computer equipment. o Supplies increased $7.1K o Transfer Out to Debt Service decreased $168K; due to increased sales tax receipts in 4B Economic Development fund for debt payments, which in turn reduces the General Fund transfer out amount. o Travel & Training increased $2.3K Non-Operating Expenditures • Budgeted to be $2.5M; a 138% increase of $1.4M; prior year estimated $1.04M o Capital Outlay increased $13K o Transfers Out to conduit funds increased due to one-time building permit revenues  to CP increased $725K  to GMR increased $613K  to VMR increased $110K Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $9.4M o This amount represents a 3% increase of $248K from prior year estimated fund balance. o The unassigned balance of $9.1M represents coverage for 350 operating days. 37 This page is intentionally blank 38 39 Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget vs FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated General Sales Tax -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Property Tax - - - - 0% Hotel Tax - - - - 0% Charge for Services 3,795,515 4,585,075 4,585,075 - 0% Beverage Tax - - - - 0% Franchise Fees - - - - 0% Permits & Fees 168,865 268,115 274,441 6,326 2% Permits & Fees Buildings - - - - 0% Fines & Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 15,020 57,765 57,765 - 0% Contributions - - - - 0% Misc Income 17,600 23,460 23,460 - 0% Total Revenues 3,997,000 4,934,415 4,940,741 6,326 0% Transfers In - - - - 0% Other Sources - - 2,600,000 2,600,000 100% Total Other Sources - - 2,600,000 2,600,000 0% TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 3,997,000$ 4,934,415$ 7,540,741$ 2,606,326$ 53% Payroll Transfer In -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Payroll Transfer Out 482,700 482,700 559,024 76,324 16% Total Payroll and Related 482,700 482,700 559,024 76,324 16% Debt 1,155,174 1,172,041 2,015,626 843,585 72% Economic Development - - - - 0% Insurance - - - - 0% Repair & Maintenance 165,250 167,065 163,065 (4,000) -2% Rent & Utilities 156,499 157,499 177,544 20,045 13% Services 2,144,775 3,322,435 3,321,194 (1,241) 0% Supplies 7,250 7,040 7,040 - 0% Travel & Training 7,535 7,920 7,920 - 0% Total Operations & Maintenance 3,636,483 4,834,000 5,692,389 858,389 18% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 4,119,183 5,316,700 6,251,414 934,714 18% Capital Outlay 25,780 35,055 31,055 (4,000) -11% Projects - Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - - 0% Projects - Capital & Expansions Funds - - - - 100% Total Capital 25,780 35,055 31,055 (4,000) -11% Transfers Out 56,250 68,250 81,539 13,289 19% Other Uses - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 56,250 68,250 81,539 13,289 19% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 82,030 103,305 112,594 9,289 9% TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 4,201,213 5,420,005 6,364,008 944,003 17% EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (204,213) (485,590) 1,176,733 1,662,323 342% FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 886,329 886,329 400,738 (485,591) -55% FUND BALANCE, ENDING 682,116 400,739 1,577,472 1,176,732 294% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 682,116 400,739 1,577,472 1,176,732 294% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Cash 682,116$ 400,739$ 1,577,472$ 1,176,732$ 294% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 682,116$ 400,739$ 1,577,472$ 1,176,732$ 294% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Combined Program Summary ENTERPRISE FUNDS 40 ENTERPRISE FUNDS Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Cemetery Fund Utility Fund TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - 2 Property Tax - - - 3 Charge for Services 14,150 4,570,925 4,585,075 4 Hotel Tax - - - 5 Beverage Tax - - - 6 Franchise Fees - - - 7 Permits and Fees - - - 8 Permits and Fees Utility - 274,441 274,441 9 Fines and Forfeitures - - - 10 Investment Earnings 2,465 55,300 57,765 11 Contributions - - - 12 Misc Income 1,625 21,835 23,460 13 Total Revenues 18,240 4,922,501 4,940,741 14 Transfers In - - - 15 Other Sources - 2,600,000 2,600,000 16 Total Other Sources - 2,600,000 2,600,000 17 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 18,240 $ 7,522,501 $ 7,540,741 18 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 19 Payroll Transfers In $ - $ - $ - 20 Payroll Transfers Out - 559,024 559,024 21 Total Payroll & Related - 559,024 559,024 22 Debt - 2,015,626 2,015,626 23 Economimc Development - - - 24 Insurance - - - 25 Repair & Maintenance 2,000 161,065 163,065 26 Rent & Utilities - 177,544 177,544 27 Services 14,639 3,306,555 3,321,194 28 Supplies - 7,040 7,040 29 Travel & Training 125 7,795 7,920 30 Total Operations & Maintenance 16,764 5,675,625 5,692,389 31 Capital Outlay - 31,055 31,055 32 Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - 33 Capital Project Funds - - - 34 Total Capital - 31,055 31,055 35 Transfers Out - 81,539 81,539 36 Other Uses - - - 37 Total Other Uses - 81,539 81,539 38 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 16,764 6,347,244 6,364,008 39 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1,476 1,175,257 1,176,733 40 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 203,584 197,156 400,739 41 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 205,060 $ 1,372,413 $ 1,577,472 41 Section 4 Enterprise Funds Overview Enterprise Funds are comprised of • 255 Cemetery Fund • 410 Utility Fund Revenues and Other Sources • Budgeted to be $7.5M; a 53% increase of $2.6M from prior year estimated of $4.9M o Permits and Fees increased $6.3K o Other Sources increased $2.6M due to one-time bonds for Fort Worth Waterline project Expenditures and Other Uses • Budgeted to be $6.4M; a 17% increase of $944K from prior year estimated of $5.4M o Payroll transfers out to General Fund increased $76K; FY18/19 will reflect full year’s wages for two positions that were not hired until late in FY17/18. A new Project Manager position was created and was not filled until March 2018. Public Works Assistant was not hired until December 2017. This position was created to replace a Utility Billing Coordinator position that was left open in October 2017. o Debt increased $843K; costs for the Fort Worth Water Line o Repair and maintenance decreased $4K o Rent and utilities increased $20K o Services decreased $1.2K o Capital outlay decreased $4K o Transfers out increased $13K Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $1.6M o $205K – Cemetery Fund 255 o $1.3M – Utility Fund 500 42 43 Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 16/17 Proposed Budget Budget Budget vs FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 15/16 Estimated General Sales Tax -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Property Tax - - - - 0% Hotel Tax - - - - 0% Charge for Services - - - - 0% Beverage Tax - - - - 0% Franchise Fees - - - - 0% Permits & Fees 6,000 6,000 6,000 - 0% Permits & Fees Buildings - - - - 0% Fines & Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 7,015 21,480 21,480 - 0% Contributions - 130,000 - (130,000) -100% Misc Income - - - - 0% Total Revenues 13,015 157,480 27,480 (130,000) -83% Transfers In 306,250 744,000 1,476,065 732,065 98% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Sources 306,250 744,000 1,476,065 732,065 0% TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 319,265$ 901,480$ 1,503,545$ 602,065$ 67% Payroll Transfer In -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Payroll Transfer Out - - - - 0% Total Payroll and Related - - - - 0% Debt - - - - 0% Economic Development - - - - 0% Repair & Maintenance - - - - 0% Rent & Utilities - - - - 0% Services - - - - 0% Supplies - - - - 0% Travel & Training - - - - 0% Total Operations & Maintenance - - - - 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - - 0% Utility Maintenance & Replacement Fund 510 245,000 - 225,000 225,000 100% General Maintenance & Replacement Fund 600 287,000 278,625 594,475 315,850 113% Utility Vehicle Maint/Replace Fund 505 - - - - 0% General Vehicle Maint/Replace Fund 605 - 105,000 260,000 155,000 148% Total Capital 532,000 383,625 1,079,475 695,850 181% Transfers Out - - - - 100% Other Uses - - - - 0% Total Other Uses - - - - 100% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 532,000 383,625 1,079,475 695,850 181% TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 532,000 383,625 1,079,475 695,850 181% EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (212,735) 517,855 424,070 (93,785) 18% FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 1,053,144 1,053,144 1,570,999 517,855 49% FUND BALANCE, ENDING 840,409 1,570,999 1,995,069 424,070 27% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 840,409 1,570,999 1,995,069 424,070 27% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Cash 840,409$ 1,570,999$ 1,995,069$ 424,070$ 27% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 840,409$ 1,570,999$ 1,995,069$ 424,070$ 27% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Combined Program Summary 44 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Utility M&R General M&R Utility Vehicle M&R General Vehicle M&R TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 2 Property Tax - - - - - 3 Charge for Services - - - - - 4 Hotel Tax - - - - - 5 Beverage Tax - - - - - 6 Franchise Fees - - - - - 7 Permits and Fees - 6,000 - - 6,000 8 Permits and Fees Building - - - - - 9 Fines and Forfeitures - - - - - 10 Investment Earnings 16,350 2,290 350 2,490 21,480 11 Contributions - - - - - 12 Misc Income - - - - - 13 Total Revenues 16,350 8,290 350 2,490 27,480 14 Transfers In 5,000 1,000,799 10,000 460,266 1,476,065 15 Other Sources - - - - - 16 Total Other Sources 5,000 1,000,799 10,000 460,266 1,476,065 17 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 21,350 $ 1,009,089 $ 10,350 $ 462,756 $ 1,503,545 18 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 19 Payroll Transfers In $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 20 Payroll Transfers Out - - - - - 21 Total Payroll & Related - - - - - 22 Debt - - - - - 23 Economimc Development - - - - - 24 Insurance - - - - - 25 Repair & Maintenance - - - - - 26 Rent & Utilities - - - - - 27 Services - - - - - 28 Supplies - - - - - 29 Water Purchases - - - - - 30 Total Operations & Maintenance - - - - - 31 Capital Outlay - - - - - 32 Maintenance & Replacement Funds 225,000 594,475 - 260,000 1,079,475 33 Capital Project Funds - - - - - 34 Total Capital 225,000 594,475 - 260,000 1,079,475 35 Transfers Out - - - - - 36 Other Uses - - - - - 37 Total Other Uses - - - - - 38 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 225,000 $ 594,475 $ - $ 260,000 $ 1,079,475 39 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES (203,650) 414,614 10,350 202,756 424,070 40 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 845,683 122,794 23,674 578,848 1,570,999 41 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 642,033 $ 537,408 $ 34,024 $ 781,604 $ 1,995,069 45 Section 5 Internal Service Funds Overview Internal Service Funds are comprised of • 510 Utility Maintenance and Replacement • 600 General Maintenance and Replacement • 505 Utility Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement • 605 General Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement Revenues and Other Sources • Budgeted to be $1.5M; a 67% increase of $602K from prior year estimated of $901K o Contributions decreased $130K; due to one-time receipts in prior year. o Transfers in from General Fund to conduit funds (Vehicle/General Maintenance & Replacement Funds) increased $732K; being funded by one-time planning and development building permit fees and revenues. Expenditures and Other Uses • Budgeted to be $1.1M; a 181% increase of $695K from prior year estimated of $383K o 510 Utility Maintenance and Replacement fund increased $225K; projects that were adopted in FY17/18 have cancelled and moved out to FY18/19.  $45K - Sewer Easement Cleaning Machine  $90K – Repaint Ground Storage Tank  $90K – Pump Station Equipment o 600 General Maintenance and Replacement increased $315K;  $300K - Fiber connectivity project in the IT department o 605 General Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement increased $155K;  $260K - Fire department ambulance Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $2.0M o $642K - Utility Maintenance and Replacement o $537K - General Maintenance and Replacement o $ 34K - Utility Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement o $781K - General Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement 46 5 Year Projection Estimated FY 18-19 1 2 3 4 Description Account Number FY 16-17 PROPOSED FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 Interest Earned 16 505-36110-16-000 350$ 350$ 350$ 350$ 350$ 350$ Transfer In from UF 88 505-52550-88-000 6,250 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Fund 505 total 6,600 10,350 10,350 10,350 10,350 10,350 Interest Income 16 510-36110-16-000 16,350 16,350 14,500 14,500 14,500 14,500 Transfer in from UF 88 510-52550-88-000 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Fund 510 total 16,350 21,350 19,500 19,500 19,500 19,500 Interest Income 00 600-36110-00-000 2,290 2,290 2,165 2,165 2,165 2,165 WA Keller Police Substation 17 600-33700-17-000-000053 25,000 - - - - - Firefighter Equipment Fees 14 600-34008-14-000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 Transfer in from GF 88 600-52510-88-000 387,750 1,000,799 579,537 498,660 447,350 447,350 Fund 600 total 421,040 1,009,089 587,702 506,825 455,515 455,515 Interest Earned 10 605-36110-10-000 2,490 2,490 2,450 2,450 2,450 2,450 Contributions 10 605-33700-10-000 105,000 - 150,000 - - - Transfer In from GF 88 605-52510-88-000 350,000 460,266 579,537 498,662 447,350 447,350 Fund 605 total 457,490 462,756 731,987 501,112 449,800 449,800 901,480$ 1,503,545$ $1,349,539 $1,037,787 $ 935,165 $ 935,165 Motor Vehicle 16 505-47410-16-000 -$ -$ -$ 50,000$ -$ -$ Fund 505 total - - - 50,000 - - Sewer Easement Cleaning Machine 16 510-44114-16-000-000014 - 45,000 - - - - Repaint Ground Storage Tank 16 510-44119-16-000-000015 - 90,000 - - - - Pump Station Equipment 16 510-44123-16-000-000005 - 90,000 - - - - Fund 510 total - 225,000 - - - - WA-Irrigation System 17 600-43340-17-000-000007 6,500 6,500 15,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 WA-15 Ton Split HVAC System 17 600-43347-17-000-000024 6,500 14,000 10,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 WA-2 Ton Roof Top Units 17 600-43347-17-000-000025 7,500 7,500 15,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 WA-AC ton/7.5 ton server room 17 600-43347-17-000-000026 6,500 6,500 - 20,000 20,000 20,000 WA-HVAC System Replacement 17 600-43347-17-000-000032 7,500 7,500 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Update Security System 17 600-43354-17-000-000018 2,750 2,750 5,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Update Security Cameras 17 600-43354-17-000-000019 10,300 10,300 2,000 12,000 12,000 12,000 WA-Heater Boilers 17 600-44219-17-000-000029 9,675 9,675 - 25,000 25,000 25,000 WA-Painting/Cloth Wall R&M 17 600-44220-17-000-000012 6,500 6,500 10,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Ext Envrnmt Imprvmts Irrig 17 600-44306-17-000-000009 7,500 7,500 - 12,000 12,000 12,000 WA-Parking Lot 17 600-44306-17-000-000015 - 25,000 - - - - WA Playground Equipment 17 600-44311-17-000-000040 - 5,000 - - - - WA-Plumbing Repair/Replacement 17 600-45904-17-000-000036 2,775 9,000 15,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Carpet/VCT Flooring 17 600-45908-17-000-000008 25,000 35,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 WA-Envrnmt Bldg UG light/water 17 600-45908-17-000-000010 2,750 10,000 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Refurbish Classrooms 17 600-45908-17-000-000017 21,000 30,000 35,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 WA-Interior Building R&M 17 600-45908-17-000-000023 5,500 15,000 10,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 WA-Exterior Paint & Wood R&M 17 600-45909-17-000-000011 4,500 4,500 4,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Roof Repairs 17 600-45909-17-000-000013 47,550 47,550 15,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Mech Eqpmt 2 Man Lift 600-47411-17-000-000055 - 25,000 - - - - WA-Furniture/Interior Bldg 17 600-47415-17-000-000045 7,000 15,000 - - - - TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Maintenance and Replacement Funds REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES MAINTENANCE/REPLACEMENT PROJECTS Dept 47 5 Year Projection Estimated FY 18-19 1 2 3 4 Description Account Number FY 16-17 PROPOSED FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 Maintenance and Replacement Funds Dept WA-Keller Police Substation 17 600-47418-17-000-000053 25,000 - - - - - Trail Repairs and Maintenance 19 600-43343-19-000-000014 - 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Park Repairs and Maintenance 19 600-45911-19-000-000043 - 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Servers & Network Storage 20 600-43405-20-000-000020 15,000 40,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 Network Printers/Peripheal Dev 20 600-43405-20-000-000021 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Network Equipment 20 600-43405-20-000-000027 - 115,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 Server Replacements 20 600-43405-20-000-000033 5,000 20,000 12,500 100,000 12,500 12,500 Phone System/Peripheal Devices 20 600-45305-20-000-000028 5,000 65,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Town-Irrigation R&M 26 600-43340-26-000-000007 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Town-HVAC System Replacement 26 600-43347-26-000-000032 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Town-Heater 26 600-44219-26-000-000029 - 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 Town-Parking Lot 26 600-44306-26-000-000015 - 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 Town-Env Bldg UG light/water 26 600-45908-26-000-000010 - 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Town-Furniture/Interior Bldg 26 600-47415-26-000-000045 36,325 2,700 - - - - Fund 600 total 278,625 594,475 265,500 410,000 322,500 322,500 Motor Vehicle (WA Buses)10 605-47410-10-000 105,000 - 150,000 - - - FD Insurance Claims 14 605-45210-14-000 - - - - - - Motor Vehicle F ire Dept 14 605-47410-14-000 - 260,000 - - 60,000 1,000,000 Motor Vehicle Facilities 17 605-47410-17-000 - - - 50,000 - - Fund 605 total 105,000 260,000 150,000 50,000 60,000 1,000,000 383,625$ 1,079,475$ $ 415,500 $ 510,000 $ 382,500 $1,322,500 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 517,855 424,070 934,039 527,787 552,665 (387,335) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 1,053,144 1,570,999 1,995,069 2,929,108 3,456,895 4,009,560 1,570,999$ 1,995,069$ $2,929,108 $3,456,895 $4,009,560 $3,622,225 ENDING FUND BALANCE TOTAL MAINTENANCE/REPLACEMENT PROJECTS 48 49 Fiscal Year Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget vs FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated General Sales Tax 1,439,500$ 1,439,500$ 1,700,000$ 260,500$ 18% Property Tax - - - - 0% Hotel Tax 845,000 853,642 853,642 - 0% Charge for Services - - - - 0% Beverage Tax - - - - 0% Franchise Fees - - - - 0% Permits & Fees - - - - 0% Permits & Fees Buildings - - - - 0% Fines & Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 5,230 14,881 14,881 - 0% Contributions 753,000 373,000 197,300 (175,700) -47% Misc Income 66,310 112,312 69,587 (42,725) -38% Total Revenues 3,109,040 2,793,335 2,835,410 42,075 2% Transfers In - - - - 0% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Sources - - - - 0% TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 3,109,040$ 2,793,335$ 2,835,410$ 42,075$ 2% Payroll Transfer In -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Payroll Transfer Out 518,510 518,510 555,167 36,657 7% Total Payroll and Related 518,510 518,510 555,167 36,657 7% Debt - - - - 0% Economic Development 234,640 238,940 336,940 98,000 41% Insurance - - - - 0% Repair & Maintenance - - - - 0% Rent & Utilities 59,789 60,569 80,614 20,045 33% Services 377,315 506,270 329,516 (176,754) -35% Supplies 10,000 11,762 11,762 - 100% Travel & Training 4,145 5,919 5,919 - 0% Total Operations & Maintenance 685,889 823,460 764,751 (58,709) -7% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,204,399 1,341,970 1,319,918 (22,052) -2% Capital Outlay - - - - 0% Projects - Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - - 0% Projects - Capital & Expansions Funds - - - - 0% Total Capital - - - - 0% Transfers Out 1,987,500 1,577,500 1,564,300 (13,200) -1% Other Uses - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 1,987,500 1,577,500 1,564,300 (13,200) -1% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,987,500 1,577,500 1,564,300 (13,200) -1% TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 3,191,899 2,919,470 2,884,218 (35,252) -1% EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (82,859) (126,135) (48,808) 77,327 61% FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 1,301,443 1,301,443 1,175,308 (126,135) -10% FUND BALANCE, ENDING 1,218,584 1,175,308 1,126,499 (48,808) -4% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 1,218,584 1,175,308 1,126,499 (48,808) -4% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% Cash 1,218,584$ 1,175,308$ 1,126,499$ (48,808)$ -4% - 0% - 0% - 0% - 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 1,218,584$ 1,175,308$ 1,126,499$ (48,808)$ -4% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Combined Program Summary REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 50 SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Visitors Fund 4B Fund ED Fund PID Fund PA Fund LS Fund TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax $ - $ 1,400,000 $ 300,000 $ - $ - $ - $ 1,700,000 2 Property Tax - - - - - - - 3 Charge for Services - - - - - - - 4 Hotel Tax 816,702 - 36,940 - - - 853,642 5 Beverage Tax - - - - - - - 6 Franchise Fees - - - - - - - 7 Permits and Fees - - - - - - - 8 Permits and Fees Building - - - - - - - 9 Fines and Forfeitures - - - - - - - 10 Investment Earnings 14,606 - - - - 275 14,881 11 Contributions 3,000 - 164,300 - 30,000 - 197,300 12 Misc Income 9,587 - - 60,000 - - 69,587 13 Total Revenues 843,895 1,400,000 501,240 60,000 30,000 275 2,835,410 14 Transfers In - - - - - - - 15 Other Sources - - - - - - - 16 Total Other Sources - - - - - - - 17 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 843,895 $ 1,400,000 $ 501,240 $ 60,000 $ 30,000 $ 275 $ 2,835,410 18 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 19 Payroll Transfers In $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 20 Payroll Transfers Out 555,167 - - - - - 555,167 21 Total Payroll & Related 555,167 - - - - - 555,167 22 Debt - - - - - - - 23 Economimc Development - - 336,940 - - - 336,940 24 Insurance - - - - - - - 25 Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - 26 Rent & Utilities 80,614 - - - - - 80,614 27 Services 329,516 - - - - - 329,516 28 Supplies 11,762 - - - - - 11,762 29 Travel & Training 5,919 - - - - - 5,919 30 Total Operations & Maintenance 427,811 - 336,940 - - - 764,751 31 Capital Outlay - - - - - - - 32 Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - - - - - 33 Capital Project Funds - - - - - - - 34 Total Capital - - - - - - - 35 Transfers Out - 1,400,000 164,300 - - - 1,564,300 36 Other Uses - - - - - - - 37 Total Other Uses - 1,400,000 164,300 - - - 1,564,300 38 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 982,978 1,400,000 501,240 - - - 2,884,218 39 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES (139,083) - - 60,000 30,000 275 (48,808) 40 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 753,694 - - 377,549 30,000 14,065 1,175,308 41 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 614,610 $ - $ - $ 437,549 $ 60,000 $ 14,340 $ 1,126,499 51 Section 6 Special Revenue Funds Overview Special Revenue Funds are comprised of • 220 Visitor Association Fund • 200 4B Economic Development Fund • 210 Economic Development Fund • 215 Local Public Improvement District • 225 Public Arts Fund • 418 Lone Star Public Fund Revenues and Other Sources • Budgeted to be $2.8M; a 2% increase of $42K from prior year estimated of $2.8M o Sales and Use Tax increased $260K o Contribution decreased $175K; Economic development fund 210 contributions (lot fees) for Westlake Academy decreased from prior year. o Misc Income decreased $42K; Local Public Improvement District Fund 215 decreased misc reimbursements from prior year. Expenditures and Other Uses • Budgeted to be $2.9M; a 1% decrease of $35K from prior year estimated of $2.9M o Payroll transfers out to General Fund increased $36K; due to market band adjustments, performance pay, insurance, taxes and retirement. o Economic Development increased $98K; due to a new sales tax abatement. o Rent and Utilities increased $20K; based on tiered schedule for the new town hall building. o Services decreased $176K; Local Public Improvement District Fund 215 consultant fees decreased. o Transfers out decreased $13K Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $1.1M o $614K - Visitors Association Fund o $ 0 - 4B Economic Development Fund o $ 0 - Economic Development Fund o $437K - Local Public Improvement District o $ 60K - Public Arts Fund o $ 14K - Lone Star Public Fund 52 53 Fiscal Year Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget vs FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% 2 Property Tax 271,411 296,984 256,878 (40,106) -14% 3 Hotel Tax - - - - 0% 4 Charge for Services - - - - 0% 5 Beverage Tax - - - - 0% 6 Franchise Fees - - - - 0% 7 Permits & Fees - - - - 0% 8 Permits & Fees Buildings - - - - 0% 9 Fines & Forfeitures - - - - 0% 10 Investment Earnings - - - - 0% 11 Contributions - - - - 0% 12 Misc Income - - - - 0% 13 Total Revenues 271,411 296,984 256,878 (40,106) -14% 14 Transfers In 2,710,068 2,412,169 2,405,901 (6,268) 0% 15 Other Sources - - - - 0% 16 Total Other Sources 2,710,068 2,412,169 2,405,901 (6,268) 100% 17 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 2,981,479$ 2,709,153$ 2,662,779$ (46,374)$ -2% EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 18 Payroll Transfer In -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% 19 Payroll Transfer Out - - - - 0% 20 Total Payroll and Related - - - - 0% 21 Debt Service Payments 2,987,768 2,688,113 2,689,990 1,877 0% 22 Economic Development - - - - 0% 23 Insurance - - - - 0% 24 Repair & Maintenance - - - - 0% 25 Rent & Utilities - - - - 0% 26 Services - 2,180 3,610 1,430 66% 27 Supplies - - - - 0% 28 Water Purchases - - - - 0% 29 Total Operations & Maintenance 2,987,768 2,690,293 2,693,600 3,307 0% 30 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 2,987,768 2,690,293 2,693,600 3,307 0% 31 Capital Outlay - - - - 0% 32 Projects - Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - - 0% 33 Projects - Capital & Expansions Funds - - - - 0% 34 Total Capital - - - - 0% 35 Transfers Out - - - - 0% 36 Other Uses - - - - 0% 37 Total Other Uses - - - - 0% 38 TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - - 0% 39 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 2,987,768 2,690,293 2,693,600 3,307 0.12% 40 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (6,289) 18,860 (30,821) (49,681) 263% 41 FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 11,961 11,961 30,821 18,860 158% 42 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 5,671 30,821 (0) (30,821) -100% 43 Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 5,671 30,821 (0) (30,821) -100% 44 UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 45 Cash 5,671$ 30,821$ (0)$ (30,821)$ -100% 46 - - - - 0% 47 - - - - 0% 48 - - - - 0% 49 - - - - 0% 50 TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 5,671$ 30,821$ (0)$ (30,821)$ -100% Combined Program Summary DEBT SERVICE FUNDS 54 DEBT SERVICE FUNDS Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Debt Fund 300 (revenue supported) Debt Fund 300 (property tax supported) TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - 2 Property Tax - 256,878 256,878 3 Charge for Services - - - 4 Hotel Tax - - - 5 Beverage Tax - - - 6 Franchise Fees - - - 7 Permits and Fees - - - 8 Permits and Fees Building - - - 9 Fines and Forfeitures - - - 10 Investment Earnings - - - 11 Contributions - - - 12 Misc Income - - - 13 Total Revenues - 256,878 256,878 14 Transfers In 2,405,901 - 2,405,901 15 Other Sources - - - 16 Total Other Sources 2,405,901 - 2,405,901 17 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 2,405,901 $ 256,878 $ 2,662,779 18 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 19 Payroll Transfers In $ - $ - $ - 20 Payroll Transfers Out - - - 21 Total Payroll & Related - - - 22 Debt 2,403,171 286,819 2,689,990 23 Economimc Development - - - 24 Insurance - - - 25 Repair & Maintenance - - - 26 Rent & Utilities - - - 27 Services 2,730 880 3,610 28 Supplies - - - 29 Water Purchases - - - 30 Total Operations & Maintenance 2,405,901 287,699 2,693,600 31 Capital Outlay - - - 32 Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - 33 Capital Project Funds - - - 34 Total Capital - - - 35 Transfers Out - - - 36 Other Uses - - - 37 Total Other Uses - - - 38 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 2,405,901 287,699 2,693,600 39 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES - (30,821) (30,821) 40 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE - 30,821 30,821 41 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ - $ (0) $ (0) 55 Section 7 Debt Service Funds Overview Debt Service Funds are comprised of • Fund 300 – Revenue Supported Debt • Fund 301 – Property Tax Supported Debt Revenues and Other Sources • Budgeted to be $2.7M; a 2% decrease of $46K from prior year estimated of $2.7M o Property Tax decreased $40K; primarily due to more than anticipated taxes received in the prior year to be used on current year debt. o Transfers in decreased $6.2K Expenditures and Other Uses • Budgeted to be $2.7M; a .12% increase of $3.3K from prior year estimated of $2.7M o Debt Service Payments increased $1.8K o Services for Bank Charge increased $1.4K Fund Balance • Ending fund balance is projected to be zero. 56 57 WESTLAKE ACADEMY Program Summary Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated Transportation 10,000$ 10,000$ 10,500$ 500$ 5.00% Parking 15,000 15,000 15,000 - 0.00% Athletic Activities 90,700 90,700 94,200 3,500 3.86% Interest Earned 3,000 9,000 9,000 - 0.00% WAF Blacksmith Donation 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 - 0.00% WAF Salary Reimbursement 67,800 67,800 69,834 2,034 3.00% Town Contribution - Westlake Reserve 300,000 300,000 300,000 - 0.00% Town Contribution 15,000 15,000 15,000 - 0.00% Other Local Revenue (BTS, Tech & Other)58,800 58,800 47,300 (11,500) -19.56% Fund raiser (Back to School)16,000 - - - 0.00% Food Services 6,100 7,000 7,000 - 0.00% Total Local Revenues 1,582,400 1,573,300 1,567,834 (5,466) -0.35% TEA - Foundation School Funds (Inc. accrual)5,781,200 5,913,676 5,741,074 (172,602) -2.92% CTE Funding (additional TEA-FSP Funds)572,200 424,933 508,316 83,383 19.62% TEA - Available School Funds 191,300 167,161 365,166 198,005 118.45% TEA - Facilities Allotment $200 per ADA - - 184,856 184,856 0.00% TEA - IB Training 6,300 6,300 3,000 (3,300) -52.38% TRS On-behalf/Medicare Part B 450,700 392,275 477,583 85,308 21.75% Total State Revenues 7,001,700 6,904,345 7,279,995 375,650 5.44% TOTAL REVENUES 8,584,100$ 8,477,645$ 8,847,829$ 370,184$ 4.37% Function 11 - Instructional 4,975,270$ 4,839,602$ 5,008,974$ 169,372$ 3.50% Function 12 - Resources & Media 82,639 87,379 90,935 3,556 4.07% Function 13 - Curriculum & Staff Development 84,545 86,200 84,545 (1,655) -1.92% Function 21 - Instructional Leadership 206,623 161,919 170,216 8,297 5.12% Function 23 - School Leadership 757,692 896,747 924,198 27,451 3.06% Function 31 - Guidance & Counseling 223,973 307,664 321,467 13,803 4.49% Function 33 - Health Services 66,024 71,146 72,919 1,773 2.49% Function 36 - Co/Extracurricular Activities 218,358 237,474 219,169 (18,305) -7.71% Function 41 - Administrative 260,167 319,088 308,772 (10,316) -3.23% Function 51 - Maintenance & Operations 960,743 947,615 947,445 (170) -0.02% Function 52 - Security & Monitoring - - 40,000 40,000 0.00% Function 53 - Data Processing 195,505 199,407 216,103 16,696 8.37% Function 61 - Community Services 124,460 133,763 138,322 4,559 3.41% Function 71 - Debt Service 166,200 167,068 167,068 - 0.00% TOTAL EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTION 8,322,199$ 8,455,072$ 8,710,132$ 255,060$ 3.02% Object Code 61XX - Salaries 6,279,299$ 6,378,398$ 6,585,303$ 206,905$ 3.24% Object Code 62XX - Contracted Services 1,003,205 1,069,705 1,056,667 (13,038) -1.22% Object Code 63XX - Supplies & Materials 395,828 322,333 425,124 102,791 31.89% Object Code 64XX - Other Operating Costs 477,667 517,568 475,970 (41,598) -8.04% Object Code 65XX - Debt Service 166,200 167,068 167,068 - 0.00% TOTAL EXPENDITURES BY OBJECT 8,322,199$ 8,455,072$ 8,710,132$ 255,060$ 3.02% Other Resources - Local 60,000$ 85,000$ 76,000$ (9,000)$ -10.59% Other Uses - Local (60,000) (85,000) (76,000) 9,000 -10.59% NET OTHER RESOURCES (USES)-$ -$ -$ -$ 0.00% EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXP 261,901$ 22,573$ 137,697$ 115,124$ 510.01% FUND BALANCE BEGINNING 939,271$ 939,271$ 961,844$ 22,573$ 2.40% FUND BALANCE ENDING 1,201,172 961,844 1,099,541 137,697 14.32% Assigned - Bus Maintenance 24,090 24,090 19,000 (5,090) -21.13% Assigned - Uniform/Equip replacement 15,000 15,000 15,000 - 0.00% FUND BALANCE ENDING (Unassigned)1,162,082$ 922,754$ 1,065,541$ 142,787$ 15.47% Number of Operating Days (365)51 40 45 4.82 12.09% Dollars per Operating Day 22,801$ 23,165$ 23,863$ 699$ 3.02% vs REVENUES EXPENDITURES 58 Section 8 Westlake Academy Overview Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues are budgeted at $8.8M; a 4.37% increase of $370K from prior year estimated of $8.4M • Other sources are budgeted at $76K; a 10.59% decrease of $9K from prior year estimated of $85K Expenditures and • Expenditures are budgeted at $8.7M; a 3.02% increase of $255K from prior year estimated of $8.4M • Other sources are budgeted at $76K; a 10.59% decrease from prior year estimated of $85K Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $1.09M • This amount represents a 14.32% increase of $137K from prior year estimated fund balance. • The unassigned balance of $1.06M represents coverage for 45 operating days. 59 This page is intentionally blank 60 61 Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Adopted Estimated Proposed FY 18/19 Proposed Budget Budget Budget vs FY 17/18 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 17/18 Estimated REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% 2 Property Tax - - - - 0% 3 Hotel Tax - - - - 0% 4 Charge for Services - - - - 0% 5 Beverage Tax - - - - 0% 6 Franchise Fees - - - - 0% 7 Permits & Fees - - - - 0% 8 Permits & Fees Buildings - - - - 0% 9 Fines & Forfeitures - - - - 0% #Investment Earnings 41,600 67,180 67,180 - 0% #Contributions 175,000 201,390 - (201,390) -100% #Misc Income - - - - 0% #Total Revenues 216,600 268,570 67,180 (201,390) -75% #Transfers In 1,765,324 640,000 1,189,300 549,300 100% #Other Sources - - 3,387,134 3,387,134 100% #Total Other Sources 1,765,324 640,000 4,576,434 3,936,434 100% #TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1,981,924$ 908,570$ 4,643,614$ 3,735,044$ 411% EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES #Payroll Transfer In -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% #Payroll Transfer Out 54,565 54,565 - (54,565) -100% #Total Payroll and Related 54,565 54,565 - (54,565) 100% #Debt - - - - 0% #Economic Development - - - - 0% #Repair & Maintenance - - - - 0% #Rent & Utilities - - - - 0% #Services - - - - 0% #Supplies - - - - 0% #Travel & Training - - - - 0% #Total Operations & Maintenance - - - - 0% #TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 54,565 54,565 - (54,565) 100% #Capital Project Fund 410 445,000 595,000 2,192,051 1,597,051 268% #Capital Expansion Fund Municipal 405 9,843,000 7,339,673 2,399,630 (4,940,043) -67% #Capital Expansion Fund Expansion 412 - - 85,000 85,000 #DIV/0! #Total Capital 10,288,000 7,934,673 4,676,681 (3,257,992) -41% #Transfers Out - - - - 0% #Other Uses - - - - 0% #Total Other Uses - - - - 0% #TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 10,288,000 7,934,673 4,676,681 (3,257,992) -41% #TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 10,342,565$ 7,989,238$ 4,676,681$ (3,312,557)$ -41% #EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (8,360,641) (7,080,668) (33,067) 7,047,601 100% #FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 14,283,223 14,283,223 7,202,555 (7,080,668) -50% #FUND BALANCE, ENDING 5,922,582 7,202,555 7,169,488 (33,067) 0% #Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 5,922,582 7,202,555 7,169,488 (33,067) -57% #UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE, ENDING -$ -$ -$ -$ 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS #Cash 5,922,582 7,202,555 7,169,488 (33,067) 0% #- 0% #- 0% #- 0% #TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS 5,922,582$ 7,202,555$ 7,169,488$ (33,067)$ -57% # Combined Program Summary CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS 62 CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS Current Year Fund Detail Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Capital Fund Academy Fund Municipal Fund TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES 1 General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - $ - 2 Property Tax - - - - 3 Charge for Services - - - - 4 Hotel Tax - - - - 5 Beverage Tax - - - - 6 Franchise Fees - - - - 7 Permits and Fees - - - - 8 Permits and Fees Building - - - - 9 Fines and Forfeitures - - - - Investment Earnings 38,000 29,180 - 67,180 Contributions - - - - Misc Income - - - - Total Revenues 38,000 29,180 - 67,180 Transfers In 1,025,000 164,300 - 1,189,300 Other Sources 3,387,134 - - 3,387,134 Total Other Sources 4,412,134 164,300 - 4,576,434 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 4,450,134 $ 193,480 $ - $ 4,643,614 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Transfers In $ - $ - $ - $ - Payroll Transfers Out - - - - Total Payroll & Related - - - - Debt - - - - Economimc Development - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - Services - - - - Supplies - - - - Travel & Training - - - - Total Operations & Maintenance - - - - Capital Outlay - - - - Maintenance & Replacement Funds - - - - Capital Project Funds 2,192,051 85,000 2,399,630 4,676,681 Total Capital 2,192,051 85,000 2,399,630 4,676,681 Transfers Out - - - - Other Uses - - - - Total Other Uses - - - - TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 2,192,051 $ 85,000 $ 2,399,630 $ 4,676,681 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES 2,258,083 108,480 (2,399,630) (33,067) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 1,590,074 1,782,525 3,829,956 7,202,555 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 3,848,157 $ 1,891,005 $ 1,430,326 $ 7,169,488 63 Section 9 Capital Project Funds Overview Capital Project Funds are comprised of • 410 Capital Project Fund • 412 Academic Expansion Fund (Westlake Academy) • 405 Municipal Expansion Fund (Fire Station) Revenues and Other Sources • Budgeted to be $4.6M; a 411% increase of $3.7M from prior year estimated of $908K o Contributions decreased $201K; due to one-time receipts in prior year. o Transfers in increased $549K for one-time planning and development building permit fees and revenues. o Other Sources increased $3.4M due to one-time bonds for improvements in roads, facilities and grounds. Expenditures and Other Uses • Budgeted to be $4.7M; a 41% decrease of $3.3M from prior year estimated of $7.9M o Payroll transfers out to General Fund decreased $54K; due to one-time costs in prior year for Project Manager in the Public Works department. o Projects for Capital and Expansion decreased $3.3M  Fund 410 - Capital Projects increased $1.6M; for improvements in roads, facilities and grounds; will be offset by bond funds noted in revenue section.  Fund 405 - Municipal Expansion - decreased $4.9M; due to one-time costs in prior year for Fire Station construction.  Fund 412 - Academic Expansion - increased $85K; due to one-time costs for Westlake Academy facilities master plan update. Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be $7.2M o $3.8M - Capital Project Fund 410 o $1.9M - Academic Expansion Fund 412 o $1.4M - Municipal Expansion Fund 405 64 ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 Transfer in from GF 300,000$ 1,025,000$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Interest Income 38,000 38,000 38,000 38,000 38,000 38,000 NET REVENUES $ 338,000 $ 1,063,000 $ 38,000 $ 38,000 $ 38,000 $ 38,000 Cash (Fund Balance)-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ FM1938 TOWN IMPROVEMENTS (50,000) (220,000) - - - - NET project 20 (50,000) (220,000) - - - - Cash (Fund Balance)- - - - - - SH114/HWY170 ENHANCEMENTS - - - - - - NET project 30 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 480,180 - - - - ROANOKE ROAD RECON/DRAIN SOUTH - - (480,180) - - - NET project 34 - 480,180 (480,180) - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 281,960 - - - - SAM SCHOOL ROAD RECON & DRAINANGE - (281,960) - - - - NET project 40 - - - - - - Cash (Fund Balance)- - - - - - E.DOVE ROAD RECON & DRAINAGE (vaq/tb)(100,000) - - - - - NET project 41 (100,000) - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 983,954 - - - - OTTINGER ROAD RECON & DRAINAGE - - (983,954) - - - NET project 58 - 983,954 (983,954) - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 404,125 - - - - PEARSON LANE RECON & DRAINAGE - (404,125) - - - - NET project 60 - - - - - - Cash (Fund Balance)- - - - - - DOVE ROAD/FM1938 SIGNALIZATION (160,000) - - - - - NET project 68 (160,000) - - - - - Contribution Revenue 26,390 - - - - - SOLANA/HWY 114 SIGNALIZATION - - - - - - NET project 69 26,390 - - - - - Contribution Revenue - - - - - - SOLANA/FM1938 SIGNALIZATION (10,000) - - - - - NET project 70 (10,000) - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 80,000 - - - - FLASHING CROSSWALK LIGHTS - (80,000) - - - - NET project 75 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 90,000 - - - - SOLANA PAVEMENT REPAIRS - (90,000) - - - - NET project 78 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 54,450 - - - - WYCK HILL PAVEMENT RESURFACE - (54,450) - - - - NET project 79 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 80,000 - - - - FM1938 PAVEMENT REPAIRS - (80,000) - - - - NET project 80 - - - - - - ROAD and STREET IMPROVEMENTS DEPT 16 $ (293,610) $ 1,244,134 $ (1,464,134) $ - $ - $ - FUND 410 - CAPITAL PROJECT FUND FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL FORECAST CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS DESCRIPTION 65 ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL FORECAST CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS DESCRIPTION WAF Grant 175,000$ -$ 135,000$ -$ -$ -$ WA - OUTDOOR LEARNING CENTER (175,000) - (123,595) - - - NET project 71 - - 11,405 - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 82,000 - - - - WA - POND REPAIRS - (82,000) - - - - NET project 77 - - - - - - FACILITY and GROUND IMPROVEMENTS DEPT 17 $ - $ - $ 11,405 $ - $ - $ - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M -$ 229,500$ -$ -$ -$ -$ WAYFINDING SIGNAGE - (229,500) - - - - NET project 67 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 30,000 - - - - TRAIL CONNECTION AT 114/SOLANA - (30,000) - - - - NET project 42 - - - - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 300,949 - - - - TRAIL - WESTLAKE ACADEMY TO CEMETERY - - (300,949) - - - NET project 52 - 300,949 (300,949) - - - Bond Revenue - Issue $3.387M - 290,016 - - - - TRAIL - DOVE/PEARSON/ASPEN - (290,016) - - - - NET project 53 - - - - - - Contribution in prior year - - - - - - CEMETARY IMPROVEMENTS (100,000) (50,000) - - - - NET project 76 (100,000) (50,000) - - - - PARKS/TRAIL/CEMETERY IMPROVEMENTS DEPT 19 $ (100,000) $ 250,949 $ (300,949) $ - $ - $ - Cash (Fund Balance)-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Fiber Connectivity between Buildings - (300,000) - - - - INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENTS $ - $ (300,000) $ - $ - $ - $ - Cash (Fund Balance)-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Payroll Transfers Out to GF (54,565) - - - - - PAYROLL TRANSFERS $ (54,565) $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Total Revenues & Transfers in 539,390$ 4,450,134$ 173,000$ 38,000$ 38,000$ 38,000$ Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (649,565) (2,192,051) (1,888,678) - - - NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (110,175) 2,258,083 (1,715,678) 38,000 38,000 38,000 Beginning Fund Balance 1,700,249 1,590,074 3,848,157 2,132,479 2,170,479 2,208,479 Ending Fund Balance 1,590,074 3,848,157 2,132,479 2,170,479 2,208,479 2,246,479 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 1,590,074 3,848,157 2,132,479 2,170,479 2,208,479 2,246,479 Unassigned Ending Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 66 ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FIVE YEAR FINANCIAL FORECAST CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS DESCRIPTION Engineering Fees (545,742)$ (4,100)$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Construction Expense (6,248,000) (1,739,281) - - - - Land Purchase - - - - - - Design Fees (76,950) (61,474) - - - - Furniture & Fixtures (200,000) (75,000) - - - - Security Service (167,000) (150,500) - - - - Contingency (75,000) (107,700) - - - - Misc. Expense (4,250) (258,075) - - - - Appraisal Fees (2,115) - - - - - Misc Legal (3,147) - - - - - Boyle & Lowry (16,690) - - - - - Advertising Public Notices (224) (2,500) - - - - Printing (555) (1,000) - - - - Total Expenditures $ (7,339,673) $ (2,399,630) $ - $ - $ - $ - NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (7,339,673)$ (2,399,630)$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Beginning Fund Balance 11,169,629 3,829,956 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 Ending Fund Balance 3,829,956 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 Restricted Funds 3,829,956 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 1,430,326 Unassigned Ending Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Interest Earned 29,180$ 29,180$ 27,400$ 27,400$ 27,400$ 27,400$ Transfer in from ED 200 340,000 164,300 145,700 127,100 127,100 127,100 Total Revenues & Transfers In 369,180 193,480 173,100 154,500 154,500 154,500 Consultant Fees - Master Plan - (85,000) - - - - Total Expenditures & Transfers Out - (85,000) - - - - NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 369,180 108,480 173,100 154,500 154,500 154,500 Beginning Fund Balance 1,413,345 1,782,525 1,891,005 2,064,105 2,218,605 2,373,105 Ending Fund Balance 1,782,525 1,891,005 2,064,105 2,218,605 2,373,105 2,527,605 Restricted Funds 1,782,525 1,891,005 2,064,105 2,218,605 2,373,105 2,527,605 Unassigned Ending Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Total Revenues & Transfers in 908,570$ 4,643,614$ 346,100$ 192,500$ 192,500$ 192,500$ Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (7,989,238) (4,676,681) (1,888,678) - - - NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (7,080,668) (33,067) (1,542,578) 192,500 192,500 192,500 Beginning Fund Balance 14,283,223 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 Ending Fund Balance 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 6,204,410 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 6,204,410 Unassigned Ending Balance -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ TOTAL ALL FUNDS FUND 405 - FIRE STATION PROJECT FUND 412 - ACADEMY EXPANSION 67 This page is intentionally blank 68 69 CAPITAL PROJECT FORECAST Formerly Adopted and New Proposed Projects Totals FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 PROJECT Dept Proj thru Estimated Proposed Projected GRAND No.No.FY 16/17 Budget Budget Budget TOTAL X 405 Fire Station Complex 2,737,121$ 7,339,673$ 2,399,630$ -$ 12,476,424$ TOTAL FUND 405 2,737,121 7,339,673 2,399,630 - 12,476,424 X 412 Academy Expansion (Master Plan Update)- - 85,000 - 85,000 TOTAL FUND 412 - - 85,000 - 85,000 16 CP20 FM1938 Town Improvements 3,035,361 50,000 220,000 - 3,305,361 16 CP34 Roanoke Road Reconstruction & Drainage South 2,900 - - 480,180 483,080 16 CP40 Sam School Road Reconstruction & Drainage - - 281,960 - 281,960 FM 1938 & Dove Road Traffic Signal (Cash)277,730 160,000 - - FM 1938 & Dove Road Traffic Signal (Contribution)26,389 - - - 16 CP70 FM 1938 and Solana Traffic Signalization 294,703 10,000 - - 304,703 16 CP75 Flashing Crosswalk - Dove/Pearson & Dove/Ottinger - - 80,000 - 80,000 16 CP78 Solana Pavement Repairs - - 90,000 - 90,000 16 CP79 Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface - - 54,450 - 54,450 16 CP80 FM1938 Pavement Repairs - - 80,000 - 80,000 Sub-Total - Road/Street Improvements 3,637,083 220,000 806,410 480,180 5,143,673 17 CP71 WA Outdoor Learning Space 129,808 175,000 - 123,595 428,403 17 CP77 WA Pond Repairs - - 82,000 - 82,000 Sub-Total - Academic Facilities Improvements 129,808 175,000 82,000 123,595 510,403 19 CP42 Trail Connection at Hwy 114 & Solana Blvd.- - 30,000 - 30,000 19 CP67 Wayfinding Signage - - 229,500 - 229,500 19 CP76 Cemetary Improvements - 100,000 50,000 - 150,000 Sub-Total - Trail/Park/Cemetery Improvements - 100,000 309,500 - 409,500 19 CP52 Trail - Academy to Cemetery - - - 300,949 16 CP58 Ottinger Road Recon/Drainage - - - 983,954 19 CP53 Trail - Dove/Pearson/Aspen - - 290,016 - 16 CP60 Pearson Lane Recon/Drainage - - 404,125 - Sub-Total - Trail and Road Improvements - - 694,141 1,284,903 1,979,044 20 CP81 Firber Connectivity Project - - 300,000 - 300,000 Sub-Total - Information Technology Improvements - - 300,000 - 300,000 TOTAL FUND 410 3,766,891 495,000 2,192,051 1,888,678 8,342,620 6,504,012$ 7,834,673$ # $ 4,676,681 #1,888,678$ #20,904,044$ Totals FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 PROJECT thru Estimated Proposed Projected GRAND FY 16/17 Budget Budget Budget TOTAL Contributions (Formerly adopted)321,092$ 110,000$ 50,000$ -$ 481,092$ Foundation Contribution 129,808 175,000 0 123,595 428,403 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS 450,900 285,000 50,000 123,595 909,495 Cash/Fund Balance (Formerly adopted)3,315,991 210,000 605,000 0 4,130,991 TOTAL CASH 3,315,991 210,000 605,000 0 4,130,991 FY 17/18 Fire Station - 20 yr Bonds 2,737,121 7,339,673 2,399,630 0 12,476,424 FY 18/19 Street/Trail - 20 yr Bonds 0 0 1,622,051 1,765,083 3,387,134 TOTAL BONDS 2,737,121 7,339,673 4,021,681 1,765,083 15,863,558 6,504,012$ 7,834,673$ $ 4,676,681 1,888,678$ 20,904,044$ Project Description GRAND TOTAL ALL PROJECTS TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL PROJECTS 1,284,903 694,141 464,119 CP6816 FUND 405 - MUNICIPAL FACILITIES FUND 412 - ACADEMY FACILITIES FUND 410 - CAPITAL PROJECTS Funding Summary 70 Project Description: Fund 405 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering 28,190 545,742 4,100 - - - - 578,032 Construction Expense - 6,248,000 1,739,281 - - - - 7,987,281 Land Purchase 1,750,000 - - - - - - 1,750,000 Design Fees 663,576 76,950 61,474 - - - - 802,000 Furniture & Fixtures - 200,000 75,000 - - - - 275,000 Security - 167,000 150,500 - - - - 317,500 Contingency - 75,000 107,700 - - - - 182,700 Misc/Land/Foundation - 4,250 258,075 - - - - 262,325 Appraisal Fees 10,885 2,115 - - - - - 13,000 Misc Legal 12,853 3,147 - - - - - 16,000 Boyle & Lowry 18,310 16,690 - - - - - 35,000 Advertising 776 224 2,500 - - - - 3,500 Bond Issuance Tax Note 2017 29,232 - - - - - - 29,232 Bond Issuance 2016 CO 222,454 - - - - - - 222,454 Printing 845 555 1,000 - - - - 2,400 PROJECT EXPENDITURES 2,737,121 7,339,673 2,399,630 - - - - 12,476,424  Fund 405 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - 319,764 - - - - 319,764 Misc Contribution 2016 CO 246,750 - - - - - - 246,750 Texas Tax Note 1,530,000 - - - - - - 1,530,000 Bond Proceeds 9,180,000 - - - - - - 9,180,000 Contributions - Private 1,200,000 - - - - - - 1,200,000 PROJECT EXPENDITURES 12,156,750 - 319,764 - - - - 12,476,514  Land Contribution (in kind) 1,750,000 - - - - - - 1,750,000 FUNDING TOTAL 13,906,750 - 319,764 - - - - 14,226,514 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Services - - - 3,900 5,150 5,305 5,464 - Insurance - - - 3,700 4,893 5,040 5,191 - Repair & Maintenance - - - 38,000 50,000 51,500 53,045 - Rent & Utilities - - - 48,500 64,580 66,517 68,513 - Debt Service CO 2017 - - - 509,725 508,500 507,125 510,525 - Debt Service Tax Note 2017 - - - 234,118 233,254 233,326 233,326 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 837,943 866,377 868,813 876,064 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Iconic Fire-EMS Station PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET This project will provide an inconic Fire-EMS Station, which includes 4 bays, sleeping areas for staff members, kitchen/food preparation, storage, multi-purpose space to serve as a community/staff training, EOC room and offices for administration. The station is estimated to be approximately 18K square feet of usable space and would also include the Town's Emergency Operations Center (EOC) with a back-up generator for sustainability. It does not include any apparatus or a fire training facility. The project includes the acquisition of land by private donation, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 71 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering 80,923 - - - - - - 80,923 Consultant Fees - - 85,000 - - - - 85,000 Design Fees 550,885 - - - - - - 550,885 Misc. Legal 7,861 - - - - - - 7,861 Irrigation R&M 4,987 - - - - - - 4,987 Landscape - WA Expansion 20,264 - - - - - - 20,264 Utility Relocations (W/S/E)55,286 - - - - - - 55,286 Advertising 2,496 - - - - - - 2,496 Audio Visual 349,992 - - - - - - 349,992 Printing 116 - - - - - - 116 Courier Service 1,578 - - - - - - 1,578 Security Expense 11,000 - - - - - - 11,000 Misc. Expense 4,087 - - - - - - 4,087 Construction Expense 9,135,117 - - - - - - 9,135,117 Water Service 3,641 - - - - - - 3,641 Furniture & Fixtures 463,795 - - - - - - 463,795 Bond Issuance Costs - 2013 CO 123,316 - - - - - - 123,316 Transfer Out to GF 36,398 - - - - - - 36,398 Portable Buildings 359,617 - - - - - - 359,617 EXPENDITURES TOTAL 11,211,358 - 85,000 - - - - 11,296,358 410-10110-20-000-000081 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Contributions 1,080,473 - - - - - - 1,080,473 Interest Earned 12,800 29,180 29,180 27,400 27,400 27,400 27,400 180,760 Interest Earned Bonds 11,192 - - - - - - 11,192 Misc Revenue 233,500 - - - - - - 233,500 Transfer in from GF 720,726 - - - - - - 720,726 Transfer in from ED 1,420,000 340,000 164,300 145,700 127,100 127,100 127,100 2,451,300 Transfer in from CP 200,000 - - - - - - 200,000 Other Sources 366,774 - - - - - - 366,774 Bond Proceeds - 2013 CO 8,294,800 - - - - - - 8,294,800 Bond Premiums - 2013 CO 284,437 - - - - - - 284,437 FUNDING TOTAL 12,624,703 369,180 193,480 173,100 154,500 154,500 154,500 13,823,963 FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Westlake Academy Master Plan Update PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - WA campus facility master planning was discussed at a joint Town Council/Board of Trustees workshop on February 5, 2018. Much discussion between Staff and the Council/Board ensued, with a consensus that further discussion on this topic was needed. The discussion on February 5th with the Council/Board focused on the need and desire to re-address capital improvement planning for Westlake Academy. Presently we have a multi-year Westlake Academy (WA) Campus Facility Master Plan that was adopted by the Town Council on November 12, 2012 and by the Board of Trustees on November 5, 2012. Much time and effort as well as financial resources were invested in this Plan. Since it has been almost six years since it was approved and adopted, it is time to re-examine the Plan again, if for no other reason than to make sure it is still meeting the Town’s needs for its school, Westlake Academy. If approved the Staff approach is a “three pronged” approach, with parallel pathways conducted concurrently which ultimately intersect, thus moving us forward in both the short and the long term. 72 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000071 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction 129,808 175,000 - 123,595 - - 428,403 Design - - - - - - - - FF&E - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - EXPENDITURE TOTAL 129,808 175,000 - 123,595 - - - 428,403 410-33700-00-000-000071 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Transfer in from General Fund - - - - - - - - Transfer in from Utility Fund - - - - - - - - Contribution WAF 129,808 175,000 - 123,595 - - - 428,403 FUNDING TOTAL 129,808 175,000 - 123,595 - - - 428,403 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Services - - - - 1,000 1,000 1,000 - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - 2,000 2,060 2,122 2,185 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 2,000 3,060 3,122 3,185 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #71 Westlake Academy - Outdoor Learning Space PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING The outdoor classroom greatly facilitates teachers’ flexibility in their lessons to incorporate more hands-on science experiences. Establishing an area for on-going investigations has provided the students an authentic opportunity to connect their learning to the natural environment. Activities may include plant and animal investigations (including insects & small invertebrates), water chemistry projects using both our own pond as well as additional water sources housed within the facility, earth science, as well as understanding weather and weather patterns. The space is located along the north drive and around the pond. Phase I was completed in May 2017 which includes the vegetable garden and planter boxes located north of the Gym. Phase II was completed in May 2018 which includes the Math & Science Plaza; includes two concrete pads, one for the phase of the moon, sundial, compass, simple machine rack and ruler, sidewalks and retaining walls. Phase III in FY19/20 has not been selected at the is time. There are 5 other stations in the outdoor learning stations master plan which include, water station, courtyard garden, art courtyard, nature trail and music station. At this time the school or WA Foundation has not made any commitment on funding any of this stations. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 73 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000077 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - 12,000 - - - 12,000 Construction - - 70,000 - - - 70,000 Design - - - - - - - - FF&E - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 82,000 - - - - 82,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Transfer in from General Fund - - - - - - - - Transfer in from Utility Fund - - - - - - - - Bonds 2018/19 CO Bonds - - 82,000 - - - - 82,000 FUNDING TOTAL - - 82,000 - - - - 82,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed OPERATING IMPACT FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - 2,060 2,122 2,185 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 5,740 5,740 5,740 - Other - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 7,800 7,862 7,925 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #77 Westlake Academy Pond Repairs PROJECT EXPENSE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The irrigation pond at the Westlake Academy is leaking on the east side with water running onto the property east of the campus. In March of 2017 a clay dam was installed which has slowed the water flow. This project will remove the silt from the pond and install a clay liner. 74 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000042 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - Construction 30,000 30,000 Design - Contingency - Other Admin cost - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 30,000 - - - - 30,000 410-33501-00-000-000042 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 30,000 - - - - 30,000 Transfer in from Utility Fund - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 30,000 - - - - 30,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - 2,100 2,100 2,100 2,100 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 2,100 2,100 2,100 2,100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #42 Trail Connection at Hwy 114 and Solana Blvd. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING This project will extend an existing 8 ft. concrete trail an estimated 1,000 feet from the west side of Hwy 114 to the east side of Hwy 114. This project will start at the same time the signal project for the intersection of Solana Blvd and Hwy 114 begins. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 75 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000067 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - 229,500 - - - 229,500 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 229,500 - - - - 229,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash/Transfers - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 229,500 - - - - 229,500 UnFunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 229,500 - - - - 229,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 16,065 16,065 16,065 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 16,065 16,065 16,065 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #67 Wayfinding Signage The "Wayfinding" Sign Project will showcase the town’s major venues, direct visitors through major corridors that lead to various Town’s destinations and trails. The project would include the locations, design and cost estimate to create and install the wayfinding signage. The package would include but not limited to the following, • Development of a Master Plan to provide staff a guideline and template for wayfinding • Implementation. • Recognizable wayfinding system that is easily adaptable for future development • Create a signage system that blends into Westlake • Material selections • Define trail access points PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 76 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000076 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - 10,000 - - - - - 10,000 Construction - 90,000 50,000 - - - - 140,000 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other Admin cost - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 100,000 50,000 - - - - 150,000 410-33700-000-000076 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash/Transfers - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - 150,000 - - - - - 150,000 Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - - - - - - - UnFunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - 150,000 - - - - - 150,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - 2,000 2,060 2,122 - Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 2,000 2,060 2,122 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #76 Cemetery Improvements PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING This project would include a new water well, storage tanks, irrigation system, fence on the southeast corner and underground power for the water well. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 77 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000020 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - - - - - - - Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other 3,035,361 50,000 220,000 - - - - 3,305,361 EXPENDITURES TOTAL 3,035,361 50,000 220,000 - - - - 3,305,361 410-10110-00-000-000020 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) 3,035,361 50,000 220,000 - - - - 3,305,361 Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 3,035,361 50,000 220,000 - - - - 3,305,361 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #20 FM1938 Town Improvements PROJECT EXPENSE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING This work will include repair and replacement of irrigation, wheelchair ramps, sidewalk and plants that are dead or in need of repair through the FM 1938 corridor. Funding for this work is from project savings from the 2012 FM 1938 TxDOT road construction landscape project and the subsequent 2013 streetscape project. 78 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering 2,900 - - - - - - 2,900 Construction - - - - - - - - Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - 480,180 - - - 480,180 Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 2,900 - - 480,180 - - - 483,080 410-10110-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) 2,900 - - - - - 2,900 Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 480,180 - - - - 480,180 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 2,900 - 480,180 - - - - 483,080 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - 5,088 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 33,613 33,613 33,613 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 33,613 33,613 38,701 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #34 Roanoke Road Reconstruction and Drainage South (Highway 170 south to Town limits) PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6" of asphalt to approximately 4,000 LF of Roanoke Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Project improvements will be from Highway 170 south to the Town limits. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 79 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000040 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - 49,308 - - - - 49,308 Construction - - 232,652 - - - - 232,652 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 281,960 - - - - 281,960 410-10110-00-000-000040 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 281,960 - - - - 281,960 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 281,960 - - - - 281,960 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - 5,000 5,150 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - 19,737 19,737 19,737 19,737 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 19,737 19,737 24,737 24,887 - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #40 Sam School Road Reconstruction and Drainage (Solana to Town limits) PROJECT EXPENSE The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6" of asphalt to approximately 2,000 LF of Sam School Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing 2nd year from completion. Includes 150 linear feet of sidewalk. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 80 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000068 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - Construction 304,119 160,000 - - - - 464,119 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 304,119 160,000 - - - - - 464,119 410-10110-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) 277,730 160,000 - 437,730 Contributions (Fidelity) 26,389 - - - - - - 26,389 Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 304,119 160,000 - - - - - 464,119 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #68 FM 1938 and Dove Road Signalization This project will provide for the signalization of the FM 1938 and Dove Road intersection consistent with the enhancements at SH 114. The need to signalize is being caused by the proposed signalization of FM 1938 and Solana Blvd/Capital Pkwy that is currently included with the Entrada development improvements. The installation of a proposed traffic signal at FM 1938 and Solana Blvd/Capital Pkwy. in connection with the Granada and Entrada developments, the intersection would decrease traffic congestion and increase safety at the FM 1938 and Dove Road intersection. While FM 1938 is a TxDOT roadway, the cost to signalize will be the responsibility of the Town. Staff will continue to pursue TxDOT funding for signalization of this intersection. Project was completed during FY17/18. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 81 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000070 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction 294,703 10,000 - - - - 304,703 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 294,703 10,000 - - - - - 304,703 410-33700-00-000-000070 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Contributions/Grants 35,163 10,000 - 45,163 Entrada PID 217,413 - - - - - - 217,413 Granada 15,738 - - - - - - 15,738 Fidelity 26,389 - - - - - - 26,389 Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 294,703 10,000 - - - - - 304,703 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - 200 200 200 200 - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 200 200 200 200 - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #70 FM 1938 and Solana Blvd Traffic Signalization This project will provide for the signalization of the FM 1938 and Solana Blvd intersection consistent with the enhancements at SH 114. The installation of the proposed traffic signals is in connection with the Granada and Entrada developments that would decrease traffic congestion and frustration. Staff is also currently working with TxDot for a proposed signal at the FM 1938/Dove Road intersection. Project was completed during FY17/18. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING 82 410-73000-00-000-000075 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - 55,000 - - - - 55,000 Design - - 25,000 - - - - 25,000 Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 410-33501-00-000-000075 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - 2,000 2,060 2,122 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 4,800 4,800 4,800 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 6,800 6,860 6,922 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The town trail system currently starts and/or stops at the Westlake Academy campus. The use of the trail has increased over the past two years due to the growth of the community and the Academy. Flashing light at the crosswalk would give vehicles a warning that pedestrians are crossing at Dove Rd & Ottinger or Dove Rd &Pearson. This project includes flashing signs and lights being installed in the pavement. Includes three flashing lights and striping of the crosswalk at Dove and Pearson. Lights would be actived by pedestrians walking on the trail that would need to cross over Dove to go north on Pearson. FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #75 Flashing Crosswalk Lights (Dove @ Pearson & Ottinger) PROJECT EXPENSE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING Ottinger Road 83 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000078 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - 90,000 - - - - 90,000 Construction - - - - - - - - Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 90,000 - - - - 90,000 410-33501-00-000-000078 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 90,000 - - - 90,000 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 90,000 - - - - 90,000 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 6,300 6,300 6,300 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 6,300 6,300 6,300 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #78 Solana Pavement Repair This project will provide repairs to several sections of concrete pavement failures on Solana Boulevard. The repairs will consist of removal/replacement of concrete and failed subgrade and traffic control. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 84 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000079 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - 54,450 - - - 54,450 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 54,450 - - - - 54,450 410-33501-00-000-000079 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 54,450 - - - - 54,450 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 54,450 - - - - 54,450 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 3,812 3,812 3,812 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 3,812 3,812 3,812 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #79 Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface This project will provide for the removal and replacement of 1" to 2" of the existing 6" asphalt on Wyck Hill Lane. The existing subgrade is in excellent condition and does not require re-stabilization. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 85 Project Description: 410-73000-00-000-000080 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - 80,000 - - - 80,000 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 410-33501-00-000-000080 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 80,000 - - - - 80,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 5,600 5,600 5,600 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 5,600 5,600 5,600 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #80 FM1938 Pavement Repair This project will provide repairs to several sections of stamped/stained concrete pavement failures on FM 1938. The repairs will consist of removal/replacement of concrete and failed subgrade and traffic control PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 86 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000052 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project 410-73000-00-000-000058 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Trail- Engineering/Design - - - - - - - Trail - Construction - - - 1,284,903 - - 1,284,906 Trail - Design - - - - - - - Road/Bridge - Engineering - - - - - - - Road/Bridge - Construction - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 1,284,903 - - - 1,284,906 410-33501-00-000-000052 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project 410-33501-00-000-000058 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 1,284,903 - - - - 1,284,903 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 1,284,903 - - - - 1,284,903 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Trail - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Trail - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Trail - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 89,943 89,943 89,943 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 89,943 89,943 89,943 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #52/58 PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET This project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 7" asphalt to approximately 4,000 LF of Ottinger Road (from Westlake Academy to SH 170) and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. In conjunction with this project, the existing Ottinger Road bridge will be replaced with new box culvert, much like the Dove Road improvements. Staff will determine through engineering design analysis the final design criteria including horizontal and vertical alignment. A trail will provide East to West interconnectivity within the Westlake trail system. Includes a primitive trail head on the Southeast corner of the cemetery property (primitive parking, restrooms and water fountain). Ottinger Road Reconstruction/Drainage & Trail (North of Westlake Academy) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Project 52 Trail $ 300,949 Project 58 R&D $ 983,954 87 Project Description: 410-74400-00-000-000053 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project 410-73000-00-000-000060 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Trail - Engineering - - - - - - - - Trail - Construction - - 694,141 - - - - 694,141 Trail - Contingency - - - - - - - - Road - Engineering - - - - - - - - Road - Construction - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 694,141 - - - - 694,141 410-33501-00-000-000053 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project 410-33501-00-000-000060 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - 694,141 - - - - 694,141 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 694,141 - - - - 694,141 vision link #NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME?#NAME? Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Trail - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Trail - Repair & Maint - - - - - - - - Trail - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - 48,591 48,591 48,591 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 48,591 48,591 48,591 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #53/60 PROJECT EXPENSE Pearson Lane Reconstruction & Drainage & Trail Dove Road / Pearson Road / Aspen Lane PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET This project will provide trail connectivity from Aspen Lane north to Dove Road along the east side of Pearson Road. This will include crosswalk devices at the corner of Dove and Pearson. In addition the project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 5" of asphalt to approximately 1,300 LF of Pearson Lane and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Project 53 Trail $290,016 Project 60 R&D $404,125 Grand Total $694,141 88 Project Description: 410-74400-20-000-000081 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - Construction - Design - Contingency - Other Cost 300,000 300,000 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 300,000 - - - - 300,000 410-10110-20-000-000081 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - 300,000 - - - - 300,000 Bonds FY 18/19 CO - - - - - - - - Transfer in from Utility Fund - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - 300,000 - - - - 300,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET FUNDED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT #81 Fiber Connectivity between Buildings (Municipal/Academy) PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Improve Technology, Facilities and Equipment: Reduce critical infrastructure downtime - With the addition of the EOC at the new Fire/EMS station and a complete fiber duct between all of our locations, we have the opportunity to install our own fiber between all of the locations to provide faster connectivity than we can afford through vendors. With this rollout we would start with 10Gbps connectivity between all of our locations (approximately 100X faster than our current connections), with the ability to increase to 40Gbps and 100Gbps in the future. Using our own fiber will allow us flexibility in internet connectivity - options to combine the internet connection at each location into a single faster connection, or reduce or remove internet connectivity costs at one or more locations and route all internet traffic through a single location. Since we have moved to a virtual server architecture, having our own fast fiber connectivity between locations will allow us to move virtual servers to any location when necessary (disaster recovery, scheduled hardware down time for updates, upgrades, repairs, etc.) We will be able to have our data available at any of the locations without any reduction in speed or productivity. 89 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FORECAST Unfunded / Under Discussion Totals FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 PROJECT Dept Thru Estimated Proposed Projected Projected Projected Projected GRAND No.FY 16-17 Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget TOTAL 16 SH114 and Schwab Way Traffic Signal Upgrade $ - $ - $ - $ 257,500 $ - $ - $ - 257,500$ 16 Hwy 170 and 377 Traffic Signal Upgrade - - - 265,000 - - - 265,000 16 Dove Road & Randol Mill Traffic Circle - - - - 674,238 892,427 - 1,566,665 16 Hwy 170 and Roanoke Traffic Signal Upgrade - - - 15,000 257,500 - - 272,500 16 Glenwyck Farms Telecommunications Ductbank - - - 806,400 - - - 806,400 16 SH 114/170 Enhancements 239,433 - - - - 830,592 - 1,070,025 Sub-Total - Road/Street Improvements 239,433 - - 1,343,900 931,738 1,723,019 - 4,238,090 19 Hwy 377 Landscape Improvements (Phase I and II) - - - 411,100 436,000 - - 847,100 19 Trail - Fidelity Campus to WL Parkway at Hwy 114 - - - 330,338 - - - 330,338 19 Westlake Academy Pedestrian Underpass - - - - - 741,600 - 741,600 19 Cemetery Improvements - - - - 73,609 77,904 - 151,513 19 15-30 Acre Community Park - - - - 8,623,423 183,706 - 8,807,129 Sub-Total - Trail/Park/Cemetery Improvements - - - 741,438 9,133,032 1,003,210 - 10,877,680 TOTAL UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION)239,433$ -$ -$ 2,085,338$ 10,064,770$ 2,726,229$ -$ 15,115,770$ PROJECTS FOR FUTURE YEARS (TBD) Municipal Town Hall - - - - - - - - WA Land Expansion - - - - - - - - WA Labs - - - - - - - - WA Phase II Construction - - - - - - - - WA Phase III Construction - - - - - - - - TOTAL TO BE DECIDED -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Project Description 90 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - 15,000 - - - 15,000 Construction - - 242,500 - - - 242,500 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 257,500 - - - 257,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 257,500 - - - 257,500 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 257,500 - - - 257,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - 200 206 212 219 - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - 200 206 212 219 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SH114 and Schwab Way Traffic Signal Upgrade This project will upgrade the current signal poles at the SH 170/Roanoke Road intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. The current configuration of Roanoke Road will change once the main lanes of SH 170 are constructed, resulting in the reduction of the traffic signalization for northbound and southbound traffic PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 91 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - 15,000 - - - 15,000 Construction - - 250,000 - - 250,000 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 265,000 - - - 265,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 265,000 - - 265,000 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 265,000 - - - 265,000 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - 200 206 212 - Debt Service - - - - - 16,200 16,200 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 200 16,406 16,412 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Hwy 170 and 377 Traffic Signal Upgrade PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This project will upgrade the current signalization of the SH 170 and US 377 intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. 92 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - 106,090 106,090 Construction - - - - - 786,337 786,337 Design - - - - 36,050 - 36,050 Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - 638,188 - 638,188 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - - 674,238 892,427 - 1,566,665 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - 674,238 892,427 - 1,566,665 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - - 674,238 892,427 1,566,665 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - 2,971 3,060 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - 5,941 6,119 - Debt Service - - - - - - 94,200 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - 8,912 103,379 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Dove Road & Randol Mill Traffic Circle Reconstruction and reconfiguration of Dove Road and Randol Mill from a 3-way stop intersection to a traffic circle to improve traffic safety. Pavement construction will be consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. PROJECT EXPENSE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 93 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - 15,000 - - 15,000 Construction - - - 257,500 - 257,500 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 15,000 257,500 - - 272,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 257,500 - - 257,500 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 257,500 - - - 257,500 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - 200 206 212 - Debt Service - - - - - - 16,350 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 200 206 16,562 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Hwy 170 and Roanoke Road Traffic Signal Upgrade PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This project will upgrade the current signalization of the SH 170/Roanoke Road intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. The current configuration of Roanoke Road will change once the main lanes of SH 170 are constructed, resulting in the reduction of the traffic signalization for northbound and southbound traffic. 94 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - 806,400 - - 806,400 Construction - - - - - - - - Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 806,400 - - - 806,400 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 806,400 - - - 806,400 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 806,400 - - - 806,400 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Glenwyck Farms Telcommunications Ductbank This project will provide for the construction of approximately 11,000 LF of telecommunication ductbank within the Glenwyck subdivision to accomodate the installation of improved telecommunication lines. Additionally, this will provide a connection of the ductbank from Granda to Terra Bella. PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 95 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - - - - 830,592 830,592 Design - - - - - - - - Painting 239,433 - - - - - - 239,433 Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 239,433 - - - - - 830,592 1,070,025 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants 149,622 - - - - - 149,622 Bonds 2011 CO $2.095M 89,811 - - - - - - 89,811 Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - 830,592 830,592 FUNDING TOTAL 239,433 - - - - - 830,592 1,070,025 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SH114/170 Enhancements PROJECT EXPENSE This project was anticipated to be a cooperative effort between Westlake, Trophy Club, and Roanoke consisting of the design and construction of landscape and hardscape improvements to the SH 170 & Hwy 114 interchange to include plantings, painting, and entry monuments. Maintenance is for irrigation only. To-date the Town has paid $239,433 for engineering and paintintg in FY 13/14. Project costs are estimated to be $3,000,000 for construction. Funding participation is anticipated to be 1/3 from each party. This project will be submitted for a TxDot grant (Green Ribbon). The Town anticipates getting $160,000 reimbursement of engineering costs in FY 15/16 from Trophy Club and Roanoke and will use those funds towards the final construction. If project does not move forward, the funds will go to the Capital Projects fund balance. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 96 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - 30,000 - - - 30,000 Construction Phase II - - - 381,100 - - - 381,100 Construction Phase II - - - - 436,000 - - 436,000 Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 411,100 436,000 - - 847,100 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 411,100 436,000 - - 847,100 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 411,100 436,000 - - 847,100 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - 5,150 5,305 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - 10,300 10,609 - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - 15,450 15,914 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Hwy 377 Landscape Improvements The project will include streetscape enhancements (hardscape, landscape) along US Hwy 377 starting at Westport Parkway stretching north for 3/4 mile. The enhancements will only be located in the median and consist of native and naturalized plantings, trees, plant bed preparations, drip irrigation, and concrete edging/mowstrip. Since the project will be within state ROW, the Town will submit this project to TxDOT for potential grant funding opportunities similar to the FM 1938 median landscape project. PROJECT EXPENSE - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 97 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - 70,000 - - 70,000 Construction - - 115,000 - - 115,000 Design - - 145,338 - 145,338 Contingency - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 330,338 - - - 330,338 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - 330,338 - - - 330,338 Unfunded - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - 330,338 - - - 330,338 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Trail - Fidelity Campus to Westlake Parkway at Hwy 114 PROJECT EXPENSE This project will provide connectivity from Hwy 114 to Capital Parkway along the east side of Westlake Parkway. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 98 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - 61,800 - 61,800 Construction - - - - - 618,000 - 618,000 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - 61,800 - 61,800 Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - - - 741,600 - 741,600 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - 741,600 - 741,600 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - - - - 741,600 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Westlake Academy - Pedestrian Underpass PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET PROJECT EXPENSE This project will provide for the construction of a pedestrian underpass on the south side of the Westlake Academy campus and connections to the existing trail system. This will require the reconstruction of a section of Ottinger Road and the relocation of water, gas, and telecommunications. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 99 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - - - 73,609 77,904 - 151,513 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - - 73,609 77,904 - 151,513 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bond Issuance - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - 73,609 77,904 - 151,513 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - - 73,609 77,904 - 151,513 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - 5,614 5,782 5,955 - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - 16,841 17,346 17,866 - Rent & Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - 9,000 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - 22,455 23,128 32,821 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT Cemetery Improvements PROJECT EXPENSE PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET These improvements will consist of section markers, roadways and landscaping. The project also anticipates a future trail head with rest facilities that will accomodate the future cemetery/academy trail. Based on current funding sources, this project will be dependent upon the future sale of plots and would be completed in four phases. Phase I & II includes the road improvements and Phase III & IV will consist of the landscaping and trail improvements. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 100 Project Description: Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Engineering - - - - 655,805 67,473 - 723,278 Construction - - - - 3,476,610 - 3,476,610 Design - - - - 65,508 67,473 - 132,981 Contingency - - - - 58,300 48,760 - 107,060 Land Purchase (390K for 10 Acres) - - - - 4,367,200 - 4,367,200 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - - 8,623,423 183,706 - 8,807,129 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed Project FUNDING TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Total Cash (Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bond Issuance - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - 8,623,423 183,706 - 8,807,129 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - - - - 8,623,423 183,706 - 8,807,129 Totals Thru Estimated Proposed IMPACT TYPE FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 Supplies - - - 2,975 3,065 - Services - - - 17,851 18,387 - Insurance - - - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - 2,975 3,065 - Rent & Utilities - - - 9,521 9,807 - Debt Service - - - - - - 528,600 - OPERATING IMPACT - - - - - 33,323 562,923 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - PROJECT FUNDING IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCUSSION) CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 15-30 Acre Community Park PROJECT EXPENSE This project would include the purchase of 15 to 30 acres of open space with the ability to add amenities such as small covered pavilions, trail heads, playground stations, sports fields, general use open spaces, dog park, restroom, football field, running track, cross country trail, outdoor tennis and basketball courts, baseball and softball fields. The project would include restrooms, concession area with outdoor eating area and parking. This facility would provide programs and activities to the Westlake community and Westlake Academy. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Projection- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 101 This page is intentionally blank 102 103 Section 11 Long Term Forecast Assumptions FY 2018-2019 PROPOSED BUDGET GENERAL FUND: REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES • Ad Valorem Property Tax (13% of total GF revenues) o Proposed increase from $.13615 to $0.15600 (.01985 increase per $100 Valuation)  General Fund Proposed $0.13201 – Prior Year $0.11133  Debt Service Proposed $0.02399 – Prior Year $0.02482 o Proposed budget is $1.5M; this reflects an increase of $258K (20%) • Sales & Use Tax (32% of total GF revenues) o Proposed budget is $3.9M; this reflects an increase of $389K (11%) o Because of the uncertainly of the funds, we are conservative with these estimates. o Includes the Property Tax Reduction portion of the Sales tax receipts o Includes an economic development situs agreement • Building permits/inspection/plan review fees (37% of total GF revenues) o Budgeted to be $4.4M with $3.6M as one-time revenues from Entrada. o This represents an increase of $2.2M (103%) o Residential fees budgeted at $1.1M and Commercial fees budgeted at $3.3M • Franchise Fees (8% of total GF revenues) o Budgeted to be $983K o Based on current year receipts, fees are budgeted to remain flat. o Because of the uncertainly of the funds, we are conservative with these estimates. • Transfers In are budgeted to remain flat at $62K; this is comprised of transfers from the Utility Fund for Fort Worth Impact Fees TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES • Payroll and Related Expenditures are budgeted at $4.5M • This reflects an overall 7% increase of $287K o Market band adjustments of $191K are reflected and based on most recent salary surveys performed by the HR dept. (GF portion is $153K) o Performance Pay of $50K is included (GF portion is $42K) o Employee Insurance reflects a 30% ($180K) increase. Due to plan increase of 20% and anticipated changes to employee coverage of approved positions in the prior year that were unfilled. o Payroll Transfers in increased $58K. o Transition Court Judge from contract service to part time employee $18K o Transition part time Facilities Clerk to full-time employee $26K (mostly insurance) o Cost to replace and train Accountant Technician II $11K o Increase car allowances & phone allowances $7K o Add On-call pay to public works employees $6K 104 Section 11 Long Term Forecast Assumptions • Operations and Maintenance Expenditures are budgeted at $3.873M • This reflects a 5% increase of $168K from the prior year estimated of $3.704M o The largest portion of this increase ($109K) is due to rent & utilities. o This section also includes service and supply expenditures, repairs and maintenance, and travel and training expenditures. • Transfers Out are budgeted at $3.7M • This reflects an 8% increase of $1.209M from the prior year estimated of $2.511M o To Debt Service Fund – decreased $6,299 o To General M&R – increased $650K to build fund balance (portion of one-time Entrada fees) o To Vehicle M&R – increased $110K to build fund balance (portion of one-time Entrada fees) o To Capital Project Fund – increased $449K (portion of one-time Entrada fees) ENTERPRISE FUNDS • Total revenues and other sources increased $2.6M (62%); due to one-time receipt of Texas Water Development Board Funds of $2.6M • Total expenditures and other uses increased by $938K (22%) due primarily to one-time payment of $880K to Fort Worth Water Line. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS • Total revenues and other sources increased $639K (74%); due to transfers in from general fund; (portion of one-time Entrada fees) • Total expenditures and other uses increased by $537K (112%) o Ambulance repairs and maintenance $260K o Repaint Ground Storage Tank $80K o Pump Station Equipment $80K o Network Equipment $115K SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS • Total revenues and other sources decreased $80K (3%) o Sales tax increased $260K o Contributions decreased $175K (economic development one time fees) • Total expenditures and other uses decreased by $43K (1%) o Economic development increased $98K o Services decreased $185K o Transfers out decreased $13K 105 Section 11 Long Term Forecast Assumptions DEBT SERVICE FUNDS • Total revenues and other sources increased $15K (1%) o Property tax increased $21K o Transfers in decreased $6K • Total expenditures and other uses increased by $3K CAPITAL PROJECT FUND • Based on adopted CIP FORECAST ASSUMPTIONS FY 19-20 THROUGH FY 22-23 GENERAL FUND: REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES • Sales & Use Tax Revenue o Annual increase of 2% to base sales and use tax thru 2023 o Commercial construction; Phase I added in 2020 thru 2023 o Commercial construction; Phase II added in 2021 thru 2023 o Commercial construction; added in 2021 thru 2023 • Property Tax Revenue o Annual increase of 2% thru year 2023 o Anticipated rate increase to property tax from year 19/20 thru year 22/23 o Estimate value on the roll two years from date of permit for new construction– separate line-item on forecast o Fidelity Abatement ends FY19/20 o Deloitte Abatement ends FY21/22 o Economic development revenues and abatements added in 2020 forward • Building permits/inspection/plan review fees o Based on estimated schedule of annual permits for commercial and residential growth shown separately • Franchise Fees increase annually by 1% • Fines and Forfeitures increase annually 1/2% • All other revenues – are increased 1% to 2.5% annually based on analysis 106 Section 11 Long Term Forecast Assumptions TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES • Salary and wages increase annually by 2.5% • Service Expenditures increase annually by 1% • Rent and Utilities increase annually by 1% • Supplies increase annually by 1% • Repair and Maintenance increase annually 1.25% • Travel and training increase annually by 1% • Debt remains flat • Westlake Academy reserve - $315K/annually • Capital Outlay remains flat thru 2023 UTILITY FUND • Revenues and Other Sources increase annually by 2% • Expenditures and other uses increase annually 1% to 2% • Restricted Funds were added for Hillwood VISITOR ASSOCIATION FUND • Revenues and Other Sources increase annually by 1% o Hotel 1 added in 2020 thru 2023 o Hotel 2 added in 2020 thru 2023 o Hotel 3 added in 2021 thru 2023 • Expenditures increase annually .05 to 1% 107 DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 Total Revenues 9,304,946 12,313,609 9,581,327 9,766,546 10,146,508 10,407,058 Total Expenditures (10,330,613)(12,064,992)(11,130,004)(11,055,456)(11,087,180)(11,256,827) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (1,025,667)248,618 (1,548,677)(1,288,910)(940,672)(849,769) Beginning Fund Balance 10,242,277 9,216,610 9,465,228 7,916,551 6,627,641 5,686,969 Ending Fund Balance 9,216,610 9,465,228 7,916,551 6,627,641 5,686,969 4,837,200 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 304,505 304,504 304,504 304,504 304,504 304,504 Unassigned Ending Balance 8,912,105 9,160,724 7,612,047 6,323,137 5,382,465 4,532,696 Operating Expenditures 9,270,948 9,543,216 9,935,220 10,022,424 10,156,770 10,326,417 Operating Cost per Day 25,400 26,146 27,220 27,459 27,827 28,292 Operating Days 351 350 280 230 193 160 Total Revenues & Transfers In 4,934,415 7,540,741 5,017,305 5,095,772 5,194,781 5,295,770 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (5,420,005)(6,364,008)(4,826,877)(4,779,136)(4,850,539)(4,921,496) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (485,590)1,176,733 190,428 316,637 344,242 374,274 Beginning Fund Balance 886,329 400,739 1,577,472 1,767,900 2,084,537 2,428,779 Ending Fund Balance 400,739 1,577,472 1,767,900 2,084,537 2,428,779 2,803,053 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 400,739 1,279,190 1,280,666 1,282,142 1,283,618 1,285,094 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 298,283 487,235 802,395 1,145,161 1,517,959 Operating Expenses 5,420,005 6,364,008 4,826,877 4,779,136 4,850,539 4,921,496 Operating Cost Per Day 14,849 17,436 13,224 13,094 13,289 13,484 Operating Days 0 17 37 61 86 113 Total Revenues & Transfers In 901,480 1,503,545 1,349,539 1,037,787 935,165 935,165 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (383,625)(1,079,475)(415,500)(510,000)(382,500)(1,322,500) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 517,855 424,070 934,039 527,787 552,665 (387,335) Beginning Fund Balance 1,053,144 1,570,999 1,995,069 2,929,108 3,456,895 4,009,560 Ending Fund Balance 1,570,999 1,995,069 2,929,108 3,456,895 4,009,560 3,622,225 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 1,570,999 1,995,069 2,929,108 3,456,895 4,009,560 3,622,225 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues & Transfers In 2,793,335 2,835,410 2,845,586 3,832,812 4,207,545 4,239,067 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (2,919,470)(2,884,218)(2,473,798)(2,788,269)(2,939,675)(2,939,344) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (126,135)(48,808)371,788 1,044,543 1,267,870 1,299,723 Beginning Fund Balance 1,301,443 1,175,308 1,112,160 1,483,688 2,527,972 3,795,581 Ending Fund Balance 1,175,308 1,126,499 1,483,948 2,528,232 3,795,841 5,095,304 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 1,175,308 1,126,499 1,483,948 2,528,232 3,795,841 5,095,304 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 FIVE YEAR FORECAST SUMMARY GENERAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS ENTERPRISE FUNDS 108 DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 FIVE YEAR FORECAST SUMMARY Total Revenues & Transfers In 2,709,153 2,662,779 2,927,134 2,921,004 2,924,798 2,922,282 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (2,690,293)(2,693,600)(2,927,134)(2,921,004)(2,924,798)(2,922,282) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 18,860 (30,821)0 0 0 0 Beginning Fund Balance 11,961 30,821 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 30,821 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 30,821 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues & Transfers In 908,570 4,643,614 346,100 192,500 192,500 192,500 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (7,989,238)(4,676,681)(1,888,678)0 0 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (7,080,668)(33,067)(1,542,578)192,500 192,500 192,500 Beginning Fund Balance 14,283,223 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 Ending Fund Balance 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 6,204,410 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 6,204,410 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues & Transfers In 21,551,899 31,499,699 22,066,991 22,846,421 23,601,297 23,991,842 Total Expenditures & Transfers Out (29,733,245)(29,762,974)(23,661,991)(22,053,864)(22,184,692)(23,362,450) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (8,181,345)1,736,725 (1,594,999)792,557 1,416,604 629,392 Beginning Fund Balance 27,778,377 19,597,032 21,319,418 19,724,158 20,516,455 21,932,800 Ending Fund Balance 19,597,032 21,333,757 19,724,418 20,516,715 21,933,060 22,562,192 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 10,684,927 11,874,750 11,625,136 13,391,183 15,405,433 16,511,537 Unassigned Ending Balance 8,912,105 9,459,007 8,099,282 7,125,533 6,527,627 6,050,655 ESTIMATED PROPOSED 1 2 3 4 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 22-23 General Fund 9,216,610 9,465,228 7,916,551 6,627,641 5,686,969 4,837,200 Enterprise Funds 400,739 1,577,472 1,767,900 2,084,537 2,428,779 2,803,053 Internal Service M&R 1,570,999 1,995,069 2,929,108 3,456,895 4,009,560 3,622,225 Special Revenue Funds 1,175,308 1,126,499 1,483,948 2,528,232 3,795,841 5,095,304 Debt Service Funds 30,821 - - - - - Capital Projects Funds 7,202,555 7,169,488 5,626,910 5,819,410 6,011,910 6,204,410 Municipal Total 19,597,032 21,333,757 19,724,418 20,516,715 21,933,060 22,562,192 Academic Funds 961,844 1,099,541 1,177,104 1,257,243 1,336,415 1,416,942 TOTAL ENDING FUND BALANCE 20,558,876 22,433,298 20,901,522 21,773,958 23,269,475 23,979,134 ENDING FUND BALANCES DEBT SERVICE FUNDS CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS ALL FUNDS SUMMARY ENDING FUND BALANCE 109 This page is intentionally blank 110 111 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies I. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The overall intent of the following Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements is to enable the Town to achieve a long-term stable and positive financial condition. The watchwords of the Town’s financial management include integrity, prudence, stewardship, planning, accountability, and full disclosure. The more specific purpose is to provide guidelines to the Town Manager and Finance Director in planning and directing the Town’s day-to-day financial affairs and in developing recommendations to the Town Manger and Town Council. The scope of these policies generally span, among other issues, accounting, purchasing, auditing, financial reporting, internal controls, operating and capital budgeting, revenue management, cash and investment management, expenditure control, asset management, debt management, and planning concepts, in order to: A. Present fairly and with full disclosure the financial position and results of the financial operations of the Town in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), and B. Determine and demonstrate compliance with finance related legal and contractual issues in accordance with provisions of the Texas Local Government Code and other pertinent legal documents and mandates. The Town Council will annually review and approve the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements as part of the budget process. II. SUMMARY OF POLICY INTENDED OUTCOMES This policy framework mandates pursuit of the following fiscal objectives: A. Operating Budget: Prepare, conservatively estimate revenues, present, and adopt the Town’s annual operating plan. B. Revenues Management: Design, maintain, and administer a revenue system that will assure a reliable, equitable, diversified, and sufficient revenue stream to support desired Town services. C. Expenditure Control: Identify priority services, establish appropriate service levels, and administer the expenditure of available resources to assure fiscal stability and the effective and efficient delivery of services. D. Fund Balance/Retained Earnings: Maintain the fund balance and retained earnings of the various operating funds at levels sufficient to protect the Town’s credit worthiness as well as its financial position from emergencies. 112 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies E. Debt Management: Establish guidelines for debt financing that will provide needed capital equipment and infrastructure improvements while minimizing the impact of debt payments on current revenues. F. Intergovernmental Relationships: Where feasible, coordinate efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives, share the cost of providing governmental services on an equitable basis and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal level. G. Grants: Seek, apply for and effectively administer within this policy’s guidelines, Federal, State, and foundation grants-in-aid which address the Town’s current priorities and policy objectives. H. Economic Development: Initiate where feasible, encourage, and participate in economic development efforts to create job opportunities and strengthen the local tax base and economy I. Fiscal Monitoring: Prepare and present regular reports that analyze, evaluate, and forecast the Town’s financial performance and economic condition. J. Financial Consultants: With available resources, seek out and employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants in the management and administration of the Town’s financial functions. K. Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Reporting: Comply with prevailing Federal, State and local statues and regulations. Conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). L. Capital Improvement Plan/Budget and Program: Multi-year planning, forecasting, preparation, and control of the Town’s capital improvement plan/budget. M. Capital Maintenance and Replacement: Annually review and monitor the state of the Town’s capital equipment and infrastructure, setting priorities for its replacement and renovation based on needs, finding alternatives, and availability of resources. N. Internal Controls: To establish and maintain an internal control structure designed to provide reasonable assurances that the Town’s assets are safeguarded and that the possibilities for material errors in the Town’s financial records are minimized. 113 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies III. OPERATING BUDGET A. Preparation: Budgeting is an essential element of the financial planning, control and evaluation process of municipal government. The “operating budget” is the Town’s annual financial operating plan. The budget includes all of the operating departments of the Town, the debt service fund, all capital projects funds, and the internal service funds of the Town. The proposed budget will be prepared with the cooperation of all Town departments, and is submitted to the Town Manager who makes any necessary changes and transmits the document to the Town Council. A budget preparation calendar and timetable will be established and followed in accordance with State law. B. Revenue Estimates for Budgeting: In order to maintain a stable level of services, the Town shall use a conservative, objective, and analytical approach when preparing revenue estimates. The process shall include analysis of probable economic changes and their impacts on revenues, historical collection rates, and trends in revenues. This approach should reduce the likelihood of actual revenues falling short of budget estimates during the year and should avoid mid-year service reductions. C. Balanced Budget: As per State Law, current operating revenues, including Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax transfers (which can be used for operations), will be sufficient to support current operating expenditures. Annually recurring revenue will not be less than annually recurring operating budget expenditures (operating budget minus capital outlay). Debt or bond financing will not be used to finance current expenditures. D. Proposed Budget Process: a proposed budget shall be prepared by the Town Manager with the participation of all of the Town’s department directors. • The proposed budget shall include four basic segments for review and evaluation: (1) personnel costs, (2) base budget for operations and maintenance costs, (3) service level adjustments for increases of existing service levels or additional services, and (4) revenues. • The proposed budget review process shall include Council participation in the review of each of the four segments of the proposed budget and a public hearing to allow for citizen participation in the budget preparation. • The proposed budget process shall allow sufficient time to provide review, as well as address policy and fiscal issues, by the Town Council. • A copy of the proposed budget shall be filed with the Town Secretary when it is submitted to the Town Council as well as placed on the Town’s website. E. Budget Adoption: Upon the determination and presentation of the final iteration of the proposed budget as established by the Council, a public hearing date and time will be set and publicized. The Council will subsequently consider a resolution which, if adopted, such budget becomes the Town’s Approved Annual Budget. The adopted budget will be effective for the fiscal year beginning October 1. The approved budget will be placed on the Town’s web site. 114 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies F. Budget Award: Each year the Council approved operating budget will be submitted annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and consideration for the Award for Distinguished Budget Presentation. G. Budget Amendments: Department Directors are responsible for monitoring their respective department budgets. The Finance Department will monitor all financial operations. The budget team will decide whether to proceed with a budget amendment and, if so, will then present the request to the Town Council. If the Council decides a budget amendment is necessary, the amendment is adopted in resolution format and the necessary budgetary changes are then made. H. Central Control: Modifications within the operating categories (salaries, supplies, maintenance, services, capital, etc.) can be made with the approval of the Town Manager. Modifications to reserve categories and interdepartmental budget totals will be made only by Town Council consent with formal briefing and Council action. I. Planning: The budget process will be coordinated so as to identify major policy issues for Town Council by integrating it into the Council’s overall strategic planning process for the Town. Each department shall have a multi-year business plan that integrates with the Town’s overall strategic plan. J. Reporting: Monthly financial reports will be prepared by the Finance Department and distributed to and reviewed by each Director. Information obtained from financial reports and other operating reports is to be used by Directors to monitor and control departmental budget. Summary financial reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. K. Performance Measures & Productivity Indicators: Where appropriate, performance measures and productivity indicators will be used as guidelines to measure efficiency, effectiveness, and outcomes of Town services. This information will be included in the annual budget process as needed. L. Contingent Appropriation: During the budget process, staff will attempt to establish an adequate contingent appropriation in each of the operating funds. The expenditure for this appropriation shall be made only in cases of emergency, and a detailed account shall be recorded and reported. The proceeds shall be disbursed only by transfer to departmental appropriation. All transfers from the contingent appropriation will be evaluated using the following criteria: • Is the request of such an emergency nature that it must be made immediately? • Why was the item not budgeted in the normal budget process? • Why can’t the transfer be made within the department? 115 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies IV. REVENUES MANAGEMENT A. Revenue Design Parameter: The Town will pursue the following optimum characteristics in its revenue system: • Simplicity - The Town, where possible and without sacrificing accuracy, will strive to keep the revenue system simple in order to reduce costs, achieve transparency, and increase citizen understanding of Town revenue sources. • Certainty - A knowledge and understanding of revenue sources reliability increases the viability of the revenue system. The Town will understand, to the best of its ability, all aspects of its revenue sources and their performance, as well as enact consistent collection policies to provide assurances that the revenue base will materialize according to budgets, forecasts, and plans. • Equity - The Town shall make every effort to maintain equity in its revenue system: i.e. the Town shall seek to minimize or eliminate all forms of subsidization between entities, funds, services utilities, and customer classes within a utility. • Administration - The benefits of a revenue source will not exceed the cost of collecting that revenue. Every effort will be made for the cost of collection to be reviewed annually for cost effectiveness as a part of the Town’s indirect cost and cost of service analysis. • Adequacy, Diversification and Stability - The Town shall attempt, in as much as is practical, to achieve a balance in its revenue system. The Town shall also strive to maintain a balanced and diversified revenue system to protect the Town from fluctuations in any one source due to changes in local economic conditions which adversely impact that revenue source. B. Other Considerations. The following considerations and issues will guide the Town in its revenue policies concerning specific sources of funds: • Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development - The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are being considered to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as a part of the evaluation for each proposed economic development project. • Non-Recurring Revenues - One-time or non-recurring revenues will not be used to finance on-going operational costs. Non-recurring revenues will be used only for one- time expenditures such as long-lived capital needs or one-time major maintenance projects that occur infrequently. Non-recurring revenues will not be used for budget balancing purposes except to cover the one-time expenditures described above. 116 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies • Investment Income - Earnings from investment of available monies, whether pooled or not, will be distributed to the funds in accordance with the equity balance of the fund from which monies were provided to be invested. • Property Tax Revenues - The Town shall endeavor to avoid a property tax by revenue diversification, implementation of user fees, and economic development. C. User-Based (Demand Driven) Fees and Service Charges. For services that are demand driven and can be associated with a user fee or charge, the direct and indirect costs of that service will be offset by a fee where possible. The Town staff will endeavor to prepare a review of all fees and charges annually, but not less than once every three years, in order to ensure that these fees provide for, at minimum, full cost recovery of service. D. Enterprise Fund Rates. Utility rates and rate structures for water and sewer services will be constructed to target full cost of service recovery. Annually the Town will review and adopt water and sewer utility rates and a rate structure that generates revenue sufficient to fully cover operating expenses, meet the legal restrictions of all applicable bond covenants, provide for an adequate level of working capital, and recover applicable general/administrative costs. The Solid Waste function will have rates that fully recover all costs and maintain an adequate balance. The Cemetery Fund will be structured to operate on lot sales and endowments. • General and Administrative (G&A) Charges – Where feasible, G&A costs will be charged to all funds for services of indirect general overhead costs, which may include general administration, finance, customer billing, facility use, personnel, technology, engineering, legal counsel, and other costs as deemed appropriate. These charges will be determined through an indirect cost allocation study following accepted practices and procedures. E. Intergovernmental Revenues. As a general rule, intergovernmental revenues (grants) will not be utilized for on-going operating costs. Any potential grant opportunity will be examined to identify all costs related to matching and continuation of program requirements. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications. If it is determined that accepting a grant with on-going cost conditions is in the interests of the Town, all the operating and maintenance costs must be included in the financial forecast and their ultimate effect on operations and revenue requirements be known. F. Revenue Monitoring. Revenues as they are received will be regularly compared to budgeted revenues and variances will be investigated. This process will be summarized in the appropriate budget report. 117 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies G. Special Revenue/Educational Funds. Where feasible and practical, General and Administrative Charges (G&A) for special revenue and educational funds of the Town of Westlake will be determined on an annual basis and transfers will be made where sufficient revenue exists to cover the associated expenditures. V. EXPENDITURE CONTROL A. Appropriations – The point of budgetary control is at the department level in the General Fund and at the fund level in all other funds. When budget adjustments among Departments and/or funds are necessary, they must be approved by the Town Council. B. Current Funding Basis - The Town shall operate on a current funding basis. Expenditures shall be budgeted and controlled so as not to exceed current revenues plus the planned use of fund balance accumulated through prior year savings. (The use of fund balance shall be guided by the Fund Balance/Retained Earnings Policy Statements.) C. Avoidance of Operating Deficits - The Town shall take immediate corrective actions if at any time during the fiscal year expenditure and revenue re-estimates are such that an operating deficit (i.e., projected expenditures in excess of projected revenues) is projected at year-end. Corrective actions can include a hiring freeze, expenditure reductions, fee increases, or use of fund balance within the Fund. D. Balance/Retained Earnings Policy - Expenditure deferrals into the following fiscal year, short-term loans, or use of one-time revenue sources shall be avoided to balance the budget. E. Maintenance of Capital Assets - Within the resources available each fiscal year, the Town shall maintain capital assets and infrastructure at a sufficient level to protect the Town's investment, to minimize future replacement and maintenance costs, and to continue service levels. F. Periodic Program Reviews - The Town Manager shall undertake periodic staff and third- party reviews of Town programs for both efficiency and effectiveness. Privatization and contracting with other governmental agencies will be evaluated as alternative approaches to service delivery. Programs which are determined to be inefficient and/or ineffective shall be reduced in scope or eliminated. G. Salary - The Town shall strive to maintain competitive salary levels for municipal employees. A salary survey will be conducted through a sampling of surrounding and comparable municipal organizations to create a comparison. The Town will strive to maintain salary levels within three percent (3%) of the median of surveyed benchmark municipalities. 118 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies H. Purchasing - The Town shall make every effort to maximize any discounts offered by creditors/vendors. Staff shall also use competitive bidding in accordance to State law, as well as intergovernmental partnerships and purchasing cooperatives to attain the best possible price on goods and services. I. Prompt Payment - All invoices will be paid within 30 days of receipt in accordance with the prompt payment requirements of State law. VI. FUND BALANCE/RETAINED EARNINGS A. General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance - The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund undesignated fund balance at, or in excess of, 90 days of operation. B. Retained Earnings of Other Operating Funds - In the Utility Fund, the Town shall strive to maintain positive retained earnings positions to provide sufficient reserves for emergencies and revenue shortfalls. C. Use of Fund Balance – The Council delegates the responsibility to assign funds to the Town Manager or his/her designee. The Council shall have the authority to assign any amount of funds. Assignments may occur subsequent to fiscal year-end. The Council will utilize funds in the following spending order: Restricted, Committed, Assigned, Unassigned Fund Balance will be targeted to only be used with Council approval and can be only be used for the following: • Emergencies, • non-recurring expenditures such as technology/FF&E (furniture, fixtures and equipment), or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. • Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund, recommendations will be made on how to restore it. • The Council shall approve all commitments by formal action. The action to commit funds must occur prior to fiscal year-end, to report such commitments in the balance sheet of the respective period, even though the amount may be determined subsequent to fiscal year-end. • A commitment can only be modified or removed by the same formal action. VII. DEBT MANAGEMENT A. Debt Issuance Analysis - All consideration of debt issuance for major capital assets will be prepared within the framework of a Council approved multi-year capital improvement plan and forecast for all Town facilities and infrastructure. 119 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies B. Analysis of Debt Issuance and Debt Issuance Alternatives - Staff will explore alternatives to the issuance of debt for capital acquisitions and construction projects. These alternatives will include, but not be limited to, • grants- in- aid • use of reserves • use of either current on-going general revenues or one-time revenues • contributions from developers and others • leases • user fees • impact fees C. Use of Debt Financing - The useful life of the asset or project shall, at a minimum, exceed the payout schedule of any debt the Town assumes. Debt financing instruments to be considered by the Town may include: • General obligation bonds - These must be authorized by a vote of the citizens of Westlake. • Revenue bonds - These bonds generate capital requirements necessary for continuation or expansion of a service which produces revenue and for which the asset may reasonable be expected to provide for a revenue stream to fund the debt service requirement. • Certificates of obligation - These can be authorized by Council approval with debt service by either general revenues or backed by a specific revenue stream or a combination of both. • Lease/purchase agreements - These shall only be used to purchase capital assets that cannot be financed from either current revenues or fund balance/retained earnings and to fund infrastructure improvements and additions. D. Assumption of Additional Debt - The Town shall not assume more tax-supported general purpose debt than it retires each year without first conducting an objective analysis as to the community's ability to assume and support additional debt service payments. E. Affordability Targets - The Town shall use an objective multi-year analytical approach to determine whether it can afford to assume new general purpose debt beyond what it retires each year. This process shall compare generally accepted standards of affordability to the current values for the Town. The process shall also examine the direct costs and benefits of the proposed expenditures. The decision on whether or not to assume new debt shall be based on these costs and benefits and on the Town's ability to "afford” new debt as determined by the aforementioned standards. The Town shall strive to achieve and/or maintain these standards at a low to moderate classification. 120 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies F. Debt Structure - The Town shall structure its debt payment schedules for general purpose debt to ensure level principal repayment schedules. The Town shall not assume any debt with "balloon' repayment schedules which consist of low annual payments and one large payment of the balance due at the end of the term. While balloon payment structures minimize the size of debt payments during the period, they force a large funding requirement on the budget of the final year. Given the uncertainties of the future, level payment schedules improve budget planning and financial management. G. Sale Process - The Town shall use a competitive bidding process in the sale of debt unless the nature of the issue warrants a negotiated bid. The Town shall award bonds based on a true interest cost (TIC) basis as long as the financial advisor agrees that the TIC basis can satisfactorily determine the lowest and best bid. H. Bond Rating Agencies Presentations - Full disclosure of operations and open lines of communication shall be made to the bond rating agencies. Town staff, with assistance of financial advisors, shall prepare the necessary materials and presentation to the bond rating agencies. I. Continuing Disclosure - The Town is committed to continuing disclosure of financial and pertinent credit information relevant to the Town's outstanding securities. J. Debt Refunding - Town staff and the financial advisor shall monitor the municipal bond market for opportunities to obtain interest savings by refunding outstanding debt. As a general rule, the present value savings of a particular refunding should exceed 3.5% of the refunded maturities. VIII. INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS The Town will pursue coordinated efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives, share the cost of providing government services on an equitable basis, and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal levels. A. Inter-local Cooperation in Delivering Services - In order to promote the effective and efficient delivery of services, the Town shall actively seek to work with other local jurisdictions in joint purchasing consortia, sharing facilities, sharing equitably the costs of service delivery, and developing joint programs to improve service to its citizens. B. Legislative Program - The Town shall cooperate with other jurisdictions to actively oppose any State or Federal regulation or proposal that mandates additional Town programs or services and does not provide the funding to implement them. Conversely, as appropriate, the Town shall support legislative initiatives that provide more funds for priority local programs. 121 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies IX. GRANTS A. Grant Guidelines - The Town shall apply, and facilitate the application by others, for only those grants that are consistent with the objectives and high priority needs previously identified above in these policies. The potential for incurring on-going costs, to include the assumption of support for grant funded positions from local revenues, will be considered prior to applying for a grant. B. Grant Review - All grant submittals shall be reviewed for their cash match requirements, their potential impact on the operating budget, and the extent to which they meet the Town's policy objectives. If there are cash match requirements, the source of funding shall be identified prior to application. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications related to additional expenditures in future years. C. Grant Program Termination - The Town shall terminate grant funded programs and associated positions when grant funds are no longer available unless alternate funding is identified. X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT A. Positive Business Environment - The Town shall endeavor, through its regulatory and administrative functions, to provide a positive business environment in which local businesses can grow, flourish and create jobs. The Town Council and Town staff will be sensitive to the needs, concerns and issues facing local businesses. B. Commitment to Business Expansion, Diversification, and Job Creation - The Town shall encourage and participate in economic development efforts to expand Westlake's economy to increase local employment. These efforts shall not only focus on newly developing areas but also on other established sections of Westlake where development can generate additional jobs and other economic benefits. C. Coordinate Efforts with Other Jurisdictions - The Town's economic development program shall encourage close cooperation with other local jurisdictions, chambers of commerce, and groups Interested in promoting the economic well-being of this area. D. Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development - The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are used to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as part of such evaluation for each prospect. Economic development agreements will contain performance language as to the business’s proposed economic impact to Westlake in exchange for Town incentives with adequate “claw-back” provisions for the Town. 122 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies XI. FISCAL MONITORING A. Financial Status and Performance Reports - Quarterly reports comparing expenditures and revenues to current budget, projecting expenditures and revenues through the end of the year, noting the status of fund balances to include dollar amounts and percentages, and outlining any remedial actions necessary to maintain the Town's financial position shall be prepared for review by the Town Manager and the Council. B. Compliance with Council Policy Statements - The Fiscal and Budgetary Policies will be reviewed annually by the Council and updated, revised or refined as deemed necessary. Policy statements adopted by the Council are guidelines, and occasionally, exceptions may be appropriate and required. However, exceptions to stated policies will be specifically identified, and the need for the exception will be documented and fully explained. XII. FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS To employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants as needed in the management and administration of the Town's financial functions. These areas include but are not limited to investments, debt administration, financial accounting systems, program evaluation, and financial impact modeling. Advisors shall be selected on a competitive basis using objective questionnaires and requests for proposals based on the scope of the work to be performed. XIII. ACCOUNTING, AUDITING, AND FINANCIAL REPORTING To comply with prevailing local, state, and federal regulations relative to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting. Accounting practices and financial reporting shall conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, (AICPA), and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). The Board shall select an independent firm of certified public accountants to perform an annual audit of all operations A. Accounting – The Town is solely responsible for the recording and reporting of its financial affairs, both internally and externally. The Town’s Finance Director is responsible for establishing the structure for the Town’s chart of accounts and for assuring that procedures are in place to properly record financial transactions and report the Town’s financial position. B. External Auditing - Town will be audited annually by outside independent accountants (auditors). The auditors must be a CPA firm and must demonstrate significant experience in the field of local government auditing. They must conduct the town’s audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and be knowledgeable in the 123 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement program. The auditors’ report on Town’s financial statements will be completed within a timely period of the Town’s fiscal year-end. The auditor will jointly review the management letter with the Town Council, if necessary. In conjunction with this review, the Finance Director shall respond in writing to the Town Council regarding the auditor’s Management Letter, addressing the issued contained therein. The Town will not require auditor rotation, but will circulate request for proposal for audit services on a periodic basis as deemed appropriate. C. External Financial Reporting - Town will prepare and publish a comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR). The CAFR will be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and will be presented annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and awarding of the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting. D. Responsibility of Auditor to Town Council – The auditor is retained by and it accountable directly to the Town Council and will have access to direct communication with the Town Council if the Town Staff is unresponsive to auditor recommendations or if the auditor considers such communication necessary to fulfill its legal and professional responsibilities. E. Internal Financial Reporting - The Finance Department will prepare internal financial reports sufficient for management to plan, monitor, and control Town’s financial affairs. XIV. CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM A. Preparation - The Town’s capital budget will include all capital projects funds and all capital resources. While the capital budget will be prepared annually on a project basis, it will be based on an on-going, multi-year capital improvement plan (CIP) that shows all funded and unfunded projects as identified by staff for all Town facilities and infrastructure. The multi-year CIP will be reviewed annually, updated by staff and presented to the Council for its review and approval. The annual capital budget will be prepared by the Finance Department with the involvement of responsible departments based on the multi- year CIP. B. Control - All capital project expenditures must be appropriated in the capital budget. The Finance Director must certify the availability of resources before any capital project contract is presented to the Town Council for approval. C. Program Planning - The capital budget will be taken from the capital improvements project plan for future years. The planning time frame for the capital improvements project plan should normally be five years, with a minimum of at least three years. The replacement and maintenance for capital items should also be projected for the next five years. Future maintenance and operational costs will be considered so that these costs can be included as appropriate in the annual budget. 124 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies D. Financing Programs - Where applicable and with Council approval, impact fees, pro-rata charges, assessments, or other fees should be used to fund capital projects which have a primary benefit to specific, identifiable property owners. Recognizing that long-term debt is usually a more expensive financing method, alternative financing sources will be explored before debt is issued. When debt is issued, it will be used to acquire major assets with expected lives which equal or exceed the average life of the debt issue. E. Reporting - Periodic financial reports will be prepared to enable the department directors to manage their capital budgets. Summary capital project status reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. XV. CAPITAL MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT The Town recognizes that deferred maintenance and not anticipating capital replacement needs increases future capital costs. Annually, available funds will be evaluated during the budget process and a percentage of each operating fund’s budget will be recommended to the Council for transfer. Upon approval by the Council, the recommended amount will be transferred to the appropriate funds (General/Utility/Vehicle Maintenance Replacement Fund) for major maintenance and replacement of street, building roof, flooring, air conditioning, equipment, etc. XVI. INTERNAL CONTROLS A. Written Procedures - Whenever possible, written procedures will be established and maintained by the Finance Director for all functions involving purchasing, cash handling and/or accounting throughout the Town. These procedures will embrace the general concepts of fiscal responsibility set for in this policy statement. B. Department Directors’ Responsibilities - Each department director is responsible for ensuring that good internal controls are followed throughout his/her department, that all directives or internal controls are implemented, and that all independent auditor internal control recommendations are addressed. Departments will develop and periodically update written internal control procedures. XVII. ASSET MANAGEMENT A. Investments – The Finance Director shall promptly invest all Town funds with the depository bank in accordance with the provisions of the current Bank Depository Agreement or in any negotiable instrument authorized by the Town Council. Further, investments shall be 125 Section 12 Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies made in accordance with the Investment Policy approved by the Town Council for the Town of Westlake that meets the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act (PFIA), Section 2256 of the Texas Local Government Code. The Finance Director will issue quarterly reports on investment activity to the Town Council. B. Cash Management - Town’s cash flow will be managed to maximize the cash available to invest. Such cash management will entail the centralization of cash collections, where feasibility, including utility bills, building and related permits and license, fines, fees, and other collection offices as appropriate. Periodic review of cash flow position will be performed to determine performance of cash management and conformance to investment policies. The underlying theme will be that idle cash will be invested with the intent to (1) safeguard assets, (2) maintain liquidity, and (3) maximize return. C. Fixed Assets and Inventory - Such assets will be reasonably safeguarded and properly accounted for and prudently insured. The fixed asset inventory will be updated regularly. D. Capitalization Criteria – For purposes of budgeting and accounting classification, the following criteria must be capitalized: • The asset is owned by the Town of Westlake • The expected useful life of the asset must be longer than one year, or extend the life on an identifiable existing asset by more than one year • The original cost of the asset must be at least $5,000 • The asset must be tangible • On-going repairs and general maintenance are not capitalized • New Purchases – All costs associated with bringing the asset into working order will be capitalized as part of the asset cost. This includes start- up costs, engineering or consultant type fees as part of the asset cost once the decision or commitment to purchase the asset is made. The cost of land acquired should include all related costs associated with its purchase • Improvements and Replacement – Improvement will be capitalized when they extend the original life of an asset or when they make the asset more valuable than it was originally. The replacement of assets components will normally be expenses unless they are a significant nature and meet all the capitalization criteria. E. Computer System/Data Security – The Town shall provide security of its computer/network system and data files through physical and logical security systems that will include, but are not limited to: network user authentications, firewalls, content filtering, spam/virus protection, and redundant data backup. 126 Section 12 Municipal Investment Policy I. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of the Town of Westlake (the “Town") that the administration of its funds and the investment of those funds shall be handled as its highest public trust. Investments shall be made in a manner which will provide the maximum security of principal invested through limitations and diversification while meeting the daily cash flow needs of the Town and conforming to all applicable state and Town statutes governing the investment of public funds. The receipt of a market rate of return will be secondary to the requirements for safety and liquidity. It is the intent of the Town to be in complete compliance with local law and the Texas Public Funds Investment Act (the "Act", Texas Government Code 2256). The earnings from investments will be used in a manner that best serves the public trust and interests of the Town. II. SCOPE This Investment Policy applies to all the financial assets and funds held of the Town. Any new funds created by the Town will be managed under the provisions of this Policy unless specifically exempted by the Town Council and this Policy. III. OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGY It is the policy of the Town that all funds shall be managed and invested with four primary objectives, listed in order of their priority: safety, liquidity, diversification and yield. These objectives encompass the following. • Safety of Principal - Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the Town. Investments shall be undertaken in a manner that seeks to insure the preservation of capital in the overall portfolio. The suitability of each investment decision will be made on the basis of safety. •• Liquidity - TThhee TToowwnn''ss iinnvveessttmmeenntt ppoorrttffoolliioo wwiillll rreemmaaiinn ssuuffffiicciieennttllyy lliiqquuiidd ttoo eennaabbllee iitt ttoo mmeeeett aallll ooppeerraattiinngg rreeqquuiirreemmeennttss wwhhiicchh mmiigghhtt bbee rreeaassoonnaabbllyy aannttiicciippaatteedd.. IInnvveessttmmeenntt ddeecciissiioonnss wwiillll bbee bbaasseedd oonn ccaasshh ffllooww aannaallyyssiiss ooff aannttiicciippaatteedd eexxppeennddiittuurreess.. • Diversification - Diversification is required in the portfolio's composition. Diversification of the portfolio will include diversification by maturity and market sector and will include the use of a number of broker/dealers or banks for diversification and market coverage. Competitive bidding will be used on each sale or purchase. • Yield - The Town's investment portfolio shall be designed with the objective of attaining a reasonable market yield, taking into account the Town's risk constraints and cash flow needs. A reasonable market yield for the portfolio will be defined as the six month (180 day) U.S. Treasury Bill which compares to the portfolio's maximum weighted average maturity of six months. The authorized investment purchased will be of the highest credit quality and marketability supporting the objectives of safety and liquidity. Securities, when not matched to a specific liability, will be short term to provide adequate liquidity. The portfolio shall be diversified to protect against market and credit risk in any one sector. 127 Section 12 Municipal Investment Policy The maximum weighted average maturity of the portfolio will be no more than 180 days and the maximum stated maturity of any security will not exceed two years. The funds are combined for investment purposes but the unique needs of all the funds in the portfolio are recognized and represented. Effective cash management is recognized as essential to good fiscal management. Cash management is defined as the process of managing monies in order to ensure maximum cash availability. The Town shall maintain a cash management program which includes timely collection of accounts receivable, prudent investment, disbursement of payments within invoice terms and the management of banking services. IV. LEGAL LIMITATIONS, RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY Specific investment parameters for the investment of public funds in Texas are stipulated in the Public Funds Investment Act, Chapter 2256, Texas Government Code, (the "Act"). The Act is attached as Exhibit A. The Public Funds Collateral Act, Chapter 2257, Texas Government Code, specifies collateral requirements for all public funds deposits. The Collateral Act is attached as Exhibit B. The Interlocal Cooperation Act, Chapter 791, Texas Government Code, authorizes local governments in Texas to participate in a Texas investment pool established thereunder. V. DELEGATION OF INVESTMENT AUTHORITY The Finance Director, acting on behalf of the Council, is designated as the Investment Officer of the Town and is responsible for all investment management decisions and activities. The Council is responsible for considering the quality and capability of staff, investment advisors, and consultants involved in investment management and procedures. All participants in the investment process shall seek to act responsibly as custodians of the public trust. The Investment Officer shall develop and maintain written administrative procedures for the operation of the investment program which are consistent with this Investment Policy. Procedures will include safekeeping, wire transfers, banking services contracts, and other investment related activities. The Investment Officer shall be responsible for all transactions undertaken and shall establish a system of controls to regulate the activities of subordinate officials and staff. The Investment Officer shall designate a staff person as a liaison/deputy in the event circumstances require timely action and the Investment Officer is not available. No officer or designee may engage in an investment transaction except as provided under the terms of this Policy and the procedures established by the Investment Officer and approved by the Town Manager. VI. PRUDENCE 128 Section 12 Municipal Investment Policy The standard of prudence to be used in the investment function shall be the "prudent person" standard and shall be applied in the context of managing the overall portfolio. This standard states: "Investments shall be made with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, which persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the probable safety of their capital as well as the expected income to be derived." Limitation of Personal Liability - The Investment Officer and those delegated investment authority, when acting in accordance with the written procedures and this Policy and in accord with the Prudent Person Rule, shall be relieved of personal liability in the management of the portfolio provided that deviations from expectations for a specific security's credit risk or market price change are reported in a timely manner and that appropriate action is taken to control adverse market effects. VII. INTERNAL CONTROLS The Investment Officer shall establish a system of written internal controls which will be reviewed annually with the independent auditor of the Town. The controls shall be designed to prevent loss of public funds due to fraud, employee error, and misrepresentation by third parties, or imprudent actions by employees of the Town. VIII. AUTHORIZED INVESTMENTS Acceptable investments under this policy shall be limited to the instruments listed below. The choice of high-grade government investments and high-grade, money market instruments are designed to assure the marketability of those investments should liquidity needs arise. • Obligations of the United States Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, not to exceed two (2) years to stated maturity and excluding mortgage backed securities; • Fully insured or collateralized certificates of deposit from a bank doing business in the State of Texas and under the terms of a written depository agreement with that bank, not to exceed one year to stated maturity; • No-load, SEC registered money market mutual funds. No more than 80% of the entity's monthly average balance may be invested in money market funds • Public Funds interest bearing accounts; and • Constant dollar, AAA-rated Texas Local Government Investment Pools as defined by the Public Funds Investment Act. If additional types of securities are approved for investment by public funds by state statute, they will not be eligible for investment until this Policy has been amended and the amended version adopted by the Council. 129 Section 12 Municipal Investment Policy Delivery versus Payment - All investment security transactions shall be conducted on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis to assure that the Town has control of its assets and/or funds at all times. IX. AUTHORIZED FINANCIAL DEALERS AND INSTITUTIONS Securities broker/dealers may be primary or regional broker/dealers and will meet other criteria as determined by the Investment Officer including state registration and completion of a Town Broker/Dealer questionnaire (attached as Exhibit D). The following criteria must be met by authorized firms. • annual provision of an audited financial statement, • proof of certification by the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) • proof of current registration with the Texas State Securities Commission, and • completion of the Town's broker/dealer questionnaire. Every bank and broker/dealer with whom the Town transacts business will be provided a copy of this Investment Policy to assure that they are familiar with the goals and objectives of the investment program. The firm will be required to return a signed copy of the Certification Form (attached as Exhibit C) certifying that the Policy has been received and reviewed and only those securities approved by the Policy will be sold to the Town. X. DIVERSIFICATION AND MATURITY LIMITATIONS It is the policy of the Town to diversify its investment portfolio. Invested funds shall be diversified to minimize risk or loss resulting from over-concentration of assets in a specific maturity, specific issuer, or specific class of securities. Diversification strategies shall be established and periodically reviewed. XI. SAFEKEEPING AND COLLATERALIZATION The laws of the State and prudent treasury management require that all purchased securities be bought on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis and be held in safekeeping by either an approved, independent third party financial institution or the Town's designated depository. Securities Owned by the Town - All safekeeping arrangements shall be approved by the Investment Officer and an agreement of the terms executed in writing. The safekeeping bank may not be within the same holding company as the bank from which the securities are purchased. The custodian shall be required to issue original safekeeping receipts to the Town listing each specific security, rate, description, maturity, CUSIP number, and other pertinent information. Collateral - Collateralization shall be required on all bank time and demand deposits for principal and accrued interest amounts over the FDIC insurance coverage of $100,000 (by tax identification number). In order to anticipate market changes and provide a level of additional security for all funds, collateral with a market value equal to 102% of the total deposits are required. The pledging bank will be made contractually liable for monitoring and maintaining the collateral levels at all times. All collateral will be held by an independent third party bank outside the holding company of the bank, pledged to the Town. 130 Section 12 Municipal Investment Policy Authorized collateral will include only: • Obligations of the US Government, its agencies and instrumentalities to include mortgage backed securities which pass the bank test, • Municipal obligations rated at least A by two nationally recognized rating agencies. • The custodian shall be required to provide original safekeeping receipts clearly marked that the security is pledged to the Town. XII. REPORTING The Investment Officer shall submit quarterly reports to the Council containing sufficient information to permit an informed outside reader to evaluate the performance of the investment program and in full compliance with the Act. At a minimum the report shall contain: • Beginning and ending market value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio • Beginning and ending book value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio • Change in market value during the period • Detail on each asset (book, market, description, par ad maturity date) • Earnings for the period • Overall weighted average maturity of the portfolio The report will be prepared jointly by all involved in the investment activity and be signed by the Investment Officer. It will contain all elements as required by the Act and be signed by the Investment Officers as in compliance with the Act and this Policy. Market prices for assignment of market values will be obtained from an independent source. The three month Treasury Bill average yield for the reporting period will be reported as a gauge of performance and risk. XIII. DEPOSITORIES The Town will designate one banking institution through a competitive process as its central banking services provider at least every five years. This institution will be used for normal banking services including disbursements, deposits, and safekeeping of Town owned securities. Other banking institutions from which the Town may purchase only certificates of deposit will also be designated as a depository. All banking arrangements will be in written form in accordance with FIRREA which requires a resolution of approval of the agreement by the Bank Council or Bank Loan Committee. XIV. INVESTMENT POLICY ADOPTION BY COUNCIL The Town's Investment Policy and its incorporated strategies shall be adopted by ordinance annually by the Council. 131 Section 12 Employee Pay Plan Policy I. SCOPE OF PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to set out the philosophy, purpose, and intent of the Town of Westlake’s pay system for municipal employees. The Town of Westlake’s mission is “to be a unique community, blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent.” The Town of Westlake believes that market-based salary, in combination with employee competence and their overall contribution to the Town’s success, should largely determine their compensation and career advancement opportunities. The philosophy and objectives of this pay policy are as follows: • First, the Town’s pay system should be internally equitable. It must ensure that pay ranges of each position within our organization reflects the value of comparable positions within our organization. In order to achieve this, we must pay employees fairly compared to their coworkers, and employees must also perceive that they are paid fairly compared to their coworkers. • Second, The Town’s pay system must be externally competitive in the market place, so that the Town of Westlake support or strategic outcome objective to attract, recruit, and retain highly qualified employees who are vital to accomplishing the organization’s vision and mission. • Third, to be motivational to our employees, providing the opportunity for future pay increases based upon individual work performance and development of job-related skills and competencies. II. DEFINITION With these objectives in mind, the Town’s municipal compensation plan is a broad band pay system. A broad band pay system is markedly different than the traditional “step-in- grade” pay system. A broad band pay system is one that structures pay utilizing two primary steps. • First, the responsibilities and qualifications required of each position are analyzed. • Second, using this position analysis, pay for these positions are surveyed against the market to create a broad set of occupation groups that become the pay bands. Each pay band has a minimum, mid-point, and a maximum rate of pay; however, within each band there is flexibility for hiring and provision of performance pay. Utilization of a broad band pay system by an organization is intended to: 132 Section 12 Employee Pay Plan Policy • Reward employees for positive behaviors that contribute to the effectiveness of the Town’s service delivery to our stakeholders; • Assist the Town in fulfilling its vision and mission by offering increased opportunities for career advancement and recognition of the Town’s municipal employees; • Provide the organization’s leadership greater flexibility with a pay system that can be used to adjust to changes in market conditions, enhance hiring practices, and reward outstanding performance; • Adjust to changes in market conditions as it relates to increases in pay for groups of employees within each band; ensuring the Town’s pay system remains competitive to the comparable market. III. IMPLEMENTATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PAY PLAN For its first year of implementation (FY 16-17), most employees will be placed within the established pay band for their position at their current rate of pay, with up to a three (3) percent market adjustment of the employee’s base pay rate. To promote internal equity, positions that have surveyed further below market may receive a higher market adjustment, at the discretion of their supervisor. In the fiscal years following FY 16-17, depending on market survey results and availability of funding, the municipal broad band pay system may have both a market adjustment and performance pay component, as defined below. IV. CLASSIFICATION AND PAY BAND PLACEMENT The following criteria will be used when classifying positions to determine band placement: • Nature or type of work performed • Level of responsibility • Impact of position on the organization • Reporting relationships • Scope of duties • Complexity of work • Supervision received and/or exercised • Knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) required to perform required job duties. Factors that will not be considered in classifying a position: • Incumbent of the position • Performance of the employee or incumbent • Longevity of the employee or incumbent in position • Qualifications of the employee or incumbent that are not required by the position Employee pay progression within a band can occur if there is a market adjustment approved for that band. Progression in a band can also occur if an employee’s job performance, as determined by review of job performance, results in a performance pay increase. Pay progression is defined as movement within a band that increases the employee’s pay on an on-going basis. 133 Section 12 Employee Pay Plan Policy Other instances that can create employee progression in a pay band include: • Promotion • Significant increase in job skills, job-related education or training or competencies • Position reclassification: These instances can only occur after proper analysis and with criteria established by the Human Resources Department and approved by the Town Manager or their designate. V. PAY PLAN PARAMETERS In order to successfully practice this pay philosophy using this policy, as well as reach our objectives, the Town will use the following parameters to utilize this pay system: Internal Equity a. In order to maintain accurate position classifications, the Town of Westlake will conduct a position analysis of 1/3 (one-third) of the organization’s positions each year. This ensures that all positions are reviewed on a rolling three-year basis. b. Upon review of the position analysis by the Director of Human Resources, and with the approval of the Town Manager or their designee, position classifications may be adjusted to a new band. This can occur if a new position classification is created, or if the duties, roles, and responsibilities have substantially evolved, resulting in a position that is greater similarity to another classification band. Performance Pay a. On-going performance pay may be awarded to individuals or teams who, as determined in their performance evaluation, have clearly gone “above and beyond” their traditional roles, job duties, and assignments over the evaluation period. b. Performance pay is awarded through the review process and the established criteria outlined by the HR department c. One-time performance pay may be offered to employees or teams who, based on performance evaluation, have been determined to have gone above and beyond expectations. One-time performance pay is a lump-sum, one-time payment and will not impact the base pay of the employee and will not move their pay within their position’s assigned band. d. All performance pay, whether on-going or one-time adjustments, is dependent upon the availability of financial resources. Market-Based Pay a. The Town of Westlake will conduct an annual market salary study in the spring prior to budget preparation for the upcoming fiscal year. b. Depending on the results of the market study, and if funds are available, all or some of the salary bands will be proposed to the Town Council for adjustment based upon the results of the annual market salary study. Proposed adjustments to any pay band will not be proposed unless the market study indicates bands have increased by 2.5% or more. c. Employee salaries may receive a market adjustment if their current salary has 134 Section 12 Employee Pay Plan Policy shifted to become less than 97.5% of the market average. d. All new hires will be placed at the minimum rate of their band, unless a hiring manager recommends placement at a higher rate. This must be reviewed first by the Human Resources Department and approved by the Town Manager or their designee. Generally, new hires proposed to be paid higher than band minimum may be brought into the pay system within 3% above or below a band’s midpoint; however, exceptional qualifications and experience of the new hire must be demonstrated by the hiring department to the Human Resources Department and the Town Manager for this to be approved. e. All market adjustments are dependent upon available financial resources. f. The market value for positions within the Town of Westlake will be determined annually through the completion of a survey of comparison communities identified by staff and approved by the Town Council. g. Employees with base compensation within 3% of the market average are considered to be “at market.” h. Positions currently at or above the market will not qualify for any market-based adjustment, and will remain at their current rate of pay. i. If the market rate for a position declines, the salary of position holders will not be negatively impacted, but they will not receive any market-based adjustments. j. Market adjustments will impact the base pay of the employee and may only be applied if the Town of Westlake has adequate financial resources available to fund the adjustments. VI. BROADBAND CLASSIFICATIONS BAND KIND TITLE SUB BAND KIND TITLE E Policy Making Top Management 10 Coordinating Town Manager 9 Policy Asst. Town Manager D Programming Senior Management 8 Coordinating Director 7 Programming Asst. Director C Interpretive Middle Management 6 Coordinating Dept. Manager 5 Interpretive Superintendent B Routine Skilled 4 Coordinating Supervisor 3 Routine Technician A Automatic Semi Skilled 2 Coordinating Coordinators 1 Automatic Engineers O Defined Unskilled 0 Defined Laborers 135 Section 12 Employee Pay Plan Policy VII. DEFINITIONS FOR THE BANDS ARE AS FOLLOWS: • "BAND E" POLICY DECISION - These decisions are associated with board level management, and involve guiding the organization as a whole through policy development, setting the overall direction, and tone of the organization. Restrictions to these decisions are often only limited by the laws of the state (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND D" PROGRAMMING DECISION - These decisions are typically made by senior management or department directors and are generally tasked with executing the organization's policy through strategy development. Establishing guidelines by which further decisions are made. A typical senior management decision is made at the organizational or department level. For instance, the decision on how to set up the organization's network infrastructure is usually determined by management, while the decision to upgrade is based on policy (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND C" INTERPRETIVE DECISIONS - Middle management who have constraints placed upon them by them by senior management. These are usually made by business unit managers, such as a budget manager or project research analyst. Once overall strategy is developed by the senior managers, the middle managers decide how to utilize resources in order to meet deadlines. The unit manager should always know why certain staff members have been assigned to a particular job and may have to interpret situations not currently covered by rules or guidelines (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND B” ROUTINE DECISIONS - Skilled supervisors know the "how", the "where", and the "when" to set up equipment, systems, and are aware of the rules that govern these processes. They can decide which process is to be used in order to carry out the interpretive decisions as they have a firm handle on operations. For example, a billing clerk knows how to complete the utility billing process, including the way in which entries have to be made, as they have the book of rules and regulations to refer to as needed (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND A" AUTOMATIC DECISIONS - Each process is a cycle of operations. The process is decided by the supervisor who then sets up the process or the "how" of the task at hand. This is generally accomplished by a semi-skilled individual who completes the task as outlined, within the constraints of the process. This individual can decide where and when to carry out the operations needed for the task (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND O" DEFINED DECISIONS - "Band O" decisions are rarely seen in an organization. These decisions are those involving speed of completion of a task, and are usually left to unskilled, entry level, nonexempt employees (Paterson, 1972). 136 Section 12 Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement VEHICLE MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT The Town recognizes that deferred maintenance and not anticipating capital replacement needs increases future capital costs. Annually, available funds will be evaluated during the budget process and a percentage of each operating fund’s budget will be recommended to the Council for transfer. Upon approval by the Council, the recommended amount will be transferred to the appropriate funds (General or Utility Maintenance Replacement Fund) for major maintenance/ replacement of street, building roof, flooring, air conditioning, equipment, etc. The Town of Westlake owns, operates, and maintains a number of vehicles. To provide a fiscally responsible vehicle and equipment replacement policy that enables the Town to maximize vehicle and equipment utilization, while maintaining the Town’s desired public image and high-quality program of services for our residents. Therefore, the Town of Westlake will maintain a Vehicle and Equipment Replacement and Depreciation Schedule; said schedule will be maintained by the Finance Department. Vehicle and equipment replacement criteria will be developed according to each items anticipated useful service life. Typically, this is based upon the type or “category” of the vehicle/equipment and its usage. Each item will be surveyed annually and assigned a score based upon the Point Range and Guideline document. A vehicle will be replaced according to the established criteria unless the Department Head(s) and the Town Manager’s office determine that: 1) mechanical failure or vehicle damage warrants earlier replacement, or 2) the vehicle is still serviceable and may serve additional years beyond its original anticipated service life. Funding for vehicle/equipment replacement should be incrementally allocated from department operating funds to a restricted Capital Maintenance and Replacement Fund, subject to funding availability on an annual basis. Future vehicle/equipment replacements should be funded from this restricted fund, which receives accumulated operating fund transfers based upon the Vehicle and Equipment Depreciation Schedule. Funding will consist of an annual set-aside based upon a straight-line depreciation for each vehicle over the course of its useful life and budgeted as part of the annual budget development process. Depreciation fees should commence the same fiscal year of each new and replacement vehicle/equipment purchase. Likewise, depreciation expenses should be expensed from the respective department operating budget and deposited into the Capital Maintenance and Replacement Fund. Depreciation expenses shall continue through the service life of the new vehicle/equipment and shall cease upon retirement of said vehicle/equipment. 137 Section 12 Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement REPLACEMENT AND DEPRECIATION GUIDELINES Purpose - To provide a fiscally responsible vehicle and equipment replacement and depreciation policy, which will enable the Town of Westlake to maximize asset utilization while maintaining a positive public image and being fiscally responsible in our budgeting and fleet replacement programs. Policy - Replacement criteria for Town-owned vehicles and equipment will depend primarily on a point system, which is based upon the following factors: • Age • Miles/Hour Usage • Type of Service • Reliability • Maintenance and Repair Costs (not to include incident repairs) • Condition Point Range Chart Note: The Town may decide to retain a vehicle beyond the stated criteria after an evaluation of anticipated usage, repairs and operating costs. Each Town vehicle and small equipment have been placed in a specific category (as listed below) in order to allow for uniformity in our replacement standards. Category "A" - This category consists of the one (1) 18-passenger and one (1) 20- passenger school bus. The life span for school bus is 10 years. The Fire Department which includes engines, ladder truck, ambulances, and attack truck which are used primarily as a front-line response vehicle. The front-line life-span of the Engine is 15 years and has a reserve life-span for additional five years. The ambulance front-line life-span is seven years and has a reserve vehicle life-span for additional seven. The Town currently has one (1) Engine, one (1) Attack Truck and two (2) Ambulances. Category "B" - This category consists of Maintenances and Public Works vehicles which are used to serve the public on a day-to-day basis and pull trailers. Due to the heavy use, these vehicles may be scheduled for replacement at 100,000 miles provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than vehicles of the same type. The Town currently has two (2) Public Works trucks. Category "C" - This category consists of all other cars and pickups, which include administration pool car, building inspection truck, warrant officer public safety vehicle. These vehicles are generally assigned to a designated staff member and should not be replaced earlier than 100,000 miles provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than vehicles of the same type. Category "D" - This category consists of other off-road equipment (mule and mowers) that are used to serve the public on an "as needed" basis. Replacement of this category may be made after 2,500 operating hours, or provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than equipment of the same type. The Town currently has one (1) Kawasaki utility vehicle and (1) mower. 138 Section 12 Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Category "E" - This category consists of light equipment (weed-eaters, chain saw and pumps, generators, trailers, and other small hand-operated equipment) which are used to serve the public on an "as needed" basis. Replacements in this category may be made after the total maintenance cost exceeds the original purchase price of a particular piece of equipment. The cost of upgrading a piece of equipment will be the responsibility of the operating division. The Town currently has one weed-trimmer, chain saw, blower, small generator and a trailer. GUIDE FOR EARLY REPLACEMENT OF TOWN-OWNED VEHICLES Early Replacement - The consideration of early replacement of a vehicle often arises when major expenditures are necessary to restore it to a safe operating condition (e.g., major component failure or incident damage). The economic effect of such repairs cannot be avoided because the cost to the Town is normally about the same whether the vehicle is sold in un-repaired condition or restored to repaired condition. However, replacement prior to the normal criteria for vehicles will result in an acceleration of all future replacement cost cycles required to satisfy a continuing vehicle need. This acceleration of cost cycles causes a sizable increase in the total present value cost of all fixture cycles and should be avoided whenever possible. Major vehicle repairs should always be made, with two exceptions: 1. Major expenditures for repair should not be made when the cost of the repair plus the vehicle salvage in un-repaired condition exceeds its wholesale value in repaired condition. 2. Major deferrable expenditures should not be made when a vehicle is in the final six months of its retention cycle. During this period, the penalty for early replacement is small and, therefore, the vehicle should be replaced rather than repaired. Depreciation Formula - Current acquisition price of each vehicle divided by the utilization cycle mileage or total maintenance cost) will provide the yearly depreciation allowance. EXAMPLE A – Vehicles Mileage: $30,000 vehicle divided by the target replacement cycle of 100,000 miles will give you a depreciation cost of $.30 per mile. $0.30 times the number of miles (20,000) the vehicle was driven the previous year will give you the yearly depreciation amount $6,000. EXAMPLE B – Small Equipment Maintenance Cost: depreciate the original purchase price by 15% per year, for power hand tools, trailers, etc. Replace the item only when the maintenance cost reaches the original purchase price. 139 Section 12 Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Point Ranges for Replacement Consideration Point Scale Condition Description 20 points & under Excellent Do not replace 21 to 25 points Very Good Re-evaluate for the following year's budget 26 to 31 points Fair Qualifies for replacement if M/R cost exceed 60% of cost 32 to 37 points Poor Replacement if budget allows Above 38 points failed Needs priority replacement Below are two examples on how the point range and guidelines for Category "B" and “C” would work. Data Description Points Year 1999 26 points Type Crown Victoria Passenger Car 1 point Mileage 64,000 6 points Maintenance Repair driver side window motor 2 points Condition Poor paint and body condition, hail damage, rust spots, small dents, interior - rips, tears, stains, cracking on seat covers 5 points Total Points 40 points Staff recommendation = Replacement this year Data Description Points Year 2005 14 points Type Silverado F150 extended cab truck 1 point Mileage 35,000 3 points Maintenance low 1 points Condition Very good exterior and interior condition 1 points Total Points 20 points Staff recommendation = Include the replacement cost in the five-year forecast 140 Section 12 Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Point range and guidelines for Category "B" and “C” Factor Points Description Age Usage Type of Service 1 Each 10,000 miles of usage 1 Standard sedans, SUV’s and pickups 2 Each year of chronological age 3 Vehicles that pulls trailer, haul heavy loads and continued off-road usage 4 Any vehicle involved in ice or snow removal or road treatment Reliability Preventive Maintenanc e Work Not Included 1 In shop one time within 3-month time period, no major breakdowns/road side assistance call with 3-month period 2 In shop one time within three-month time period, 1 breakdown/ road side assistance call within 3-month period 3 In shop, more than once within 3-month time period, 1 or more breakdown/road side assistance call within same period 4 In shop, more than twice within one-month time period, 1 or more breakdowns/road side assistance call in same time period 5 Two or more breakdowns within one-month time period M&R Cost Incident Repair Not Include 1 Maintenance cost are less than or equal to 20% of replacement 2 Maintenance cost are 21-40% of replacement cost 3 Maintenance cost are 41-60% of replacement cost 4 Maintenance cost are 61-80% of replacement cost 5 Maintenance cost are greater than or equal to 81% of replacement cost Condition 1 No visual damage or rust 2 Minor imperfections in body and paint, interior fair (no rips, tears, burn) 3 Noticeable imperfections in body and paint surface, minor rust, minor damage for add-on equipment, won interior (one or more rips, tears, burns). 4 Poor paint and body condition, rust (holes), interior (rips, tears, burns, cracked dash) and major damage for add-on equipment 5 Previous accident damage, poor paint and body condition, rust (holes), interior (rips, tears, burns, cracked dash) and major damage for add-on equipment GRAND TOTAL 60 Point Ranges Condition Description 0-20 Excellent Do not replace 21-25 Very Good Re-evaluate for next year’ budget (5-year forecast) 26-31 Good Qualifies for replacement this year if M/R cost exceed 60% of cost 32-37 Fair Qualities for replacement this if budget allows 38+ Poor Needs priority 141 Page 1 of 2 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consideration and discussion of a Resolution to ratify the property tax increase as reflected in the FY 2018-2019 Annual Budget. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager Debbie Piper, Finance Director Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Fiscal Responsibility Fiscal Stewardship Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: October 1, 2018 Completion Date: September 30, 2019 Funding Amount: $1,990,235 Status - Funded Source - Ad valorem Tax EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) Pursuant to the requirements of HB 3195, it is necessary for the Town Council to vote to ratify the property tax increase as reflected in the FY 2018-2019 Budget. This vote is a procedural requirement of HB 3195. Section 102.007, Local Government Code, Subsection (c), reads as follows: “Adoption of a budget that will require raising more revenue from property taxes than in the previous year requires a separate vote of the governing body to ratify the property tax increase reflected in the budget. A vote under this subsection is in addition to and separate from the vote to adopt the budget or vote to set the tax rate required by Chapter 26, Tax Code, or other law.” Page 2 of 2 As presented, this budget will raise more total property taxes compared to last year by $272,358, or 17.10% and, of that amount, $50,499 is tax revenue to be raised from new properties added to the tax roll this year. If the proposed tax rate of $0.15600 is adopted, this budget will raise more total property taxes compared to last year by $368,126 or 24.9%. The ad valorem tax rate proposed in the FY 2018-19 Budget compared to the rates adopted for FY 2017-18 is as follows: FY 17-18 FY 18-19 Adopted Proposed Tax Rate Tax Rate Variance M&O $0.11133 $0.13201 $ 0.02068 I&S $0.02482 $0.02399 $ (0.00083 $0.13615 $0.15600 $ 0.01985 RECOMMENDATION Recommend approval of a resolution to ratify the property tax increase as reflected in the FY 2018-2019 Budget. ATTACHMENTS Resolution Resolution 18-37 Page 1 of 1 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO 18-37 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS RATIFYING THE PROPERTY TAX INCREASE AS REFLECTED IN THE FY 2018- 2019 ANNUAL BUDGET. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake has adopted an annual budget that required raising more revenue from property taxes than in the previous year; and WHEREAS, House Bill 3195 requires that the governing body ratify the property tax increase reflected in the budget in a separate vote; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That the findings above are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein. SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas hereby ratifies the property tax increase reflected in the Town of Westlake FY 2018-2019 annual budget. SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor _________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary ______________________________ Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Page 1 of 2 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Consideration and discussion of an Ordinance Levying Municipal Ad Valorem (Property) Taxes for the 2018 Year in accordance with the Fiscal Year 2018-19 Proposed Budget. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager Debbie Piper, Finance Director Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Fiscal Responsibility Fiscal Stewardship Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: October 1, 2018 Completion Date: September 30, 2019 Funding Amount: $1,990,235 Status - Funded Source - Ad valorem Tax EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) On June 28, 2010 the Town Council set the residential homestead tax exemption at the maximum (20%) allowed by State law. There were also exemptions adopted by that earlier Resolution (which is restated and confirmed in the tax levy ordinance) for an exemption for people who are disabled or over 65 and an exemption for Freeport goods. In addition, there is a provision in the current Town Code for a “tax freeze” for people over 65 or who are disabled and have a Westlake residence homestead. This Town Code provision has been interpreted by the Town’s attorney to mean that a person who currently, as of this year, has a Westlake homestead residence and is over 65 or disabled prior to the date the tax levy is adopted will have a zero tax Page 2 of 2 rate. That interpretation was presented and accepted by the Town Council. During the workshop presentation of the municipal budget on August 27, 2018, staff recommended a proposed tax rate of $0.15600 per $100 valuation. This is above the effective tax rate of $0.13551 which dictates two additional public hearings for resident input. The first public hearing was held September 10, 2018 where discussion was had by the Council, but no residents present. The second meeting was September 19, 2018 with one residents present to give support to the Council. The ad valorem tax rate proposed in the FY 2018-19 Budget compared to the rates adopted for FY 2017-18 is as follows: FY 17-18 FY 18-19 Adopted Proposed Tax Rate Tax Rate Variance M&O $0.11133 $0.13201 $ 0.02068 I&S $0.02482 $0.02399 $ (0.00083 $0.13615 $0.15600 $ 0.01985 RECOMMENDATION Recommend adoption of an ordinance levying a municipal ad valorem (property) tax totaling $0.15600 per $100 of assessed valuation. ATTACHMENTS Ordinance Ordinance 867 Page 1 of 3 TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 867 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS LEVYING TAXES TO BE ASSESSED ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTIES WITHIN THE TOWN LIMITS OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE FOR THE TAX YEAR 2018 (FISCAL YEAR 2018-2019); SETTING OUT EXEMPTIONS AND LIMITATION; NO STATE LAW STATEMENTS REQUIRED; PROVIDING FOR THE COLLECTION OF DELINQUENT TAXES AND A COLLECTION PENALTY TO BE ADDED TO DELINQUENT TAXES; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, a public hearing on the proposed annual budget for the Town of Westlake, Texas, for the fiscal year beginning on October 1, 2018 and ending on September 30, 2019, was duly advertised giving the date, time, place and subject matter of the public hearing, and WHEREAS, a public hearing was set by the Town Council in a duly posted Town Council meeting on September 24, 2018, and all citizens were invited to participate and be heard; and WHEREAS, all requirements of state law were met, including Open Meetings Act, Texas Government Code chapter 551 requirements and the requirement of Texas Local Government Code 102.002 that the budget officer prepare a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year; and WHEREAS, it is deemed to be in the best interest of the citizens of the Town of Westlake, Texas to levy a tax as set forth below, on all taxable properties within the Town limits of Westlake in order to provide the necessary funds to provide municipal services to its citizens and to meet all municipal commitments; and WHEREAS, The Town of Westlake will raise more total property taxes than last year’s budget by $272,358 or 17.10%, and of that amount, $50,499 is tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake has passed exemptions to certain applicable taxes which were previously adopted by earlier Resolution and recognized and adopted a tax limitation set out in the Town Municipal Code and such exemptions and limitation are included and adopted as part of this Ordinance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds the passage of this Ordinance to be in the best interest for the citizens of Westlake, for the preservation of public health, safety and welfare of the citizens of the Town. Ordinance 867 Page 2 of 3 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That all matters stated in the findings hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirely. SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas shall hereby levy the following taxes on each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) of taxable valuation on all taxable property within the Town limits of the Town of Westlake, Texas to be assessed and collected by the Tax Assessor/Collector for the tax year 2018 (Fiscal year 2018-2019) for the purposes stipulated below, to-wit: (a) For General Fund Maintenance and Operations (M&O) levied on $100 of taxable valuation: $0.13201 (b) For Interest and Sinking Fund (debt service) levied on $100 of taxable valuation: $0.02399 SECTION 3: Exemptions: That the Town Council authorizes the following exemptions and limitations: (a) Homestead exemption - That it is the intent of the Town Council of the Town of Westlake to adopt the highest possible homestead exemption, which would be a homestead exemption in the amount of twenty percent (20%) of the value of the homestead, and in any event, the exemption shall be at least a minimum of Five Thousand dollars ($5,000). For purposes of this section "residential homestead" is defined as a structure (including a mobile home) or a separately secured and occupied portion of a structure (together with land, not to exceed ten (10) acres, and improvements used in the residential occupancy of the structure and the land and improvements have identical ownership) that (1) is owned by one or more individuals, either directly or through a beneficial interest is a qualifying trust; (2) is designed or adapted for a human residence; (3) is used as a residence; and (4) is occupied as his or her principal residence by an owner or, for property owned through a beneficial interest in a qualifying trust, by a trustee of the trust who qualifies for the exemption. (b) Over 65 or Disabled exemption - That an exemption for a resident over 65 or disabled, pursuant to section 11.13(b) of the Texas Tax Code shall be authorized in the amount of $10,000. A resident is eligible for an exemption under this section if the resident is over 65 or disabled, but the resident shall not be entitled to two exemptions under this section, as set out in section 11.13(b) of the Texas Tax Code. (c) The Town of Westlake previously adopted an ad valorem tax limitation in section 86-2 of the Town Code, for elderly and disabled citizens according to Article VIII, Section 1-b of the Texas Constitution and Texas Tax Code § 11.261, which provides “The county, municipality, or junior college district may not increase the total annual amount of ad valorem taxes the county, municipality, or junior college district imposes on the residence homestead of a disabled individual or an individual 65 years of age or older above the amount of the taxes the county, municipality, or junior college district imposed on the residence homestead in the first tax year, Ordinance 867 Page 3 of 3 other than a tax year preceding the tax year in which the county, municipality, or junior college district established the limitation described by Subsection (a), in which the individual qualified that residence homestead for the exemption provided by Section 11.13(c) for a disabled individual or an individual 65 years of age or older.” This provision, commonly referred to as a “tax freeze” means that residents who are already eligible for the provisions of that section will not have any increase in their taxes from the time that they became eligible, as citizens of Westlake, for that section. SECTION 4: State Law Required Statements: (A) THIS TAX RATE WILL RAISE MORE TAXES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS THAN LAST YEAR’S TAX RATE. (B) The tax rate for the upcoming fiscal year will be $0.15600 (M & O of $0.13201 and interest and sinking fund of $0.02399 totaling $0.15600). The taxes raised for maintenance and operations will be approximately $105.60 on a $100,000 home with a homestead exemption. SECTION 5: The Town of Westlake will pursue collection of delinquent taxes and adopts the provisions of Section 33.07 of the Texas Tax Code so that hereafter an additional penalty of Twenty (20) percent of the delinquent tax, penalty and interest on delinquent taxes will be imposed on taxes becoming delinquent as provided by the Texas Tax Code and the Town’s collection agreement. SECTION 6: If any portion of this Ordinance shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor _________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary ______________________________ Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney 10. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION REGARDING THE LETTER OF RESIGNATION OF COUNCIL MEMBER WAYNE STOLTENBERG. Town Council Item # 10 No supporting documentation Resolution 18-38 Page 1 of 2 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 18-38 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPOINTING _____________________ TO FILL THE VACANT UNEXPIRED TERM FOR THE POSITION OF COUNCIL MEMBER FOR THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS. WHEREAS, Section 22.010 of the Local Government Code governs the filling of a vacancy on the Council Member in a Type A General Law Municipality; and WHEREAS, The Council has accepted the resignation of Wayne Stoltenberg, effective __________________ ______, 2018, from the Town Council; and WHEREAS, The Town Council desires to fill the vacancy of the unexpired term of Wayne Stoltenberg in the most expeditious and efficient way prescribed by law. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas does hereby appoint ______________________ effective on the _________________ _____, 2018, to fill the vacant unexpired term of Wayne Stoltenberg and that _______________________, will serve until the next regular municipal election held in May 2019, in the Town of Westlake, Texas. SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 18-38 Page 2 of 2 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor _______________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: _______________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Page 1 of 2 estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, September 24, 2018 TOPIC: Discussion and Consideration of a Resolution Appointing a Commissioner and Alternate Commission to the Planning & Zoning Commission. STAFF CONTACT: Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary and Tanya Morris, Administrative Assistant to the Town Secretary Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Informed & Engaged Citizens / Sense of Community Municipal & Academic Operations High Quality Planning, Design & Development - We are a desirable well planned, high-quality community that is distinguished by exemplary design standards. Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: June 18, 2018 Completion Date: September 24, 2018 Funding Amount: 0.00 Status - Not Funded Source - N/A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) Member New Term Expires Ken Kraska June-19 Greg Goble June-20 Michelle Lee June-19 Liz Garvin June-20 Tim Brittan June-19 Vacant (Alt) June-19 Sharon Sanden (Alt) June-20 Page 2 of 2 RECOMMENDATION N/A ATTACHMENTS Resolution APPLICATION FOR APPOINTMENT Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Boulevard, Building 7, Suite 7200 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Tel: (817) 430-0941 * Fax: (817) 430-1812 www.westlake-tx.org Email: townhall@westlake-tx.org ܆ Economic Development Corporation ܆ Historical Preservation Society ܆ Planning and Zoning Commission ܆ Texas Student Housing Authority ܆ Tree City USA Advisory Committee ܆ Public Art Society of Westlake ܆ Westlake Academy Foundation Board ܆ Other: ______________________ Applicant’s Name: Address: City, State, Zip: How long have you lived at this address? Email Address: Home Phone #: Fax #: Work Phone #: Cell #: Occupation, Experience/Degrees held: Why do you want to serve on this committee? Do you have any political conflicts of interest? Do you have any related experience? What do you feel that you have to offer this committee? Signature of Applicant: Date: Received by: Date: Date Appointed: Date Removed: Position Sought (please indicate 1st, 2nd, and 3rd choice): Applicant Information Office Use Only PAMELA PAYNE-FREEMAN WESTLAKE, TEXAS 76262 1.8 YEARS Licensed Real Estate Agent and Investor with 34 years experience in residential, land, commercial sales and investments. Bachelor's Degree. Proven track record for sales with the latest award being Top 500 agent in all of Texas for Re/Max in 2017. Volunteered for many years for organizations that help feed, clothe and house the homeless. To give back to our community. My first choice is to serve on the Planning and Zoning Committee None 34 Years experience in real estate sales, building, development and investments. To better serve my clients, I have reached out to planning and zoning departments for answers pertaining to my clients needs and or interests. I am a dedicated team player with good peoples skills, listening skills as well as being open-minded. Skilled in conflict resolution to avoid litigation. Well-versed on the subject of construction codes and laws. Pamela Payne-Freeman Digitally signed by Pamela Payne-Freeman Date: 2018.06.29 09:30:28 -05'00' ✔ ✔ Resolution 18-39 Page 1 of 2 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 18-39 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPOINTING A COMMISSIONER AND ALTERNATE COMMISSIONER TO THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION. WHEREAS, Currently a vacancy exist for both a Commissioner and Alternate Commissioner on the Planning and Zoning Commission; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has received an applications for consideration of appointments; and WHEREAS, the meeting at which this Resolution was considered was open to the public as required by law, and public notice of the time, place, and subject of the meeting has been given in accordance with Chapter 551, Government Code; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake does hereby appoint the following individual to serve as a member of the Planning and Zoning Commission for the term noted below: _________________ Commissioner Term Expiring June _______ _________________ Alternate Commissioner Term Expiring June _______ SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 18-39 Page 2 of 2 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor _______________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: _______________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada Town Council Item # 13 – Executive Session Town Council Item # 14 – Reconvene Council Meeting NECESSARY ACTION a. Section 551.087 Deliberation Regarding Economic Development Negotiations (1) to discuss or deliberate regarding commercial or financial information that the governmental body has received from a business prospect that the governmental body seeks to have locate, stay, or expand in or near the territory of the governmental body and with which the governmental body is conducting economic development negotiations; or (2) to deliberate the offer of a financial or other incentive to a business prospect described by Subdivision (1) for the following: - Charles Schwab - BRE Solana - Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P., related to Centurion’s development known as Entrada and Granada Town Council Item #15 – Necessary Action FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS: Any Council member may request at a workshop and / or Council meeting, under “Future Agenda Item Requests”, an agenda item for a future Council meeting. The Council Member making the request will contact the Town Manager with the requested item and the Town Manager will list it on the agenda. At the meeting, the requesting Council Member will explain the item, the need for Council discussion of the item, the item’s relationship to the Council’s strategic priorities, and the amount of estimated staff time necessary to prepare for Council discussion. If the requesting Council Member receives a second, the Town Manager will place the item on the Council agenda calendar allowing for adequate time for staff preparation on the agenda item. - None Town Council Item # 16 – Future Agenda Items Town Council Item # 17 – Adjournment Regular Session