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02-05-18 TC BOT Agenda Packet Mission Statement Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent. Westlake, Texas – “One-of-a-kind community; natural oasis – providing an exceptional level of service.” Page 1 of 3 TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS Vision Statement An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. BOARD OF TRUSTEE AND TOWN COUNCIL JOINT WORK SESSION AGENDA February 5, 2018 1500 Solana Boulevard Building 7, Suite 7100 1st Floor, Council Chamber Westlake, TX 76262 Regular Session & Work Session: 6:15 p.m. Page 2 of 3 Regular Session 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. DISCUSSION AND CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION 18-07, AUTHORIZING THE TOWN MANAGER TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH GREEN SCAPING TO COMPLETE PHASE II OF THE OUTDOOR LEARNING STATIONS WHICH INCLUDES THE MATH & SCIENCE PLAZA AND AUTHORIZE THE TOWN MANAGER TO MAKE FUNDING CHANGES NOT TO EXCEED $25,000.00 ON THIS PROJECT. 3. ADJOURNMENT Work Session 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION REGARDING WESTLAKE POLICE SERVICES AND WESTLAKE ACADEMY SECURITY INCLUDING RECOMMENDATIONS RELATED TO WESTLAKE ACADEMY SECURITY. 3. PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION REGARDING A DRAFT SCOPE OF SERVICES AND REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR POTENTIAL UPDATE OF THE WESTLAKE ACADEMY CAMPUS MASTER PLAN. 4. EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Sec. 551.076. Deliberation Regarding Security Devices or Security Audit to deliberate: (1) the deployment, or specific occasions for implementation, of security personnel or devices; or (2) a security audit. 5. RECONVENE MEETING 6. BOARD-COUNCIL RECAP / STAFF DIRECTION Page 3 of 3 7. ADJOURNMENT ANY ITEM ON THIS POSTED AGENDA COULD BE DISCUSSED IN EXECUTIVE SESSION AS LONG AS IT IS WITHIN ONE OF THE PERMITTED CATEGORIES UNDER SECTIONS 551.071 THROUGH 551.076 AND SECTION 551.087 OF THE TEXAS GOVERNMENT CODE. CERTIFICATION I certify that the above notice was posted at the Town Hall of the Town of Westlake, 1500 Solana Blvd., Building 7, Suite 7100, Westlake, TX 76262, February 1, 2018 by 5:00 p.m. under the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551 of the Texas Government Code. _____________________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary If you plan to attend this public meeting and have a disability that requires special needs, please advise the Town Secretary 48 hours in advance at 817-490-5710 and reasonable accommodations will be made to assist you. estlake Town Council TYPE OF ACTION Regular Meeting - Action Item Westlake Town Council Meeting Monday, February 05, 2018 TOPIC: Consider approval of a Resolution Authorizing the Town Manager to enter into an agreement with C. Green Scaping, LP to complete Phase II of the outdoor learning stations which includes the Math & Science Plaza and authorize the Town Manager to make funding changes not to exceed $25,000 on this project. STAFF CONTACT: Troy J. Meyer, Facilities Director Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Mission: Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesess with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost- effective, & transparent. People, Facilities, & Technology Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Improve Technology, Facilities & Equipment Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: February 5, 2018 Completion Date: May 31, 2018 Funding Amount $175,000 Status - Funded Source - Contributions/Grants EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) In March of 2016, the Westlake Academy Foundation raised $102,200 to create a master plan for outdoor learning stations on the Academy campus. The master plan would include 5 to 8 activity stations to be used by grades, K-12. The stations would include a vegetable garden, interactive Math and Science Plaza, music station, art court yard, wetland and nature trail. David McCaskill’s architect firm was hired in April of 2016 to create the master plan, cost estimate and design of each of the activity stations. The firm created a video survey to obtain feedback from the students and facility members in May of 2016. The Outdoor Leaning team included key facility staff members and administrators who reviewed the 500 plus responses form the video survey. The team concluded that the original Phase I would include the Math and Science Plaza and a vegetable garden. In June, the architect firm began to develop pricing estimates for all the stations and performed site visits to determine the best practices for each station. Staff presented the findings to the Foundation board in August of 2016. The feedback from the Foundation board and team was to use the area to the north of the gym to locate both the vegetable garden and combine the Math and Science Plaza with the astronomy station. In November 2016, staff received three bids to complete Phase 1 - the Math and Science Plaza and vegetable garden. Staff presented the bid results to the Foundation on December 14, 2016. The recommendation was to remove the Math and Science Plaza (Phase II $135,000) and move forward with the vegetable garden, sidewalks and site grading for Phase I at $100,725. The vegetable garden and sidewalks were completed in May 2017. Westlake Academy facility members and foundation worked together to create a promotional video for the Phase II Math and Science Plaza and raised $175,000 at 2017 Gallery Night event. David McCaskill’s architect firm met with the Director of the Foundation, facility staff members and administrators to update the drawing which include additional components to the project. . • Trail markers • Vertical ruler • Additional stone seating • Terraced seating In January 22, 2018, staff received the following bids to complete Phase II - the Math and Science Plaza; The low bidder was C. Green Scaping LP, the same contractor that constructed the outdoor garden. The low bid total was $231,896.20. This amount is over the budget of $175,000 that was established for this project. Staff and the the architect firm have discussed these anticipated changes with the C. Green Scaping and they are in the process of evaluating cost for each of these items. Unfortunately, it will take time to finalize a cost for each. In our discussion, C. Green Scaping agreed they could get the project in budget without sacrificing quality. • Green Scape $231,896.20 • Fort Worth Civil Contractor $302,043.00 • Hightland Landscaping $ 13,470.00 (Only Landscapeing) • Brick & Staone Master $ 19,350.00 (Only Stone work) This project will be funded by proceed raised at the 2017 Galley Night event and the WA Foundation. Final numbers for the project will be present on Feburary 5th at the Town Council meeting. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends the approval of this agreement for $1XX,XX with C. Green Scaping to complete Phase II of the outdoor learning stationswhich include the Math & Science Plaza, sidewalks and optional seating area and authorize Town Manager to make funding changes not to exceed $25,000 on this project. All other bids will be rejected. ATTACHMENTS Resolution Exhibit A, Agreement Resolution 18-07 Page 1 of 2 TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 18-07 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE TOWN MANAGER TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH C. GREEN SCAPING LP TO COMPLETE PHASE II OF THE OUTDOOR LEARNING STATIONS WHICH INCLUDES THE MATH AND SCIENCE PLAZA AND SIDEWALKS AND AUTHORIZE THE TOWN MANAGER TO MAKE FUNDING CHANGES NOT TO EXCEED $25,000 ON THIS PROJECT. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake owns and operates the Westlake Academy and provides facilities for Town and Academy use; and, WHEREAS, Phase II of the outdoor learning station includes the Math and S cience P laza and sidewalks which are designed for grades K-12; and, WHEREAS the Math and Science Plaza will give the Westlake Academy facility members the tools to enhance the outdoor learning experience; and, WHEREAS, having received bids and properly evaluated said bids as required by state law, the Town Council accepts the bid from C. Green S caping, LP and reject all other bids for the Math and Science Plaza; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: That the Town of Westlake Town Council hereby accepts the bid from C. Green Scaping, LP and reject all other bids to complete Phase II of the outdoor learning station which includes the Math and Science Plaza and sidewalks and authorize Town Manager to make funding changes not to exceed $25,000 on this project., attached as Exhibit "A". SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 18-07 Page 2 of 2 SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS DAY 5 th OF FEBURARY, 2018. ATTEST: _____________________________ Laura L. Wheat, Mayor ____________________________ ______________________________ Kelly Edwards, Town Secretary Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager APPROVED AS TO FORM: ____________________________ L. Stanton Lowry, Town Attorney Town Council Item # 3 – Adjournment Regular Session estlake Town Council and Westlake Academy Board of Trustees TYPE OF ACTION Workshop - Discussion Item Joint Work Session: Westlake Town Council and Academy Board Meeting Monday, February 05, 2018 TOPIC: Presentation and Discussion Regarding Westlake Police Services and Westlake Academy Security Including Recommendations Related to Westlake Academy Security. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager/Superintendent; Mike Wilson, Chief of Police; Dr. Mechelle Bryson, Executive Director, WA; Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager; Troy Meyer, Director of Facilities Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Curriculum Outcome Objective Respect for Self and Others Academic Operations PYP / MYP / DP Improve the Efficiences of Operational Systems Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Mission: Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesess with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost- effective, & transparent. Municipal & Academic Operations Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Maximize Efficiencies & Effectiveness Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: January 19, 2018 Completion Date: open ended Funding Amount: N/A Status - N/A Source - N/A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) This item has been placed as a workshop item for the joint workshop of the Town Council and the Board of Trustees. The reason is twofold: one, is that this subject involves services that affect the Town’s municipal budget and services provision, and two, it affects Westlake Academy school operations. While to some extent the finances and management for these two sectors of service are accounted for in a separate manner, the finances and management are also intertwined. Thus, it is optimal to discuss the subject of Westlake Academy security not only in the context of the school itself, but also in the broader context in which that security occurs. That broader context is via the Town’s inter-local agreement for police services provided by the Keller Police Department. As a result of the recent mass shootings that have occurred in Sutherland Springs Texas, Rancho Tehama California, Italy Texas, and Benton Kentucky, some residents have voiced concern to Westlake Town officials regarding the adequacy of the security level at Westlake Academy. This has raised questions as to what, if any, additional services or strategies might be beneficial in closing any potential gaps in the Westlake Academy Security Plan. Before delving into Westlake Academy security, the Town Manager/Superintendent first requested that our Police Chief, Mike Wilson, analyze and address the question of capacity and use of police services for the entire Town of Westlake. This analysis had not been done in approximately five years and the intent was to find out to what extent the current increment of police services is being fully utilized. This analysis is especially important to update given Westlake’s residential, business, and traffic growth over the last 5 years. In FY17-18, the Town of Westlake is under contract to the City of Keller to pay $963,519 for police services. These services include police patrol, criminal investigation, crime prevention/community education, jail services, animal control, police administration, and public safety dispatch. This report will provide statistical data for the 2016-2017 Fiscal Year extracted from KPD’s Computer Aided Dispatch System (CADS) and will address Westlake current police service levels and their utilization, strategies and tactics relating to security at Westlake Academy, and potential options for enhancing security at Westlake Academy. Staff have been working on this issue for several weeks and has consulted with the Director of Facilities, WA Executive Director, Town Manager/Superintendent, Police Chief and Assistant Town Manager. RECOMMENDATION Review the attached report from Chief Wilson including the recommendations contained therein from Chief Wilson. ATTACHMENT 1. Report dated Jan. 2018 from Chief Wilson regarding analysis of policy services in Westlake, Westlake Academy security, and recommendations pertaining to police presence at Westlake Academy. January 26, 2018 REPORT ANALYZING LEVEL OF POLICE SERVICES IN THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE. Prepared By Chief Michael Wilson Keller Police Department mwilson@cityofkeller.com 817-743-4501 2 INTRODUCTION In light of the recent mass shootings that have occurred in Sutherland Springs Texas, Rancho Tehama California, Italy Texas, and Benton Kentucky some residents have voiced concern to Westlake Town Officials and myself regarding the adequacy of the security level at the Westlake Academy and what, if any additional services or strategies might be beneficial in closing any potential gaps in the Westlake Academy Security Plan. This report will provide statistical data for the 2016-2017 Fiscal Year extracted from our Computer Aided Dispatch System (CADS) and will address current service levels, strategies and tactics relating to security at Westlake Academy, and potential options for enhancing security at Westlake Academy. BACKGROUND Since June of 2002, the Town of Westlake has contracted with the City of Keller to have the Keller Police Department be the exclusive Law Enforcement Agency for the Town of Westlake. At that time a service level analysis was conducted and the amount of additional staff needed to be added to the Keller Police Department was determined. An Inter-local Agreement was passed by the respective Councils which outlines the terms, conditions, and cost of the Police Services Agreement. The contract provides the Town of Westlake with the following: • An adequate number of police patrol units to provide routine neighborhood patrol, patrol of business establishments, answer calls from the public for police related calls, and enforce traffic laws within the Town of Westlake. This is currently accomplished by staffing two officers 24/7 in two patrol sectors (District #1 and #5) that cover the entire Town of Westlake and also overlap into North Keller. • Two dedicated motor officers to the Town of Westlake for forty hours each week per motor officer (not including vacation, sick, or training time) to enforce traffic laws and investigate motor vehicle collisions that occur in the Town of Westlake. Generally the motor officers work Monday-Friday during the morning and evening commuter hours. • Police and Fire Dispatch services including being the Public Service Answering Point for all 9-1-1 calls originating from the Town of Westlake. This includes housing and entering warrants from the Westlake Municipal Court. • Utilization of personnel assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division for the follow-up investigation of major crimes that occur within the Town of Westlake. • Utilization of a Community Services Officer to provide crime prevention programming to Westlake residents and businesses when requested. • Utilization of a Regional SWAT team for major incidents that occur within Westlake. • Utilization of a Regional Crash team to investigate motor vehicle collisions resulting in serious bodily injury and/or death and to provide reconstruction of the scenes. • Jail capacity and services for housing Westlake prisoners. • Animal Control Services including space at the Keller Regional Animal Adoption Center. • All services from the Keller Police Administration including the Keller Chief of Police assuming the responsibility of being the Chief of Police for the Town of Westlake. To calculate a cost for this agreement Westlake would be assessed the cost of eight (8) full- time equivalents along with an administrative charge. The cost of eight (8) full-time equivalents is not a static staffing number and there are times when Westlake will receive more resources than what can be delivered 3 by eight (8) employees to handle peak events and prevent Westlake from ever being subject to “black-out time” where officers are unable to respond to high priority incidents. This provides Westlake the full services of a Nationally Accredited Police Department with eighty-eight (88) members, associated equipment and extensive capital for the annual cost of eight (8) employees. The price of the contract for 2017/18 fiscal year is $963,519. ANALYZING DATA TO DETERMINE PROPER PATROL COVERAGE To determine the proper staffing level of police personnel for adequate patrol coverage we need to measure the amount of calls for service. This is the workload metric for patrol and illustrates what the officers are doing and the percentage of unallocated time for patrol. A reasonable amount of unallocated time allows officers to provide a visual presence within the community while maintaining a reasonable response time. Calls for service are broken down into two major categories; Reactive or Citizen Initiated and Proactive or Officer Initiated. Some common examples of a Reactive or Citizen Initiated Calls for Service include alarm calls, criminal and motor vehicle collision investigations, and disturbances. Proactive or Officer Initiated Calls for Service include Motor Vehicle Stops, Pedestrian Stops, Building Checks, Community Policing problem solving activities, and Campus Patrols. Listed below is the number of Calls for Service for Citizen Initiated and Officer Initiated. Because the Districts overlap between Westlake and North Keller the data for both municipalities are shown. Citizen Initiated Calls-For-Service in Westlake/North Keller for FY17 District And Town Total By District Average Time Per Call By District. Average Time Spent Per Day By District 1 Westlake 534 34:55 0:51:05 5 Westlake 1047 31:54 1:31:32 1 Keller 1460 31:15 2:04:58 5 Keller 534 32:33 0:47:37 Officer Initiated Call-For-Service in Westlake/North Keller for FY17 District and Town Total By District Average Time Per Call By District Average Time Spent Per Day By District 1 Westlake 6852 (3892 traffic stops) 08:31 (07:07 traffic stops) 2:39:50 (1:15:51 traffic stops) 5 Westlake 10219 (5867 traffic stops) 08:38 (07:27 traffic stops) 4:01:32 (1:59:51 traffic stops) 1 Keller 8603 (2239 traffic stops) 06:44 (06:57 traffic stops) 2:38:38 (0:42:40 traffic stops) 4 The above data shows that the officers patrolling Westlake and North Keller spend on the average of five (5) hours per day in both cities (21% of their time) answering calls for service from citizens. This leaves 79% of their time free to patrol and perform self-initiated activity. Compared to the same analysis in 2012, time officers have spent answering calls from citizens has increased by 4% resulting in a corresponding decrease in unallocated patrol time. Within that 79% of available time, the officers assigned to Westlake and North Keller spend an average of 10.82 hours on officer self-initiated activity. Out of those 10.82 hours, officers in Westlake and North Keller spend an average of 4.17 hours per day conducting traffic stops. When you add the total amount of hours for citizen and officer calls for service this equates to a total of 15.82 hours or 66% of the officer’s time committed to citizen and officer initiated activity. Self-initiated activity for officers in Westlake and North Keller has increased an hour since 2012, time spent each day conducting traffic enforcement has increased slightly, and the total amount of officer time committed to citizen and officer calls for service has increased by 8% (2 hours daily). Much of the increase can be attributed to foot patrols in construction and park areas (85 conducted in 2012 and 700 conducted in FY 16/17), Campus Patrols/Business Checks at Westlake Academy (73 in 2012 and 443 in FY 16/17), increases in Neighborhood Checks, and House Checks (69 in 2012 and 396 in FY 16/17). 21% 79% Percentage of Work Time for Patrol Officers in Westlake and North Keller Answering calls from Citizens Answering calls from Citizens Unallocated Patrol Time 5 Keller 4632 (478 traffic stops) 07:06 (09:50 traffic stops) 1:30:00 (0:12:53 traffic stops) 5 Because Westlake and North Keller patrol districts overlap to take advantage in the economy of scale for each community the total amount of all measured Patrol Activities for the two districts were analyzed and Westlake Districts consume a daily average of 9.05 hours of total patrol activity while North Keller consumes a daily average of 7.01 hours. This equates to a 57% Westlake - 43% Keller ratio. We have no way to determine outside of the measureable 66% of total police activity where the random patrol occurs in percentages between the two municipalities. 43%57% Percentage of all measured Police Activities spent in each City North Keller Westlake 4.17 6.65 9.18 Breakdown of Unallocated Patrol Time Spent by Officers Traffic Stops Other Officer Initiated Activity Officer Unallocated Time for Patrol 6 Analyzing the calls for services by citizens in Westlake by day and time of week, reveals that the number is relatively small (1,581) and accounts for less than 2.4 hours per day for both Westlake Districts. Therefore, there is no opportunity or need to staff differently in the districts by day of the week or hour of the day. The data shows most of the calls occur during the day shift and during the week days. This is when we have the most staffing available with the two sector officers and the two motor officers that can break away from their exclusive traffic duties and respond to high priority calls from the public. There were no identified “black out times” when an officer was not available to respond to a high priority call within the Town of Westlake. Actually, there are instances each month when additional resources are pulled from Keller Patrol Sectors and Traffic Units to handle major calls for services within the Town of Westlake. Dropping the municipal boundaries based on the severity of the call continues to be the most effective and efficient use of resources versus overstaffing for occurrences that happen very infrequently. Analyzing the support roles of Crime Prevention, Criminal Investigations, SWAT Team, and Animal Control Services, the contract does not specify a fixed amount of resources allocated to Westlake. Therefore, Westlake continues to receive what is needed to accomplish the goal. One of the best features of the Police Services Contract for the Town of Westlake is that the Town receives support functions of a mid-size police department of 88 employees for the cost of eight (8) employees while the City of Keller receives the needed additional patrol coverage in North Keller and an additional Records Clerk. During the past year, the Criminal Investigations Division has been assigned to investigate 30 Westlake offenses, submitted 35 evidentiary items to the lab for analysis, and filed 116 in-custody cases with the Denton and Tarrant County District Attorney’s Officer. The Community Service Officer has been available for home security audits, which is advertised on the Town of Westlake webpage, has presented on Healthy Choices and Bullying at Westlake Academy for Grades K to 5, Drug Awareness, Bullying, and Cyber Bullying for Grades 6 to 12, and presented to Westlake Academy parents on Drug Awareness, Internet Safety, and Cyber Bullying. In addition, the Community Services Officer has attended Vaquero Club HOA meetings, and conducted Meet the Officer events at Primrose Entrada. The SWAT team has provided dignitary protection details at Deloitte University, escorted Medal of Honor recipients through the town of Westlake, participated in table top exercises at Deloitte University and Fidelity, provided self- defense training for Fidelity employees, and participated in critical incident training at Deloitte University. The SWAT team commanders and team leaders routinely meet with the corporate campuses to conduct walk- through exercises to ensure they have accurate layouts of the facilities. Animal Services responded to 89 animal related calls in FY 2016/2017. The agreement also includes utilization of equipment (vehicles, radios, etc.), state-of-the-art police, jail, and animal service facilities, dispatch service, and discounted radio access through NETCO. Additional benefits associated with the agreement include technology improvements such as Siren GPS, which enhanced the Town’s 911 service for those using mobile devices. Current Security Measures for Westlake Academy The current security measures employed at Westlake Academy were established following a Security/Safety Assessment commissioned by the Town of Westlake in 2013 and a Security Audit conducted by the Keller Police Department that same year. With both the assessment and audit the three following areas were analyzed: 7 • The Outer Layer of Protection: Roadways, surrounding environment to the curb and/or sidewalk of the property line. • The Middle Layer of Protection: School yards, athletic fields, parking areas, and other curtilage located on the property. • The Inner Layer of Protection: the Academy structure and interior. The Town of Westlake, Westlake Academy, and Keller Police Department each play critical roles in ensuring a safe environment for all stakeholders at Westlake Academy. Please note that this report will provide an overview and will not speak to specific confidential strategies being utilized. The on-going strategies and any new strategies introduced at the campus factor in identified threats to the campus, along with, emerging trends. Known high level threats to educational institutions and places where the public gather are active attacks and weather events. For the purpose of this report, I will be focusing on events that pose an immediate threat to life safety at Westlake Academy. The Outer Layer of Protection is a multifaceted approach due to the various external factors that can impact it. Awareness, engagement, communication, and high visibility are our greatest tools in this layer. We continuously communicate with the Town of Westlake and Westlake Academy when there may be direct threats to Westlake Academy based on other law enforcement activities going on in the area or events at the neighboring corporate campuses. Environmental factors that could impact Westlake Academy are critical incidents in surrounding residential areas, corporate campuses, major highways and railways, or weather events. The Middle Layer of Protection is a more directed approach with specific goals we are looking to achieve. From a law enforcement perspective you never want your activities to be routine. Our goal is to work to eliminate the opportunity for a crime/event to occur. We work to eliminate the opportunity by varyi ng our activities in our proactive patrols of the area, utilizing directed enforcement details such as traffic enforcement, and conducting random building checks and foot patrols around the campus. These activities are conducted at all hours of the day and night, and throughout the entire week, even when class is not in session. Within the middle layer, campus staff plays an integral role in ensuring safety. Procedures deployed during student drop off and pick-ups, student transitions from one area of the campus to another, and outdoor activities require effective monitoring, recognition, and communication of real and perceived threats. The middle and outer layers are the hardest layers to secure due to the various unknowns that can impact each level and the inability to limit and/or control ingress and egress through each layer. The Inner Layer of Protection is a multifaceted approach like the one utilized in the Middle Layer combining protocols and procedures employed by Westlake Academy staff, strategies implemented by the Keller Police Department, along with, the design and implementation of security features on campus. Examples of measures implemented by Westlake Academy would be their Emergency Response Team, which is designed to respond to incidents ranging from severe weather events to critical incidents, the creation and implementation of an Emergency Operations Manual that includes campus lockdown procedures that are trained on by the staff, along with a communication system that notifies staff of various threats on the campus. Currently, the Keller Police Department utilizes a campus patrol program, on-campus training/engagement programs with students, works with Westlake Academy and town staff in formulating response procedures for events that could impact the Academy, and modifies 8 department training for rapid response incidents at Westlake Academy to include campus layout and resource deployment. Additional Security Options for Westlake Academy Based on our current security strategies the following options have been identified to enhance the security at Westlake Academy: • The addition of a Full-time School Resource Officer at Westlake Academy. This option would provide continuous police presence at the Academy as an officer is permanently assigned to the campus, except for time off request, training, and sick time. A full-time SRO has a heighten level of understanding of school routines and protocols. One concern is the ability of one officer to effectively monitor, patrol, and address the potential safety threats occurring in the three protection layers mentioned above due to the layout and openness of the campus. The cost for an SRO at Westlake Academy would be approximately $111,000 annually. This fee would provide for the officer, the officers uniforms and equipment, associated training, and vehicle. • Creating a Westlake Police Sub-station at Westlake Academy. The option of creating a police sub-station at Westlake Academy has been discussed over the past few years. The sub- station would provide a check-out location for the two officers assigned to traffic enforcement and the two officers assigned to patrol the Town of Westlake for the completion of accident and offense reports, return telephone calls, and take breaks. The sub-station concept would enhance coverage within the Town of Westlake, due to officers currently having to return to the Keller Police Department to complete some of these tasks. Further, the sub-station creation would allow us to enhance our current security measures by increasing police presence on the campus, create more engagement programs and opportunities with Westlake Academy staff, students, and parents while providing more officers to fulfill service requests and the needs of the Academy. The sub-station model would have black-out times with no officers on campus, but those times would vary and also continue with our random patrol model to break from routines that can be monitored and compromised. Westlake Academy and Keller Police Department staff have identified an area on-campus that could be modified to serve as a police sub-station. The cost of this modification, along with, associated furniture and equipment is estimated to be no more than $25,000. • Collaborative training and team building between Westlake Academy and Keller Police Department staff. There are always options to enhance relationships between places of learning and local law enforcement to ensure that the goals of both are being achieved. Both the Westlake Academy and Keller Police Department have programs in place to address threats and incidents on the campus. By creating joint training and team building opportunities we can both assess our policies and responses to ensure we are aware of one another’s roles and goals in the preparation, training, and response to such events. • Enhance officer engagement with the students at Westlake Academy. Our strongest tool in securing Westlake Academy are the relationships we can establish with the students. Analysis of 9 the many incidents at places of learning revealed that there were warning signs seen by classmates or threats communicated. By enhancing our relationships with the students, the students will feel more comfortable reporting information to law enforcement or school staff. We would work to achieve this by first engaging students in the classrooms through various training programs followed by building relationships with students during lunch periods and passing periods. Recommendations for Improving Campus Security at Westlake Academy The recent mass shooting incidents in Sutherland Springs Texas, Rancho Tehama California, Italy Texas, and Benton Kentucky have served as stark reminders of the constant threat facing our society today. Taking those incidents into account, along with known factors surrounding active attacks on school campuses, I am making the following recommendations: • Create a Westlake Police Sub-station at Westlake Academy. • Design and implement a collaborating training program that engages Westlake Academy and Keller Police Department staff and when appropriate Town of Westlake staff. • Enhance officer engagement throughout all grade levels. Design programs that bring officers into the classrooms. While creating a School Resource Officer position for Westlake Academy seems to be the best option, it does not provide the flexibility nor the resources to adequately serve a campus like Westlake Academy. The campus design, location, and desired learning environment is not conducive to a traditional School Resource Officer model. By implementing a sub-station we are able to utilize all of the police assets assigned to The Town of Westlake to enhance security at the campus. Additionally, our greatest tool enhancing security in and around Westlake Academy and the Town of Westlake is higher levels of stakeholder engagement. Officers working out of the sub-station at Westlake Academy will establish a strong platform for building partnership relationships with staff, students, and their parents. The recommended options would be clearly defined with performance goals and expectations for Keller Police Department staff assigned to the area. The Keller Police Department is community driven and committed to delivering police services that are congruent with our stakeholder’s expectations. The recommendations I have made is an aggressive model and one that does not follow traditional form; however, I believe that due to the educational goals of Westlake Academy and the Town of Westlake a traditional response would not meet the goals and expectations of the community. estlake Town Council and Westlake Academy Board of Trustees TYPE OF ACTION Workshop - Discussion Item Joint Work Session: Town Council & Academy Board Meeting Monday, February 05, 2018 TOPIC: Presentation and Discussion Regarding a Draft Scope of Services and Request for Proposals for Potential Update of the Westlake Academy Campus Master Plan. STAFF CONTACT: Tom Brymer, Town Manager/Superintendent; Dr. Mechelle Bryson, Executive Director, WA; Amanda DeGan, Assistant Town Manager; Troy Meyer, Director of Facilities Strategic Alignment Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Curriculum Outcome Objective Planned / Responsible Development Academic Operations PYP / MYP / DP Improve the Efficiences of Operational Systems Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Vision, Value, Mission Perspective Strategic Theme & Results Outcome Objective Informed & Engaged Citizens / Sense of Community Citizen, Student & Stakeholder Exemplary Service & Governance - We set the standard by delivering unparalleled municipal and educational services at the lowest cost. Increase CSS Satisfaction Strategic Initiative Outside the Scope of Identified Strategic Initiatives Time Line - Start Date: January 19, 2018 Completion Date: open ended Funding Amount: N/A Status - N/A Source - N/A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (INCLUDING APPLICABLE ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY) This item has been placed as a workshop item at a joint workshop of the Town Council and the Board of Trustees. The reason is twofold: one is that this subject involves services that affect the Town’s municipal budget and services provision, and two, it affects Westlake Academy school operations. While to some extent the finances and management for these two sectors of service are accounted for in a separate manner, they are also intertwined. Thus, it is optimal to discuss the subject of Westlake Academy campus facility planning not only in the context of the school itself, but also in the broader context of the Town’s capital improvement budgeting process. The current WA campus facility master plan is 6 years old. When considering the approximate year long process it took for the feedback, planning and consensus stages as to the parameters for preparing a campus master plan, including enrollment targets and projects, the current campus plan is now over 7 years old. Many of the senior WA on-campus management in place today were not with the school when this master plan was formulated. There is a variety of new input these team members would give if the plan was updated. Also, much has changed in the Westlake community over the past 7 years, including significant residential growth that was not in place when the current campus master plan was compiled. Key to this process of updating this campus master plan is engaging the appropriate consulting services. The key to obtaining the appropriate consulting services is precisely crafting the scope of services for this consulting engagement, to the best extent possible. In other words, if the Board/Council desires a campus plan update (which staff does recommend), what is the basis of that planning? What is it we wish the campus master plan update to accomplish for us? What outcomes do we wish it to achieve? What planning period or periods are we considering? Are we looking at only changes to a campus master plan dictated by enrollment growth? If so, is it only primary boundary enrollment growth or secondary boundary enrollment growth, or both? Are we wanting to consider campus master plan revisions based on academic program changes or additions? Extra-curricular program changes or additions? Are willing to consider re-purposing existing buildings? Is the current WA campus site adequate to meet future needs or is additional land needed? If so, why is it needed? What is the estimated cost of identified needs and what is our financial capacity and appetite for funding them? What type of phasing of facilities is recommended? Certainly, there are likely many other relevant questions that can be asked about proceeding with a WA campus master plan update, but all these questions illustrate the need for clarity from the Board/Council as to what it is they wish to achieve and address with a plan update. That is the purpose of this workshop item. It should also be noted that the scope of services determines the cost of consulting services, so being as precise as possible helps proposing consultancies to more accurately price their engagement for these services. Staff members have been collaborating on this issue for several weeks and it has involved the Director of Facilities, WA Executive Director, Town Manager/Superintendent, Director of Planning and Development, and the Assistant Town Manager. RECOMMENDATION Staff recommendation is for the Board/Council to review, discuss, and provide staff direction pertaining to the attached draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for a possible WA campus master plan update. Staff strongly recommends especially that the Board/Council review the Introduction and Section V of the draft RFP. These sections of the RFP layout a proposed scope of services for this engagement. Staff also recommends that the Board/Council discuss funding for this engagement. Funding was proposed by staff during the formulation of the FY17-18 budget process. Direction from the Council at that time was not to fund it, but to approach the Texas Student Housing Authority (TSHA) for potential funding dollars. However, staff recommends prior to doing that, that the Board/Council discuss and give direction regarding the scope of this engagement since it will determine its cost. Staff also recommends that the Council/Board discuss if it still wishes to pursue TSHA funding of this effort or to fund it from Town funds (which would require a budget amendment and would likely require using General Fund’s fund balance). ATTACHMENT Draft RFP for WA Campus Master Plan Update Consulting Services. Page 1 of 18 Town of Westlake, Texas DRAFT 1 29 18 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) Consulting Services for Review and Update of the Westlake Academy Campus Master Plan I. INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE OF THIS RFP The Town of Westlake, Texas (Town) is seeking creative and innovative proposals from qualified architect and/or school facility planning firms for a review and update to the campus facility master plan for its Town owned charter school, Westlake Academy, which features the International Baccalaureate curriculum. The scope of services requested for this engagement are detailed below. Respondents shall fully review and familiarize themselves with this RFP document prior to responding to the Town with a proposal. A summary of this scope of services is as follows: *Revise the Westlake Academy facility master plan for the campus. Projecting school site (i.e. land) and facility needs for the planning period that accommodates: *the next 1-2 years *the next 3-5 years *the next 5-10 years *Projected student enrollment for those periods (working from demographic projections by Westlake Academy’s retained demographer0. *Program offerings including current offerings, changes or expansion in said offerings, and/or new program offerings as identified. Page 2 of 18 *Current utilization of existing space and recommended phasing of any proposed (existing) facility renovation or new facilities. II. THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE – MUNICIPAL AND ACADEMIC SERVICES Westlake, Texas is a growing, vibrant community with a unique identity conveniently located in the Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) metroplex along the State Highway 114 corridor. The community is minutes away from the north entrance to DFW airport. The high-end demographic of Westlake’s residents reflects the current housing market through distinctive developments and a one-of-a-kind community. Westlake residents are very well educated and quite successful in their respective fields of employment. Westlake’s development standards are of the highest quality. Westlake is home to several top tier companies. With the recent announcement by the Charles Schwab Company to construct a major corporate office campus in Westlake, and with this construction underway, the Town now has a financial industry cluster located in its boundaries that also includes Fidelity Investments and Deloitte LLP. The environment in Westlake, culturally, governmentally, and business-wise, is a very sophisticated one. Further background information regarding the Town of Westlake is contained in the appendix to this RFP. The Town’s operating budget for all departments, including Westlake Academy (WA) for FY 17-18 is approximately $40M. The Town holds the charter from the State of Texas for Westlake Academy (WA or the Academy). WA is the largest department (i.e. operating unit) of the Town with FY17-18 operating budget of $8.3M (not including debt service) with 100 direct line employees. Funding for Westlake Academy comes from more than one source. The school’s operating budget is funded through State public education monies (called the Foundation School Program) and donations raised largely from Academy parents through the Westlake Academy Foundation’s annual Blacksmith Campaign. Other funding is expensed to the Town’s municipal budget which includes debt service for campus buildings as well as support services (which is detailed below). The Town operates under the council-manager form of government. As such, all department heads, with the exception of the Town Attorney and Municipal Judge, report to the Town Manager who also serves as the Superintendent of the Academy. WA’s on-campus senior administrator, the Executive Director, is appointed by and reports to the Town Manager/Superintendent. The Town Manager/Superintendent is appointed by and reports to the Town Council which also serves as the Board of Trustees for the school. The Academy is in its fifteenth year of operation having graduated eight (8) senior classes to date. We have also grown into a school that offers all grades from K-12 with a student enrollment for SY17-18 of approximately 856. We are a public, open enrollment charter school that offers the full breadth of the IB curriculum and as such, the Academy must meet State requirements for charter schools. The only requirement that can be imposed on students as a condition of admittance is the geographic location of the student’s primary residence. Students must reside either in the school’s primary boundaries (meaning within the Town of Westlake) or reside within the school’s secondary boundaries which is a defined area within the DFW metroplex. Students residing in WA’s secondary boundaries must be admitted into the school via a lottery which determines a waiting list (if necessary). Page 3 of 18 Westlake Academy is chartered by the State to be a “full breadth” IB school which means that WA offers all three (3) of the IB curriculums. They are: Primary Years Programme: K-G5 Middle Years Programme: G6-G10 Diploma Programme: G11-12 Further, the IB curriculum is the only curriculum that WA offers. The State’s charter for WA provides specifically for this curriculum to be offered by the Academy, although in some of the upper grades certain Advanced Placement (AP) classes are offered in applicable grades. Operating as an open enrollment charter school, WA must comply with all applicable State and Federal laws and regulations governing such schools. As such, the Academy is a school of choice for its students. As mentioned previously, the only condition on enrollment pertains to the geographic location of the student’s primary residence, i.e. there is no selective student admission process based on, for example, a student’s previous academic performance. Students residing in the Town of Westlake presently are guaranteed enrollment (pending available space) should they wish to attend the Academy. Students residing in WA’s approved secondary can only enter the Academy via an annual lottery which determines an enrollment waiting list for those prospective students. As a school of choice, school age children living in the Town of Westlake can, in addition to WA, choose to attend their “home” independent school district (ISD), choose a private school, or be home schooled. There are three (3) ISD’s that serve three (3) different portions of Westlake (Carroll, Keller, and Northwest ISD’s). As a municipally owned charter school, a “shared services model” is used to provide many of the “back of house”/support services a school requires. A large portion of these services are expensed to the Town’s municipal budget, not the WA’s operating budget and are housed, in part, at the Town’s municipal offices, not on the WA campus (note: some IT staff and Facility Maintenance staff are housed on campus). Below is a brief description of the major support services charged to the Town’s municipal budget on behalf of the school (note: this list is fairly comprehensive although it may not list every support service provided by municipal operations if it is a service not utilized on a continual basis): • Financial and accounting services including monitoring and assistance with budget preparation and administration, financial reporting, auditing, and accounts payable/receivable. • Management of the school’s campus on-going facility maintenance, facility planning, facility renovation/updating (as needed,) and facility construction (as needed). • Annual debt service on bonds issued to build Westlake Academy. Debt service issued by the Town to build these facilities will be $1.8M in FY 17/18. • Human resources including supporting WA’s employee hiring process, employee benefit programs administration, compensation program administration, personnel policy development and administration, employee support and job description configuration for new or changing positions. • Support and management of WA’s information technology services, both support for systems on which this technology operates (servers, printers, internet provider interface, Page 4 of 18 network administration and protection, etc.), but also technical support for extensive use of technology devices deployed on campus such as laptops, smart boards, desk top computers, iPads, device software, i3D printers, regular printers, photo copy machines etc. (note: the campus utilizes a 1-1 iPad program where all WA students utilize an assigned iPad for academic uses). • Strategic planning and Board of Trustee meeting agenda planning and preparation provided through the Superintendent’s office (who also is the Town Manager). • Risk management services and police/security services. III. HISTORY AND BACKGROUND ON WESTLAKE ACADEMY In 2002, the Town of Westlake successfully petitioned the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to establish a municipally operated open-enrollment charter school under Subchapter D, Chapter 12 of the Texas Education Code (TEC). Charter schools are public schools that are operated under a contract called a charter. Contracts are issued by an authorizing agent(s) in each state as determined by the state legislature. In Texas, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) acts as the authorizing body. In September of 2003, the Academy opened its doors for the first time, becoming the only municipally operated charter school in the State of Texas. The Academy is considered the largest operating department of the Town of Westlake and receives both financial and personnel support services from the municipality. The Town officials who pioneered the school decided to follow another bold path by aligning Westlake Academy with the globally recognized and acclaimed International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum. The International Baccalaureate Organization is a non- profit educational foundation based in Geneva, Switzerland that offers four(4) highly respected programmes of international education that develop the intellectual, personal, emotional and social skills needed to live, learn, and work in a rapidly globalizing world. Leading universities and government organizations recognize an IB education as excellent preparation for success in higher education, future careers, and personal life. In fact, colleges actively recruit IB graduates, frequently offering them credit or advanced standing for their IB coursework. Students who earn an IB diploma are equipped with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to compete with students around the world. IB instruction is currently being provided in over 900 schools nationwide and over 2,300 in 128 countries worldwide. Page 5 of 18 Westlake Academy became an IB World School in 2006 after it was authorized to offer the Primary Years Programme (grades K-5); further accreditation followed in 2007 with the Middle Years Programme (grades 6-10), and in 2008 with the Diploma Programme (grades 11-12), making it the first school in Texas and fifth school in the United States to offer all three IB programmes and a truly world class K-12 education. The Academy graduated its first MYP class in 2008, followed by the first DP graduates in 2010. The land and buildings that comprise the Academy campus are owned by the Town of Westlake. The campus is located on 23 acres adjacent to J.T. Ottinger Road, near the intersection of State Highways 114 and 170. The original campus included three stand-alone academic buildings with 29 classrooms, administrative offices, restrooms, a library, a breakout area, a performance hall, dining and kitchen area, locker rooms, and a gym, totaling 52,600 square feet. The Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center opened in August of 2009, adding another 8,400 square feet of building space to the campus. This facility includes one art room, two science labs, five offices, a workroom, conference room, restrooms and a breakout space. Three portable classroom buildings were placed into service in the fall of 2013 to accommodate enrollment growth, followed by an addition three in the fall of 2014. Phase One of the Facility Master Plan was completed in FY 14/15, adding three new buildings and approximately 38,000 square feet, including a classroom building with additional administrative office space, a multi-purpose hall that serves as both a cafeteria and gymnasium, and a field house that includes a classroom, weight room, locker room and showers, and storage space. IV. CURRENT CAMPUS FACILITIES The current school campus consists of approximately 106,000 square feet of usable educational space. Configured in classrooms, common space, gymnasium, arts & sciences building, modular units, secondary building, multi-purpose hall, and a fieldhouse. The campus was built in three (3) separate construction projects over the life of the school. The latest being Phase One of our Campus Master Plan (FMP) that was drafted and approved in 2012. The original buildings were constructed and opened for school in the 2002-2003 time frame. Followed by the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center in 2009 and the first phase of the Campus Master Plan being built in 2014. Growth within our existing WA campus Facility Master Plan (FMP) is recommended based on two (2) options and according to three (3) phases. Option A may accommodate up to 1,300 students and included an addition of more than 65,000 square feet of space to the then existing campus. This option would have more than doubled the existing educational space without acquiring any additional Page 6 of 18 adjacent land. Option B would also accommodate the 1,300 students; however, it also contemplated the purchase or donation of additional land for outdoor use (ballfields, track, etc.) The Phases within the overall plan consisted of the following: Phase One – would allow for 855 students on campus, the addition of a cafetorium, a fieldhouse, a secondary school building and use of the existing portable classrooms. Additional square footage of approximately 38,000. Phase Two – builds on Phase One and would allow for a total of 1,140 students on campus, add a kindergarten pod, and an addition to the secondary building. Additional square footage of approximately 21,400. Phase Three – contains all shown in Phase One and Two along with an auditorium (seating 975 people), add three (3) new classrooms to the existing arts and sciences building, remove the portable buildings, and accommodate up to 1,300 students. Additional square footage of approximately 20,725. The overall student body has also grown since the school began in 2003. The original offerings consisted of G1 – G5 with Kindergarten and G6 being offered in the second year of operation. From there, the school added one consecutive grade each year until we reached our first class of graduating seniors in 2010. The number of enrolled students has grown over 300% from 195 in 2003 to approximately 856 in 2018. We also have a lottery waiting list of approximately 2,500 students for the current school year. Any additional growth will likely be driven by the enrollment of Westlake residents from our primary boundary which is also dependent on the construction activity and home development within the community. V. SCOPE OF THIS RFP The Town completed its first comprehensive campus master plan (since the initial construction of the Academy’s first group of buildings) in 2012. This campus master plan was adopted by the Town Council/Board of Trustees and the first phase of the plan’s recommended facilities were built in 2013- 2014 (year). Since that time, Westlake Academy (the Academy or WA) has retained new campus leadership with varying thoughts and perspectives regarding the current Plan and possible revisions, updates, and/or changes that might be necessary. This RFP is intended to achieve that end, i.e. recommendations from a school facilities professional, based on appropriate input from Town staff and the Board of Trustees, for revisions, updates, and/or changes to the WA facility master plan for the campus. The respondent will propose the methodology they intend to utilize to meet this scope of services as well as an estimated cost for these services. These services shall take into account the following: • The Town’s vision, values, and mission statements as well as those for Westlake Academy, including the Town’s Comprehensive Plan. • Current Board of Trustee policy and direction on current student admission and residency requirements as well current enrollment/class size goals and targets. Page 7 of 18 • Gaining strong familiarity with current campus facilities, including their configuration, utilization by grade and subjects taught, as well as land area for the campus in order to provide an adequate assessment for their ability to meet current and future needs as outlined (note: this assessment shall examine the campus’ land area and whether said land area is sufficient to accommodate current and future facility needs. It shall also analyze classroom usage, i.e. what percentage of the day are all class rooms at full capacity, 75% capacity, 50% capacity, and descending capacities as identified). • Planning periods to determine these facility needs and campus plan updates of: *the next 1-2 years *the next 3-5 years *the next 5-10 years Note: this will be based on enrollment projections furnished to the consultant from WA’s demographer. • An exit strategy for the portable buildings currently in use. • Existing space repurposing. • Office space needs, storage needs, as well as on-campus facility maintenance equipment/supply storage needs. • Regulatory requirements imposed by the school’s authorizing agency, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) regarding enrollment caps, charter requirements, etc. • WA’s existing Board approved campus master plan, including previous enrollment forecasts on which that plan is based upon, and any changes in circumstances or academic or extra-curricular programming that have impacted its current ability to meet the school’s VVM. • Current educational and extra-curricular programming and services currently offered at WA. • Any modifications to those existing educational and extra-curricular services forecast for the future via the WA strategic plan. • Any new and/or expanded educational and extra-curricular services forecast for the future via the WA strategic plan. • Forecasted residential growth for the Town and its impact on Westlake Academy. It should be noted that current and future service demands on existing or recommended WA facilities shall be based on enrollment growth only for students currently residing in or relocating to WA’s primary boundary, i.e. the corporate limits of the Town. Page 8 of 18 TASKS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH SERVICES REQUESTED To accomplish this scope of services, specific tasks necessary shall include an updated campus master plan proposed renovations and additions for the existing Westlake Academy buildings and site to fully address space recommendations. The tasks and deliverables to include the following: • Concept master plan of site including phased site plans and traffic circulation concept as well as recommendations for additional parking (if determined it by the consultant that additional parking is needed). • Concept floor plan for renovation of existing buildings and new buildings for master plan • Program of spaces validating number of spaces and square footage • Narrative supporting master plan and concept design. The narrative and plans to outline scope of major areas to be impacted by potential future renovations • Preliminary cost estimating to allocate budgets for future phases • Preliminary Code Analysis for future phase buildings including storm shelter requirements • Two site visits including visual assessment of existing building spaces and site components, with comparison to information provided by the Owner COORDINATION, REVIEW, AND DELIVERABLES • Three (3) planning workshops with Owner’s Stakeholder Committee to discuss programmatic and space needs. Said committee will be designated by the Owner. • One review and coordination meeting with Owner • Draft pdf and two (2) bound copies of deliverable for review and comment • Final pdf and two (15) bound copies of deliverable addressing Owner’s comments • One (1) oversize paper copy of final deliverable scaled drawings • Three (3) workshops with the Board of Trustees as well as presentation to Board of Trustees of final recommendations by the consultant. EXCLUSIONS FROM PROFESSIONAL SERVICES • Architectural design beyond concept design • Engineering analysis and design • Construction Documentation • Detailed accessibility survey • Geotechnical investigation • Observation of structural deficiencies • Field measurements of existing structures or framing. Existing structures or framing will be depicted in accordance with existing documents provided by others • Environmental or hazardous materials conditions / issues • Boundary and topographic survey • Zoning modifications, including plats, easements, Special Use Permits, and Planned Districts. • Specific exterior and interior material selections and samples • Public meetings or presentations, except as noted above OWNER’S RESPONSIBILITIES The Owner shall provide the following information prior to commencement of services: • Prior Building and site assessments • Current Approved Campus Facility Master Plan • Educational Specifications Page 9 of 18 • Design Guidelines • Existing building drawings • Boundary and topographic survey • Prior traffic study • School District Strategies (SDS) demographic report and other demographic reports available to Town • Town’s Comprehensive Plan (Forging Westlake) • WA current enrollment by grade • Current Board of Trustee Admissions and Residency Policies • Historic Student Enrollment information (as may be requested Note: The Town of Westlake will retain ownership of all files, documents and deliverables that result from this project VI. CONDITIONS FOR PROPOSAL SUBMISSION AND WITHDRAWAL The Town will receive written proposals for this consulting engagement, no later than 5:00 PM on __________,2018 at the following address: Town of Westlake ~ 1500 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 7 (The Plaza), Suite 7200 ~ Westlake, TX 76262 To facilitate processing of proposals, please mark the outside of the RFP envelope or package as follows: a. WESTLAKE ACADEMY FACILITIES MASTER PLAN UPDATE PROPOSAL. b. The envelope or package shall also include the PROPOSER'S RETURN ADDRESS. c. Proposers shall submit five (5) copies of the proposal in a sealed envelope or package marked as noted above. d. A Proposer may submit their proposal by personal delivery or by mail, but not by facsimile, or via email. e. The Town cautions Proposers that, in order to insure actual delivery of their proposal to the Town’s offices prior to the submission deadline, they be mailed or hand-delivered at the above address. f. A written proposal received by the Town after the established deadline will be returned unopened to the Proposer. Selection of the successful respondent to this RFP will be based solely on the Town of Westlake Staff’s review and evaluation of proposals submitted based on the Town Staff’s determination as to the responsiveness and completeness to the scope of services requested, as well as cost, experience, and qualifications of the proposing firm. Weighting of these factors for determination of the successful respondent will be at the Town’s sole discretion. Further, evaluation of past work and references may be utilized by the Town in determining the most responsive proposal to this requested scope of services. Respondents shall include with their RFP submission examples of similar engagements they have been involved in, their role in that engagement, as well as references, emails, and phone numbers of parties for whom the respondent conducted this work. Respondents shall include a list of those in their firm who Page 10 of 18 will work directly on this engagement, their role in the engagement, and include information on their work background, credentials, and education. The successful responder to this RFP will be expected to enter into a contract specifying all deliverables and a timeline for these deliverables as well as a timeline for completion of the entire consulting engagement. These timetables and deliverables shall be identified in the respondent’s proposal. The Town reserves the right to accept and/or reject any and all proposals at its sole determination. Additionally, the Town reserves the right to negotiate with identified successful responder the cost, timetable, and deliverables for a final agreement that would be entered into between the Town and the successful respondent. Interested potential responders to this RFP are encouraged to meet with the Town Manager, WA Executive Director and the Director of Facilities for any one-on-one briefing they would like regarding the Town of Westlake/Westlake Academy, this RFP, or both. Additionally, Town Staff encourages interested firms to attend a pre-submittal conference on ______________ at 10:00am in the Town Council Chambers located at 1500 Solana Blvd., Bldg. 7 (The Plaza), Suite 7200. It is the sole responsibility of interested responders to inquire and identify the Town’s current communication, marketing and outreach initiatives, tactics, and strategies. During the time period in which proposals are being received by the Town, respondents should refer all questions about this RFP to Troy Meyer, Director of Facilities and Parks/Recreation. If the Town determines that this question(s) has an answer that would assist all responders in the completion of their submittal, this information will be sent out to all firms that have indicated a desire to submit a proposal for consideration for this engagement. Proposers may withdraw their proposals by notifying the Town in writing at any time prior to the submission deadline. After the deadline, proposals shall become a record of the Town and will not be returned to the Proposers. Proposers shall be aware that after opening and during the evaluation process, all proposals submitted remain confidential. Once a decision to award is made, all proposals are subject to public disclosure consistent with State law. Proposers must invoke the exemptions to disclosure provided by law and must clearly identify in the proposal the data or other materials to be protected and state both the reasons why such exemption from public disclosure is necessary and the legal basis for such exemption. All other contents of the submitted proposals become public record. However, as stated above, the Town cannot guarantee that any or all portions of RFP’s received will not be made available to the public under the Texas Open Records Act. Proposers are encouraged, as they work on the content of their proposals for submission, to assume that their entire proposal will ultimately be deemed a public record. Page 11 of 18 APPENDIX TO REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS SCOPE OF SERVICES COMMUNITY IDENTITY Westlake is a growing community located in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex on the border of Denton and Tarrant counties. The community has grown to more than 1,200 permanent residents with significant development activity occurring over the last ten years. Westlake’s day-time Monday through Friday population is currently estimated at 12-14,000 due to its corporate business community. The term “unique” accurately reflects the Town of Westlake and how it perceives itself. This uniqueness is captured in the language one finds in its strategic plan as a one-of-a-kind community that is an oasis in the heart of the Fort Worth-Dallas metropolitan area. Westlake utilizes a land use plan and development standards that have created high-end inviting residential neighborhoods coupled with architecturally vibrant corporate campuses, while at the same time emphasizing open space preservation. Westlake is a “premier knowledge based community” owning the only municipal open enrollment charter school in Texas, and one of only a few in the nation. Additionally, this school, known as Westlake Academy, is a K-12 International Baccalaureate World School. While Westlake is a leader in public education, Westlake also is known for its shared service municipal service delivery model as well as for its innovative economic development partnerships between the Town and its corporate community. Westlake values environmental stewardship with its emphasis on public and private open space in its development standards along with services like its automated curbside residential recycling program. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake, as a community that is fully involved and invested in its rich heritage, vibrant present, and exciting, sustainable future. WESTLAKE’S “VVM”, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES In 2009, the Town Council approved its first Vision, Values, and Mission Statements as well as a Strategic Plan driven by this “VVM”. In 2011, the Town began updating its VVM moving toward a strategic issues driven format for its strategic plan, as well as utilizing a balanced score card system for measuring the organization’s performance. The Town’s current VISION, VALUES, MISSION statements are: Vision Statement ~ An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive developments, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. Value Statements Transparent/Integrity-driven Government ~ Fiscal Responsibility ~ Educational Leaders Family Friendly & Welcoming ~ Sense of Community ~ Innovation Strong Aesthetic Standards ~ Informed & Engaged Citizens/Sense of Community Preservation of our Natural Beauty ~ Innovation ~ Planned/Responsible Development Mission Statement On behalf of the citizens, the mission of the Town of Westlake is to be a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our resident and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent. Page 12 of 18 TOWN OF WESTLAKE PROFILE HISTORY The Town of Westlake has a short, but fascinating history. The geographic region, known as the place where the cross timbers met the prairie, holds tales of settlers from the Peters Colony, Indian treaties signed by Sam Houston, tremendous archeological treasures, and some of the oldest settlements in north Texas. The region has always been known for its natural beauty, its trade value, and its wonderful people. The Town of Westlake and northeast Tarrant County has maintained that distinction over the years, becoming one of the most desirable and sought after places to live in America. In 1956, Dallas lawyer Glenn Turner purchased about 2,000 acres along State Highway 114. The area came to be known as Circle T Ranch. Soon after, ranches and homeowners in the surrounding community incorporated, taking the name Westlake. The area included what is known today as Westlake, plus the area north, to the northern shore of Denton Creek. In the early 1970s, Houston developers Johnson and Loggins and professional golfer Ben Hogan approached Westlake about building a golf course, country club, and a housing development. Residents' interests differed. In 1973, Westlake disannexed this area from its corporate boundaries, clearing the way for that upscale housing development and golf course now known as the Town of Trophy Club. Nelson Bunker Hunt, a Texas oil millionaire, purchased the Circle T Ranch in the 1970s and it became a social hub for glamorous parties attended by celebrities from around the world. Hunt declared bankruptcy in 1989 and the Circle T Ranch was purchased by Ross Perot Jr. in 1993, owner of Hillwood Properties. While at times the Town and Hillwood have had disagreements over the type of development that should occur in Westlake, that relationship today is strong and has had a huge positive impact on Westlake with Hillwood bringing substantial business and residential development to Westlake. These developments include Fidelity Investments, Chrysler Financial, Vaquero Estates, and Deloitte University. WESTLAKE MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT Taking its name from its location west of Lake Grapevine, the Town was incorporated in 1956 as a Type A General Law Town under the rules of the State of Texas. The Town Council is comprised of a Mayor and five Council Members who are elected at large for a two (2) year staggered term each May. In 1999 The Town, by referendum, adopted the council-manager form of government. The Council is entirely responsible for creating Town policy. The Council hires and directs the Town Manager who administers the daily operations of the Town, insures that Town policies are implemented and enforced, as well as serves as the Superintendent of Westlake Academy. The Westlake Page 13 of 18 Town Council was recognized in 2012 by the Texas City Management Association as the City Council of the year for their commitment to good governance. TOWN OPERATIONS The Town of Westlake has an approved an operating and capital improvement budget of approximately $40 million for the fiscal year 2017-2018, and includes approximately 140 full-time equivalent employees (municipal and academic). The Town of Westlake provides a full range of public services to its citizens, as well as operates the only municipally owned charter school in Texas. The Town has received awards for its citizens, communications program as well as recognition for excellence in financial reporting. The Town has a rolling 5 year capital improvement program and has invested heavily in the last 3 years in maintaining and improving its infrastructure as well as public buildings at Westlake Academy. The Town of Westlake utilizes a service delivery model that is mixture of direct service delivery (example, school operations and fire-EMS), as well as out-sourcing via the private sector and other local governmental entities. For example, a private firm is used for solid waste collection and disposal. Inter-local agreements are used to out- source police and water treatment services to neighboring municipalities and special districts are used to provide sewage treatment services for the Town. In the Town’s most recent resident survey (2015), the services provided by the Town received the following satisfaction ratings: Page 14 of 18 D. WESTLAKE COMMUNITY EVENTS Westlake is a family-friendly environment where events are held to help get our residents out and participating in activities with their children and neighbors. Arbor Day. Held at a local park in the community, this annual celebration is an afternoon of service and tree planting along with educational sessions on tree care advice, and complimentary trees. Admission is free. The Town is an official “Tree City, USA” community. Decoration Day. The Westlake Preservation Historical Society sponsors its annual "Decoration Day" event each Memorial Day at the International Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF) Cemetery. This community event is a public commemoration of veterans, both past and present, who have served our country and defended our freedom and liberties. Activities include live music, treasure hunts for the kids, and a homemade ice-cream competition. Past events have included live reenactments of people and events pertaining to Westlake’s history. The event ends at sunset. Masterwork Concert Series. The Masterworks Music Series is a variety of free music programs. These free concerts are for arts lovers of all ages and feature instrumental and vocal music ranging from Country & Western to Blues & Jazz with the entertainment of local, regional and national artists. Performances are held at The Plaza in the Solana Office Park. E. WESTLAKE ACADEMY Westlake Academy is an Open Enrollment Charter School which opened September 1, 2003. The Academy distinguishes itself among neighboring educational offerings with a particular focus on producing students who are globally minded, critical thinkers. The campus is sited on a scenic 24 acre site with approximately 100,000 square feet of physical plant comprising its current facilities. The programs of the International Baccalaureate Organization (Primary Years Program, Middle Years Program, and Diploma Program) have been selected as the educational model utilized at the Academy. Use of educational technology is pervasive used to enrich the classroom curriculum. An environment rich with heritage, the Westlake Academy mission is to provide educational opportunities to each child in keeping with his or her individual needs. Westlake Academy is a K-12 public charter school, meaning it is a school of choice. It was recently recognized as a top 50 school (at #33) in the Washington Post Challenge Index for 2016. The Academy is a premier learning establishment that is consistently ranked in the top tier of all public schools in the State of Texas and prides itself on providing a learning environment where students have the resources and facilities to excel. In 2016 U.S. News & World Report ranked Westlake Academy #9 in Texas, #17 in U.S. charter schools, and #58 out of about 22,000 U.S. public high schools. Westlake Academy is the Town’s largest operating unit with a staff of ninety-five (101) and a current enrollment of approximately 856. The school serves children from the Town of Westlake (comprising approximately 28% of the school’s enrollment, although this segment is growing), as well as children from its extended boundaries as defined by the Texas Education Agency. Entrance into the Academy from these extended boundaries is through a wait list set by a yearly lottery as required by State and Federal law. Children living within the Town are automatically eligible to attend Westlake Academy (pending classroom availability), a factor that requires the Town to exercise close scrutiny on its residential growth patterns as well as residential land use and zoning. Arbor Day at Glenwyck Park Page 15 of 18 Westlake is also served by three (3) excellent independent public school districts; Carroll ISD, Northwest ISD, and Keller ISD. Children of Westlake residents also have the choice of sending their children to these public schools, depending on the location of their residence in Westlake. F. WESTLAKE DEVELOPMENT, FACTS AND, FIGURES The Town of Westlake has experienced exponential growth in the last decade; the national census reported 207 permanent residents in 2000 and 992 permanent residents in 2010. The 2010 Census provides a benchmark of 302 households in Westlake as of the summer of 2010, with our current (2016) internal calculations showing us with 417 single family residential homes. The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) estimates Westlake’s population in 2016 at approximately 1,200. Daytime population during the work week is estimated at 12,000 - 14,000. The Town’s land area covers 6.6 square miles, which is situated in the northern triangle of the Fort Worth-Dallas area in Northeast Tarrant County. Today, the Town of Westlake is home to several neighborhoods, all of which share a commitment to excellence, but each possess their own unique character and charm. All residents live in single- family homes and there is an award winning private golf course in Town. The median age in Westlake is 47, and 52% of the residents are female with 48% of the Town’s residents having lived in Westlake for five (5) of less years. The Town is approximately 25-30% built out with the majority of new development continuing to be corporate campuses. There has been an increase over the last decade in high-end residential development located around the Vaquero Golf Course, Granada, Terra Bella, and recently approved Quail Hollow. The Town’s focus on high-quality development has led to more than 2.9 million square feet of commercial space, valued at over $900 million, being added since 2005 with an additional 641,000 square feet coming on line in the last 18 months with the development of Entrada and Charles Schwab, valued together at $118 million. Vaquero Westlake Academy Campus Page 16 of 18  According to the Tarrant County Appraisal District’s records, in 2012 the average market value of a Westlake residence is $1.3 million. In 2014, the Town experienced another upswing in residential building permits. While home construction in Westlake did slow in 2008-09 due to the impacts of the national economic recession. Westlake’s residential construction size and value have remained consistent over the last 10 years.  A 5 year history of residential building permits activity in Westlake is as follows:  2016 – 29 average value $1,376,619  2015 – 12 average value $1,492,841  2014 – 20 average value $1,472,247  2013 – 2 average value $1,416,737  2012 – 15 average value $1,940,673 In August 2012, a study commissioned by the Town conducted by School District Strategies examined the impacts of developed and undeveloped residentially zoned property on Westlake Academy enrollment, both current and future. That study determined in 2012, there were 162 vacant developable lots available in Westlake for new home construction. Currently, a new 84 lot single family residential subdivision (Granada) is well underway with an estimated home value of $1.2+ million. Additionally, a 95 lot residential luxury estate development is also under construction - Quail Hollow. Also since 2012, Westlake opened a retail development in northwest Westlake at the intersection of State Highways 377 and 170 and currently has Entrada under development, an 85 acre mixed use development, valued around $33 million, which is like no other in the Metroplex. Westlake was recognized in 2010 as certified “gold level” Scenic City for its strong development, aesthetic, and open space standards. In 2011, Forbes Magazine named Westlake as having the highest per capita income of any community in the country. The $15 million TxDOT project known as the F.M. 1938 (Davis Blvd) improvement project, begun in FY 09/10, and created a new major north/south corridor in Westlake. This road is currently being improved southward through Keller and Southlake to F.M. 1709 (Southlake Blvd). This corridor significantly impacts mobility in the region. In addition, Deloitte University, a $300 million, 107 acre, international corporate training facility was located in Westlake. The 700,000 sq. ft. facility features over 800 hotel rooms, office space, conference centers, amenity centers, as well as many on-site parks, trails, and water features. Deloitte University represents another step towards Westlake’s goal to become an education-centered community and was recognized by the Texas Economic Development Council in 2012 with a Community Economic Development award for the economic benefits that Westlake and the State of Texas derived from this project. Deloitte University Glenwyck Farms Entry FM1938 Artist Page 17 of 18 Most recently, Westlake has organically grown into a financial services hub along State Highway 114 with the recent addition of Charles Schwab, adding to its mix of corporate campuses. This company plans to employ close to 1,200 people over the next few years in its 500,000 square feet of office space, valued at $100 million. According to NCTCOG, estimates of Westlake’s housing and population for 2016 is: January 1, 2016 Estimate for Westlake Housing Type Housing Units Population Estimate Single Family 398 1,230 Multi-family 0 0 Other 0 0 Group Quarters Population January 1, 2016 Population Estimate (Published) * 1,230 G. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND AREA EMPLOYERS The DFW Metro area is home to more Fortune 500 companies than any other area in the United States. Some of those companies reside in Westlake, others are located nearby (as reflected in the list below). Companies located in Westlake draw a large work force to Westlake creating a large daytime population, Monday-Friday, of an estimated 12,000-14,000. This in turn affects the demand on municipal services and infrastructure. Some of the community’s top employers are: Fidelity Investments, Deloitte University, Charles Schwab, and Wells Fargo. Several companies have offices in Solana, a high-profile corporate campus near State Highway 114. Solana’s Village Circle also provides a mix of retail spaces and restaurants, plus offers the 296-room Marriott Solana hotel. Westlake’s proximity to major highways as well as area airports further enhances its appeal as a corporate office location. Westlake is located 12 miles to the west of DFW Airport and 7 miles to the east of the Alliance Airport. Courtyard at Solana Complex Fidelity Campus Page 18 of 18 The Solana Office Complex was the first of Westlake’s corporate locations; originally built by IBM in the 1980’s. Since then Westlake has collected additional corporate residents like most recently Charles Schwab, along with Fidelity Investments, Wells Fargo, Deloitte University, and many more. The Complex has recently undergone a significant remodeling/facelift project giving the offices a more modern look and feel. We have experienced an increase in tenant interest and leasing – helping to fill office space that had been vacant during the last few years. Major Area Employers Employees AMR Corporation 15,143 Bell Helicopter/Textron 4,873 BNSF Railway 2,500 Sabre Holdings 3,000 Gaylord Texan Resort 2,000 DFW Airport 1,900 Healthmarkets 1,200 Larger Local Employers Employees Fidelity Investments 5,003 Charles Schwab 500 + Wells Fargo 574 Deloitte University 478 Sabre JLL 317 Marriott Solana Hotel EXECUTIVE SESSION The Council will conduct a closed session pursuant to Texas Government Code, annotated, Chapter 551, Subchapter D for the following: a. Sec. 551.076. Deliberation Regarding Security Devices or Security Audit to deliberate: (1) the deployment, or specific occasions for implementation, of security personnel or devices; or (2) a security audit. Joint Board of Trustees & Town Council Item # 4 – Executive Session Joint Board of Trustees & Town Council Item # 5 – Reconvene Council Meeting BOARD-COUNCIL RECAP / STAFF DIRECTION Joint Board of Trustees & Town Council Item # 6 – Council Recap / Staff Direction Joint Board of Trustees & Town Council Item # 7 – Adjournment Work Session