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Ord 835 Adopting a revised FY 2016-17 and new proposed FY 2017-2018 budget TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 835 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, REVISING THE BUDGET FOR THE 2016-2017 FISCAL YEAR; ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2017 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 INCLUDING INVESTMENT POLICY, PAY PLAN POLICY, FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES, RESTRICTED, COMMITTED AND ASSIGNED FUND BALANCES; PROVIDING AUTHORIZATION TO THE TOWN MANGER TO APPROVE APPROPRIATED FUNDS UP TO $50,000; PROVIDING THAT THE BUDGET TO BE KEPT IN CITY SECRETARY'S OFFICE; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, public notice of a public hearing on the proposed annual budget, stating the date, time, and place and subject matter of the public hearing, was given as required by the laws of the State of Texas and; and WHEREAS, a public hearing was duly held and all interested persons were given an opportunity to be heard for or against any item therein on September 11, 2017; and, WHEREAS, as required by Texas Local Government Code 102.002,the budget officer has prepared a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Ordinance is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety SECTION 2: That the Town Council hereby adopts the revised budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2016 and ending September 30, 2017 as shown within Exhibit "A." SECTION 3: That the Town Council does hereby approve the proposed Municipal Budget attached as Exhibit "A", adopting the budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2017 and ending September 30, 2018. SECTION 4: That the Town Council hereby gives the Town Manager authorization to approve any appropriated funds up to the amount of$50,000. Ordinance 835 Page I of 2 SECTION 5: That a copy of the official adopted 2017-2018 budget document shall be kept on file in the office of the Town Secretary. SECTION 6: If any portion of this Ordinance shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 11th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2017. ATTEST: fi%[c Fit / z&. L ura a L. Wheat, Mayor \ ki l Kelly Edw` s, Town Secr N OF WEST Thomas E. Bryme , o n Manager AO. �y APPROVED AS TO FO VI m '% =/L. Stan�&Lowry, To Atto Ordinance 835 Page 2 of 2 �• + 1. WES • t � + . . TE Tciv of +. 1' +. KE A rT A ou0-R-r e. AIDOPTED OPERATING BUDGET - - - - Fiscal Year 2017-2018 The Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Blvd, Suite 7200 * Westlake,Texas 76262 *www.westlake-tx.org ty PROPERTY TAX VOTE TOWN OF WESTLAKE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 ANNUAL BUDGET This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year's adopted budget by approximately $49,640 (does not include any prior year payments and penalties), which is a 3.37% increase from last year's budget. The property tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year is $57,674. TOWN COUNCIL RECORD VOTE The members of the governing body voted on the proposal to consider the budget as follows: FOR: Alesa Belvedere Carol Langdon Rick Rennhack Wayne Stoltenberg AGAINST: None PRESENT but abstained from Voting: None ABSENT: Michael Barrett PROPERTY TAX RATE COMPARISON Adopted Adopted Tax Rate FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Property Tax Rate $0.13695/100 $0.13615/100 Effective Tax Rate $0.13695/100 $0.13615/100 Effective Maintenance & $0.13724/100 $0.12899/100 Operations Tax Rate Rollback Tax Rate $0.16467/100 $0.17252/100 Debt Rate $0.00813/100 $0.02482/100 MUNICIPAL DEBT OBLIGATIONS The Total debt obligation for the Town secured by property taxes for various projects totals $277,700. This amount covers the series 2011 CO payment for street projects of $115,300 and the 2013 CO payment of $162,400 for construction of the Westlake Academy Arts and Science Center. The debt payment for the Science Center was originally paid from the Visitor Association Fund. i VISION STATEMENT & POINTS An oasis of naturdbeauty rhat maintains our open yaces k in balance with distinctive developments,tram,andquabty � t 1 _ , of�fe amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. r - - WE ARE LEADERS A premiere place to live, leadership in Public education, r corporate and Governmental partnerships, and high development standards. A SENSE OF PLACE Distinctive neighborhoods, architecturally vibrant corporate campuses, grazing longhorns, soaring red-tailed hawks, meandering roads and trails, lined with natural stone and native oaks. A CARING COMMUNITY Informed residents, small town charm and values, historical preservation. SERVICE EXCELLENCE Public service that is responsive and professional, while balancing efficiency, effectiveness and financial stewardship. EXEMPLARY GOVERNANCE Town officials, both elected and appointed, exhibit respect, stewardship, vision, and transparency. ii VALUE STATEMENTS Transparent / Integrity-driven Government . . - Fiscal Responsibility ; Family Friendly & Welcoming Educational Leaders Sense of Community � r • Innovation • Strong Aesthetic Standards Informed & Engaged Citizens Preservation of our Natural Beauty r Planned / Responsible Development . r • r MISSION STATEMENT Westlake is a unique community blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent. MISSION TAG LINE One-of-a-kind community; natural oasis - providing an exceytional level of service. G. F.O.A. DISTINGUISHED BUDGET AWARD GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award PRESENTED TO Town of Westlake Texas For the Fiscal Year Beginning October 1, 2016 �. Executive Director The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) has presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the Town of Westlake for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1 , 2016. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan, and as a communication device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. iv G. F.O .A. DISTINGUISHED BUDGET AWARD The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the Town of Westlake for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2016. The Town has received this award annually since October 1 2007. To receive this award, the Town must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan, and as a communications device. POLICY DOCUMENT COMMUNICATIONS DEVICE This criterion involves including a Town-wide This criterion relates to having the budget statement of budget policies, goals and document available for public inspection; objectives for the year, and an explanation providing summary information suitable for use of the budgeting process to the reader, by interested citizens and/or the media; avoiding describing the short-term and operational the use of complex technical language and policies that guide the development of the terminology; explaining the basic units of the budget. The criterion also relates to the budget, including funds, departments or longer-term Town-wide policies that are activities; and disclosing sources of revenues and expected to continue in effect for a number explanations of revenue estimates and of years. The budget award criterion also assumptions. The intent is to enhance the requires the inclusion of a budget message communication aspects of the budget and/or transmittal letter by the Town document, so that information in the budget Manager. * * * can be communicated to a reader with a non- financial background. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget document continues to conform to FINANCIAL PLAN program requirements, and we are submitting it This criterion involves including an to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another explanation of the financial structure and Laward. operations of the Town, and the Town's major revenue sources and fund structure. The budget should contain an all -inclusive financial plan for all funds and resources of ' OPERATIONS GUIDE the Town, including projections of financial This criterion involves including information in the condition at the end of the fiscal year, document explaining the relationship between projections of current year financial activity, organizational units (departments) and and provide a basis for historical programs; including an organization chart, a comparisons. The budget should also present description of the departmental organizational a consolidated picture of all operations and structure and staffing levels, and historical financing activities in a condensed format comparisons of staffing levels; explaining how and an explanation of the budgetary capital spending decisions will affect operations; accounting basis, whether prepared on a providing objectives and performance generally accepted accounting principles measures; and describing the general directions (GAAP) basis, cash basis, modified accrual given to department heads through the use of basis, or any other acceptable method. * * * goals and objectives, reorganizations, statement of functions, or other methods. V TRANSPARENCY STARS AWARD Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar announced The Town of Westlake is the latest local government entity to achieve specific transparency goals through the Comptroller's Transparency Stars program! "By providing meaningful financial data in addition to visual tools and analysis of its revenues and expenditures, The Town of Westlake has shown a true commitment to Texas taxpayers. This effort achieves the goals set by my office's Transparency Stars program," Hegar said. "I am pleased to award The Town of Westlake a star for its accomplishments." The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts originally launched the Leadership Circle Program to recognize local governments across Texas that were striving to meet a high standard for financial transparency online. The Town of Westlake received this award in March 2014 and March 2015. However, in January 2016 the Leadership Circle Program was discontinued and replaced with a more rigorous program called the Transparency Stars Award meant to recognize local Texas governments for going above and beyond in their transparency efforts. Any earned Star will remain valid as long as the website information is maintained. After receiving an initial star for Traditional Finances, remaining stars may be awarded in any order. Local government entities can then apply for stars in the areas of: • Debt Obligations • Contracts and Procurement • Economic Development • Public Pensions The Town of Westlake strives to place an emphasis on transparency. It is our commitment that the Town of Westlake's financial information is readily accessible and available for our citizens. • In 2016, the Finance department took the challenge and was one of the first four cities to recently earn the prestigious Transparency Star for Traditional Financial Reporting! • In 2017, the Finance department applied for and earned the Transparency Star for Debt Obligation Reporting. Congratulations to Jaymi Ford; Finance Supervisor and Melinda Brown; Accounting Technician 11 for preparing this award-winning website for the Town of Westlake! The following link will take you to the Town of Westlake's Financial Transparency Page http://westlake-tx.org/index.aspx?NID=530 Vi 2017 TRADITIONAL FINANCIAL REPORTING Transparency Items • Finance Reporting Summary .1parenq, n • Revenues and Expenditures per Capita e- • Property Tax Rates 0�. • Annual Operating Budgets • Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports - • Popular Annual Financial Reports - • Capital Improvement Plans • Quarterly Financial Reports • Raw format budget for the current fiscal year GQie • Check Registers for the last three fiscal years o��1 anal F►r�� • Contact information for Town Staff • Contact Information for Town Council • Open Records Request Application and instructions 2017 DEBT OBLIGATION REPORTING Transparency Items • Debt Obligation Summary • Tax Supported Debt ,�s'PaCe��Y,s t4�,� • Revenue Supported Debt • Tax Supported Debt per Capita • HB 1378 Local Government Debt • Westlake Property Tax • Westlake Sales Tax • Annual Operating Budgets • Listing of Debt Service Payments Processed • List of All Outstanding Debt �e� n ,�'�� • Texas Comptroller Debt at a Glance t 0bl iciat • Bond Review Board of Local Governments • Contact information for Town Staff • Contact Information for Town Council V11 WESTLAKE ELECTED COUNCIL MEMBERS Laura Wheat Carol Langdon Mayor i Mayor Pro-Tem (wheat@westlake-tx.org clangdon@westlake-tx.org Michael BarrettAlesa Belvedere Council Member Council Member mbarrett@westlake-tx.org abelvedere@westlake-tx.org Rick Rennhack Wayne Stoltenberg Council Member Council Member rrennhack@westlake-tx.org wstoltenberg@westlake-tx.org WESTLAKE BOARDS & COMMISSIONS .M Westlake Historical Preservation Society Westlake Academy Foundation Planning & Zoning Commission Texas Student Housing Authority - • 4B Economic Development Board Arbor Day Advisory Committee Public Arts Committee w ■ Vlll WESTLAKE ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE Tom Brymer Town Manager tbrymer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 Amanda DeGan Asst.Town Manager adegan@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5715 TOWN SECRETARY'S OFFICE Kelly Edwards Town Secretary kedwards@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5710 Tanya Morris Assistant tmorris@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5741 FINANCE DEPARTMENT Debbie Piper Director dpiper@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5712 Jaymi Ford Supervisor jford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5721 Marlene Rutledge Academic Technician mrutledge@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5737 Melinda Brown Municipal Technician mbown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5728 MUNICIPAL COURT Jeanie Roumell Administrator jrooumell@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5746 Troy Crow Marshal tcrow@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5716 Martha Solis Deputy Clerk msolis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5748 Christine Ellis Court Clerk cellis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5747 Vickie Brown Court Clerk vbrown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5724 COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY AFFAIRS Ginger Awtry Director gawtry@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5710 Jon Sasser Manager jsasser@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5736 HUMAN RESOURCES AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Todd Wood Director twood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5711 Blair Wilson Generalist bwilson@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5734 PARKS & RECREATION AND FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Troy Meyer Director tmeyer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5735 Kerry Wade Assistant kwade@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5768 PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Ron Ruthven Director rruthven@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5739 Pat Cooke Inspector pcooke@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5726 Nick Ford Coordinator nford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5742 Dottie Samaniego Permit Clerk dsamaniego@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5745 PUBLIC WORKS Jarrod Greenwood Director jgreenwood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 Paul Andreason Technician pandreason@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5731 EMERGENCY SERVICES Richard Whitten Fire Chief rwhitten@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5785 John Ard Fire Marshal jard@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5783 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Jason Power Director jpower@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5750 Ray Workman Technician rworkman@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5751 Mitch Wells Technician mwells@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5752 ix BUDGET GUIDE & 'SABLE OF CONTENTS The Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Blvd, Building 7, Suite 7200 *Westlake, Texas 76262 1 . EXECUTIVE SECTION • 89 Ad Valorem Property Tax Analysis- A property tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or • 01 Transmittal Letter-This section is written to the Town property pays on the value of the property being taxed. Council by the Town Manager and provides a high-level preview of the Town's budget.It contains information • 95 Personnel and Organization-Since salaries make up including the Ad Valorem Tax rate,fund summaries as the greatest portion of the expenditure budget,it is well as short term and long term trends. The letter helps logical to apply forecasting techniques that can provide tie together the core elements which make up the a true picture of where payroll dollars are headed. budget and illustrates how those elements further the Town's goals found within the strategic management • 107 Long Term Planning-The Long-Range Financial system. Forecast takes a forward look at the Town's revenues and expenditures.Its purpose is to identify financial • 23 Strategic Plan-The Town has adopted a Strategic trends,shortfalls,and issues so the Town can proactively Management System (SMS)which drives the way the address them. Town conducts its business.The department directors contribute to the SMS by developing a corporate 3. GENERAL FUND business plan and aligning their yearly budget proposals to that plan. 125 General Fund-The Town's principal operating fund, which is supported by taxes,fees,and other revenues • 31 Community Profile- This section includes statistical that may be used for any lawful purpose.The fund of the and supplemental data that describes the Town of Town that accounts for all activity not specifically Westlake and its community.It furnishes a valuable accounted for in other funds.It includes such operations perspective when reviewing budget issues and making as police,fire,planning,finance and administration. decisions related to allocation of government resources. The goal is to provide a context for understanding the 4. ENTERPRISE FUNDS decisions incorporated into the budget document. • 213 Enterprise Funds-GAAP requires state and local 2. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS governments to use enterprise fund types to account for "business-type activities". These activities include services • 57 Budget 101 Overview-This section explains the primarily funded through user charges.Water and sewer meaning behind the numbers which are presented in this utilities are common examples of government budget document.It gives perspective to the Town's enterprises. budgeting process,basis of budgeting and accounting, how the budget is amended and the fund accounting 217 Utility Fund-The Utility Fund is an enterprise or system. business fund.This means that the direct beneficiaries of the "business"pay for all costs through fees or rates. • 83 Financial Summaries and Analysis-This section gives Water,sewer service,and garbage service revenues an analysis between the current year and prior year generated through our rates,as well as the expenses for budget,as well as the variance explanations. Several providing these services are accounted for in the Utility different tables are presented of all fund revenues, Fund.As with the General Fund,prudent financial expenditures and fund balance amounts. management and bond requirements make it necessary to have healthy reserves. X BUDGET GUIDE & TABLE OF CONTENTS The Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Blvd, Building 7, Suite 7200 *Westlake, Texas 76262 • 223 Cemetery Fund-The Cemetery fund includes all 263 413 Economic Development-The 413 Economic operations associated with the 5.5-acre cemetery Development Fund collects a'/2 cent sales tax to be located on J.T.Ottinger Road.This includes interment,lot allocated to qualified development projects.The 46 Fund sales,record keeping,and all maintenance associated has been committed to the repayment of the debt with the grounds,fences,trees and flower beds.The incurred for the Town's Civic Campus project. cemetery was donated and conveyed by deed to the Town during FY2008-09. 267 Economic Development-The Economic Development Fund was set up to maintain all receipts 5. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS and disbursement of funds pertaining to agreements between the Town and various corporations for • 227 Internal Service Funds-Internal service funds are economic development. used for operations serving other funds or departments within a government on a cost-reimbursement basis. 271 Public Improvement District Fund(Local)-accounts for monies received from bond proceeds,inspection fees • 231 Utility Major Maintenance-The Utility Maintenance& and payments related to the Solana Public Improvement Replacement Fund (UMR)was created to provide a District. mechanism for repair and replacement of capital assets such as pump stations,lift stations,elevated and ground 275 Lone Star Public Facilities-This fund was set up storage facilities,etc. initially with donations from several involved corporations that were going to benefit from tax-exempt bonds. • 235 General Major Maintenance-The General Maintenance&Replacement Fund (GMR)was created 7• DEBT SERVICE FUNDS to provide a mechanism for the long-term repair and replacement of large capital assets such as HVAC,walls, 279 Debt Service Funds-This section provides a summary floors and ceilings,plumbing,electric,roadways,etc. of the annual principal and interest payments for all outstanding bonded debt and capital leases.The Town • 239 Vehicle Major Maintenance-The Vehicle issues general obligation bonds and certificates of Maintenance&Replacement Fund (VMR)was created obligation to provide for the acquisition and construction to provide a mechanism for the long-term repair and of major capital facilities and infrastructure. replacement of Town vehicles. • 289 Debt Service Fund 300-This fund tracks the 6. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS infrastructure and building projects funded with dedicated,self-supporting revenue streams such • 255 Special Revenue Funds-This section provides a as sales tax revenues. detailed spending plan for funds which account for proceeds of specific revenue sources that are legally 297 Debt Service Fund 301 -This fund tracks the restricted for certain purposes. infrastructure and building projects funded with Property Taxes. • 259 Visitors Association Fund-The Visitors Association Fund was established in late FY 1999-2000 and collects a 7%hotel occupancy tax from the Marriott Solana, Deloitte University and any future Westlake hotels. xi BUDGET GUIDE & 'SABLE OF CONTENTS The Town of Westlake * 1500 Solana Blvd, Building 7, Suite 7200 *Westlake, Texas 76262 8. WESTLAKE ACADEMY FUND 11 . MUNICIPAL POLICIES • 301 Westlake Academy-This fund was incorporated into 369 Fiscal and Budgetary Policies the Town's budget beginning in FY 2010-11.Westlake The overall intent of the following Fiscal and Budgetary Academy opened its doors in September 2003 when the Policy Statements is to enable the Town to achieve a Town of Westlake officials took advantage of the State of long-term stable and positive financial condition. The Texas' acceptance of chartered schools and thus, watchwords of the Town's financial management became the first and only municipality in the state to include integrity,prudence,stewardship,planning, receive a chartered school designation. accountability,and full disclosure. • 9. CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS 385 Investment Policy It is the policy of the Town of Westlake that the • 313 Capital Projects-The Capital Projects funds are used administration of its funds and the investment of those to account for financial resources to be used for the funds shall be handled as its highest public trust. acquisition or construction of major capital facilities (other than those financed by proprietary fund types). 391 Employee Pay Plan Policy The purpose of this policy is to set out the philosophy, • 317 Capital Project Fund-This fund tracks the purpose,and intent of the Town of Westlake's pay system infrastructure and building projects funded with general for municipal employees. fund operating transfers,bond funds,intergovernmental revenue and other special fund sources.Capital projects 12. APPENDIX are those projects over$25,000 that may extend over one fiscal year to complete. • 399 Ordinance to Adopt the Budget • 401 Ordinance to Adopt Property Tax Rate • 323 Westlake Academy Expansion-The Westlake • 404 Glossary Academy Expansion Fund tracks and accumulates • 410 Acronyms resources intended to finance future Academy expansion. 10. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN • 327 Capital Improvements Program-(CIP)is for the purchase,construction or replacement of the physical assets of the Town.This section includes a listing of projects for the current year as well as projects that are planned for implementation over a five-year period. Town staff plans for a five-year period,but has also identified several projects that cannot be addressed given funding limitations. xii • .+ + - -10'-N + . . . . + . E.:kEcu UVE + 1 4 gab At L A .a mar UAW. 577 L ty RETURN TO T.O.C. Transmittal Letter This section is written to the Town Council by the Town Manager and provides a high-level preview of the Town's Budget. The letter helps tie together the core elements which make up the budget and illustrates how those elements further the Town's goals found within the strategic management system. 1 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter September 11, 2017 Honorable Mayor and Town Council: On behalf of the Town of Westlake's Senior Leadership Team, I am pleased to submit the FY 2017-18 Proposed Budget for the Town Council's consideration. This year's budget theme is "Maintaining our Vision in a Sea of Change". This builds on the FY 2016-17 theme of "Forging Westlake, Managing the Impact of Growth". I. THEME SIGNIFICANCE, OUR TRENDS, & AN OVERVIEW Because of the current and potential development within our community, it is both an exciting and challenging time in Westlake! This fiscal year's theme, as well as last year's, reflects our commitment to approaching new growth in a planned and deliberate manner in concert with the Town's Comprehensive Plan -Forging Westlake. Our community has experienced significant growth patterns over the last few years in both commercial and residential sites. Adhering to the Town's Vision is the key to Westlake's success for managing the significant growth. Staff has developed the theme of "Maintaining our Vision in a Sea of Change"to adequately reflect our current environment. While growth is occurring, it also presents very clear challenges for our community if we wish to continue to maintain the elements of Westlake that make it so unique. These community attributes include our beautiful neighborhoods with top quality residences, strong aesthetic standards, a top-tier Town owned K-12 charter school, open space preservation, streetscaping, emphasis on proactive planning, and maintaining our view corridors. The "sea of change" that surrounds Westlake involves not only our current internal development but also the current growth opportunities planned for the State Highway (SH 1 14) corridor in northeast Tarrant County and into southern Denton County. The communities that surround us are undergoing significant development as well, which adds to the "sea of change" affecting Westlake. The impact of anticipated growth along the SH 114 corridor is described by Mr. Robin McCaffrey (AIA and APA) of MESA Planning, the firm that was engaged to update the Town's latest Comprehensive Plan, Forging Westlake. According to Mr. McCaffrey: Westlake, with the arrival of the Charles Schwab Corporation project, is crossing through a portal into the future suggested by the Town's 2015 Comprehensive Plan. In conjunction with Fidelity and other financial services in and around Westlake, Westlake hosts nearly 4 million square feet of an industry type (i.e. financial services), constituting a significant Industry Cluster. At this scale, the aggregation of a single industrial code activity is important enough to attract vertical and horizontal 2 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter expansion, which further substantiates Westlake's importance as a financial services center in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. Bringing the above described importance to the Town's other advantages of proximity, makes Westlake a singularly important center for growth and development going forward. These advantages of proximity include: • Next in the sequence of market advancement: It is an historical phenomenon that corridor growth markets advance along the corridor at key threshold densities achieved in the "downstream" growth areas. In Dallas, advancement from one market to another along a corridor (such as the 1-45 corridor) happens when the downstream growth center attains a density in the range of 4 million square feet. This happened when Richardson attained such a threshold and the market advanced to Plano. Once Plano attained the threshold, the market advanced to Allen. Once Allen attained the threshold, the market advanced to Fairview and McKinney. Now along the SH 114 corridor, Southlake is approaching this important threshold, thereby intensifying market interest in Westlake. • End of the line for corridor growth:Advancement of the market into Westlake is more unusual than other corridor conditions because Westlake holds an "end-of-the-line" relationship to such market advancement. West of Westlake lies Alliance, a massive industrial based development which extends all the way to 1-35W(the easterly boundary of Fort Worth) at which point the 1141170 corridor ends with limited expectation of extension. Therefore, Westlake alone will receive most of the market growth within the 114 corridors for the foreseeable future. • Large land supply in a market of high demand: The end-of-the-line position held by Westlake, intensifies demand for development land upon a Town with an ample, but finite, land supply. Therefore, Westlake will have an unusual opportunity to be selective and the worse thing Westlake can do in the face of that demand is allow lower level development to corrupt the opportunities this market position affords. The Town should first understand the true unusual opportunities over which it governs and in the full understanding of that position consider important questions. II. UNDERSTANDING "OUR SEA OF CHANGE" LOCAL CHALLENGES INVOLVING RESIDENTIAL GROWTH Westlake's unique position in the SH 114 corridor that Mr. McCaffrey describes makes it imperative that, as we consider the FY 2017-18 program of municipal services for our Town, we maintain our vision in this "sea of change" within and around Westlake. 3 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter Our Town's vision is: An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open spaces in balance with distinctive developments, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. What are some of the local challenges within Westlake that have influenced the recommendations for services and funding levels in the FY 17-18 Budget? • Westlake's Permanent Population Growth: This is the portion of our population considered to be our permanent residents. From the 1990 population of 185 to 2016's population of 1,264 represents an increase of 583%equal to 1,079 additional residents. We will need to continue to monitor and plan for the continued increase in these numbers considering our Comprehensive Plan's (Forging Westlake) forecast of approximately 7.21% annual population growth between now and 2040. This would bring us to around 7,000 residents. • Traffic Demands Due to Growth in Westlake and Surrounding Areas: The four (4) municipalities surrounding Westlake (Keller, Southlake, Trophy Club, and Roanoke) are projected to have a combined population of 215,000 people by 2040. The growth in these communities will generate additional traffic that commutes through our Town. With our projected level of residents (7,000) and the existing zoning entitlements (if executed) we would expect an estimated 300,000 vehicle trips per day. Local impacts associated with this level of growth affect our street infrastructure, water and sewer system capital investment requirements, as well as demand for daily municipal services. Policies established in Forging Westlake will be essential for addressing this issue via the Town's thoroughfare plan as it pertains to development which occurs in the community. • Balanced Growth to Impact Cost of Municipal Services: Likewise, the ability to fund municipal services utilizing a cost-effective revenue format requires balanced growth that provides for commercial development and a diversified tax base, while maintaining the community's open space and bucolic atmosphere. At the same time, we must continue to ensure the policy direction of the Town is focused on growth paying for the infrastructure for which it creates the demand. • Housing Start Increases and Maintaining Westlake's High Quality Residential Housing: We continue to see strong single family residential construction demand. This has been demonstrated in Granada Phase 1 as well as in existing subdivisions such as Vaquero, 4 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter Paigebrooke, and Terra Bella. Additionally, the infrastructure for three (3) new single family residential developments, Carlyle Court, Granada Phase 2 and Quail Hollow, has been completed, accepted by the Town and building permit issuance in those developments is underway. Also, the mixed-use development called Entrada continues to progress with infrastructure construction making significant headway. Entrada's infrastructure is being financed with a Town approved Public Improvement District (PID), the bonds for which are paid back by assessments on development within Entrada. When the infrastructure is complete, it will add (over time) a wide variety of 322 residential units to Westlake - ranging from single family homes, to villas, to town homes. Once complete, these four (4) developments will add approximately 463 new lots to our residential inventory. �® Our residential construction activity shows a steady increase in building permits for housing which has occurred since we have emerged from the 2008-09 recession. Housing starts in Westlake, due to the high value of our homes, add taxable value to our taxing - base; however, this also impacts the demand for municipal services, especially the Town's charter school, Westlake Academy. As the area economy continues to perform well, and Westlake and our surrounding communities continue to experience commercial development, this will further attract individuals who work for and own these businesses. In turn, these individuals will need housing. As our housing stock expands in response to these forces, we will need to manage our distinctive developments to ensure we maintain our community as an `oasis of natural beauty' and achieve high-end housing options as identified in the Housing element of Forging Westlake. III. UNDERSTANDING "OUR SEA OF CHANGE" LOCAL CHALLENGES INVOLVING COMMERCIAL GROWTH Commercial land use growth in Westlake is also a trend which affects the budget for FY17-18 The local challenges related to commercial growth include: • Commercial Development, Economic Development, and Daytime Population Growth: Because Westlake is the home to major corporate office campuses, its Monday-Friday daytime population is growing and is conservatively estimated to be approximately 10,000- 12,000 individuals. These office complexes are comprised of notable corporate clients that include Deloitte, LLP and Fidelity Investments. Currently, Fidelity has almost 6,000 employees 5 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter at their Westlake campus,with expansion room for two (2) more office buildings in addition to their two (2) existing office buildings. • New Charles Schwab Corporate Campus: The announcement of their regional corporate campus in 2016 is beginning to come to fruition. Phase 1 will consist of a 500,000-sq. ft. office building and parking garage. Adjacent to the Schwab campus will be a mixed-use development,which Hillwood Properties will develop near the intersection of SH 170 and SH1 14. The campus will initi ally have approximately 1,500-1,900 employees and should round out with an estimated 5,000 employees when all phases are complete. Presently, Schwab is well underway in the process of hiring 500 employees for its temporary Roanoke Road location in Westlake. • Commercial Development in Entrada: The mixed-use development called Entrada, located at FM1938/Davis Blvd. and SH 114,will also create growth in our commercial tax base. During the past budget year, commercial buildings totaling 55,000 sq. ft. have been approved by the Town for the development. A CVS Pharmacy is open for business as well as a Primrose Private School. Other commercial uses include various retail, restaurants, amphitheater and hotels. • Solana Redevelopment/Reinvestment: The Solana Office Complex, acquired by Equity Office (Blackstone) approximately two (2) years ago, has seen a resurgence in occupancy. Equity's multi-million-dollar investment in the complex to improve its parking, landscaping and buildings has been a strong positive path for Westlake. The investment is boosting office occupancy levels with Sabre Corporation expanding their presence into Westlake by leasing significant office space in Solana. They are also hiring up to 500 new employees. The municipality has assisted in this revitalization effort by leasing 20,000 sq. ft. of office space for the next 10 years. The new location in Solana will allow us to all be in one office suite and better serve the Westlake community. • Economic Development: The Town has also pursued the ideas advanced in the Economic Development element of Forging Westlake. That is,where appropriate, to pursue businesses that ultimately expand the Town's tax base with high quality office buildings, and at the same time, compliments our financial services business cluster which has already been created through our corporate residents of Fidelity and Deloitte. Further, we pursue the types of businesses interested in high quality office campus development and creating well-paying positions for employees. With the Schwab announcement (and the start of M construction of the TD AmeriTrade's complex in Southlake) we are well n ` O SC�rr on our way to becoming a financial services corridor within the DFW �iO QC Metroplex. C D E�1'C'-V 6 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter While offering economic development incentives for the Schwab project, the tax abatement provided is in-line with incentives offered in our region, plus the company is providing one-time funding for Westlake Academy. Staff will continue to monitor our corporate stakeholders and attempt to identify avenues to strengthen these relationships and assist in attracting new corporations to Westlake. The expansion of commercial development will continue to grow Westlake's daytime population. IV. UNDERSTANDING "OUR SEA OF CHANGE" OTHER LOCAL CHALLENGES INVOLVING STRATEGIC PLANNING, RESIDENTS FEEDBACK AND WESTLAKE ACADEMY There are other local challenges involving both financial and physical site planning, strategic forecasting, residential feedback through our survey instruments and the Town's public charter school, Westlake Academy,which have shaped the SY17-18 Budget: • Westlake's residential growth impact on the Academy: The number of Westlake residents who are selecting Westlake Academy as the educational choice for their students has doubled in the past five years. Resident surveys continually indicate that the Academy is a strong motivator for our residents to live in Westlake, and one of the top three (3) reasons why they plan to remain in our community. For example, the 2017 municipal services survey results indicate 75% of the new residents say enrollment at Westlake Academy was extremely important/important to their decision to live in the community. With the majority of those residents then listing this as the number one (1) reason they will remain in Westlake over the next five (5) years. Q4. Importance of Various Reasons in the Planning for Academy growth in the Decision to Move to Westlake face of residential development by Percentage of respondents who felt the item was'extremely important.""very important"or"important" Quality of life :99% continues to be a challenge. Low crime rates.+quality of public safety 9s° Wherever possible, the Town has Aesthetic appeal&high development standards �7° Quality of your subdivision 97° entered economic development Type ofhousing availableJill[ 96% Access to major highways 94,1 agreements with residential Small town feel 94' Sense of community 92,' developers to provide funding for Access to DEW airport 91%; Number of publicly accessible parks&trails 81% Westlake Academy facilities to Subdiosion amenities 80% lessen the impact of their residential otherpkeAeademy "% Access to other public schools 70%j development on the school's Westlake as a retirement destination 68% Proximity to private schools 45% enrollment. Employment opportunities in the Westlake area 39% 0% 20% 40% GD% 50% 100% Extremely Important oVery Important Dlmportant Source:ETC IrutrhrteDirectionl9nder(101--ilesrPake,TX 7 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter Westlake Academy has experienced steady enrollment growth from 491 students in SY 2009- 10 to a projected 856 in SY 2017-18. The current increase of student population is a result of the Phase I expansion efforts on the Academy campus and our development. Our growth requires that we carefully manage our student admissions processes to provide adequate space for children of Westlake 05. Reasons Residents Will Stay in Westlake Over the Next Five Years residents. tryi nage of respondents who selected Me item as one eitheir top three choices Quality of lite 43% Westlake Academy 33% Approximately 39,000 sq. ft. of new Aesthetic appeal&high development standards 2$% Quality of your subdivision 25% facilities space was opened on Smalltorvnfeel z5%; Low crime rateslqualily of public safety 20°% campus in SY 14/15. It was Access to other public schools 11% Access to SFW airpod % 7 comprised of a secondary subdMsionamendes 14% Sense of common ity 13% classroom building, field house, and Type dIn...ingaV.ble s5� Access to major highways 4% a primary years' multi-use hall. WeBrtaka as .ti.—.t dastinatlm, 4%. Number of publicly accessibl e parks 8 trails 3% These buildings increased our EmploymenropwonhiesiniheWeadakearea 3% Pro]rimityto private Schools 2% ' capacity and allowed for 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% soy �t at Choice 02nd Choice 03rd Choice decompression of our current Source:FTCbu1truteDlrect1onF1ndar11017-Wes!lalot,T4 school facilities.The lottery waiting list for student admissions from our secondary boundaries continues to grow from 705 in 2011 to over approximately 2,411 students for this coming school year. • Continued Public Education Funding Shortfall: State funding of public education was decreased by the State Legislature in 2011. While it has increased somewhat since then, the allocation has not kept pace with basic cost increases. And, in the Legislature's most recent 2017 session, the per student funding for public education was not increased for the next biennium. This negatively impacts Westlake since it owns and operates our public charter school, Westlake Academy,which receives approximately 800 of its operational funding from the State. The municipal government continues to allocate significant resources to the school to deal with State funding limitations, maintain high quality educational services, provide for the Academy's facilities and support services, as well as preserve space for the children of Westlake residents. Additionally, the Westlake Academy Foundation (WAF) raises significant operating funds for the Academy,without which the school could not operate. • Implementation of the Comprehensive Plan: With the 2015 adoption of the Town's new Comp Plan, Forging Westlake, several ordinances have been rewritten and new ones drafted so that the Plan's recommendations can be implemented. The task of implementing the changes to the ordinances as well as dealing with the demands of growth required additional staff team members in FYI 6-17. Those staffing costs are carried forward into the FYI 7-18 budget given the significant and continued demand on staff time for new development review and planning required in our high growth environment. 8 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter • Pursuit of Infrastructure and Services Reinvestment While Combating Certain Cost Increases: We must also reinvest in maintaining our infrastructure. However, with growth comes the need to allocate capital spending in new public buildings and our water and sewer utility. An example of a key project needed to deal with the Town's growth, is a Phase 2 water transmission line to our wholesale water provider. This is a costly project which will require us to significantly invest in our water system. • Staffing Levels, Insurance Costs, and Retention: Our infrastructure investment must be monitored in tandem with the staffing needs to maintain our current service delivery levels. This includes keeping our compensation/benefit package competitive to attract and retain excellent employees so we can continue delivering exceptional service. We have found this to be especially true as it relates to having adequate staffing to deal with Overall Composite Customer Satisfaction Index 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2015 & 2017 development review and construction. (19 ase Year 2009=100) We have balanced all these 130 127 components in light of maximizing staff 121 efficiencies and processes to help 120 ---------------------------- ------------------------------------------- contain large expenditure drivers such 113 as employee health insurance. 110 ------------------------ -------------------------------------------------------- 105 Customer interactions and our 100 101 100 100 141 100 100 .. 99.. 99...... methodology to deliver services remains so of interest to our residents and we wes<Eako U.S.Average X20119 22010 02011 02013 W2015 82017 continue to receive high marks for our sett:e�rcrnsam1oa01s> personalized approach. In early 2017, our consultant, Chris Tathum with ETC presented Council with positive feedback indicating that our staff team is "setting the standard for service delivery compared to other communities." Since 2009, our composite index score for overall satisfaction has increased 21 points. • Continued Emphasis on Long-range Financial and Strategic Planning: The FY 17-18 budget contains an updated Long-Range Financial Forecast which identifies key revenue and expenditure drivers while assessing historical financial trends and their potential impact upon the town's financial stability. The forecast must be monitored and updated during the budget formulation process, as well as reviewed with the Town Council as the budget is being prepared. Staff will also continue to produce a quarterly financial report for the Council that monitors and analyzes trends in the General Fund, Utility Fund, and Visitor Association Fund.The report serves as a valuable tool to assist in developing a proactive, rather than reactive, approach to our changing financial trends. 9 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter In FYI 3/14, we began utilizing the Balanced Scorecard framework for our long-term strategic visioning for the community. Council has identified our vision, approved the municipal and academic mission statements, along with the performance measures and reviewed staff identified strategic and departmental initiatives for the coming fiscal year. We will utilize this methodology for our organization on an annual basis to ensure we are staying current with our communities needs and the factors influencing our neighboring municipalities. Town of Westlake Tier One Strategy Map Citizen. Student & Preserve Increase CSS Stakeholder Desirability& Satisfaction Quality of Life Financial Increase Increase Financial Revenue Stewardship Capacity Streams Reserves Municipal & Academic Encourage Increase Operations Maximize Wesllake's Transparency, Efficiencies& unique Sense Accessibility& Effectiveness of Place Communications People, (M) Improve Optimize Facilities & Technalagy, Planning&Facilities& DevelopmentTechnology Equipment Capabilities V. UNDERSTANDING "OUR SEA OF CHANGE" REGIONAL CHALLENGES THAT IMPACT US Westlake does not exist in a vacuum. As stated in our Vision, we are surrounded by an "ever expanding landscape" of urban growth in the DFW area, especially northeast Tarrant and Southern Denton counties. Regional factors that continue to affect Westlake include: L� 10 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter • DFW Metro Area Employment and Population Growth: Since 1970, the DFW Metro area has grown by more than 150%- a faster pace than the state and the nation. At 9,500 square miles, it is larger in total area than five (5) of our states. With a population of nearly 6.8 million, it is the fourth largest metropolitan area rel in the country. Forecasts from the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) predict employment to grow, in this 12-county standard metropolitan statistical (SMSA) area, by almost 70% over the � next 30 years. Population growth over this same 30-year period is , forecasted by NCTCOG to be 69%. This regional growth is currently and will continue to impact Westlake. • Water Demand: Westlake is in the State's Region C water planning area which covers all or a part of 16 North Central Texas counties. The population of Region C is projected to grow from what was nearly 6.5 million in 2010 to just over 9.9 million in 2040 and ultimately to over 14.3 million by 2070. Dry-year water demands in Region C are expected to reach 2.2 million acre-feet per year by 2040, and 2.9 million acre-feet per year by 2070, largely due to population growth. This increased demand will create a projected shortage of 1.2 million acre-feet per year by 2070-which is why planning and development of new water management strategies are so critical. And, while much of the recent years' drought has been alleviated by heavy rain fall in the past 12 months, increased water demand due to growth requires that we not be complacent about this regional issue. • Transportation, Mobility, and Traffic Congestion: With the region's population and employment growth, traffic and the associated congestion has also increased. The recent 2014 amendment to Mobility 2035, the region's transportation plan, estimates that between now and 2035, an estimated $395.3 billion is needed to eliminate the worst levels of congestion in our region. However, this plan only identifies $94.5 billion in funding for these projects, meaning that congestion will worsen and mobility will be further impeded over time. VI. THIS YEAR'S BUDGET THEME AND UNDERSTANDING WHERE WE HAVE COME FROM Context is always helpful for understanding where we stand today as a community. Each of our budgets have reflected a theme of challenges, initiatives, and/or areas of emphasis that the budget for that fiscal year was intended to address. Those budget themes have been: 11 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter + FY 2011-12 "INVESTING IN OUR FUTURE" Ad valorem property tax implemented to stabilize our revenue streams, provide for financial sustainability, and invest in our infrastructure. iiiiHE FY 2012-13 ANNUAL •P "DRIVING SERVICE EXCELLENCE" ® Focused on our ability to deliver excellent customer service. 0 FY 2013-14 "MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER: A GROWING COMMUNITY, A GROWING SCHOOL" Expansion at the Academy and infrastructure reinvestment However,things began to change in 2014 as reflected in the budget themes from the last 2 years: . _ FY 2014-15 V "COMMUNITY GROWTH ON THE HORIZON" Recognizing the growth that was about to occur. s FY 2015-16 rG eft "FORGING WESTLAKE: WRITING THE NEXT CHAPTER" c(ye— The first fiscal year where we began to utilize our new Comprehensive Plan (Comp Plan), Forging Westlake, to plan for our growth. 12 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter FY2016-17 "FORGING WESTLAKE: MANAGING THE IMPACT OF GROWTH" This fiscal year's budget emphasized moving from implementing our new Comp Plan, to inculcating it into our budget with sufficient resources to properly administer our planning and development review services in a way -- - - that more effectively deals proactively with the impact of growth in all the Town's services. VII. THE IMPORTANCE OF "MAINTAINING OUR VISION" The trend (of the last two (2) fiscal years) for growth in Westlake shows no sign of abating. Short of a cooling of the local or national economy (or both), major corporations and their employees continue to relocate to the DFW metroplex and our SH 114 corridor continues to reflect that economic growth. This is also true for expansion of existing i companies and businesses in the Metroplex. So, we are now launched into a "sea of change". Hence, this year's budget theme of "Maintaining our Vision in a Sea of Change" The question does not appear to be if we will grow, but rather how we will grow. And, the "how we will grow" is why this budget theme is so important. Using our community Vision to guide us will be key to becoming the type of community Westlake envisions itself to be now and into the future. This vison permeates our Comprehensive Plan EcE (Forging Westlake) and likewise, must be reflected in this budget as well. pl�q"KDIOP-MA GET The growth predicted in Forging Westlake, and identified as early as the Town's FYI 4-15 Budget as being on our horizon, is under way for the third straight year. Westlake finds itself in the "vortex" of one of DFW's most desirable executive housing corridors. With growth now arriving in full force, it becomes imperative that we not only understand and deal with the changes that are now occurring, but also understand the impact that future potential growth will have if existing zoning entitlements are fully utilized. In the face of these growth challenges, maintaining Westlake's unique bucolic character, exceptional quality of life, and distinctive development standards,while at the same time managing the challenges development creates, is no small task. Growth projections of the magnitude projected for the next 30 years in Forging Westlake require that we plan, be proactive, 13 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Letter and be prudent in our decision making, all the while striving to continue to offer the high-quality services Westlake currently enjoys. Our role as a Town government must be to maintain and advance our position as a premier community. We have moved from planning for growth to experiencing it and, with that,we must embrace all the challenges and benefits growth creates. There is no doubt that we continue to face challenges- many from the "macro perspective", i.e. challenges created by growth throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. Further challenges remain from the "micro perspective" for those specific to Westlake. The challenges, first identified and outlined beginning in the FYI 5-16 Budget, are still in place, and it appears they will be with us for the foreseeable future -into FYI 7-18 and beyond. Planner Robin McCaffrey's assessment of the SH 114 corridor growth in Westlake and the reasons for it, described above, are now coming to pass. VIII. CLOSING THOUGHTS ON TAKING THE LONG VIEW AND ITS BENEFITS FOR WESTLAKE In the FYI 5-16 Budget transmittal letter, I recounted how almost 25 years ago, Westlake's governing body recognized that their Town stood at a crossroads; one of change driven by growth in and around Westlake. In 2013,while Westlake's vision had remained much the same, it was recognized by the Town Council that further growth in Westlake and our surrounding area was pending and required a proactive approach. The Council's response was to embark on a two (2) year long process, with much community input, to formulate an updated Comprehensive Plan (Comp Plan). In March 2015, the Town Council adopted this newly drafted Comprehensive Plan which is titled Forging Westlake. The Plan is "mission critical" for the Town to effectively deal with the growth now occurring in Westlake in a manner that is true to our vision, values and mission as a community. The FYI 7-19 budget was formulated to address these challenges within the context of Town Council financial policies, available resources, our Strategy Map, and a conservative 5-year financial forecast. My thanks to our great Leadership Team and Finance Department staff for their dedicated participation in this journey toward our Vision as we prepared this FY2017-18 Budget. Without their unerring belief in that Vision, and their working as a team with the Town Council, our success in moving towards our Vision would not be possible. Thomas E. Brymer Town Manager I'y� 14 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Financials FUND BALANCE CHANGES BY FUND TYPE On behalf of the Senior Leadership Team and all Westlake staff members, I am presenting the Fiscal Year 2017-18 budget document for the Council's consideration as follows: Projected Projected Net Beginning Revenues Expenditures Ending Change Fund Type Fund and Other and Other Fund Percent to Fund Change Balance Sources Uses Balance of Total Balance Percent General Fund $ 9,614,346 $ 9,122,826 $ 10,563,575 $ 8,173,597 46% $ (1,440,749) 15% Enterprise Funds 694,192 3,997,000 4,201,213 489,979 3% (204,213) -29% Internal Service Funds 610,402 319,265 532,000 397,667 2% (212,735) -35% Special Revenue Funds 1,331,605 3,109,040 3,191,899 1,248,746 7% (82,859) -6% Debt Service Funds 6,289 2,981,479 2,987,768 - 0% (6,289) -100% Capital Projects Funds 14,579,3401,981,924 10,342,565 6,218,699 35% (8,360,641) -57% I Totall 26,836,174 21,511,534 $31,819,020 $16,528,688 93% 0,307,486)L.-38% Academic Funds 997,046 8,644,100 8,382,199 1,258,947 7% 261,901 26% $27,833,217 $30,155,634 $40,201,219 $17,787,631 100% $(10,045,585) -36% The FY 2017-18 budgeted expenditure amount totals $40,201,219 for all funds • Fund balance shows a 36% decrease of $10,045,585 from the prior year estimated budget. o Academic funds reflect a 26% increase of $261,901 o Municipal funds reflect a 38% decrease of $10,307,486 and include planned use of fund balance. MUNICIPAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES If only Municipal operating expenditures were taken into consideration (removal of all expenditures related to capital projects, inter-fund transfers and Westlake Academy), the FYI 7-18 budget shows a 7.14% increase of $1,076,875. ESTIMATED ADOPTED Change Change FY 1J1J&J16_ FY 17/18 Amount Percent Payroll&Related $ 3,768,792 $ 4,204,869 $ 436,077 12% Operating Expenditures 11,321,711 11,962,509 640,798 6% 15 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Financials GENERAL FUND REVENUES Evaluating the budget within the context of a long-term forecast is important as it shows whether we are on the right road financially in FY 2017-18. ESTIMATED ADOPTED FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Total Revenues and Other Sources $ 9,772,370 $ 9,122,827 $ 9,506,484 $ 9,401,183 $ 10,079,649 $ 9,807,273 Total Expenditures and Other Uses 8,711,150 10,563,575 11,018,126 10,985,832 10,929,627 10,409,727 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 1, 1 (1,440,748) (1,511,641) Beginning Fund Balance 8,553,121 9,614,347 8,173,598 6,661,957 5,077,307 4,227,330 Ending Fund Balance 9,614,347 8,173,5 6,661,957 5,077,307 4,227,330 3,624,876 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 553,197 555,202 283,146 283,1461 283,146 283,146 I ssi 9,061,150$ 7,618,3961$ 6,378,811 $ 4,794,161 $ 3,944,184 $ 3,341,730 Operating Cost per Day $ 23,866 $ 26,160 $ 26,212 $ 26,891 $ 26,980 $ 27,506 Operating Days 380 291 243 178 146 121 %of Operating Exp. 255% 213% 173% 125% 101% 85% GENERAL SALES AND USE TAX • Budgeted to be $3,510,500 and comprises 39%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 6%increase of$200,000 when compared to prior year estimates primarily due to a development agreement. o Sales taxes are collected on the sale of goods and services within the Town as authorized by the State of Texas. o The maximum sales tax allowed in the State of Texas is 8.25% per dollar on all taxable goods and services. 6.25% per dollar is kept by the State; municipalities receive a maximum of 2%. Funds are collected by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and remitted to the Town monthly. o An amount equal to 1.50%of taxable sales is appropriated to the Town's General Fund. This total includes .50%that is received for property tax reduction. o The Town also receives an additional .50%sales tax that is recorded in the 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund. 16 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Financials AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX The Town of Westlake has assessed a property tax since FY201 1/2012. The ad valorem tax rate for the FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Town of Westlake continues to be the lowest for Adopted Proposed Change municipalities in the immediate area. Tax Rate Tax Rate Amount M&O $0.12882 $0.11133 $(0.01749) The proposed ad valorem tax rate per$100 of I&s $0.00813 $0.02482 $ 0.01669 assessed valuation will decrease by $0.00080 for FY $0.13695 $0.13615 $(0.00080) 2017-2018 to the proposed tax rate of $.13615 (the calculated effective rate). As a reminder, the effective tax rate is the total tax rate calculated to raise the same amount of property tax revenue for the Town from the same properties. FY13/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Estimated Total Appraised Value $1,227,858,917 $1,248,082,317 $1,274,372,828 $1,431,173,915 $1,500,171,790 $17,910,162 $20,223,400 $26,290,511 $156,801,087 $68,997,875 1.48% 1.65% 2.11% 12.30% 4.82% Net Taxable Value $889,054,513 $920,188,732 $943,308,794 $1,124,442,640 $1,172,624,627 32,085,263 31,134,219 23,120,062 181,133,846 48,181,987 3.74% 3.50% 2.51% 19.20% 4.28% Total Tax Revenue $1,353,355 $1,432,916 $1,479,452 $1,565,510 $1,596,528 -13,187 79,561 46,536 86,058 31,018 -0.96% 5.88% 3.25% 5.82% 1.98% Property Tax Rate $ 0.15684 $ 0.15634 $ 0.15634 $ 0.13695 $ 0.13615 This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year's adopted budget by approximately $49,640 (does not include any prior year payments and penalties), which is a 3.37% increase from last year's budget. The Total debt obligation for the Town secured by property taxes for various projects totals $277,700. This amount covers the series 2011 CO payment for street projects of $115,300 and the 2013 CO payment of $162,400 for Arts & Science Center construction. The debt payment for the Science Center was originally paid from the Visitors Association Fund. Based on our July 2017 certified values, the Town's "net taxable value" increased by $48,181,987 over the prior year adjusted information for FY 16-17. 17 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Transmittal Financials VISITOR ASSOCIATION FUND REVENUES Hotel Occupancy Taxes are obtained through the assessment of a 7% hotel occupancy tax. Authority granted by the State of Texas allows cities to levy a tax not to exceed 7% of the rental rate for a hotel/motel room. Funds generated by the occupancy tax may be used in a manner that directly enhances and promotes tourism and the convention and hotel industry. Additionally, because Westlake has broader statutory authority under State law than most cities to spend hotel/motel occupancy tax funds for any municipal purpose, the Town has used these funds to cover costs of various municipal operational costs and capital projects (an example would be payment of a portion of the debt service for Westlake Academy related bonds). • Total revenues are budgeted to be $826,820 • This represents a .7%increase of$6,010 from prior year estimated revenues of$820,810. UTILITY FUND REVENUES Utility Fund revenue is primarily comprised of fees for water and wastewater service. The fund also receives a small portion of its revenue through tap fees and interest income, and currently serves as a mechanism for collecting and distributing debt service and impact fees. • Total revenues are budgeted to be $3,638,958 • This represents a 2%increase of$53,788 from prior year estimated revenues of$3,585,180 18 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Service Level Adjustments SERVICE LEVEL ADJUSTMENT OVERVIEW The Town utilizes "service level adjustments" to create an organizational outcome of being fiscal stewards and tracking our cost increases or decreases. A service level adjustment (SLA) is a request for any dollars in excess of the baseline/target budget. (FY 2016-17 budget, adjusted for year-end estimates, less one-time purchases). There are 2 types of "Service Level Adjustments". Maintain o Same level of service as previous year, but increased due to inflation, etc. o Activities that require additional resources to maintain the current level of service due to growth, new equipment, etc. are considered additions to the baseline/target budget and are included in the "SLA". New or expanded level of service. o All requests for new personnel, programs or equipment that represent a new addition to the current operation are considered additions to the baseline/target budget and are included in the new costs. o Show any revenues or reduction in current expenditures the new or expanded levels of service will create o Designate if item represents an "Unfunded Mandate". An unfunded mandate is a statute or regulation that requires a state or local government to perform certain actions, yet provides no money for fulfilling the requirements. This budget reflects the following service level adjustments. TOTAL ONE-TIME ON-GOING AMOUNT AMOUNT AMOUNT REVENUES $ 1,928,774 $1,422,299 $506,475 Percent 44% 26% EXPENDITURES $8,370,148 $7,631,400 $738,748 Percent 91% 9% NET CHANGE $(6,441,375) $(6,209,101) $(232,274) 19 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Service Level Adjustments BALANCED SCORECARD OVERVIEW STRATEGIC THEMES Strategic Themes guide the way the Town does business and helps us determine how we should invest our time and resources. Themes are also indicators of our "pillars of excellence" which translates our vision and mission statements into focus areas for our community. The Council identifies each theme and creates a strategic result (or definition) to assist us in telling the Westlake story. In the budget process, this allows for increased transparency, clarity, and accountability, providing the Town a framework for demonstrating results. The continued quality and success of this community does not happen without the diligent effort of a committed team of residents, businesses, community leaders, and staff members. STRATEGIC THEMES Natural Exemplary Service & High Quality Planning, Exemplary Education- Oasis Governance Design, & Development Westlake Academy Preserve and We set the standard We are a desirable, well Westlake is an maintain a perfect by delivering planned, high-quality international blend of the unparalleled municipal community that is educational leader community's and educational distinguished by where each individual's natural beauty. services at the lowest exemplary design potential cost. standards. is maximized. STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES Strategic Themes is a view of the Town's strategy from a specific vantage point. The Town's operational model encompasses our mission, vision, and values statement, and utilizes the four Perspectives as a framework. PERS As the name implies "a balanced scorecard" is divided into Citizens, Students these perspectives that help ensure that we focus on the &Stakeholders components necessary to achieve our strategy and aligns our Financial work with the vision and mission for our community. Stewardship Municipal & Our current perspectives encompass the areas of People, Academic Operations Facilities, and Technology (organizational capacity building), People, Facilitiesand Technology Municipal & Academic Operations (operational processes), Financial Stewardship (public funds and financial oversight), and Citizen, Students, & Stakeholders (customer service). All work together to ensure we create a vibrant and responsive community for our residents. 20 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Service Level Adjustments SERVICE LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS BY PERSPECTIVE This budget aligns our organizational priorities contained in the Town's Balanced Score Card by Perspective, with the resources needed to fund Service Level Adjustments (SLA). This shows how these SLA's impact the BSC's strategic objectives within each of the BSC perspectives. Further, it connects how each SLA within each Perspective addresses challenges identified in the transmittal letter. PERSPECTIVE & OUTCOME OBJECTIVE TOTAL ONE-TIME ON-GOING AMOUNT AMOUNT AMOUNT CUSTOMERS, STUDENTS, STAKEHOLDERS Outcome Objectives: $ 302,017 $ 54,580 $ 247,437 • Preserve Desirability& Quality of Life 18% 82% • Increase CSS Satisfaction FINANCIAL STEWARDSHIP Outcome Objectives: $1,928,774 $ 1,422,299 $ 506,475 • Increase Financial Capacity&Reserves 74% 26% • Increase Revenue Streams MUNICIPAL AND ACADEMIC OPERATIONS Outcome Objectives: $ 330,718 $ 83,660 $ 247,058 • Maximize Efficiencies& Effectiveness 25% 75% • Encourage Westlake's Unique Sense of Place • Increase Transparency,Accessibility& Communications PEOPLE, FACILITIES AND TECHNOLOGY Outcome Objectives: $7,737,414 $7,493,160 $ 244,254 • Attract Recruit Retain, Develop Quality Workforce 97% 3% • Improve Technology, Facilities&Equipment • Optimize Planning&Development Capabilities 21 RETURN TO T.O.C. ty S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLl��� L6Z�L 22 RETURN TO T.O.C. Strategic Planning and Management System The Town Council and staff utilize the "Balanced Scorecard " method to implement and review our existing strategic framework, along with the mission, vision, and values statement of the Town. The balanced scorecard system is designed to communicate our strategy throughout the organization community with our stakeholders, align our daily work activities to the overall vision, serve as the framework for prioritizing services, and utilize performance measures to evaluate our successes and opportunities. 23 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan BALANCED SCORECARD STRATEGIC PLANNING & MANAGEMENT SYSTEM The Town Council and staff utilize the "Balanced Scorecard " method to implement and review our existing strategic framework, along with the mission, vision, and values statement of the Town. The balanced scorecard system is designed to communicate our strategy throughout the organization/community with our stakeholders, align our daily work activities to the overall vision, serve as the framework for prioritizing services, and utilize performance measures to evaluate our successes and opportunities. The Balanced Scorecard is a strategic planning and management system that is used extensively in business and industry, government, and nonprofit organizations worldwide to align business activities to the vision and strategy of the organization, improve internal and external communications, and monitor organization performance against strategic goals. In short, it is a tool that businesses use to ensure that their work meets their goals in a measurable way by connecting organizational strategy to the work people do on a day-to-day basis, i.e. "You said...we did..." The graphic at the right illustrates the Balanced Scorecard approach and the following pages of this STRATEGIC PLANNING section demonstrate how Westlake has aligned with WITH A BALANCED SCORECARD this framework. CUSTOMER/STAKEHOLDER/MARKET NEEDS Components include the _Stra�egic Altitude o Vision, Mission, Values 3aft. o Perspectives o Themes and Results zs,000ft. Missiox o Strategic Objectives o Measures and Targets 2U,000ft. VisioH o Strategic Initiatives VALues SS,ODO ft. PERSPEGTNEB Each element is critical to the success of the SO,000 ft. THEMEB B[REBLILTB municipality and helps us evaluate and communicate our performance. srRArEcc osEcrNEs 5,000 ft. . MEASi7RES&TARLiETS Upon review of the existing mission and vision Ground S7 RA7 E6[C 1[llTiIIiNEB statements, the Council provided feedback to the Town staff and requested an updated version for review. Staff reviewed the previous version and created a more succinct statement that identifies the unique service programs, describes our commitment to personal customer service, and outlines the financial stewardship component, which is important to our community. After the staff analyzed the Town's strengths/weaknesses, as well as the opportunities/threats we face (SWOT), the information was presented to the Council during a retreat in May of 2013. The following was created as a result of the discussions in 2013 along with annual review as necessary. 24 _ RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan MlssloN The mission statement describes what " n Westlake is a unique community blending preservatio must be done to achieve the adopted of our natural environment and viewscapes,while vision. Town Council has adopted the serving our residents and businesses with superior following Mission statement for the Town: municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent." VISION The town's vision statement outlines what we strive to be. Upholding such a F.-An oasis of natural beauty that maintains our open statement is a task that requires effort on spaces in balance with distinctive developments, trails, multiple levels. The balanced scorecard and quality of life amenities amidst an ever-expanding system will help ensure that the Vision of urban landscape." the Town remains true in years to come. VALUES Driving how the Town accomplishes its work are our corporate values. These are the principles that we hold important and standards by which the Town operates.These values, as adopted by the Town Council, and are designed to guide staff in their day to day work and the Council as it conducts its business: INTEGRITY-DRIVEN GOVERNMENT Transparent Innovation Sense of Community Fiscal Responsibility Strong Aesthetic Standards Educational Leaders Informed & Engaged Citizens Family Friendly & Welcoming Preservation of our Natural Beauty Planned Responsible Development STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES A Perspective is a view of the Town from a specific vantage point. Four basic perspectives are traditionally used to encompass a Balanced Scorecard organization's activity. The Town's business model,which encompasses mission, vision, and strategy, utilizes the four Perspectives as a framework: A balanced scorecard is divided into four unique perspectives that help the Town focus on the strategy that has been aligned to the vision and mission for our community. 25 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan The four perspectives of the plan,which were customized by the Council, are as follows: Citizens,Students, Financial Municipal and People, Facilities, and Stakeholders: Stewardship: Academic Operations: &Technologies: viewed through the eyes Financial oversight; focuses on processes that involves,work culture, of our customers and effective use of resources create value for the innovation,leadership, stakeholders customers and governance,tools and stakeholders technology necessary to provide services STRATEGIC THEMES AND RESULTS The Council grouped this information along with the major components of our previous strategic plan and ranked the importance of the concepts according to each area of concern. The final activity involved the formation of our "strategic themes" for the municipal services. Natural Oasis Preserve and maintain a perfect blend of Town staff then constructed strategy the community's natural beauty. maps for each theme, identified a We set the standard by delivering strategic result, populated the maps Exemplary Service unparalleled municipal and educational with strategic objectives and created &Governance services at the lowest cost. an objective commentary document. High Quality We are a desirable,well planned, high- All of this sets the framework for a Planning, Design, quality community that is distinguished by comprehensive Tier One map for the & Development exemplary design standards. municipal program of services. The Exemplary Westlake is an international educational current Balance Scorecard was leader where everyone's potential Education adopted by Council in September is maximized. 2014. The Town Council has worked closely with staff to adopt a management system based on the Balanced Scorecard framework. This was developed to help the Town direct its own destiny rather than allow future events to do so. Through sound business principles the Town is able to provide services more effectively to the citizens of Westlake, increasing both efficiency and customer satisfaction. Ultimately, it guides the way the Town does business and helps us determine how we should invest our time and resources. In the budget process, this allows for increased transparency, clarity, and accountability, providing the Town a framework for demonstrating results. The continued quality and success of this community does not happen without the diligent effort of a committed team of residents, businesses, community leaders, and staff. Years of consistent planning and strategic thinking has brought Westlake where it is today. OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance measures hold government departments accountable. While allowing them to recognize their successes and adjust programs of service that are under performing. Because performance measures are determined according to the Strategy Map, it becomes evident how each department aligns with Town goals, and how well departments are meeting the expectations set by the Strategy Map. 26 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan PERSPECTIVES OBJECTIVES PERFORMANCE MEASURES • Alignment between comp plan,zoning&dev.Regulations Preserve Desirability • Ratio of exemplary schools in/around Westlake &Quality of Life Enrollment composite (capacity vs.wait list) Citizens, Student successes from WA Students, Direction Finder survey results And Attrition rate • Average length of time residents live in Westlake Stakeholders Increase Percentage of leavers (all) CSS External validation points (awards per year) Satisfaction Direction Finder survey results • Percentage of violations issued to residents due to failure to meet development/code requirements Increase Financial Fund Balance Financial Capacity&Reserves • Quarterly financial report data Stewardship Increase • Local revenue monitoring Revenue Streams • Percent of revenues budgeted • Percentage of time spent on Q2 planning and implementation Maximize Efficiencies • Number of policies and procedures updated/passed &Effectiveness (quarterly) • Number of internal processes reviewed and updated each Municipal quarter And Encourage • Percentage of first submission plans that meet Academic Westlake's Unique environment/development goals Operations Sense of Place • Percentage of CSS participation events/meetings • Increased survey completion (All) Increase Transparency, • Direction Finder survey(effectiveness of town Accessibility& communications,effort to keep residents informed, Communications opportunities for public input and availability of town records. • Email/website statistics • Percentage of qualified candidates within applicant pools Attract, Recruit,Retain Time to fill positions &Develop the Highest Percent of increased competency specific Quality Workforce Employee turnover rate People, Employee satisfaction results Facilities, overtime vs.Comp time and Improve Technology, Critical infrastructure downtime Facilities&Equipment Cost of repairs vs.replacement costs Technologies Projected CSS growth Optimize Planning& Direction Finder survey results Development Capabilities • Percentage of deadline compliance These performance measures help determine the quantity and quality of our work, as identified in our plans. We consistently evaluate our work and review our performance quarterly because we firmly believe that what gets measured gets done. 27 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan In addition to monitoring these performance measures, the Town of Westlake also desires the opinion of its citizens. Every two years Westlake undertakes a broad citizen survey designed to measure government performance and to gauge the current and future needs of residents. This survey is an incredibly useful tool within the strategic management system, and it allows Town services to be tailored based upon citizen attitudes. Westlake's performance measures are evolutionary and undergo on-going review. As we improve our ability to gather and mine data about our work,we will be able to add performance measures to the departmental business plans as a gauge of success. These departmental efficiency and effectiveness measures will be grouped with the appropriate outcome objective then fed into the Town-wide scorecard to give an overall picture of the Town's performance. As the Town continues to develop these scorecards, measurement units, data sources, and targets will be refined.Through quarterly performance reviews, departmental performance is documented. Trends are also tracked over time through budget documents. TOWN OF WESTLAKE STRATEGY MAP Citizens, Preserve Students & Desirability & Increase CSS Quality of Life Satisfaction Stakeholders Financial Increase Increase 1 Financial Capacity Revenue 1 Stewardship / Reserves Streams Municipal & Maximize Encourage Increase Academic Efficiencies & Westlake's Transparency Effectiveness Unique Sense Accessibility & Operations of Place Communications People, Attract, Recruit, Improve Optimize Facilities & Retain & Develop Technology, Planning & the Highest Quality Facilities & Development Technology Workforce Eaubment Capabilities L 28 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Strategic Plan WESTLAKE'S STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT / BUDGET CYCLE Establishing a link between a Town's strategy and budget is fundamental to effective public budgeting. Westlake works hard to connect the strategy management system to the budget process. Incorporating the Strategy Map into resource allocation decisions ensures the Town budget reflects the priorities of the Town Council.The illustration below depicts the annual process of developing the Town's budget. As the Budget Cycle illustration indicates, the process never ceases. F E 17 B JAN W FEB MAR OCT SEP APR C AUG MAY JUL JUN O Budget 'T J L1 Ja S E P 29 RETURN TO T.O.C. ty S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLl��� L6Z�L 30 RETURN TO T.O.C. Westlake Community Profile This section includes statistical and supplemental data that describes the Town of Westlake and it's community. It furnishes a valuable perspective when reviewing budget issues and making decisions related to allocation of government resources. The goal is to provide a context for understanding the decisions incorporated into the budget document. 31 RETURN TO T.O.C. _ Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile INTRODUCTION Westlake is in the LONE STAR STATE OF TEXAS and is known as the place where the cross timbers meet the prairie. Westlake boaHolds tales of settlers from the Peters Colony, Indian treaties signed by Sam Houston, tremendous archaeological treasures, and some of the oldest settlements in North Texas. In the perspective of Texans it conjures images of crystal rivers fed from designer spring waters, oak trees dipped in Spanish moss and prairies awash in bluebonnets. Wildlife in all its forms and a rich history embroiders the tapestry. Other geographical regions mark the coast, the mountains and basins, the piney woods, the prairies and plains, the Trans-Pecos region, but all seem tied to the historical umbilical cord of the Cross Timbers Hill Country. e Westlake is an oasis of natural beauty that maintains open spaces in balance with distinctive development, trails, and quality of life amenities amidst an ever expanding urban mow landscape. Nestled in the DFW Metroplex, Westlake is a Gold Level Scenic City and home to many small independent businesses and several corporate campuses Distinctive developments and architecturally vibrant corporate campuses find harmony among our meandering roads and trails, ' lined with native oaks and stone walls. We are leaders in education, known for our innovative partnerships between the Town-operated Charter school and our corporate neighbors. We strive to maintain strong aesthetic standards and preserve the natural beauty in our town. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake, as a community,we are family friendly,welcoming, fully involved and invested in our rich heritage, vibrant present and exciting, sustainable future. Say "welcome home"to a place familiar to the heart even f you've never been Gere. 32 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile LOCATION Westlake is conveniently located between DFW Airport and Alliance Airport, on the south side of State Highway 114, providing quick, easy access to all areas of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex. 114 114 -— ��`Roanoke u V • - The unique location of Westlake is ideal for many of its major corporate campuses and residential communities. A common ideal ��� �. shared by our corporate and individual residents is their support of the existing ;�` Westlake-t- 1, a�oV character and charm of the community as well as a commitment to excellence in new T . development. HISTORY OF WESTLAKE The region has always been known for its natural bounty, its trade value, and its wonderful people. The Town of Westlake and northeast Tarrant County has maintained that distinction over the years, becoming one of the most desirable and sought after places to live in America. Early Settlers... 1847 • The Town of Westlake was settled by Charles and Matilda Medlin when they arrived in the area with about 20 other families in 1847. They initially settled along Denton Creek but • moved south to higher ground after weathering ferocious - floods from the creek. Until 1997, the three-story Medlin barn - was a local historic landmark. When it had to be removed, after what was believed to be 130 years of use, for safety • concerns. Legends include those of Sam Bass and Bonnie and Clyde hiding in the barn. The 1870's... = = Dove Road was the cardinal road between Grapevine and Roanoke. The road took its name from the Dove Community which was located between the two towns. Dove Road originated in the 1870's and got its name from the Lonesome Dove Baptist Church located in the community. of 33 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile The 1930's... In the late 1930s, Ted Dealey, turned his attention to a lush and untouched piece of the Cross Timbers region. It was there he built a stunning country place designed by prominent architect, Charles Dilbeck. This place was known as the 220 Ranch. The Dealey Home, which has been relocated to a new location off Dove Road, is now known as Paigebrooke Farm. The 1940's- 1950's It was late in the 1940's after World War II, at about the _ - same time that Dealey built his home, that Circle T Ranch had its beginnings with J. Glenn Turner. He used the place to raise and train Tennessee Walking horses, and as a retreat and showplace. Circle T Ranch was expanded throughout the 1950's to approximately 2,300 acres. `rte In 1955, there were rumors of an attempt to annex Circle T Ranch; as a defensive move, J Glenn Turner organized the neighboring ranches and homeowners in the surrounding community into forming their own city. On the 27th day of December in 1956, citizens attended a meeting to declare the Town of Westlake into existence thru incorporation and to swear in the first Board of Aldermen. The area included what is known today as Westlake, plus the area north, to the northern shore of Denton Creek. This northern land was annexed from Westlake and formed the town of Trophy Club in the 1970's. The Town of Westlake has changed much since its original incorporation in 1956. During the early years, our mayor and board members met to discuss town business in the comfort of each other's living rooms-an interesting contrast to how our town operates today. The 1960's... In 1969, the Circle T Ranch was purchased by oil millionaire Nelson Bunker Hunt. The ranch became known for its glamorous parties attended by celebrities from all over the world. The 1970s ... In the early 1970's, the state decided to name one of Westlake's well-known streets after the person who was living in the first house on the road. That person was J.T. Ottinger. Also in the early 1970s, Houston developer and professional golfer Ben Hogan approached Westlake about building a golf course, country club, and a housing development. In 1973, Westlake deannexed what is now known as the Town of Trophy Club, clearing the way for the upscale housing development and golf course. 34 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile The 1980's ... VeilIn the mid-1980s, IBM built Solana, the multi use office agecomplex. IBM maintained a large presence for over 10 years. At that time, several of the office buildings became available for use by other corporations. ;.. ` + L ' NEventually, IBM sold its partnership interest. r The 1990's ... In 1989, Nelson Bunker Hunt declared bankruptcy and the Circle T Ranch was � hmar?wegrm purchased by Ross Perot Jr. in 1993. In 1997, to the dismay of residents, there was n �` an attempt to dissolve the Town of '6 Westlake. Many court battles, including lGirle appeals to the Texas Supreme Court, were , waged as emotions rose. Ultimately Town 7'may he drsant�exed leadership prevailed. In 1999, the Town hired the first professional manager to oversee operations. 2000 The Westlake Historical Preservation Society was established for the purpose of recording and preserving the rich history of the Town of Westlake. 2002 VIP's and residents of Westlake gather at the site of the new Westlake Academy to help raise the first wall of the school. Westlake approved the purchase of the first fire truck and ambulance. Westlake Historical Preservation Society holds the first Annual Decoration Day on Memorial Day. Westlake Academy opens. Celebrations began to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the incorporation of Westlake in December 1956. 2007 The Town of Westlake dedicated and sealed a time capsule containing a variety of special items. This time capsule will remain sealed until September 8, 2057, during the town's 100th anniversary celebration. 2009 Deloitte University announces Westlake as the site for its $300 million learning and leadership center. Westlake Academy Arts &Sciences Center was completed. 2010 Westlake's first gas well was successfully drilled in Solana. 2011 New retail growth began along the Town's western boundary with construction of a new IQuick Trip convenience store and a Centennial Fine Wine & Liquor store. 35 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile 2013 The Town's open enrollment charter school, Westlake Academy, completed its 10th year of operations. Completed construction on the State's $15 Million Phase 1 FM 1938 project. 2014 Installation of a secondary ground storage water tank. Completed Phase I expansion construction of three buildings on the Westlake Academy campus that will accommodate new students. 2015 Work began on Granada, a new 84 home housing development, and Entrada, a mixed-use development modeled after historic villages in Spain. 2016 Charles Schwab Corporation,working with major Westlake land owner and developer Hillwood Properties, announced their intention to build a regional headquarters which will be adjacent to a mixed use development that Hillwood will develop located near the intersection of SH 170 and SH 114. HISTORIC PRESERVATION There are few gifts more taken for granted than our heritage. We've all kept the old photographic albums or maybe even been fortunate enough to have recovered a piece of wood from the house our great-grandmother was born in. Apart from the relics and stories passed down from generation to generation, there is little effort made in today's frantic world to preserve and protect our community heritage. As we grow older, few of us have not paused on ocasion and wished that certain memories could somehow be crafted and professionally woven into a legacy rather than relegated to the yellowing pages of the picture album. With such thoughts in mind, The Westlake Historical Preservation Board was created to discover, preserve and perpetuate the history of our town and region that is, after all, composed of family histories. We owe a debt of gratitude to the local volunteers whose work reflects the fact that our past is as much a guide to our future as it is a trail to our present. �► Westlake, a new town in an old locale, has determined that history will have a place in town government by creating a historical board. We sa invite you along the trails, traces, side roads, and by-ways of long ago. And we can't forbear to Y. remind you that "the best paths always lead home;" that we are all pathfinders, in one way or another. 36 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile HISTORICAL MARKERS IN WESTLAKE Board members of the Westlake i5 also on a journey toward its own destiny that will be unlike any Westlake Historical other of the towns around it-better, richer because Westlake will take Preservation Society into account its past in charting its future. The folk of yesterday are gone researched eight and oo io most of the evidence proving they were here. They are significant locations remembered onlya5 long 3o there are rememberero. When even memories recently nominated for are gone, there i5 precious little-an old house here or there, Small historical markers. The cemeteries with headstones askew, historical plagues, old-timey things in Town Council museums,photographs, bits of poetry, recipes and old letters with the unanimously approved a musty Smell of time,documents from court house records, words trapped historical marker master in newspapers, magazines or books. plan at the June 13th 2011 meeting which identified the sites and WESTLAKE AND THE CROSS TIMBERS place markers. This marker stands next to the loop parking lot in front of the Westlake Academy on JT The sites are in the heart ' Ottinger Road. of Westlake and on highly traveled roads. Our history begins in a distinctively unique geographic region of North Central Texas, Instead of going through Nic- the Cross Timbers. Early explorers and the State to receive the travelers noticed the area because of the designated plaques, the extended groves of oak trees bordered with stretches of open prairie. As early as 1832, Washington Irving Town will take on the described it in a Tour of the Praries: "I shall not easily forget the mortal toil, project. The Texas and the vexations of flesh and spirit, that we undertook occasionally, in Historical Marker our wanderings through the Cross Timber. It was like struggling through application process forests of cast iron."The Cross Timbers region extends across parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. From a map, it may be seen that the requires exhaustive region runs in irreular vertical lines, a little like icing running down the sides research and of a cake. Benjamin Tharp writings documentation for described the area as timbered islands amid lakes of grass called oak potential sites and can savannas, a name that refers to - take up two to three wooded areas broken by stretches of years. grasslands. Hence, describing our home Westlake, Texas." The rock chimney from the original rte• TEXAS Buck King homestead still standing at ,� Pearson Lane and Aspen Lane. +' Pearson Road was known as Buck King { Road. *** 37 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile HISTORICAL MARKERS IN WESTLAKE SHOCKEY-HUFFMAN HOMESTEAD & FAMILY FARM This homestead is now occupied by Solana Village Plaza and was established by Isaac Shockey in 1885. The homestead consisted of STAR multiple wood-frame buildings and a well. This marker stands off STAGECOACH ROUTE Solana Blvd near Village Center Plaza. The site of an1850s log cabin on Denton Highway south of POSSUM TROT SCHOOL Stagecoach Hills This was a one-room Airpark. Later a rock school house from house was built there 1890 to 1905 near where travelers on Dove and Ottinger the Denton-Birdville roads, south of Westlake Academy. stagecoach stagecoach route : �, ��+ stopped for water The school had 16 to t r ' i collected from 20 students ages 8 through 13. This nearby springs. marker stands at the southwest corner of North Pearson and Dove Road. TERRA BELLA HOMESTEAD This site is on Dove Road, purchased by Ed Noack in 196 which became Terra Bella Estates in 2007. THE CIRCLE T RANCH + THRASHER Off State Highway 114, FAMILY HOME the 2,300 acres known on Dove Road west as Circle T Ranch was of Precinct Line Road, home of purchased by J. Glenn Henry and Beulah Turner in the 1940s and Thrasher on a 40- 1950s. acre tract bought in PAIGEBROOKE FARM Off Dove Road near Ottinger Road is the site of the Dealey Home designed by Charles Dilbeck and built in the late 1930s. 38 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile WESTLAKE LOCAL GOVERNMENT The Town of Westlake was incorporated in 1956 as a Type A general-law municipality under the rules of the state of Texas. The Town operates under the Council-Manager form of government. The Council is comprised of a mayor and five (5) council members and is responsible for, among other things, passing ordinances, adopting the budget, appointing committees, and hiring the Town Manager. The Mayor and Town Council members serve two (2) year terms. All elected officials are elected at large for a two year s taggered term each May. The Town Manager is responsible for carrying out the policies and ordinances of the Council, for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Town and appointing and supervising heads of various departments. The Town Council shall conduct regularly scheduled meetings on dates and times as established by the Town Council. All Mondays shall be established as a day available for regular meetings as needed. Special meetings shall be called in accordance with Section 22.038(b) of the Texas �Local Governm ent Code. The regular Council meetings shall convene not earlier than 6:30 p.m C � 0 � Laura Wheat Carol Langdon Mayor Mayor Pro-Tem �m 7 Michael Barrett Alesa Belvedere Rick Rennhack Wayne Stoltenberg Council Member Council Member Council Member Council Member The Town provides municipal and academic services that are necessary for our residents, and delivered with an eye to maintaining fiscal stewardship for the resources that are entrusted to the government. 39 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile Major services provided under the general government and enterprise functions are: fire and emergency medical services, police, water and sewer utility services, park and recreational facilities, financial accounting, communications and community affairs, street improvements, education and other related administrative services. The Town utilizes a combination of both, direct service delivery along with outsourced services. The decision as to which service to deliver directly versus out-sourcing is based on analysis of cost- effectiveness, citizen responsiveness, and customer service quality. The council-manager form is the system of local government that combines strong political leadership, representative democracy through elected officials, and professional management. The form establishes a representative form of government by concentrating all power in the elected Town council. The council hires a professionally trained and educated Town Manager to oversee the delivery of public services and the daily operations of the Town. Council Members are part-time volunteers who serve as the policy making board for the Town's government. WESTLAKE OPERATIONS The Town of Westlake employs 137.84 full-time equivalent employees (municipal and academic) and provides a full level of public services to its citizens as well as operates the only municipally owned Charter School in the state. The Town of Westlake utilizes a private firm for solid waste collection and disposal, as well as contracts with Keller, a neighboring community, for police services. Department Name FY17/18 General Government • Town Manager 1.00 • Assistant Town Manager 1.00 • Administrative 0.50 • Planning and Development 4.00 • Town Secretary 1.50 • Facilities/Grounds maintenance 1.25 • Municipal Court 4.50 • Finance 4.00 • Payroll/Human Resources 2.00 • Information Technology 2.00 • Public Safety 15.50 • Culture and Recreation 0.50 • Public Works 4.00 f� Marketing and Public Affairs 2.00 r Education 93.09 Total Employees 137.84 40 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile GLENWYCK PARK Theark at Glenw ck Farms is 13.5 acres of �yy p Y i open space with a variety of 60 feet oak and pecan trees. The park, which opens at dawn and closes at dusk, is maintained by The Town of Westlake and the Home Owner's Association of Glenwyck Farms. The park is located at 1601 Fair Oaks Drive, and includes a running brook, three rustic bridges, and a paved walking path. Oak and pecan trees, some of which tower 60 feet, decorate the lush area. SHOPPING Westlake is surrounded by excellent retail shopping options in many of our neighboring cities: Roanoke, Southlake, and Trophy Club. There is something for everyone only minutes away but keep watch...for more Westlake retail stores in the Solana and Entrada developments! LODGING FACILITIES The Marriott Solana was designed by famous Mexican architect Richardo Legoretta.The hotel is one of Marriott's most unique, full-service hotels. Marriott Solana guests are provided with a unique, upscale experience.The resort feel of the hotel is supplemented)with fields of Texas wildflowers and groves of oak trees. The informal, yet arnott,, stylized approach uses light and color throughout, making for an exhilarating HOTELS & RESORT S experience. Whether you are staying at the hotel for work or pleasure, you are sure to leave feeling pampered. DINING ESTABLISHMENTS Westlake offers a small variety of restaurants within the town's limits. Located off Highway 114 at the Solana/Kirkwood Bouldvard exit, and just minutes from your doorstep, Solana houses a few dining options, La Scala offers traditional Italian and Mar Cocina serves up authentic mexcian food. The Marriot Solana Hotel offers an upbeat modern d6cor for breakfast lunch and dinner, featuring all your favorites served with a local Texas flare. In addition, the Marriott also includes a Starbucks Coffee House where tour favorite coffee beverages are served daily. Westlake is also surrounded by excellent dining options in Southlake, Roanoke and Trophy Club. 41 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile WESTLAKE COMMUNITY EVENTS Westlake is a family-friendly environment where events are held, which provide opportunites for our residents to gather and participat in activities with their children and neighbors. MASTERWORKS CONCERT SERIES... The Masterworks Music Series is a variety of free music programs sponsored by the Town of Westlake, Cassidy Turley and ARTSNET. These free concerts are for music lovers of all ages and feature instrumental and vocal music ranging from Country & Western to Blues & Jazz with the entertainment of local, regional and national artists. The concert season begins in April and performances are held at the Plaza (courtyard) in Solana. ...DECORATION DAY Held annually on Memorial Day in May, Decoration Day honors those who have bravely upheld our freedoms by serving our country- past and present. The Westlake Preservation Historical Society sponsors its annual "Decoration Day" event which is usually held in Westlake at the International Order of Odd Fellows Cemetery. Activities include live music, treasure hunts for the kids, and a homemade ice-cream competition. The event ends at sunset.-:- ANNUAL unset.ANNUAL VINTAGE CAR SHOW... _ x: Classic car enthusiasts join together each October at the Solana Club in Westlake for the Annual Westlake Vintage Car Show. This ORO event features vintage classic original or restored to original automobiles, trucks and pickups from 1909 to 1959. Awards included Best of Show, Best of Class, People's Choice and Town of Westlake Mayor's Choice. " Held annually each spring, Arbor Day promotes tree conservation and in recent years has centered around linear or pocket parks �. ". located in Westlake. In addition, there are educational sessions on 1 a tree care advice, and complimentary trees. Admission is free.,,- HOLIDAY ree.HOLIDAY COMMUNITY TREE LIGHTING... Enjoy an evening of community fellowship as the holiday season officially begins with the lighting of the Christmas Tree. This free event includes games & entertainment, cookie decorating, musical selections by the Westlake Academy Choral Group and Drama Students, and don't forget our special visitors from the North Pole! 42 RETURN TO T.O.C. _ Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile WESTLAKE POPULATION The Town of Westlake has experienced exponential growth over the last decade; the national census reported 207 residents in 2001 and 992 residents in 2011. Population Growth 118 1 00 1270 9 1 803 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Tarant County Average Age Percent Unemployment Rate 18—34 years 4% Source:2016 Town of Westlake Audit 35—54 years 52% 55—74 years 36% 75+ years 8% 2002 MIR=6.10% Source:2017 Westlake Citizen Survey 2003 6.30% 2004 5.30% AN 2005 5.10% 84% of Household Income Percent 2006 4.60% residents rate Under$50K 6% 2007 4.30% the Town of $50K - $149K 4% 2008 5.10% Westlake as I $150K - $500K 31% 2009 8.10% an excellent $500K plus 59% place to live! Source:2017 Westlake Citizen Survey Z0 8.10%1 7.90% 2012 6.20% 2013 6.00% Years Lived in Westlake Percent 5 years or less 49% 2014 5.00% 6 to 10 years 23% 2015 4.00% 11 to 15 years 15% 2016 4.10% 16 years plus 13% Source:2017 Westlake Citizen Survey 43 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC STATUS Source:2016 Town of Westlake Audit Calendar Estimated Personal Per Capita ROMER Year Population Income Personal Income LOCATION 2002 289 $ 13,715,216 $ 47,457 2003 303 15,242,398 50,305 2004 328 41,027,552 125,084 • Northeast Tarrant County 2005 355 45,292,916 127,586 . 7 square miles 2006 698 90,835,901 130,137 (approximate) 2007 703 93,316,319 132,740 2008 785 115,891,905 147,633 12 miles west of Dallas- 2009 803 120,920,285 150,586 Fort Worth International 2010 847 102,852,057 121,431 Airport 2011 992 26,678,400 127,700 . 7 miles east of Fort Worth 2012 1,063 138,423,531 130,254 Alliance Airport 2013 1,109 147,292,890 132,859 Elevation 574 feet 2014 1,150 160,462,095 135,516 2015 1,200 165,871,904 138,227 2016 1,270 179,058,721 140,991 CLIMATE Tarrant County, Community College, Days of sunshine: 137 Hospital & School Taxes -2016 (Combined) • Carroll ISD - $2.0166 Mean winter temperature: 54 F • Keller ISD - $2.1466 • Northwest ISD - $2.0791 • Mean summer temperature: 92 F Denton County and School Taxes • Mean annual 2016 (Combined) precipitation: 33.7 inches • Northwest ISD - $1 .7009 • Mean annual snowfall: 3.1 inches Major Developments & Planned Developments • Deloitte University • Fidelity Investments North Texas Campus 1 • Solana Corporate Campus • Westlake Corners - at SH 377/SH 170 intersection • Entrada - an 85 acre mixed-use development • Quail Hollow and Carlyle Court • Granada Phase I and II z • Charles Schwab regional headquarters 44 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS The Town of Westlake is home to several communities, all of which share a commitment to excellence but possess unique character and charm. Well-known for its carefully planned development and growth, many homeowners choose this area for the wide variety of opportunities and the strong family orientation of its residents. ` GLENWYCK FARMS (220 of residents live here) A private community situated on over 100 wooded acres xin a quiet rural setting. Glenwyck has one acre home sites r J f in a park-like setting with mature trees, a running trail and several natural ponds. This neighborhood is also home to Glenwyck Farms Park, 13.5 acres of open space with a running brook, rustic bridges and paved walking MN path. Oak and pecan trees, some of which tower 60 feet, decorate the lush area. MAHOTEA BOONE (3% of residents live here) - Westlake's oldest subdivision, having been platted about 1978, Mahotea Boone has fourteen lots, eleven of which currently have older homes. It is zoned for minimum two acre lots and appears to be redeveloping with larger homes. The developer was Bill Boone,who named the street after his grandmother. TERRA BELLA(4%of residents live here)-A 28 lot, 54.7 ;' a acre, gated subdivision with a 22.6 acre open space C nd nature preserve featuring a hike and bike trail. As Westlake's newest subdivision, the first house was permitted for construction in August 2009. Terra Bella is ccessible from Dove Road and Sam School Road, on the eastern border of Westlake. - VAQUERO ESTATES (530 of residents liver here). Gently rolling hills and picturesque meadows comprise the private oasis of Vaquero, With approximately 333 homes, this guard-gated community surrounds a world class golf course designed by Tom Fazio, complete with shimmering ponds and countless groves of majestic oaks. This subdivision offers the highest quality in home design and construction. 45 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS GRANADA (under construction) This subdivision is one of the latest additions with plans for gorgeous luxury homes set on 84 acres. The average price for these residences is targeted at$1 million plus &you'll find what that buys is a stunning home with all the right touches and details. With average lot sizes of 30,000 square feet, families will have plenty of space to enjoy the Texas landscape. - CARLYLE COURT (under construction. = Our new Carlyle Court developm ent will offer only gated estate lots, each one being 1-1.5 acre homesites. The neighborhood is very private featuring both trees and open spaces. Connections to the existing Westlake trail system are also available right outside your door! QUAIL HOLLOW (under construction) A Private Enclave of Wooded 1-2 Acre+ Home Sites. This picturesque 188-acre gated community is set _amidst one one of the most desirable locations in all of ` North Texas and is limited to only 92 home sites. r A STAGECOACH HILLS (12% of residents live here) r.� AIRP In this 30-house subdivision, airplanes are `■► almost as common as cars. The subdivision's EST. 1971 name comes from its location on an old � K stagecoach trail from Keller to Denton. 46 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile ENTRADA COMMERICAL DEVELOPMENT WHAT'S You and your family will especially appreciate the mixed- SPECIAL use approach that will make all your favorite spots ►7 convenient and easy to access. Westlake's Entrada project is taking shape with a 135-room The architecture will emulate the Catalonia region of Hyatt Place Hotel, a Primrose northeastern Spain with a blend of rich Texas-Spanish Mission School, a Starbucks and a CVS Pharmacy all confirmed style and a community design to create a European village for the 85-acre project. type environment. The red the roofs are planned to quickly let you know you're not in a cookie Entrada also will have 300 cutter rehashed development. residential units, including 200 single family villas, 70 to 80 townhomes and 40 to 50 Carefully planned to provide condominiums. Several luxury residents with an enviable lifestyle, retailers are anticipated for the $500 million project uses the the project. The 161,000- square-foot Hyatt will have a latest trends in lifestyle planning to 15,000-square-foot provide a combination of office, conference room for special hospitality, entertainment, and events. single-family housing, including a The centerpiece will be a selection of detached homes, 7 lake with a fountain feature townhomes, condominiums, and WESTLAKE that harkens back to a village villas. on the Spanish coastline. The E N T RA D project also includes an outdoor amphitheater and This development has attracted some of the nation's most trails that connect to the rest respected builders of luxury homes and, when completed, of Westlake's network. The will set a standard for both architectural design and luxury buildings will have small setbacks, echoing the living in the North Texas area. European-inspired design. roe .. [ G li'o � ■ 'r�l�r I —% a I"JL it I SAr � rrlo rr i � !lrr�lirr!!.r• .,I — r�.�- i ijlrrau. r-�,rpr...ar rAA ru�r..! • t � � 5 i t 47 RETURN TO T.O.C. _ Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile ADVANTAGES OF DOING BUSINESS IN WESTLAKE Regional Advantages • Adjacent to the Alliance Airport High Standards area which is home to over 60 • Gold level Scenic City Designation for high Fortune 500 companies. aesthetic and open space standards. • Lower cost of living-7% below the • The Town of Westlake has twice been named national average. the most affluent community in America by • No corporate sales tax in the state Forbes Magazine. of Texas. • Town support for economic development • Affordable housing- Prices 20% incentives. • Flexible high development standards to below the national average. accommodate logical development. • Strong workforce throughout DFW Metroplex. • Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area ranked 4th largest population center in United States (Source: US Census Bureau) Hwy 114 Corridor West Region • Civilian labor force of 3 million in Greater DFW. Population 8 Demographics • Superb access to seven major This region includes a population of over highways and Dallas/Fort Worth 151,000 people with the following characteristics. International Airport. Family Oriented: Avg. of 2.89 people per • Location midway between Alliance household. Airport and Dallas Love Field. Well Educated: 47.30 of those over 25 years of • Low local property tax rate. age have a bachelors degree or higher. • Central location within the Young at heart: Avg. age of 37 years old Metroplex. Total Households: 67,598 • Excellent choice and availability of Average Household Income: $91,972/year. office and retail space. i Strategically Located • Westlake is conveniently located on the south side of State Highway 114, providing quick, easy access to all areas of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. • The unique location of Westlake is ideal for many of its major corporate campuses and residential communities. • Westlake's proximity to major highways as well as area airports further enhances its appeal as a corporate office location. • Westlake is 12 miles to the west of DFW Airport and 7 miles to the east of Alliance Airport. • Traffic counts on Highway 114 adjacent to the city are presently around 70,000 cars per day. • Those counts may reach as high as 100,000 per day when TxDOT completes all renovations of Highway 114 from Roanoke to 1-35 at the raceway. 48 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile WESTLAKE EMPLOYERS Source:2016 Town of Westlake Audit COMPANY NA ,&OUNT PERCENT Fidelity Investments 5,864 49.1% Core Logic 1,790 15.0% The DFW Metro area is home to more Fortune 500 companies than Travelocity 880 7.4% any other area in the United Wells Fargo 617 5.2% States. Sabre 500 4.2% Deloitte 486 4.1% Several major employers are Verizon Wireless(ALL) 446 3.7% located within the Town ofWestlake. First American Title 262 2.2% Sount Physicians 173 1.4% Solana Business Park, including a Marriott Solana Hotel 143 1.2% premium Marriott Hotel, stands as the area's premier corporate Vaquero Country Club 135 1.1% development offering tenants a Westlake Academy 95 0.8% customizable site-specific Levi Strauss 70 0.6% partnership. Solera 68 0.6% Solana Club/Larry North 57 0.5% Fidelity Investments created a stunning 300-acre campus that is Town of Westlake 42 0.4% a user-friendly environment. It fits Image Engineering Group LTD 40 0.3% into and even enhances the Marsh & McLennan Companies 35 0.3% area's natural surroundings and Western &Southern Life Insurance 31 0.3% abounds with native trees, grasses and flowers. Midwest Hospitality, LLC 20 0.2% Mar-Cosina Tex Mex 20 0.2% Deloitte University operates their All Other Employers 179 1.5% $160 million dollar, 160 acre, international training facility. The Fidelity Investments 5,864 49.1% facility features over 800 rooms, Core Logic 1,790 15.0% office space, conference centers, TOTA -- amenity centers, as well as many parks, trails, and water features. This development represents another step towards Westlake's goal to become an education- All • - centered community. 3,419 ., Fidelity ,7% Investments 5,864 Core Logic49%• y: ., •r - 49 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile SALES AND USE TAX RATE General Sales and Use Tax Many people don't know that most (show in millions) of their sales and use tax is remitted to the State of Texas, in fact, for every dollar of taxable sales, the ' state receives six and one quarter ' cents (or 6.25%) In the State of Texas local municipalities have the option to adopt up to an additional two cents (or 2%) for local use for a total maximum combined rate of 8.250. This local tax must be in accordance with state law and be utilized for specific purposes as identified by the state's local 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 government code. 4B Economic Development Fund-This fund utilizes the revenues generated from a '/2 cent sales tax to fund qualified development projects. Currently, the 4B Fund is committed to the repayment of the debt incurred for the construction of Westlake Academy. General Fund Allocation -The Town levies 1 '/2 % in sales tax that is utilized to offset expenditures in the General Fund and is used to reduce the property tax burden on local residents and businesses by providing Westlake with an additional unrestricted revenue source. HOTEL OCCUPANCY TAX Hotel occupancy Tax In addition to sales and use tax (show in thousands) collections, the Town receives a 7% hotel occupancy tax from the Marriott Solana and any future hotels in Westlake. ' This revenue is recognized in the Visitors Association Fund and is used to help fund a shuttle program for hotel guests as well as other marketing and promotional activities. — 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 50 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile PROPERTY TAX MW �IF Total '110 Top Ten Principal Assessed The Town of Westlake instituted a property tax in 2010. Property Tax Payers Value BRE Solana LLC $123,689,077 ➢ Effective Tax Rate is the total tax rate calculated to raise the same amount of property tax revenue FMR Texas, LLC/LTD 77,129,554 Partnership from the same properties. Dallas MTA LP 49,822,886 The calculated effective rate DCLI LLC 46,697,787 for FY2017/2018 HMC Solana 39,844,325 will decrease by .00080 for a tax rate of$.13615 Maguire Partners-Solana 17,562,432 Currently$.13695 Lexington TNI Westlake LP 17,012,143 Marsh USA Inc 11,763,580 Homestead Exemptions Fidelity Investments Inc 9,482,577 The Westlake Town Council approved a homestead exemption of 20%,which is the maximum amount Prince Whipple Trust 6,979,984 allowed by the State of Texas. TOTAL $399,984,345 Tax Freeze The Town Council also approved a tax freeze for all residential accounts identified as over 65 by the tax appraisal district. To learn more information about the tax freeze or find out if you qualify, please visit the following websites: Denton Central Appraisal District or Tarrant Appraisal District. Ad Valorem Tax Comparison per$100 Jurisdictions - The Town 0.50 ■Trophy Club of Westlake contracts with — -- ■Southlake the Tarrant County Tax 0.40 ■Keller 0.30 Assessor Collector's Office to collect the Town's ■Roanoke portion of local property 0.20 .13615 ■Grapevine tax. 0.10 ■Haslet 0.00 ■Westlake There are multiple taxing jurisdictions within Westlake's boundaries; whether or not a business or residence is required to pay tax to a particular jurisdiction is determined by where they are located within Westlake and the boundaries of the respective taxing jurisdictions. Currently, the following taxing jurisdictions collect property taxes in Westlake: ` �. ➢ Independent School Districts; Carroll, Keller and Northwest ➢ Tarrant County; College and Hospital �\ ➢ Denton County and Trophy Club MUD 1 ' .r 51 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Community Profile Westlake residents can determine which taxing jurisdictions apply to their property as well as obtain current property tax rate information by conducting a property search on the appropriate appraisal district website: Denton Central Appraisal District or Tarrant Appraisal District. DIRECT AND OVERLAPPING PROPERTY TAX RATE Source:2016 Town of Westlake Audit 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 TOWN DIRECT RATES Ad Valorem Property Tax General Fund 0.13835 0.14197 0.13888 0.13710 0.13710 Debt Service Fund 0.01849 0.01487 0.01796 0.01924 0.01924 SUB-TOTAL DIRECT 0.15684 0.15684 0.15684 0.15634 0.15634 OVERLAPPING RATES School Districts Carroll ISD 1.41500 1.40000 1.40000 1.40000 1.40000 Northwest ISD 1.37500 1.37500 1.45250 1.45250 1.45250 Keller ISD 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 Counties Denton County 0.27736 0.28287 0.28491 0.27220 0.27220 Tarrant County 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 Other Tarrant College 0.14897 0.14897 0.14950 0.14950 0.14950 Tarrant Hospital 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 Trophy Club Mud#1 0.17500 0.13339 0.13339 0.13339 0.13339 SUB-TOTAL INDIRECT 5.42323 5.37213 5.45220 5.43949 5.43949 TOTAL 5.58007 5.52897 5.60904 5.59583 5.59583 STANDARDIn Janaury 2017,Standard &Poor's Ratings Services has recently increased the Town's rating from AA+/stable to AAA. S&P Global Ratings views the outlook for this rating as & POO R'S stable. The upgrade reflects their assessment of the town's historically very strong finances and implementation of a property tax levy, which has further strengthened finances and RATING SERVICES lessened the operating fund's reliance on the somewhat volatile sales tax revenue stream. The rating reflects their opinion of the town's: • Very strong economy,with access to a broad and diverse metropolitan statistical area (MSA)but a concentrated local tax base • Strong management,with good financial policies and practices under our Financial Management Assessment methodology • Strong budgetary performance,with operating surpluses in the general fund and at the total governmental fund level • Very strong budgetary flexibility,with a high available fund balance of 100%of operating expenditures • Very strong liquidity,with total government available cash at 81.7%of total governmental fund expenditures and 7.4x governmental debt service,and access to external liquidity that we consider strong • Strong institutional framework score 52 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive OUR VISION Westlake Academy Profile Westlake Academy inspires college bound Westlake Academy is an Open Enrollment Charter School that opened students to achieve their September 1,2003 and offers the full IB highest individual curriculum for grades K-12. potential in a nurturing environment that fosters Westlake Academy distinguishes itself among the traits found in the IB neighboring educational offerings with a Learner Profile: particular focus on producing students who are WE KE globally minded. • Inquirers • Knowledgeable V"' /A The programs of the International Baccalaureate ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE SINCE 2003 • Thinkers Communicator Organization (Primary Years Program, Middle • • Principled Years Program, Diploma Program) have been • Open-Minded selected as the educational model utilized at the Academy. Educational • Balanced technology will be pervasive and will infuse the classroom curriculum. • Risk-Takers o, Wo • Caring oft' N Westlake Academy is a premier learning establishment and • Reflective 4 . y prides itself on providing a learning environment where o students have the resources and facilities to excel. o The primary geographic service area for Westlake Academy is OUR MISSION J�3Quo �ao the town limits of Westlake; students from other locations may be considered if seats are available. Westlake Academy is an IB World School whose Westlake Academy continues to have excellent academic and extra-curricular mission is to provide results and is ranked among the best high schools in America. students with an internationally minded education of the highest STUDENT UNIFORMS quality so they are well- The Westlake Academy Dress Code specifically outlines school-approved uniform balanced and respectful options for students: life-long learners. 0 formal uniforms • casual uniforms • acceptable spirit wear VALUES • Maximizing Personal The student uniform standards encourage a productive learning environment in Development which students can focus on learning, appreciate an awareness of others without distractions, develop character and good citizenship skills, instill respect and self- • Academic discipline. Excellence • Respect for Self and Others • Personal - Responsibility • Compassion and I Understanding Ell 53 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 Executive Westlake Academy Profile HOUSE SYSTEM Westlake Academy has chosen to implement a house system with each student and faculty member assigned to one of four houses named after people who represent qualities important to and inherent in the WA mission statement. While school and team spirit are promoted,the house system also encourages integration, responsibility and a sense of community. Membership in a house is life-long. Each student should be responsible for the well- being of fellow members and be proud to work for the betterment of the house. Houses will work together and compete in academic, sporting, service projects and events.All siblings will be assigned to the same house. The House System organization and leadership team consists of a House Coordinator and its own leadership team consisting of a House Captain, Service Captain, PYP Captain, and a Faculty Liaison.The 2017/2018 House Coordinators are Dawnelle Butler and Maru Busico-Flight. Keller House In 1882, at the age of two, Helen Keller became deaf and blind. Nevertheless, she learned to read, write and speak. She attended the most prestigious women's university in the United States and became a spokeswoman for all people with disabilities. She represents determination,perseverance and passion. Thoreau House Henry David Thoreau was a writer,thinker and naturalist. He was one of the country's first environmentalists. He represents a love of nature, independent thinking and standing up for one-s convictions. Wheatley House Sold into slavery at the age of seven, Phillis Wheatley nonetheless learned to read and write in English, Greek and Latin and published her first poem at the age of thirteen. She was the United States'first African-American poet. She represents our search for spirituality and cultural diversity. Whitman House Father of free, non-rhyming verse in poetic literature,Walt Whitman was truly an innovator who began his career in the years before the civil war. He used his poetry to express the distinctive virtues of the American nation. He exalts the democratic spirit and a love of a country. Rpm n Mirk 54 SECT INt + � + + ovx + # + 1 4 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 56 RETURN TO T.O.C. Budget 10 Overview This section gives perspective to the Town's budgeting process, basis of budgeting and accounting, layout and organization, budget fund structure, governmental and proprietary fund types and the relationship between funds & departments. 57 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview The Town of Westlake staff is pleased to present the 2017/2018 annual operating budget,which is the product of many hours of preparation as well as a response to ever-changing internal and external influences. The Town of Westlake's 2018 fiscal year begins on October 1, 2017 and ends September 30, 2018. It provides the framework to implement the Town's vision, mission and value statements as set out by the Town Council. LAYOUT AND ORGANIZATION The budget is designed to help the reader locate both financial and non-financial information in a timely fashion. The Fund Sections are broken down between General Fund,Special Revenue Funds, Debt Service Fund, Enterprise Funds, Internal Service Funds, Capital Projects Fund, and Westlake Academy Fund. Each Fund contains the following information: • "Fund Overview" describing the function of the fund and explaining the variances between the revenues and expenditures. • "Program Summary" of revenues and expenditures. Also included are sections detailing the Capital Improvement Plan, Long-Term Planning, Fiscal and Budgetary Policy, Investment Policy, Strategic Plan and the Town ordinance related to the adoption of the budget (after adoption). BUDGET PREPARATION As in previous years, efforts have been made to control expenditures while continuing to deliver an excellent level of service to our citizens. Concentrated efforts have been made to produce a document that clearly illustrates the uses of Town resources in a format that may be utilized as a resource tool by the Town Council, Town staff, and the citizens of Westlake. Our budget preparation process continues to be refined on an annual basis, operating within clearly defined budget preparation guidelines. Budgeting is an essential element of the financial planning, control and evaluation process of municipal government. The "operating budget" is the Town's annual financial operating plan. The budget includes all the operating departments of the Town, the debt service fund, all capital projects funds, and the internal service funds of the Town. The proposed budget will be prepared with the cooperation of all Town departments, and is submitted to the Town Manager who makes any necessary changes and transmits the document to the Town Council. A budget preparation calendar and timetable will be established and followed in accordance with State law. A "bottom-up" approach is used to solicit input from the staff Leadership Team as to their operations' needs with an emphasis on: • Identifying costs to provide the current level of services. • Identifies additional cost increases needed to maintain the current level of service. • Additional resources necessary to provide new or increased levels of service. • Delineating changes in fund balance levels for each fund. 58 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview The following procedures,which are guided by generally accepted budgeting practices, has been established: • The annual operating budget presents appropriations of expenditures and estimates of revenues for all local government funds. These revenues include sales and use taxes, ad valorem property tax, citation revenue, franchise taxes, mixed beverage taxes, license and permit fees, development fees, sales of printed material, interest income, water and sewer utility revenue, duct bank leases, and miscellaneous revenues. • The annual operating budget illustrates expenditures, anticipated revenues, and the estimated impact on reserves. • Budgets for each municipal department are broken down into specific cost components, including payroll and related categories, supplies, services, insurance, repair& maintenance, rent & utilities, economic development incentives, debt service and capital outlay. • Revenue projections are prepared for each revenue source based on an analysis of historical revenue trends and current fiscal conditions. • The budget process includes a multi-year projection of all required capital improvements. • Goals and objectives have been developed for each department and are incorporated into the evaluation of employees and performance of the organization. • A budget message summarizing local financial conditions and principal budget issues is presented to the governing council along with the annual budget. In May, the Finance Department prepares such items as budget forms and instructions for estimating revenues and expenditures. Department heads submit proposed baseline expenditures for current service levels and any additional one-time or on-going request they may have for their department. A round-table meeting is subsequently held with the Town Manager, the finance staff and each department head for review. After all funding levels are established and agreed upon; the proposed budget is presented by the Town Manager to the Town Council. A public hearing on the budget is conducted in accordance with state and local law. This meeting is held after the Council has reviewed the budget during a workshop. The Town Council approves a level of expenditure (or appropriation) for each fund to go into effect on October 1 st, prior to the expenditure of any Town funds for that budget year. EFFECT OF PLANNING PROCESSES ON THE BUDGET The budget process will be coordinated to identify major policy issues for Town Council by integrating it into the Council's overall strategic planning process for the Town. Each department shall have a multi-year business plan that integrates with the Town's overall strategic plan. The Town of Westlake utilizes several planning processes that affect the development of the operating budget. Effective planning processes assist the Town in assessing the financial implications of current and proposed policies, programs, and assumptions. An effective plan illustrates the likely outcomes of particular courses of actions. 59 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Type Of Description Of Budget Name Planning Process Planning Process Impact General Government Five-year operating Forecast of revenues, Allows for Long-Range plan to facilitate expenditures, service reallocation of Financial Forecast financial planning levels and staffing resources needs Facilities Capital Five-year plan by The prioritization of Stability of General Maintenance facility and departmental fund appropriations maintenance activity requests for projects or project along with known maintenance requirements Parks Capital Five-year plan by Identifies, prioritizes Stability of General Maintenance facility, maintenance and schedules fund appropriations activity or project improvements to parks, medians and grounds Street Maintenance Five-year plan to Inspection, Stability of General maintain and prioritization and fund appropriations improve roadways, scheduling of surface sidewalks, curbs and repair & preventive gutters maintenance of streets Vehicle and Five-year plan of Development of Timing and sizing of Equipment scheduled vehicle replacement debt issues and Replacement and heavy intervals based on payments equipment equipment age, replacement usage, and lifetime repair costs Computer Plan for the Development of Stability of General Replacement replacement of replacement fund appropriations computers and other intervals based on technology items equipment age, usage, and lifetime repair costs Capital Five-year plan of Council identification Predictable funding Improvements Plan major infrastructure of projects; levels, debt service development and prioritizing; costing; planning improvements timing; financing and project management 60 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview THE BUDGET PROCESS A proposed budget shall be prepared by the Town Manager with the participation of all the Town's department directors. The proposed budget shall include four basic segments for review and evaluation: • personnel costs • base budget for operations and maintenance costs • service level adjustments for increases of existing service levels or additional services • revenues The proposed budget review process shall include Council participation in the review of each of the four segments of the proposed budget and a public hearing to allow for citizen participation in the budget preparation. The proposed budget process shall allow sufficient time to provide review,as well as address policy and fiscal issues,by the Town Council. A copy of the proposed budget shall be filed with the Town Secretary when it is submitted to the Town Council as well as placed on the Town's website. The Town Manager submits the budget to the Town Council. The Town's fiscal year begins each year on October 1 s, and ends on September 30'h of the following calendar year. Prior to the beginning of the fiscal year, the Town Manager must submit a proposed budget, which includes: • A budget message • A consolidation statement of anticipated revenues and proposed expenditures for all funds • General fund resources in detail • Special fund resources in detail • A summary of proposed expenditures by department and activity • Detailed estimates of expenditures shown separately to support the proposed expenditure • A description of all bond issues outstanding • A schedule of the principal and interest payments of each bond issue The proposed revenues and expenditures must be compared to prior year revenues and expenditures. The budget preparation process begins early in the calendar year with the establishment of overall town goals, objectives, and analysis of current year operations compared to expenditures. Budget policies and procedures are reviewed at the same time to reduce errors and omissions. BALANCED BUDGET As per State Law, current operating revenues, including Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax (which can be used for operations), will be sufficient to support current operating expenditures. Annually recurring revenue will not be less than annually recurring operating budget expenditures (operating budget minus capital outlay). Debt or bond financing will not be used to finance current expenditures. 61 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview BASIS OF ACCOUNTING & BUDGETING The Town of Westlake utilizes the modified accrual basis of accounting and budgeting for governmental funds; and full accrual for proprietary funds. The term "basis of accounting/budgeting" is used to describe the timing of recognition, that is, when the effects of transactions or events should be recognized. This refers to the conversions for recognition of costs and revenue in budget development and in establishing and reporting appropriations that are the legal authority to spend or collect revenues. The Town's accounting system is organized and operated on a fund basis. A fund is a group of functions combined into a separate accounting entity having its own assets, liabilities, equity, revenue and expenditures/expenses. The budget is fully reconciled to the accounting system at the beginning of the fiscal year, and in preparing the CAFR at the end of the fiscal year. GAAP adjustments are made to reflect balance sheet requirements and their effect on the budget. These include changes in designations and recognition, via studies and analysis, of accrued liabilities. Amounts needed for such long-term liabilities as future payoff of accumulated employee vacation is budgeted as they budgeted as projections and once recognized are adjusted for actual amounts. In the Modified Accrual Basis, • revenues are recognized in the period when they became available and measurable • expenditures are recognized when the liability is incurred In the Accrual Basis, • revenues are recorded when earned • expenses when the liability is incurred The basis of budgeting and accounting is shown in the chart below Annual Audited Operating Budget Financial Statements GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS • General Fund Modified Accrual Modified Accrual • Special Revenue Funds Modified Accrual Modified Accrual • Debt Service Funds Modified Accrual Modified Accrual • Capital Project Funds Modified Accrual Modified Accrual • Academic Funds Modified Accrual Modified Accrual PROPRIETARY FUNDS • Enterprise Funds Full Accrual Full Accrual • Internal Service Funds Full Accrual Full Accrual 62 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Budgets are prepared on the same basis of accounting that is used in financial statements. The basis of budgeting refers to when revenues and expenditures are recognized in the corresponding accounts and reported in financial statements. Governmental fund types, including the general fund, are budgeted using the current financial resources measurement focus and the modified accrual basis of accounting. WHAT IS A FUND BALANCE? It should be noted that each fund summary ends with a line named "ending fund balance." Fund balance is defined as: • The excess of an entity's assets over its liabilities in a fund. • In other words, it is the balance that remains once the fund's expenditures have been deducted from its revenues. In the Town of Westlake, the amount of fund balance for each fund is dictated by different parameters. In the case of the General Fund and the Utility Fund, fund balance is defined in the Town's Financial Policies (see the Appendix). Balances are determined by other parameters such as bond covenants for other funds. Fund balance is a fundamental barometer of fiscal wellness and it is important to note that the fund balance for all funds meets every established requirement. LONG TERM FORECASTING Most annual operating budget documents focus on a single 12-month period where spending and revenue decisions made today will have effects that extend beyond that fiscal year. Because of that, the Town requires that long-term forecasting be made part of the Annual Operating Budget document. The purpose of this is to: • Ensure on-going financial sustainability beyond a single fiscal year or budget cycle • Achieve the Academy's mission and vision • Systematically link the annual budget to a multi-year master financial plan. Should long term forecasts and analysis show that the Town does not have a "positive operating balance" over the multi-year period, the Finance department shall bring this to the attention of the Town Manager. A "positive operating balance" means that the ending fund balance meets or exceeds the minimum levels prescribed in the Town's reserve policies. We anticipate the General Fund will maintain its minimum reserve for each of the four fiscal years beyond the current proposed budget year as shown in the chart below. 63 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Positive Unassigned I El Fund Operating Fund Operating Dollars Per Name Balance Balance Days Operating Day FY 18/19 YES $6,378,811 243 $26,212 FY 19/20 YES $4,794,161 178 $26,891 FY 20/21 YES $3,944,184 146 $26,980 FY 21/22 YES $3,341,730 121 $27,506 REVENUE ESTIMATES FOR BUDGETING: To maintain a stable level of services, the Town uses a conservative, objective, and analytical approach when preparing revenue estimates.The process shall include analysis of probable economic changes and their impacts on revenues, historical collection rates, and trends in revenues. This approach should reduce the likelihood of actual revenues falling short of budget estimates during the year and should avoid mid-year service reductions. CENTRAL CONTROL: Modifications within the operating categories (salaries, supplies, maintenance, services, capital, etc.) can be made with the approval of the Town Manager. Modifications to reserve categories and interdepartmental budget totals will be made only by Town Council consent with formal briefing and Council action. CONTINGENT APPROPRIATION: During the budget process, staff will attempt to establish an adequate contingent appropriation in each of the operating funds. The expenditure for this appropriation shall be made only in cases of emergency, and a detailed account shall be recorded and reported. The proceeds shall be disbursed only by transfer to departmental appropriation. All transfers from the contingent appropriation will be evaluated using the following criteria: • Is the request of such an emergency nature that it must be made immediately? • Why was the item not budgeted in the normal budget process? • Why can't the transfer be made within the department? PERFORMANCE MEASURES & PRODUCTIVITY INDICATORS: Where appropriate, performance measures and productivity indicators will be used as guidelines to measure efficiency, effectiveness, and outcomes of Town services. This information will be included in the annual budget process as needed. 64 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview BUDGET ADOPTION: Upon the determination and presentation of the final iteration of the proposed budget as established by the Council, a public hearing date and time will be set and publicized. The Council will subsequently consider a resolution which, if adopted, such budget becomes the Town's Approved Annual Budget. The Council adopts the budget in September prior to beginning the fiscal year which runs from October 1 st to September 30th. The approved budget will be placed on the Town's web site. BUDGET AWARD: Each year the Council approved operating budget will be submitted annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and consideration for the Award for Distinguished Budget Presentation. BUDGET AMENDMENT PROCESS Department Directors are responsible for monitoring their respective department budgets. *Budget Amendment is requested The Finance Department will monitor all financial 1. *Forwarded to Finance department operations. The budget team will decide whether *Finance Director reviews to proceed with a budget amendment and, if so, 2 -,If approved-forward to Town Manager J will then present the request to the Town Council. If the Council decides a budget amendment is •Town Manager reviews necessary, the amendment is adopted in resolution •If approved-forward to Town Council format and the necessary budgetary changes are 60w — then made. *Town Council reviews for approval The Town Manager may request that the current 1 Wi4 year budget be amended. In this process, the fFinance enters budget amendment Town Manager will review the documentation and draft an ordinance to formally amend the current budget. This ordinance is presented to the Town Council for consideration. Following the consideration of the proposed amendment, the Town Council will vote on the amendment ordinance. If the amendment is approved, the necessary budget changes are then made. All budget amendments will be approved by the Town Council prior to the expenditure of funds in excess of the previously authorized budgeted amounts within each fund. 65 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview BUDGET CALENDAR MAR * ORIENTATION AND OVERVIEW OF BUDGET PROCESS * FIVE YEAR PROJECTION SPREADSHEETS DISTRIBUTED FOR INPUT * FORMS FOR CAPITAL PROJECTS AND MAJOR MAINTENANCE AVAILABLE * REVIEW OF CALENDAR AND PROCESSES WITH COUNCIL * REVIEW OF OVERALL TOWN GOALS APR * YEAR-END ESTIMATE SPREADSHEETS DISTRIBUTED FOR PRIOR YEAR AMENDMENTS * FINANCE AMENDS PRIOR YEAR BUDGET-BECOMES BASE BUDGET FOR NEW YEAR * DEPARTMENTS ACCESS BUDGET TO REMOVE ONE TIME REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES * OPERATING BASELINE BUDGET AVAILABLE FOR EDITING * SERVICE LEVEL ADJUSTMENT FORMS AVAILABLE ON SHARED DRIVE MAY * DETAIL REVIEW BY FINANCE DEPARTMENT * GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AVAILABLE FOR EDITING ON SHARED DRIVE * TOWN MANAGER AND FINANCE BEGIN REVIEWS WITH DEPARTMENTS JUN * BUDGET MODULE OPEN FOR CHANGES TO BUDGETS PER REVIEWS * PRESENTATION OF 5-YEAR FORECAST JUL * PREPARATION FOR BUDGET RETREAT * PREPARATION OF POWER POINT AUG * BUDGET RETREAT * PUBLISH NOTICE REGARDING CONSIDERATION OF PROPERTY TAX * BUDGET WORKSHOP * NOTICE FOR PUBLIC HEARINGS POSTED IN NEWSPAPER * PRESENT PROPOSED MUNICIPAL BUDGET TO COUNCIL SEP * PUBLISH NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON BUDGET * PUBLIC HEARING ON BUDGET * ADOPTION OF OPERATING BUDGET AND TAX RATE OCT * NEW FISCAL YEAR BEGINS 66 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview FUND TYPES AND STRUCTURE Without going into too much technical jargon, funds are set up like separate companies which must operate under the parameters that were set up when the fund was created. Funds are unique to governmental type agencies. In the corporate world, "Funds" do not exist. The company receives revenues and writes checks to pay for their expenses and reports them for the company. Governments handle this process a little differently. The Town of Westlake, along with other Municipalities throughout the State of Texas, record and report all financial transactions using standard set by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Accordingly, these standards require all Municipalities to use individual funds that must be categorized into one of 11 Funds Types. W- ALL FUND TYPES 7Fuvernmental Proprietrary Fiduciary nds (11) Funds (5) Funds (0) General Fund Internal Service Funds Pension Trust Funds 1 Fund 3 Funds do not have Special Revenue Funds Enterprise Funds Investment Trust Funds 5 Funds 2 Funds do not have Debt Service Fund rivate Purpose Trust Funds 2 Funds do not have Capital Project Funds Agency Funds 2 Funds do not have Academic Funds 1 Fund Permanent Funds I do not have q The Town of Westlake has 16 funds with specific purposes which are defined by federal, state, or local laws.They include the General Fund which is used for general city operations, the Utility Fund which is used to support the City's water, sewer, drainage, and refuse service, and a multitude of Special Revenue and Capital Project Funds. 67 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES • The fund types use a financial resources GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES measurement focus and utilize the modified accrual ACCOUNTING/BUDGETING BASIS; basis of accounting and budgeting. MODIFIED ACCRUAL • Under the modified accrual basis of accounting, 1. General Fund revenues are recorded when susceptible to accrual, 2. Lone star Fund meaning that it is measurable and available. 3. visitor Association Fund Available revenues are defined as those funds that 4. Economic Development Fund are collectable within the current period, or 5. 413 Economic Development Fund collectable within a timeframe to pay liabilities of the 6. Public Improvement District Fund current period. 7. Debt Service Fund 300 • Expenditures generally represent a decrease in net 8. Debt Service Fund 301 financial resources and are recorded when a 9. Capital Projects Fund measurable fund liability is incurred. In some 10. Academy Expansion Fund instances, such as the incurrence of long-term debt, 11. Westlake Academy expenditures related to interest on the debt is recorded in the period that it is due. All "Governmental Funds" are accounted for using a current financial resources measurement focus. With this measurement focus, only current assets and current liabilities generally are included on the combined balance sheet. Operating statements of these funds present increases (revenues and other financing sources) and decreases (expenditures and other financing uses) in net current assets. The modified accrual basis of accounting is used by all Governmental Fund types. • Revenues are recognized when susceptible to accrual (i.e.,when they become both measurable and available). "Measurable" means collectible within the current period or soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. • Major revenue sources which have been treated as susceptible to accrual under the modified accrual basis of accounting include property taxes, charges for services, intergovernmental revenues, and investment of idle funds. • Expenditures are generally recorded when the related fund liability is incurred. However, principal of and interest on general long-term debt are recorded as fund liabilities when due or when amounts have been accumulated in the debt service fund for payments to be made early in the following year. Governmental fund types are those through which most governmental functions of the Town are financed. The acquisition, use, and balances of the Town's expendable financial resources and the related liabilities (except those accounted for in the Proprietary and Fiduciary Fund types) are accounted for through Governmental Fund types. 68 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview TOWN OF WESTLAKE GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS General Fund Academic Fund Debt Service Funds Lone Star Fund Capital Project Funds Visitor . Development—Economic . 413 Economic Development Fund —Westlake Academy Expansion 1. GENERAL FUND The General Fund is the general operating fund of the Town. It is used to account for all Town revenues and expenditures except those required to be accounted for in other funds. • Major functions financed by the General Fund include Finance, Administration, Building & Code Compliance, Fire/EMS, Public Works, Facilities and Grounds Maintenance, Human Resources, Parks and Recreation, Information Technology, and Engineering. • Sources of revenue include sales and use taxes, development fees and permits, court revenue, and franchise taxes. The former Westlake Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax Fund received its funding from a '/2 cent sales tax levy that was previously earmarked for the 4A Economic Development Corporation. The purpose of this fund was to reduce local property tax rates throughout Texas by providing cities with an additional unrestricted revenue source. This fund was closed at FY 2010/2011 year-end and revenues are now being recorded in the General Fund. • These funds may be used for general Town expenditures, capital projects, or debt service. 2. WESTLAKE ACADEMY FUND This fund incorporates all funds related to the Town of Westlake's charter school, Westlake Academy.This fund encompasses all operations and maintenance related to the school as well as State public school funding, Federal and state grants, and private donations used to support the daily school operations of the Academy. 3. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS These funds are used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources, other than expendable trusts or major capital projects and consists of the following: 69 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview • The Visitors Association Fund receives its primary funding from a 7% hotel occupancy tax adopted by the Town of Westlake in FY 1999/2000. Proceeds from the hotel occupancy tax are required to be used in accordance with statutory parameters including the promotion of travel and tourism in the Town of Westlake. Additionally, because Westlake has broader statutory authority under State law than most cities to spend hotel/motel occupancy tax funds for any municipal purpose, the Town has used these funds to cover costs of various municipal operational costs and capital projects (an example would be payment of a portion of the debt service for Westlake Academy related bonds). • The Public Improvement District Fund (Local) accounts for monies received from bond proceeds, inspection fees and payments related to the Solana Public Improvement District. The District was created by ordinance in February 2014 to finance the construction of public infrastructure (such as water lines and streets) in the Entrada subdivision. Revenues deposited into the PID Fund are used to cover engineering, consulting, legal, and advertising costs attributable to Entrada development and construction. • The Lone Star Public Facilities Corporation was founded in 1996 and was designed "to provide for the acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, repair, equipping, furnishing and placement in service of public facilities in an orderly, planned manner and at the lowest possible borrowing costs." The idea was to "acquire, through the issuance of installment sale obligations, office buildings located within the State of Texas but outside the boundaries of Westlake,whose tenants will be limited to those entities which are qualifying tenants under applicable federal income tax law so that the interest payable with respect to the installment sale obligations will be exempt from federal income taxation." There has been no activity in the fund for several years. • The 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund is a local option established under the Texas local government code. 413 funds are generated from a '/2 cent sales tax levy and proceeds are used for debt service. • The Economic Development Fund was set up to maintain all receipts and disbursements of agreements between the Town and various corporations for economic development. There was confusion regarding the additional revenues being recorded in the General Fund and offset by expenditures. These balances offset to zero but skewed the analysis of each. This fund is used to create more transparency to the public regarding these receipts and payments. 4. DEBT SERVICE FUNDS These funds were established to account for, and the payment of, general long-term debt principal and interest. This fund provides a clearer accounting of ongoing debt obligations compared to operating budgets. The Debt Service Fund is used to make scheduled payments for all bond issuances. 70 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview • The Debt Service Fund (Property Tax)was created to keep property tax payments separate from all remaining debt. • The Debt Service Fund provides payments for all remaining debt being paid with transfers from the General Fund and 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund. 5. CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS The Capital Projects funds are used to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities (other than those financed by proprietary fund types) and consist of these two funds: • The Capital Projects Fund tracks the infrastructure and building projects (other than those financed by proprietary fund types), funded with general operating transfers, intergovernmental revenue, bond funds and other special funding methods. Capital expenditures are clearly identified by their respective funding sources, and projects are shown in a clear, concise format. • The Westlake Academy Expansion Fund (WAE) tracks the Westlake Academy Master Facility Plan that was adopted by the Westlake Town Council/Board of Trustees in November 2012. An Economic Development Agreement was executed between the Town and Maguire Partners-Solana Land, L.P. requiring the developer to pay$10,000 for each residential lot associated with the Granada subdivision. These funds are transferred to the WAE fund for future expansion use. PROPRIETARY FUND TYPES • The fund types are accounted and budgeted for on a cost of services, or "Capital Maintenance" measurement I PROPRIETARY FUND TYPES focus using the accrual basis of accounting. ACCOUNTING/BUDGETING • Under the accrual basis of accounting, revenues are BASIS;FULL ACCRUAL recognized when earned and expenses are recognized 1. Cemetery Fund when incurred. 2. Utility Fund • For purposes of this budget presentation, depreciation is 3. Utility Maintenance not displayed and capital expenditures and bond &Replacement Fund principal payments are shown as uses of funds. 4. General Maintenance &Replacement Fund 5. Vehicle Maintenance Proprietary fund types operate in a manner like private business &Replacement Fund utilizing an accrual basis of accounting. The accrual basis of accounting is used by all Proprietary Fund types. • Revenues are accounted for on a flow of economic resources measurement focus. With this measurement focus, revenue is recorded when earned and expenses are recorded at the time liabilities are incurred. 71 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview • All assets and all liabilities associated with the operation of these funds are included on the combined statement of net assets. Net assets are segregated into net assets invested in capital assets, net of related debt, restricted net assets and un-invested net assets. • Proprietary fund-type operating statements present increases (revenues) and decreases (expenses) in total net assets. • For purposes of this budget presentation, depreciation is not displayed and capital expenditures and bond principal payments are shown as uses of funds. TOWN OF WESTLAKE PROPRIETARY Enterprise Funds Internal Service • -Utilit y Fund -Utility Maintenance& Replacement Fund Cemetery • -General Maintenance& Replacement Fund -Vehicle Maintenance& Replacement Fund 1. ENTERPRISE FUNDS Account for operations of governmental facilities operated in a manner similar to commercial enterprises where the intent is to recover, in whole or in part, the costs and expenses of providing goods and services to the public. Revenues are typically generated through usage fees based on individual demands of each customer. Enterprise funds may be used when the governing body has determined that periodic determination of revenue earned, expenses incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, management control, accountability, or other purposes. • The Cemetery Fund includes all operations associated with the 5.5-acre cemetery located on J.T. Ottinger Road which was donated during the year ended September 2008. • The Utility Fund accounts for water,wastewater and telecommunications conveyance (duct bank) services for the residents of the Town. All activities necessary to provide such services are accounted for in this Fund, including administration, operations, maintenance, financing and related debt service, and billing and collection. Additionally, the Town collects monthly solid collection fees in this fund which are paid to the Town's solid waste franchisee. 72 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview 2. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Account for services and/or commodities furnished by a designated program to other programs within the Town. Funds include the following: • The General Maintenance & Replacement Fund (GMR) is an account used to offset the future costs of repair and/or replacement of large capital assets due to age and use. Contributions from the Town's General Fund are transferred on an annual basis; resulting in a cash balance which mitigates the cash flow impact of large maintenance and capital replacement costs. • The Utility Maintenance & Replacement Fund (UMR) is an account used to offset the future costs of repair and/or replacement of large capital assets due to age and use. Contributions from the Town's Utility Fund are transferred on an annual basis; resulting in a cash balance which mitigates the cash flow impact of large maintenance and capital replacement costs. • The Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Fund (VMR) was created to provide a mechanism for the long-term repair and replacement of Town vehicles. MAJOR FUND TYPES Major funds represent the significant activities of the MAJOR FUNDS Town and basically include any fund whose revenues or General Fund 460 expenditures, excluding other financing sources and Capital Project Fund 350 uses, constitute more than 10%of the revenues or Academic Funds 7% expenditures of the appropriated budget. ' DEPARTMENT TYPE AND STRUCTURE ® Dept 10 - General Services is comprised of costs in the budget that may not be specifically identifiable to any operational budget. The activity is administered by the Finance Department and funds various charges that are not defined or directly related to any specific department or activity of the Town. Examples of cost include, electricity, insurance, professional services, contingencies, etc. These types of expenditures affect all budgets and are generally not prorated. • Dept 1 1 -The Administration Department coordinates and manages all facets of the Town's operations. Town Manager, reporting to the Town Council, serves as the chief executive TC officer for all Town operations including servingRecreation as Superintendent for Westlake Academy. His duties include implementation of the goals and objectives established by the Town Council, preparation and submission of an annual municipal budget for Board review and adoption, as well as the implementation and oversight of the adopted budget throughout its effective fiscal year. The Town Manager guides, coordinates, and facilitates recommendations to the 73 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Council on strategic planning initiatives and policies as well as their implementation. Responsible for attracting, retaining, and developing a municipal/educational work force for delivering top quality municipal and academic services. o Dept 12-The Planning and Development Department is responsible for processing platting and zoning requests and ensuring that proposed development will conform to - u the Town of Westlake's comprehensive plans. This also requires the continuous updating and amending of ordinances to address ever-changing development concerns. The Building and Code Compliance Division is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Town's adopted building codes and ordinances to assure that development is executed and maintained in compliance with ordinances and approved development plans. ® Dept 13-The Town Secretary's office performs tasks outlined in the Texas Municipal Law and Procedure for General Law Type A Cities. Coordinating municipal elections. Providing support of the Town Council, Board of Trustees, Planning and Zoning Commission, and the Zoning Board of Adjustments. Oversight of the Town's (municipal and academic) records management programs. The Town Secretary is also responsible for the communicating meeting information to the community. ® Dept 14-The Fire - EMS Department provides for the public safety needs of the Town via a variety of programs and services. Most of these services are Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) related but also includes hazardous materials mitigation, fire prevention and public education. FR4 9", Many civic organizations also benefit from these types of services through the training activities and inspection/prevention programs that the Department provides. The Department will continue to provide the most efficient method of delivering the traditional services- Fire Protection, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Inspections and It Public Education while continuing to seek further avenues of outreach into the community. ® Dept 15 -The Municipal Court performs the duties necessary to support municipal judicial functions, assist the public and manage court operations.The program will uphold the integrity of the Court and build public trust by providing unbiased quality service and accurate information delivered in an efficient and professional manner. 74 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Dept 16 -The Public Works Department is responsible for: the operation, maintenance, repair, and installation of the Town's traffic signs, signals, roadway markings, and approximately 10 miles of street pavement and storm drainage; maintaining public records and regulatory requirements. Public Works also assists other departments, the Academy, and volunteer groups as needed: ❑Setting up for community events, providing traffic control devices for DPS use, Supervision of community service workers, provide back-up coordinating/inspecting work for facility maintenance E * 17-The Facilities Department will plan for and provide facilities to enhance present and future community and educational programs and endeavors. Long-range plans include: maintenance, renovation, construction of facilities as related to civic use and educational programs-efficient facilities meeting program needs. Westlake Civic Campus facilities are generally available to the community. The Town will continue to develop cooperative projects with the community and agencies. * Dept 18-The Finance Department is responsible for collecting, recording, summarizing, and reporting the results of all financial transactions of the following entities in a timely manner and in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles while ensuring compliance with applicable state and federal statutes, bond covenants and grant contracts by reviewing financial data and reporting such in a timely manner. The Finance department is responsible for three entities; Town of Westlake, Westlake Academy, and Westlake Academy Foundation. Duties include but are not limited to; payroll processing, budgets, cash collections, audits, fraud, accounts payable and financial reporting. * Dept 19 -The Park and Recreation Department maintains a 39.5-acre park and open spaces,which includes Glenwyck Farms, Terra Bella sub-division and the Parchman property. The trees along roadways and the cemetery are also maintained to ensure the safety of drivers and pedestrians. 10 miles Trails and two pedestrian underpasses run throughout the community. Westlake Academy, IOOF cemetery, and the town owned park, located in Glenwyck Farms, provide the facilities and space for recreational use to the public. These locations also host sporting events. 75 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview • Dept 20- Information Technology(IT) works with the Town Manager to establish IT policy, evaluate and recommend technology solutions for specific departmental needs and provide administrative support to network infrastructure, systems, and staff. OXCA! • Dept 21 -The Human Resources Department (HR) provides a diverse array of services to internal and external customers, as well as providing support to the organization's general operations. These services include all HR functions, including General Administrative Services, Recruiting & Hiring, Payroll Processing, Benefits Administration, Organizational Training & Development, Policy Compliance, and Risk Management.Support is offered in partnership with other departments for bidding & purchasing, strategic planning, policy development, general administration, and finance. ® Dept 22-The department of Communications & Community Affairs is responsible for leadership and representation on matters related to Town (both municipal and academic) services' communications, promotion, and citizen/parent engagement.The position coordinates facilitation of neighborhood and WA parent meetings, publication of our email blasts, advertising, web site development, various community events and gatherings, social media, serves/supports our local chambers of commerce at meetings and events, and supports the Westlake Historical Preservation Society as Town liaison. • Dept 23 -The Keller Police Department has provided law enforcement services for the Town of Westlake since June of r 2002. The communities entered an iA interlocal agreement, which benefits both organizations through the provision of police related services for the Westlake ` citizens and brings additional staff �h 2OWN OF resources via the contract commitments "' �WMTLAIfE for the City of Keller. Jail, Emergency Communications, and Animal Services � '� are provided through a regional "k ` configuration-serving the communities, of Westlake, Keller, Roanoke, Southlake and Colleyville. 76 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FUNDS AND DEPARTMENTS LuU U Qz Z w U Z c w U O w V) nof LUn Q U O � w O U � U � w w Q Z w > w w Q cn � z Z C� U U U N Z w LU Z 3 w z m U Q O O C� Q ,O w ii S z = U 0- FUND NAME 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 GENERAL FUND General Fund ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 4B Economic Development ✓ Economic Development ✓ Public Improvement District (Local) ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Visitors Association ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Lone Star Public Facilities ✓ DEBT SERVICE FUNDS Debt Service (sales tax funded) ✓ Debt Service (property tax funded) ✓ ENTERPRISE FUNDS Cemetery Fund ✓ ✓ 500 Utility Fund ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Utility Maint & Replacement ✓ General Maint & Replacement ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Vehicle Maintenance & ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Replacement CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS Capital Project Fund ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Westlake Academy Expansion ✓ ✓ ✓ ACADEMIC FUNDS Westlake Academy ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ 77 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The Town Council has established and regularly updates a comprehensive set of financial policies for the Town of Westlake. The Town Manager and Town Council are devoted to safeguarding and improving the financial condition of the Town of Westlake. A full listing of policies can be found in the Municipal Policy Section of this document. Key features of the Fiscal & Budgetary Policies include: • Operating Budget • Revenues Management • Expenditure Control • Fund Balance • Debt Management • Intergovernmental Relationships • Grants • Economic Development • Fiscal Monitoring • Financial Consultants • Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Reporting • Capital Budget and Program • Capital Maintenance and Replacement • Internal Controls • Asset Management FUND BALANCE POLICIES The Town Manager and Town Council are devoted to safeguarding and improving the financial condition of the Town of Westlake • General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance-The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund undesignated fund balance at,or in excess of,90 days of operation. • Retained Earnings of Other Operating Funds-In the Utility Fund,the Town shall strive to maintain positive retained earnings positions to provide sufficient reserves for emergencies and revenue shortfalls. • Use of Fund Balance-The Council delegates the responsibility to assign funds to the Town Manager or his/her designee. The Council shall have the authority to assign any amount of funds. Assignments may occur subsequent to fiscal year-end. The Council will utilize funds in the following spending order: Restricted,Committed,Assigned, Unassigned 78 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Fund Balance will be targeted to only be used with Council approval and can only be used for the following: • Emergencies, • Non-recurring expenditures such as technology/FF&E (furniture,fixtures and equipment),or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. • Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund,recommendations will be made on how to restore it. • The Council shall approve all commitments by formal action. The action to commit funds must occur prior to fiscal year-end,to report such commitments in the balance sheet of the respective period, even though the amount may be determined subsequent to fiscal year-end. • A commitment can only be modified or removed by the same formal action. There are four primary reasons to maintain an adequate fund balance: • Cash Flow-It is essential for the Board of Trustees to have enough cash on hand for payroll and other obligations to be made timely. In addition, most state and federal grants require the Academy to make payment first before the grant will make reimbursement. • Unforeseen Events- Reserves often act as a contingency to meet unbudgeted and unexpected needs, thus allowing time to make permanent changes to the budget and preventing fiscal problems from needlessly worsening. • Financial Security-A fund reserve demonstrates a sign of financial strength and security to banking and financial institutions allowing the Town of Westlake to borrow funds and sell bonds when additional facilities need to be built or renovated at more favorable rates, thus saving the taxpayers money. • Interest Earning- Having a fund balance allows the Academy to earn additional revenues without having to tax citizens. FUND BALANCE COMPONENTS In February 2009, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issued GASB Statement No. 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions. This Statement established five components of fund balance and because circumstances differ among governments, not everyone will report all components. GASB 54 shifts the focus of fund balance reporting from the availability of fund resources for budgeting to "the extent to which the government is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts in the fund can be spent." 79 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview • Fund Balance Reporting - The Town shall report governmental fund balances per GASB 54 definitions in the balance sheet as follows: Non-spendable, Restricted, Committed, Assigned, Unassigned • General Fund Unassigned Fund Balance - The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund unassigned fund balance at 90 days of operation. • Use of Fund Balance - Fund Balance will be targeted to only be used with Council approval and can only be used for the following: emergencies, non-recurring expenditures, such as technology/FF&E (furniture, fixtures and equipment), or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund, recommendations will be made on how to restore it. • Approval of Commitments-The Town Council shall approve all commitments by formal action. o The action to commit funds must occur prior to fiscal year-end, to report such commitments in the balance sheet of the respective period, even though the amount may be determined after fiscal year-end. o A commitment can only be modified or removed by the same formal action. o The Town Council delegates the responsibility to assign funds to the Town Manager or his/her designee. o The Town Council shall have the authority to assign any number of funds. o Assignments may occur after fiscal year-end. o The Town Council will utilize funds in the following spending order: Restricted, Committed, Assigned, and Unassigned. NONSPENDABLE FUND RESTRICTED FUND ASSIGNED FUND UNASSIGNED FUND COMMITTED FUND BALANCE BALANCE BALANCE BALANCE BALANCE •Portion of net -This term will is used •This term is used to -The residual net -The portion of fund resources that cannot to describe net fund describe the portion of resources in excess of balance constrained be spent because of resources subject to fund balance that what is properly by limitations imposed their form and externally enforceable reflects a categorized in one of by government at its because they must be legal restrictions. government's the other four highest level and maintained intact. intended use of categories. remains binding unless resources. removed in the same manner. FUTURE GFOA POLICIES TO DISCUSS The Town of Westlake has several relevant financial policies to preserve and enhance the fiscal health of the Town. We also identify acceptable and unacceptable courses of action, and provide a standard to evaluate the school's fiscal performance. 80 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview Very soon, GFOA will be recommending that all governments include the following policies that guide the development of their budget and that are central to a strategic long term approach to financial management. 1. Operating Budget Policy (already incorporated into the Fiscal and Budgetary Policies) This section of the Fiscal and Budgetary Policies will also be updated to include the following policies that guide the development of the budget and are central to a strategic approach to our financial management. These components will need to be reviewed, updated if necessary, and/or added and approved by the Board of Trustees in subsequent years. 1. Basis of Budgeting 2. Budget Adoption 3. Budget Classification and Format 4. Organization of the Budget 5. Budget Message Requirement 6. Funds Budgeted 7. Length of the Budget Year 8. Presentation of Proposed Budget 9. Revenue Forecasting Requirements 10. Expenditure Forecasting Requirements 11. Performance Measurements 12. Line-Item Transfer Authority 13. Retention of Budget Record 2. Capital Asset Management (already incorporated into the Fiscal and Budgetary Policies) Town of Westlake operates an extensive amount of buildings, equipment, furniture, and vehicles. This purpose of this policy is to: o provide a management framework to ensure that all capital assets are repaired, maintained, and replaced and o to identify the responsible parties who shall protect, oversee and report needed repairs. 3. Budget Crisis Procedures (will need to be reviewed and discussed) This policy would be intended to provide the Town of Westlake with options when responding to unexpected fiscal issues that can and do arise. Should budget problems materialize, these procedures will support comprehensive risk analysis and contingency plans. 81 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Budget 101 Overview 4. Long Term Forecasting (will need to be reviewed and discussed) The annual operating budget focuses on a single 12-month period. However, spending and revenue decisions made today have affects that extend beyond a 12-month period. The purpose of this policy would be to o Ensure on-going financial sustainability beyond a single fiscal year o Achieve the Town's mission and vision o Systematically link the annual budget to a multi-year master financial plan. 5. Reserve Policy in Other Funds (will need to be reviewed and discussed) While the General Fund Reserve is the most important for the Town of Westlake, reserves in other funds are just as important. For that reason, the funds listed in this policy would have reserves that are restricted or committed for specific purposes. 6. General Fund Budget Reserves (already incorporated into the Fiscal and Budgetary Policies) The General Fund is the primary fund used by the Town of Westlake to account for revenues and expenditures. Accordingly, the General Fund Reserve Policy is intended to provide the Town with options when responding to unexpected issues and to afford a buffer against shocks and other forms of risk. General Fund Budget Reserves requires minimum reserves of total General Fund Expenditures with amounts committed to: • Property & Casualty Insurance • Severance pay for Sick Leave and Annual Leave • General Liability Insurance Deductibles • Catastrophic events (unforeseen emergencies- natural disaster) One of two things must happen in the future if we cannot spend equal to or less than the revenues received: (1) make future reductions (2) approve new taxes. Expenditures Ending Percent of Without Fund Fund Balance This chart reflects Fiscal Year Transfers Balance to Expenditures the General Fund FY 13/14 $6,580,496 $6,788,964 103% Budget Reserves by FY 14/15 $7,716,114 $7,240,729 94% percentage for the FY 15/16 $7,411,775 $8,541,363 115% last five years. FY 16/17 estimated $7,322,597 $9,061,150 124% FY 17/18 adopted $7,775,683 $7,618,396 980 82 RETURN TO T.O.C. All Funds - Financial Summaries and Analysis This section gives an analysis of the amounts between the current year adopted and estimated budget, as well as the variance explanations between the current year estimated and next year adopted budget. Several different tables are presented of all fund revenues, expenditures and fund balance amounts. 83 ALL FUNDS - ALL SOURCES Combined Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted EstimatedrF dopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget udget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES 8 OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 4,609,523 $ 4,550,000 $ 4,550,000 4,950,000 400,000 9% Property Tax 1,479,452 1,525,685 1,574,510 1,476,616 (97,894) -6% Charge for Services 3,836,457 3,565,755 3,752,705 3,777,315 24,610 1% Hotel Tax 822,489 837,280 837,280 845,000 7,720 1% Beverage Tax 61,476 62,500 62,500 62,500 - 0% Franchise Fees 930,042 966,370 974,770 983,815 9,045 1% Permits&Fees Other 1,235,260 263,885 336,370 308,145 (28,225) -8% Permits&Fees Buildings 1,472,709 2,287,557 2,469,458 2,137,121 (332,337) -13% Permits&Fees Utility 125,812 152,265 168,865 168,865 0% Fines&Forfeitures 796,013 805,350 809,880 809,880 0% Investment Earnings 44,309 34,400 131,065 111,965 (19,100) -15% Contributions 282,485 1,220,000 4,841,850 925,000 (3,916,850) -81% Misc Income 266,900 128,660 216,215 123,670 (92,545) -43% Total Revenues 15,962,925 16,399,707 20,725,468 16,679,892 (4,045,577) -207. Transfers In 2,930,227 3,767,750 4,414,626 4,831,642 417,016 9% Other Sources - 8,500,000 10,743,015 - (10,743,015) -100% Total Other Sources 2,930,227 12,267,750 15,157,641 4,831,642 (10,325,999) -68% GF Academic Revenues 7,868,978 8,399,173 8,227,963 8,584,100 356,137 4% GF Academic Other Sources 474,300 - 117,090 60,000 (57,090) -49% Total Academic 8,343,278 8,399,173 8,345,053 8,644,100 299,047 4% TOTAL REVENUES 8 OTHER SOURCES $ 27,236,431 $ 37,066,630 $ 44,228,162 61ek=jjgjj&JL4 j (14,072,528) 329. EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ 3,009,870 $ 3,472,410 $ 3,373,370 3,821,261 447,891 13% Payroll Transfer In (892,998) (958,765) (917,146) (1,055,775) (138,629) 15% Payroll Insurance medical/dental/life 432,389 545,605 579,109 599,995 20,886 4% Payroll Taxes workers comp/unemployment 39,917 46,845 46,454 51,180 4,726 10% Payroll Taxes social security/medicare 211,505 269,765 252,232 292,253 40,021 16% Payroll Retirement tmrs/icma 365,991 426,870 434,773 495,955 61,182 14% Total Payroll and Related 3,166,674 3,802,730 3,768,792 4,204,869 436,077 12% Debt 4,339,915 3,657,696 3,691,016 4,494,622 803,606 22% Economic Development 141,779 134,640 134,640 234,640 100,000 74% Insurance 40,585 44,640 42,375 42,375 - 0% Payroll Transfer Out 892,998 958,760 917,147 1,055,775 138,628 15% Repair&Maintenance 439,350 387,050 368,335 407,830 39,495 11% Rent&Utilities 498,485 847,105 561,254 661,604 100,350 18% Services 3,568,185 3,668,680 3,986,995 3,394,059 (592,936) -15% Supplies 199,652 225,055 223,879 269,534 45,655 20% Wafer Purchases 1,358,068 1,344,600 1,344,600 1,344,600 - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 11,479,015 11,268,226 11,270,241 11,905,039 634,798 6% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES1000- 14,645,689 15,070,956 15,039,033 16,109,908 1,070,875 1 7% Capital Project Funds 299,549 9,552,020 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% Capital Outlay 27,094 232,795 51,470 57,470 6,000 12% Maintenance&Replacement Funds 345,358 783,700 1,391,745 532,000 (859,745) -62% Total Capital 644,908 10,568,515 4,898,480 10,877,470 5,978,990 122% Transfers Out 2,930,227 3,767,750 4,406,291 4,831,642 425,351 10% Other Uses - - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 2,930,227 3,767,750 4,406,291 4,831,642 425,351 10% GF Academic Expenditures 8,754,398 8,397,745 8,360,471 8,322,199 (38,272) 0% GF Academic Other Uses - - 60,000 60,000 - 0% Total Academic 8,754,398 8,397,745 8,420,471 8,382,199 (38,272) 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 12,329,533 22,734,010 17,725,242 24,091,311 6,366,069 36% TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 975,221 $ 37,804,966 $ 32764,27M 40,201,219 $ 7,436,944 23% Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures 261,209 (738,336) 11,463,887 (10,045,585) (21,509,472) 188% Beginning Fund Balance(Municipal) 15,640,587 15,296,866 15,296,866 26,836,171 11,539,305 75% Beginning Fund Balance(Academic) 1,482,157 1,071,037 1,072,464 997,046 (75,418) -7% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 17,122,744 16,367,903 16,369,330 27,833,217 11,463,887 -707o FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1 $ 15,629,56 1 $ (10,045,585) -36% 84 ALL FUNDS - ALL SOURRETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expenditures Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Internal Sectal General Enterprise p Debt Capital Westla Fund Funds Service Revenue Service Project Fund Acade Funds REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 3,510,500 $ $ $ 1,439,500 $ $ $ $ 4,950,000 Property Tax 1,205,205 - 271,411 1,476,616 Charge for Services - 3,777,315 - - 3,777,315 Hotel Tax - - 845,000 845,000 Beverage Tax 62,500 - 62,500 Franchise Fees 983,815 983,815 Permits and Fees Other 302,145 6,000 308,145 Permits and Fees Building 2,137,121 - 2,137,121 Permits and Fees Utility - 168,865 168,865 Fines&Forfeitures 809,880 - - - 809,880 Investment Earnings 43,100 15,020 7,015 5,230 41,600 111,965 Contributions - - - 750,000 175,000 925,000 Misc Income 18,560 35,800 - 69,310 - 123,670 Total Revenues 9,072,826 3,997,000 13,015 3,109,040 271,411 216,600 16,679,892 Transfers In 50,000 - 306,250 - 2,710,068 1,765,324 4,831,642 Other Sources - - Total Other Sources 50,000 306,250 2,710,068 1,765,324 4,831,642 Academic Revenues 8,584,100 8,584,100 Academic Others Sources 60,000 60,000 Total Academic 8,644,100 8,644,100 AL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 9,122,8OF3,997,00 $ 2,981,479 1 $ 1,981,9241 $ 8,644,100 $30,155,634 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ 3,821,261 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,821,261 Payroll Transfer In (1,055,775) (1,055,775) Payroll Insurance 599,995 599,995 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 51,180 51,180 Payroll SS/Medicare 292,253 292,253 Payroll Retirement 495,955 495,955 Total Payroll&Related 4,204,869 4,204,869 Debt 351,680 1,155,174 2,987,768 4,494,622 Economic Development - 234,640 - 234,640 Insurance 33,625 8,750 - 42,375 Payroll Transfer Out 482,700 518,510 54,565 1,055,775 Rent&Utilities 445,316 156,499 59,789 661,604 Repair&Maintenance 242,580 165,250 - 407,830 Services 2,213,639 798,960 381,460 3,394,059 Supplies 252,284 7,250 10,000 269,534 Water Purchases - 1,344,600 - - - 1,344,600 Total Operations&Maintenance 3,539,124 4,119,183 1,204,399 2,987,768 54,565 11,905,039 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 7,743,993 4,119,183 1,204,399 2,987,768 54,565 16,109,908 Capital Project Funds - - 10,288,000 10,288,000 Capital Outlay 31,690 25,780 57,470 Maintenance&Replacement - 532,000 - 532,000 Total Capital 31,690 25,780 532,000 10,288,000 10,877,470 Transfers Out 2,787,892 56,250 1,987,500 - 4,831,642 Other Uses - - - Total Other Uses 2,787,892 56,250 1,987,500 4,831,642 Academic Expenditures 8,322,199 8,322,199 Academic Others Uses 60,000 60,000 Total Academic 8,382,199 8,382,199 TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 2,819,582 82,030 532,000 1,987,500 10,288,000 8,382,199 24,091,311 AL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USE $10,563,575 $ 4 532,000 $ 8,382,199 $40,201,219 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (1,440,749) (204,213) (212,735) (82,859) (6,289) (8,360,641) 261,901 (10,045,585) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 9,614,346 694,192 610,402 1,331,605 6,289 14,579,340 997,046 $27,833,217 85 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 3 Financial Analysis Fund Overview All Funds The following is a high-level overview of the FY 2017-18 budgeted revenues, other sources, expenditures and other uses. Please refer to individual funds for detailed explanations of the following changes. REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be $30,155,634. This represents a 32% decrease of $14,072,528 from prior year estimated of $44,228,162. Municipal • General Sales Tax increased $400,000 • Property Tax decreased ($97,894) • Charge for Services increased $24,610 • Hotel Tax increased $7,720 • Franchise Fees increased $9,045 • Permits and Fees Other decreased ($28,225) • Permits and Fees Building decreased ($332,337) Revenues and Other Sources • Investment Earnings decreased ($19,100) • Contributions decreased ($3,916,850) • Misc. Income decreased ($92,545) • Transfers in increased $417,016 Academic • Other sources decreased $10,743,015 29% Muncipal Academic 71% • Revenues increased $356,137 • Other Sources decreased $57,090 OPERATING EXPENDITURES Operating expenditures are budgeted to be $16,167,378. This represents a 7% increase of $1 ,076,875 from the prior year estimated of $15,090,503. • Payroll and Related is budgeted at $4,204,869; a 12% increase of $436,077 o Wages increased $311 K o Insurances increased $20K o Taxes increased $44K o Retirement increased $61 K • Operations and Maintenance is budgeted at $11,962,509; a 6% increase of $640,798. 86 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 3 Financial Analysis Fund Overview All Funds o Capital Outlay increased $6,000 o Debt increased $803,606 o Economic Development Operating Expenditures increased $100,000 o Payroll Transfers Out increased $138,628 o Rent & Utilities increased $100,350 Payroll& o Repair & Maintenance increased Opeartions Related $39,495 and 40% Maintenance o Services decreased ($592,936) 60% o Supplies increased $45,655 NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES Non-operating expenditures are budgeted to be $24,033,841. This represents a 36%increase of $6,360,069 from the prior year estimated of$17,673,772. Municipal • Capital and M&R Projects are budgeted at $10,820,000; a 123% increase of $5,972,990. o Maintenance and replacement projects decreased $859,745. Non Operating Expenditures o Capital projects increased $6,832,735. • Transfers Out and Other Uses are Academic budgeted at $4,831,642; a 10% increase 35% Muncipal of $425,351 . 65% o Transfers out to the Capital Projects fund increased $1,185,351 . o Other Sources had no changes Academic • Expenditures decreased $38,272 • Other Uses had no changes FUND BALANCE The ending fund balance is budgeted to be $17,787,632. This represents a 36% decrease of $10,045,585 from prior year estimated of $27,833,217. 87 RETURN TO T.O.C. ty S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLl��� L6Z�L 88 RETURN TO T.O.C. Ad Valorem Property Tax An ad valorem tax (Latin for "according to value") is a tax whose amount is based on the value of a transaction or of property. A property tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or property pays on the value of the property being taxed. The taxing authority performs an appraisal of the monetary value of the property, and tax is assessed in proportion to that value. 89 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Property Tax Overview This Town has assessed a property Ad Valorem Tax Comparison per$100 tax since FY2011-12. 0.50 ■Trophy Club The ad valorem tax rate per$100 of 0.40 ■Southlake assessed valuation for the Town of Westlake continues to be the lowest 0.30 ■Keller for municipalities in the immediate 0.20 ■Roanoke area. 0.10 ❑Grapevine The ad valorem tax rate per$100 of 0.00 assessed valuation will decrease by $0.00080 for FY 2017-18 to the adopted tax rate of$.13615 (the calculated effective rate). As a reminder; the effective tax rate is the total tax rate calculated to raise the same amount of property tax revenue from the same properties. FY 16/17 FY 17/18 This budget will raise more revenue from Adopted Adopted Change property taxes than last year's adopted Tax Rate Tax Rate Amount budget by approximately$49,640 (does not M&O $0.12882 $0.11133 $ (0.01749) include any prior year payments and I&S $0.00813 $0.02482 $ .01669 penalties), which is a 3.37%increase from last $0.13695 $0.13615 $ ( 0.00080) Year's budget. The Total debt obligation for the Town secured by property taxes for various projects totals $277,700. This amount covers the series 2011 CO payment for street projects of$115,300. In FY 2017-2018 the 2013 CO payment of$162,400 for Arts &Science Center construction. The debt payment for the Science Center was originally paid from the Visitor Association Fund. Based on our July 2017 certified values, the Town's "net taxable value" increased by $48,181,987 over the prior year adjusted information for FY 16-17. This is attributable to Property Tax Rate per$100 Assessed Valuation • 69%increase in residential (shown in millions) • 6%reduction in commercial • 45%increase in personal Homestead Exemptions The Westlake Town Council approved a homestead exemption of 20%,which is the maximum amount allowed by the State of v Ln Ln Texas. O � o o c c o to Ln Ln 1f1 Ln M M a-I ei ei ei a--I r-I O O O O O Tax Freeze W. L' '" V"' V"- The Town Council also approved a tax FY10/11 FY11/12 FY12/13 FY13/14 FY14/15 FY15/16 FY16/17 FY17/18 freeze for all residential accounts identified Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Estimated Proposed as over 65 by the tax appraisal district. To learn more information about the tax freeze or find out if you qualify, please visit the following websites: Denton Central Appraisal District or Tarrant Appraisal District. 90 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Property Tax Overview Jurisdictions - The Town of Westlake contracts with the Tarrant County Tax Assessor Collector's Office to collect the Town's portion of local property tax. There are multiple taxing jurisdictions within Westlake's boundaries;whether or not a business or residence is required to pay tax to a particular jurisdiction is determined by where they are located within Westlake and the boundaries of the respective taxing jurisdictions. Currently, the following taxing jurisdictions collect property taxes in Westlake: ➢ Independent School Districts; Carroll, Keller and Northwest ➢ Tarrant County, College and Hospital ➢ Denton County and Trophy Club MUD 1 Westlake residents can determine which taxing jurisdictions apply to their property as well as obtain current property tax rate information by conducting a property search on the appropriate appraisal district website: Denton Central Appraisal District or Tarrant Appraisal District. Direct and Overlapping Property Tax Rate Source:2016 Town of Westlake Audit 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 TOWN DIRECT RATES Ad Valorem Property Tax General Fund 0.13835 0.14197 0.13888 0.13710 0.13710 Debt Service Fund 0.01849 0.01487 0.01796 0.01924 0.01924 SUB-TOTAL DIRECT 0.15684 0.15684 0.15684 0.15634 0.15634 OVERLAPPING RATES School Districts Carroll ISD 1.41500 1.40000 1.40000 1.40000 1.40000 Northwest ISD 1.37500 1.37500 1.45250 1.45250 1.45250 Keller ISD 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 1.54000 Counties Denton County 0.27736 0.28287 0.28491 0.27220 0.27220 Tarrant County 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 0.26400 Other Tarrant College 0.14897 0.14897 0.14950 0.14950 0.14950 Tarrant Hospital 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 0.22790 Trophy Club Mud#1 0.17500 0.13339 0.13339 0.13339 0.13339 SUB-TOTAL INDIRECT 5.42323 5.37213 5.45220 5.43949 5.43949 TOTAL 5.58007 5.52897 5.60904 5.59583 5.59583 91 AD VALOI RETURN TO T.O.C. TAX EIGHT YEAR ANALYSIS Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Homestead exemption 20% Over 65 exemption-$10,000 APPRAISED VALUES FY10/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Estimated - $ 1,025,535,296 $ 1,090,892,532 $ 1,209,948,755 $ 1,227,858,917 $ 1,248,082,317 $ 1,274,372,828 $ 1,431,173,915 $ 1,500,171,790 amountchan e 65,357,236 119,056,223 17,910,162 20,223,400 26,290,511 156,801,087 68,997,875 percent change 6% 11% 1% 2% 2% 12% 5% cumulative ch 65,357,236 184,413,459 202,323,621 222,547,021 248,837,532 405,638,619 474,636,494 %cumulative ch 6% 18% 20% 22% 24% 40% 46% NET TAXABLE VALUES(these values will not always total due to court appears,ARB,etc) FYI 0/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FYI 2/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FYI 4/15 Actual FYI 5/116 Actual FY16/17 Adjusted Total Taxable Values $ 796,958,772 $ 937,254,545 $ 856,969,250 $ 889,054,513 $ 920,188,732 $ 943,308,794 $ 1,124,442,640 $ 1,172,624,627 amountchan e $ 140,295,773 $ 80,285,295 $ 32,085,263 $ 31,134,219 $ 23,120,062 $ 181,133,846 $ 48,181,987 ercentchange 18% -9% 4% 4% 3% 19% 4% $cumulative ch $ 140,295,773 $ 60,010,478 $ 92,095,741 $ 123,229,960 $ 146,350,022 $ 327,483,868 $ 375,665,855 %cumulative chg 18% 8% 12% 15% 18% 41% 47% Residential $ 454,890,952 $ 463,311,801 $ 473,314,728 $ 494,062,920 $ 530,229,036 $ 565,082,645 $ 698,417,863 $ 769,281,608 amount change $ 8,420,849 $ 10,002,927 $ 20,748,192 $ 36,166,116 $ 34,853,609 $ 133,335,218 $ 70,863,745 percent change 2% 2% 4% 7% 7% 24% 10% $cumulative ch $ 8,420,849 $ 18,423,776 $ 39,171,968 $ 75,338,084 $ 110,191,693 $ 243,526,911 $ 314,390,656 %cumulative ch 2% 4% 9% 17% 24% 54% 69% Commercial $ 354,362,708 $ 398,732,749 $ 309,259,502 $ 288,880,663 $ 288,318,142 $ 313,905,939 $ 319,566,649 $ 334,417,549 amountchan e 44,370,041 89,473,247 20,378,839 562,521 25,587,797 5,660,710 14,850,900 percent change 13% -22% -7% 0% 9% 2% 5% cumulative ch 44,370,041 45,103,206 65,482,045 66,044,566 40,456,769 34,796,059 19,945,159 %cumulative chg 13% -13% -18% -19% -11% -10% -6% Personal $ 73,238,159 $ 86,462,635 $ 102,298,461 $ 115,051,251 $ 110,305,420 $ 86,780,414 $ 129,385,534 $ 106,304,321 amountchan e $ 13,224,476 $ 15,835,826 $ 12,752,790 $ 4,745,831 $ 23,525,006 $ 42,605,120 $ 23,081,213 percent change 18% 18% 12% -4% -21% 49% -18% $cumulative ch $ 13,224,476 $ 29,060,302 $ 41,813,092 $ 37,067,261 $ 13,542,255 $ 56,147,375 $ 33,066,162 %cumulative chg 18% 40% 57% 51% 18% 77% 45% Ag Properties $ 263,775 $ 263,775 $ 269,301 $ 274,698 $ 257,671 $ 246,487 $ 219,661 $ 216,057 New Residential $ 19,299,376 $ 14,557,925 $ 17,679,732 $ 18,340,000 $ 28,002,713 $ 39,358,755 $ 54,909,400 $ 29,594,736 amountchan e 4,741,451 3,121,807 660,268 9,662,713 11,356,042 15,550,645 25,314,664 percent change -25% 21% 4% 53% 41% 40% -46% cumulative ch 4,741,451 1,619,644 959,376 8,703,337 20,059,379 35,610,024 10,295,360 %cumulative ch -25% -8% -5% 45% 104% 185% 53% New Commercial $ 2,905,474 $ 63,612,427 $ 24,418,346 $ 1,148,172 $ $ $ $ 12,765,665 amount change $ 60,706,953 $ 39,194,081 $ 23,270,174 $ 1,148,172 $ $ $ 12,765,665 percent change 1 2089% -62% -95% -100% 0% 0%1 100% $cumulative ch $ 60,706,953 1$ 21,512,872 1$ 1,757,302 $ 2,905,474 $ 2,905,474 $ 2,905,474 $ 9,860,191 %cumulative chg 1 2089% 740% -60% -100% -100% -100% 339% 92 AD VALOI RETURN TO T.O.C. TAX EIGHT YEAR ANALYSIS Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Homestead exemption 20% Over 65 exemption-$10,000 TOTAL TAX REVENUE GENERATED FY10/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FYI 2/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FYI 4/15 Actual FYI 5/16 Actual FY16/17 Estimated Total Revenue 1,257,246 1,442,069 $ 1,366,542 $ 1,353,355 1,432,916 1,479,452 $ 1,565,510 1,596,528 amount change $ 184,823 $ 75,527 $ 13,187 $ 79,561 $ 46,536 $ 86,058 $ 31,018 percent change 14.70% -5.24% -0.96% 5.88% 3.25% 5.82% 1.98% low New Residential $ 30,898 $ 22,833 $ 27,729 $ 28,764 $ 43,779 $ 61,533 $ 75,198 $ 40,293 amount change $ 8,066 $ 4,896 $ 1,036 $ 15,015 $ 17,754 $ 13,665 $ 34,905 percent change -26.10% 21.44% 3.73% 52.20% 40.55% 22.21% -46.42% New Commercial $ 4,652 $ 99,770 $ 38,298 $ 1,801 $ - $ $ $ 17,380 amountchan e 95,118 61,472 36,497 1,801 17,380 percent change 1 2044.82% -61.61% -95.30% -100.00%1 0.00%1 0.00%1 100.00% Raised from New $ 35,550 $ 122,602 $ 66,027 $ 30,565 1 $ 43,779 1 $ 61,533 1 $ 75,198 $ 57,674 Raised from Existing $ 1,221,696 $ 1,319,467 $ 1,300,516 $ 1,322,790 1 $ 1,389,137 1 $ 1,417,919 1 $ 1,490,312 $ 1,538,855 AVERAGE MARKET VALUE PER HOME FY10/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Ad usted - Avg Market Value $ 1,354,987 $ 1,359,897 $ 1,365,344 $ 1,416,737 $ 1,472,247 $ 1,492,650 $ 1,803,855 $ 1,815,388 amount change 4,910 5,447 51,393 55,510 20,403 311,205 11,533 percent change 0.36% 0.40% 3.76% 3.92% 1.39% 20.85% 0.64% cumulative chq 1$ 4,910 10,357 61,750 117,260 137,663 448,868 460,401 %cumulative ch 0% 1%1 5% 9% 10% 33% 34% AD VALOREM TAX PAYMENT ON AVERAGE HOME VALUE (w homestead exemption FY10/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Ad usted - Avg Taxable Value $ 1,152,595 $ 1,163,219 $ 1,166,338 $ 1,203,398 $ 1,247,251 $ 1,270,576 $ 1,425,943 $ 1,508,097 Tax Payment 1,845 1,460 1,463 1,510 1,560 1,589 1,562 1,643 amount chane $ 386 $ 4 $ 46 $ 50 $ 29 $ 27 $ 80 ercentchan e -20.91%1 0.27%1 3.18%1 3.31%1 1.87% -1.69%1 5.14% TAX RATE DISTRIBUTION AMOUNT and CALCULATED EFFECTIVE TAX RATE FYI 0/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FYI 2/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FYI 4/15 Actual FYI 5/116 Actual FY16/17 Estimated Maint.&Operations 0.15620 0.13835 0.14197 0.13907 0.13710 0.13947 0.12882 0.1 1 133 Interest&Sinking 0.00390 0.01849 0.01487 0.01777 0.01924 0.01687 0.00813 0.02482 TOTAL $ 0.16010 $ 0.15684 $ 0.15684 $ 0.15684 $ 0.15634 $ 0.15634 $ 0.13695 $ 0.13615 amountchan e 0.00326 0.00050 0.01939 0.00080 percent change -2.04% 0.00% 0.00% -0.32% 0.00% -12.40% -0.58% EFFECTIVE TAX RATE 1 $ 0.16010 $ 0.17944 1 $ 0.19326 1 $ 0.16070 $ 0.15634 $ 0.15677 1 $ 0.13695 $ 0.13615 TAX RATE DISTRIBUTION PERCENT FYI 0/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FY14/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Estimated - Maint.&Operations 97.56% 88.21% 90.52% 88.67% 87.69% 89.21% 94.06% 81.77% Interest&Sinking2.44% 11.79% 9.48% 11.33% 12.31% 10.79% 5.94% 18.23% TOTAL 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% TAX REVENUE BY TYPE FYI 0/11 Actual FYI 1/12 Actual FY12/13 Actual FYI 3/14 Actual FYI 4/15 Actual FY15/16 Actual FY16/17 Estimated Maint.&O erations $ 1,226,689 $ 1,271,975 $ 1,236,978 $ 1,198,373 $ 1,256,795 $ 1,318,059 $ 1,471,000 $ 1,305,483 Interest&Sinking $ 30,558 $ 170,094 $ 129,565 $ 154,982 $ 176,121 $ 161,393 $ 94,510 $ 291,045 TOTAL $ 1,257,246 $ 1,442,069 $ 1,366,542 $ 1,353,355 $ 1,432,916 $ 1,479,452 $ 1,565,510 $ 1,596,528 amount change 184,823 75,527 13,187 79,561 46,536 86,058 31,018 percent change 1 14.70% -5.24% -0.96% 5.88% 3.25% 5.82% 1.9871 93 RETURN TO T.O.C. ty S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLl��� L6Z�L 94 RETURN TO T.O.C. Personnel Overview AL did Since salaries make up the greatest portion of the expenditure budget, it is logical to apply forecasting techniques that can provide a true picture of where payroll dollars are headed. With this in mind, the Town uses forecasting procedures that result in more accurate personnel expenditure projections. 95 RETURN TO T.O.C. CITIZENS OF Town Attorney Advisory Ud Vourt u ge And Committees I Texas Student Housing TOWN MANAGER & WA SUPERINTENDENT to I k continued on next paqe c rt Admin strator ,ant.50 Town Se retary epu Clerk Intern.50 Assista t.50 e a Fco�nr, lerks Fina ce Ma .50 Supe isor Assistant.50 Human Re I Academic Municipal Acctg Tech II Acctg Tech II HR Generalist Parks and Recreation.50 Informa echnology Fire Chief Planning& Develo ment A Coordinator De uty Chief Fire Building Inspect Coordinator WA Technician Lieute ants ( Perm Clerk Network Manager PT Firefighter FT Firefighter Paramedics 2r4 Paramedics 9 l Public Works Commun' Technician Coordinator Manager Police Services (contracted thru the Project anager City of Keller) This organizational chart is a visual depiction of the way work is distributed within the Town of Westlake. It is also meant to be a tool to help enhance our working relationship with our customers, students and stake-holders, and to clear channels of communications to better sem} accomplish our goals and objectives. 96 RETURN TO T.O.C. This organizational chart is a visual depiction of the way work is distributed within Westlake Academy BOARD • E ecutive Director continued from previous page ' V.A.Foundation tant WESTLAKE ACADEMY DIRECTOREXECUTIVE Pri Secondary Princlpal Primary Assistant Secondary Assistant Principal Principal Primary Curriculum Coordinator Registrar Primary Counselor Administrative Staff Primary Facul and Staff Administrative Staff SPED Coo r Secondary Curriculum Coordinator Heads of SPED Faculty and Staff Department r Grade Level Athletic Team Leads Direct `- Student Life Coord ndary Counselor Technology Coordinator I lege Counselor L- Librari MYP/DP Faculty and Staff 97 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview COMPENSATION AND BENEFIT STRATEGIES ARE ALIGNED TO THE TOWNS STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE OF "ATTRACT,DEVELOP AND RETAIN A SKILLED WORKFORCE" Given the funding constraints governments are facing, accurate expenditure projections are more important than ever. Since salaries make up the greatest portion of the expenditure budget, it is logical to apply forecasting techniques that can provide a true picture of where payroll dollars are headed. Personnel staffing levels for the Town of Westlake are presented in full-time equivalents (FTE) positions. For example, a position staffed for 40 hours per week for 52 weeks per year (2,080 hours) equals one full-time equivalent position. For firefighter/paramedic positions, an FTE is based on 2,912 hours per year, or an average of 56 hours per week is used. An FTE position of .50 refers to a position that is funded for 1,040 hours per year (2,080 x .50). The personnel count includes vacant positions. PAYROLL & RELATED COSTS Payroll & Related - Base Salaries,Taxes, Insurance and Retirement • Budgeted to be $4,204,869 and comprises 54% of General Fund operating expenditures. • Reflects a 12%increase of$436,077 from prior year estimated payroll expenditures. o Market band pay adjustments of$167,000 o Addition of one full-time Project Manager for the Public Works department $90,950 o Addition of one full-time Network Manager for the I.T. department $81,687 o Medical insurance was increased by 4%equal to $20,886 o The estimated budget for FY16/17 has been decreased by$33,938 for employees who left mid-year,were hired later than budgeted, or hired at a lower wage than budgeted. ChangeFY 16/17 FY 17/18 Change Estimated Proposed Amount Percent Salaries and Wages 3,373,370 3,821,261 447,891 13% Payroll Transfer In (917,146) (1,055,775) (138,629) 15% Insurance 579,109 599,995 20,886 4% Taxes (twc/wc) 46,454 51,180 4,726 10% Taxes (ss/m) 252,232 292,253 40,021 16% Retirement 434,773 495,955 61,182 14% GRAND TOTAL $ 3,768,792 $ 4,204,869 1 $ 436,077 127o • All payroll and related expenditures are paid via the General Fund. Portions of these expenditures are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitors Association Fund. o Total payroll transfers in are $1,055,775 • Utility Fund -$482,700 • Capital Project Fund $54,565 • Visitors Association Fund - $518,510 98 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES BENEFITS FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Change Description I Estimated Adopted Amount Municipal employee Medical Insurance $ 524,847 $ 544,606 $ 19,759 4% benefits have Dental Insurance 28,459 29,115 656 2% increased $126,815 LTD/AD&D/Life Insurance 25,803 26,274 471 2% (10%). This increase is Total Insurance 579,109 599,995 20,886 4� Social Security 204,361 236,919 32,558 16% caused by many Medicare 47,871 55,334 7,463 16% factors, including the Unemployment Taxes 8,099 8,790 691 9% addition 2. additional Worker's Compensation 38,355 42,390 4,035 11% municipal employees Total Taxes 298,686 343,433 44,747 15% TMRS 407,503 468,685 61,182 15% and increases in ICMA 457 Plan 27,270 27,270 - 0% wages for existing Total Retirement 434,773 495,955 61,182 14% employees. TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS $ 1,312,568 $ 1,439,383,1 $ 126,815 1070 EMPLOYEE ALLOCATIONS BY DEPARTMENT • Total personnel staffing in FY 2017-2018 is budgeted at 137.34 positions. • This represents a decrease of 1.71 positions from the FY16-17 total of 139.05. • Police Services continue to be outsourced and contracted through the Keller Police Department. exp FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Change Perces No. Department Name Estimated Adopted Amount of total N 10 Administrative 1.00 1.00 - 1% 1 1 Town Manager 2.50 2.50 - 2% 12 Planning & Development 5.25 4.00 (1.25) 3% 13 Town Secretary 1.50 1.50 - 1 14 Emergency Services 15.50 15.50 - 11% 15 Municipal Court 4.00 4.00 - 3% 16 Public Works 3.00 4.00 1.00 3% 17 Facilities Maintenance 1.25 1.25 - 1% 18 Finance Dept 4.50 4.00 (0.50) 3% 19 Park & Recreation 0.50 0.50 - 0% 20 Information Technology 1.00 2.00 1.00 1% 21 Human Resources 2.00 2.00 - 1% 22 Communications 2.00 2.00 - 1% 23 Police Services - - - 0% Municipal Employees 44.00 44.25 , 0.25 327o Westlake Academy 95.05 93.09 (1.96) 68% Total Employees 139.05 1.71) 100% 99 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES ■ Municipal Court, ■ Emergency Services, 4.00,9% 15.50,35% ■ Public Works, 4.00,9% ■ Town Secretary, 1.50,3% ■ Facilities Maintenance, 1.25,3% ■ Planning&Development, 4.00,9% — ■ Finance Dept, 4.00,9% ■ Town Manager, 2.50,6%—,---- .50,6% ■ Park&Recreation, 0.50,1% ■ Information Technology, ■ Administrative, ■ Communications2.00,4% 1.00,2% , ■ Human Resources, 2.00,5% 2.00,5% 160 140 120 100 Academic 95.31 95.05 93.09 Employees 80 89.55 60 40 n.Municipal 20 39.25 0 Employees FY 13/14 Actual FY 14/15 Actual FY 15/16 Actual FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Estimated Adopted Westlake Academy 93.09 68% Municipal Employees 44.25 32% 100 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview RATIO OF MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES TO RESIDENTS For FY17/18 there are 1,296 projected residents and 44.25 employees.This equals a ratio of 29.28 residents per each full-time equivalent employee. This is an increase of .13 based on the prior year FYI 6/17 estimated FTE positions of 44 and 1,283 residents. Position FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Actual Actual Actual Estimated Adopted Change Westlake Residents 1,184 1,200 1,270 1,283 1,296 13 Municipal Employees 32.25 36.00 39.25 44.00 44.25 0.25 Residents per Employee 36.71 33.33 32.36 29.15 29.28 0.13 EMPLOYEE ALLOCATIONS BY FUND General Utility Capital Visitor Westlake Department Name Fund Fund Fund Fund Academy General Administrative 1.00 - - Fund Town Manager 1.90 .30 .30 Visitor Fund 36.23 Planning&Development 4.00 - - - - 3.83 I26% Utility Fund Town Secretary 1.50 3% 3.803% Emergency Services 15.50 O Municipal Court 4.00 - Public Works .75 2.85 .40 - Facilities Maintenance .63 - - .63 Finance Department 2.80 .60 .60 Park&Recreation .25 - .25 Information Technology 2.00 - - Human Resources 1.90 .05 .05 - Westlake Communications - - 2.00 Academy Westlake Academy - - - 93.09 93.09 Total Employees 36.23 3.80 .40 3.83 94.33 68% EMPLOYEES BY CLASSIFICATION Part Departm MII Time ParMM_TOTAL Time, 3.00, Administrative _______"97V 1.00 ME 1.00 2.2%_ Town Manager 2.50 - 2.50 I Planning &Development 4.00 - 4.00 Town Secretary 1.50 - 1.50 Emergency Services 14.00 1.50 15.50 Municipal Court 3.00 1.00 4.00 * Public Works 4.00 - 4.00 Facilities Maintenance .75 .50 1.25 Finance Department 4.00 - 4.00 Park& Recreation .50 - .50 Full Information Technology 2.00 - 2.00 Time, Human Resources 2.00 - 2.00 134.34, Communications 2.00 - 2.00 97.8 ° Westlake Academy 93.09 - 93.09 T 134.34 3.00 137.34 101 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview EMPLOYEE FORECAST Department Name FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Projection Projection Projection Projection Projection Administrative 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Town Manger 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 2.50 Planning & Development 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Town Secretary 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 Fire & EMS 15.50 15.50 16.50 16.50 16.50 Court 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 4.50 Public Works 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Facilities 1.25 1.75 1.75 1.75 1.75 Finance 4.00 4.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Parks and Recreation 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 IT Dept 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Human Resources 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.00 3.00 Communications 2.00 2.50 3.50 3.50 3.50 TOTAL MUNICIPAL 44.75 46.25 49.75 49.75 49.75 Vacancy Adjustments Not all positions will be filled 52 weeks per year, and so these expected vacancies are addressed in the salary budgeting process. • Start Dates- Expected start dates for open positions may vary. Keeping track of those assumptions is important because a large dollar variance may result when an actual start date differs from the budgeted date. • Attrition (Planned Retirements) - Budget consideration should be given for those positions where employees have indicated specific retirement dates. Payouts need to be budgeted. • Impact of Inflation - Inflation can have a significant impact on payroll forecasting. Cost-of- living adjustments often are used when forecasting personnel costs. The Consumer Price Index (CPI), a broad measure of consumer inflation, is the cost-of-living index used most often for determining salary increases. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' Employment Cost Index might be a better index for this purpose, as it measures the change in the cost of labor, free from the influence of employment shifts among occupations and industries. • Seasonal and Temporary Positions -Some divisions or jurisdictions use part-time or seasonal employees. Park districts, for example, often adjust staffing levels by season. • Other Considerations -Some governments make more use of overtime as an option instead of hiring fulltime workers. The use of retired employees for contractual services is another alternative to adding headcount. Fair Labor Standards Act(FLSA) The Fair Labor Standards Act established minimum wage, overtime, recordkeeping, and child labor standards and applies to all full-time and part-time employees. As amended in 1985, the FLSA provides the option for compensatory time in lieu of overtime compensation for non-exempt employees. Executive, administrative, and professional employees meeting Department of Labor exemption guidelines are exempt from FLSA overtime requirements. The Town will comply with the FLSA for all employees. 102 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview F—Bu rsonnel Tracking System dget payroll projections are based on the estimate of budgeted positions for the year, in order provide the correct number of budgeted positions.The system tracks all employees, full-time, rt-time, temporary and permanent. Non-Exempt Positions All non-exempt (hourly) positions are eligible for overtime compensation. Bi-weekly wages are based on a 40-hour work week (2,080 hours per year), equaling one full-time equivalent (FTE) position. There are 26 pay periods per year. This work schedule applies to all hourly regular, year-round employees, except for Fire/EMS employees. Non-Exempt Positions (Fire/EMS Department) Non-exempt (hourly) positions in the Fire/EMS Department are eligible for overtime pay. Pay periods are 15 days in length, and there are 24 pay periods per year. Full-time employees are scheduled to work five (5) 24-hour shifts per pay period, totaling 120 hours. Full-time employees are scheduled to work an average of 2,912 hours annually over 24 pay periods. Exempt Positions Exempt (salaried) positions are not eligible for overtime compensation. Salary amounts are not calculated or based on the number of hours worked. Exempt positions include managers and directors, and classifications are determined by Department of Labor guidelines. Compensation Plan and Salary Survey The Town of Westlake believes that market-based salary, in combination with employee competence and their overall contribution to the Town's success, should largely determine their compensation and career advancement opportunities. The ultimate goal of the compensation plan is to attract and retain top talent, and utilize best practices in all systems and processes supporting the plan. The philosophy and objectives of this pay policy are as follows: • First, the Town's pay system should be internally equitable. It must ensure that pay ranges of each position within our organization reflects the value of comparable positions within our organization. In order to achieve this,we must pay employees fairly compared to their coworkers, and employees must also perceive that they are paid fairly compared to their coworkers. • Second, The Town's pay system must be externally competitive in the market place, so that the Town of Westlake support or strategic outcome objective to attract, recruit, and retain highly qualified employees who are vital to accomplishing the organization's vision and mission. • Third, to be motivational to our employees, providing the opportunity for future pay increases based upon individual work performance and development of job-related skills and competencies. After issuing an RFP for a market survey and development of the compensation plan, an independent consultant was selected to conduct a market survey and develop a compensation system.The market survey is conducted annually utilizing data from cities in the immediate geographical area, in addition to cities with similar demographics and citizen expectations of high-quality customer service. 103 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Personnel Summary Overview For its first year of implementation (FY 16-17), employees have been placed within the established pay band for their position at their current Bedford rate of pay, adjusted for a three (3) percent market adjustment. To Colleyville promote internal equity, positions that have surveyed further below market Coppell received a higher market adjustment, at the discretion of their supervisor Euless and with Town Manager approval. In the fiscal years following FY 16-17, Flower Mound depending on market survey results and availability of funding, the Frisco municipal broad band pay system may have both a performance pay Grapevine component in addition to market adjustments, dependent upon the Hurst availability of financial resources. Keller Lewisville The Town of Westlake salary survey has historically utilized data from the McKinney Waters Consulting Group in addition to data obtained directly from other North Richland Hills cities. For FY 16-17, Position Analysis Questionnaires (PAQs) and position Roanoke descriptions were provided to the consultant during the development of Southlake the compensation system. This information was matched to similar University Park positions in fifteen (15) cities using a proprietary database to determine proper placement of each position in the pay band. Pay Increases Salary adjustments will be made in order to remain competitive, retain talent, and reward outstanding performance. Pay increases may occur due to market adjustments, or through performance pay. All forms of compensation are subject to Town Manager approval and available funding appropriated on an annual basis by the Town Council. Market Adjustments In order to maintain accurate position classifications, the Town of Westlake will conduct a position analysis of 1/3 (one-third) of the organization's positions each year, ensuring that all positions are reviewed on a rolling three-year basis. Depending on the results of the market study, and if funds are available, all or some of the salary bands will be proposed to the Town Council for adjustment based upon the results of the annual market salary study. Proposed adjustments to any pay band will not be proposed unless the market study indicates bands have increased by 2.5%or more. Employee salaries may receive a market adjustment if their current salary has shifted to become less than 97.5% of the market average. If any market adjustment is approved, all pay ranges and steps will be adjusted accordingly on the first day of the fiscal year. This does not include the Town Manager,whose compensation is determined by the Town Council. Performance Pay On-going performance pay may be awarded to individuals or teams who, as determined in their performance evaluation, have clearly gone "above and beyond" their traditional roles,job duties, and assignments over the evaluation period. Performance pay is awarded through the review process and the established criteria outlined by the HR Department. One-time performance pay may be offered to employees or teams who, based on performance evaluation, have been determined to have gone "above and beyond" expectations. One-time performance pay is a lump-sum, one-time payment, and will not impact the base pay of the employee and will not move their pay within their position's assigned band. All performance pay, whether on-going or one-time adjustments, is dependent upon the availability of financial resources. 104 Personnel rRET*RN TO T O.C. 1YYlgry Five Year iAnaiysis FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Dept Position Actual Actual Actual Estimated Adopted change 10 IGENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE Administrative Assistant - 1.00 1.00 - - - - 1.00 1.00 - 11 ITOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE Town Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Assistant Town Manager 0.75 0.90 0.90 1.00 1.00 - Administrative Assistant - - 0.25 0.50 0.50 - Parf-Time Interns 0.75 0.50 - - - - 2.50 2.40 2.15 2.50 2.50 - 12 PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT Planning&Development Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Development Coordinator - - 0.50 0.50 1.00 0.50 Part-Time Bldg Intern - - 0.50 0.75 - (0.75) Bldg Construction Zone Enforcement - - 0.50 1.00 - (1.00) Building Inspector - - - 1.00 1.00 - Permit Clerk - - - 1.00 1.00 Customer Service Coordinator 0.33 0.33 0.33 - - - Customer Service Representative 0.33 0.33 0.33 - - - 1.67 1.67 3.17 5.25 4.00 (1.25) 13 ITOWN SECRETARY'S OFFICE Town Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Administrative Assistant - - 0.25 0.50 0.50 - 1.00 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.50 - 14 FIRE/EMS DEPARTMENT Fire Chief 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Lt.Firefighter/Paramedics 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 - Fire Marshal Part-Time 0.75 0.75 0.75 1.00 1.00 - Firefighter/Paramedics full-time 6.00 7.00 8.00 9.00 9.00 - Firefighter/Paramedics part-time 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 - 12.25 13.25 14.25 15.50 15.50 - 15 IMUNICIPAL COURT OFFICE Court Administrator 0.25 0.10 0.10 - - - Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Deputy Clerk 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Marshal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Part-Time Clerk 1 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - Part-Time Clerk 2 - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - 3.75 4.10 4.10 4.00 4.00 - 16 1PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE Public Works Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Utility Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Utility Billing Coordinator - - - 1.00 1.00 - Project Manager - - - - 1.00 1.00 Customer Service Coordinator 0.33 0.33 0.33 - - - Customer Service Representative 0.33 0.33 0.33 - - - 2.67 2.67 2.67 3.00 4.00 1.00 105 Personnel rRET*RN TO T O.C. 1YYlgry Five Year iAnaiysis FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 Dept Position Actual Actual Actual Estimated Adopted change 17 FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Facilities Maintenance Director 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - Part-Time Summer Technicians 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 - Part-Time Clerk - - 0.50 0.50 0.50 - Customer Service Coordinator 0.17 0.17 0.17 - - - Customer Service Representative 0.17 0.17 0.17 - - - 1.08 1.08 1.58 1.25 1.25 - 18 IFINANCE OFFICE Finance Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Finance Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Management Analyst - - 0.25 0.50 - (0.50) Accounting Tech Municipal 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Accounting Tech Academic 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 3.00 4.00 4.25 4.50 4.00 (0.50) 19 IPARKS & RECREATION OFFICE Parks&Recreation Director 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 - Customer Service Coordinator 0.17 0.17 0.17 - - - Customer Service Representative 0.17 0.17 0.17 - - 0.83 0.83 0.83 0.50 0.50 20 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Information Technology Director 0.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Network Manager - - - - 1.00 1.00 0.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 21 JHUMAN RESOURCES OFFICE Human Resources Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - HR Generalist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 22 1COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE Communications Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Specialist 0.25 1.00 1.00 - - - Manager - - - 1.00 1.00 1.25 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 - 99 JACADEMIC SERVICES Westlake Academy 77.18 89.55 95.31 95.05 93.09 (1.96) 77.18 89.55 95.31 95.05 93.09 (1.96) Grand Total All Positions 1 109.43 125.55 134.56 Municipal Employees 32.25 36.00 39.25 44.00 44.25 0.25 Academy Employees 77.18 89.55 95.31 95.05 93.09 (1.96) 106 RETURN TO T.O.C. Long Term Planning J (multi-year forecast)---.; .Ak. .9 The Long - Range Financial Forecast takes a forward look at the Town's revenues and expenditures. Its purpose is to identify financial trends, shortfalls, and issues so the Town can proactively address them. It does so by projecting into the future the fiscal results of continuing the Town's current service levels and policies, providing a snapshot of what the future may look like as a result of the decisions made in the recent past. 107 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Forecast Overview GOALS OF LONG-RANGE PLANNING, MULTI-YEAR PLANNING Multiyear planning is a key component of Westlake's financial principles. Without proper planning, multi-year sustainability would not be attainable. With these priorities in mind, the Town approaches multiyear planning from these perspectives: • First, as it relates to revenue, effective economic analysis is essential to accurate forecasting. Various data on local economic information is used when projecting revenues for the budget. This data includes economic indicators such as interest rates, wages, health care costs, consumer spending, and housing and commercial growth. The data gathered from these sources are used to create financial scenarios for stronger current budget decisions. KEY REVENUE DRIVERS • On the expenditure side, the operational impact of projects and programs have been identified and Tax Rate incorporated into the budget and a multi-year Net Taxable Value analysis has been completed to confirm the Sales Tax sustainability of the budget over time. Mixed Beverage Tax One of the goals for the budget is to anticipate and make Franchise Fees deliberate decisions to reach financial and service goals. Licenses & Permits These trends are graphed and provided as a part of this Charges for Services budget's support materials to provide a deeper Intergovernmental Revenues understanding of the Town's overall financial condition. Fines & Forfeitures The Long-Range Financial Forecast takes a forward look at Interest Income the Town's revenues and expenditures. It sets the stage for the budget process, facilitating both Council and staff in establishing priorities and allocating resources appropriately. Forecasting gives the Council time to strategize as to course we may want to make financially, both in the short and long KEY EXPENDITURE DRIVERS term. To maximize the benefit of long-range planning, Overtime Costs Council has established the following goals: Operating Supplies Sustain existing programs at high service levels. Apparatus &Tools Maintain a healthy General Fund balance of at least 90 operating days annually. Motor Vehicle Fuel Maintain competitive employee compensation within Maintenance 3%of the median for the market. Travel,Training & Dues Provide adequate and stable funding for street and Utility Costs facility maintenance projects. Professional Services Its purpose is to identify financial trends, shortfalls, and issues Insurance Costs so the Town can proactively address them. It does so by Fleet Replacements projecting out into the future the fiscal results of continuing Capital Equipment Replacements the Town's current service levels and policies, providing a snapshot of what the future will look like as a result of the decisions made in the recent past. The purpose of the forecast is to get an idea (based on conservative assumptions) regarding what will happen in the regional and state economy, and on near-term and long-term revenue and expenditure drivers during the five (5) year planning period. The term "conservative" used in the context of financial forecasting means revenues are forecast at low growth levels or even at a decline (depending on the revenue source). 108 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Forecast Overview Expenditures,while not necessarily being forecast as declining, are generally forecast with a 2-3% escalation rate, depending on inflation. Forecasts generally have at least one scenario where all that is assumed on expenditures is the current level of service and perhaps some growth in salary/wage expenditures. The Council can, if they wish, ask that certain service level adjustments, whether it is service expansion or reduction, be included as alternate scenarios, particularly if it appears that revenues will not cover expenditures in the out years of the forecast. It is important to remember that economic conditions play in forecasting, particularly as it relates to sales tax, which can be a volatile revenue source. If economic conditions improve, sales tax receipts are affected (usually positively) as well as building permit revenue. Fund balance - is a term used to describe the net position of governmental funds calculated in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Budget professionals commonly use this same term to describe the net position of governmental funds calculated on a government's budgetary basis. GAAP financial statements report up to five separate categories of fund balance based on the type and source of constraints placed on how resources can be spent (presented in descending order from most constraining to least constraining): a. non-spendable fund balance, b. restricted fund balance, c. committed fund balance, d. assigned fund balance, e. unassigned fund balance. The total of the amounts in these last three categories (where the only constraint on spending, if any, is imposed by the government itself) is termed unrestricted fund balance. General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance-The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund undesignated fund balance at, or in excess of,90 days of operation. Use of Fund Balance-The Council delegates the responsibility to assign funds to the Town Manager or his/her designee. The Council shall have the authority to assign any amount of funds. Assignments may occur subsequent to fiscal year-end. The Council will utilize funds in the following spending order: Restricted,Committed,Assigned, Unassigned Fund Balance will be targeted to only be used with Council approval and can be only be used for the following: Emergencies, Non-recurring expenditures such as technology/FF&E (furniture, fixtures and equipment), or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund, recommendations will be made on how to restore it. The Council shall approve all commitments by formal action. The action to commit funds must occur prior to fiscal year-end, to report such commitments in the balance sheet of the respective period, even though the amount may be determined subsequent to fiscal year- end. A commitment can only be modified or removed by the same formal action. 109 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Long Term Forecast Assumptions FY 2017-2018 ADOPTED BUDGET GENERAL FUND: REVENUES (DECREASED 7%=$650K) • Property Tax Rate o Decreased $.00080 from $0.13695 to $0.13615 per$100 valuation o General Fund Portion = $0.11133 per$100 Valuation (PY $0.12882) o Debt Service Fund Portion = $0.02482 per$100 Valuation (PY $0.00813) o Tax payment increase of average home value = $80 in total o Property tax revenue in the General Fund is budgeted to be $1.205M-a decrease of$274K (190) due to the decision to include the Arts &Sciences debt which was previously paid from the Visitors Association Fund to the I&S portion of the tax. • General Sales Tax o Sales tax is budgeted to be $3.510M-an increase of$200K (6%) due to the situs agreement anticipated with Schwab construction o Because of the uncertainly of the funds, we are conservative with these estimates. o Includes the Property Tax Reduction portion of the Sales tax receipts. • Building permits/inspection/plan review fees o Budgeted to be $2.137M-a decrease of $332K (130) due to anticipated one-time revenues received in FY16/17; Residential fees budgeted at $1.519M and commercial fees budgeted at $618K. • Franchise Fees o Budgeted to be $984K- Based on current year receipt, fees are budgeted at a 1 increase • Transfers In o Budgeted at $50K-a decrease of $181 K (78%) o Due to one-time transfers from the prior year from Utility Fund for Fort Worth Impact Fees OPERATING EXPENDITURES(INCREASED 6%=$453K) • Payroll and Related Expenditures are budgeted at $4.204M o Compared to FY 16/17 estimated budgeted this is an increase of$436K (12%) o Prior year payroll adopted budget was decreased by$34K for departments that had employees who had retired or quit mid-year. o Market band adjustments of$167K are reflected and is based on most recent salary surveys performed by the HR department. o No Performance Pay is included 110 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Long Term Forecast Assumptions o Addition of Project Manager for the Public Works department is included. Total pay is $90K with cost being offset 100% by transfers in from the Utility Fund at$35K and from the Capital Fund at $55K o Addition of Network Manager for the I.T. department is included. Total pay is $81 K. o Medical, dental and life insurance reflects a 4%increase o Payroll Transfers in were reduced due to the reallocation of the percentage of time by personnel allocated to each fund. o Transfer in from Visitors Association Fund was decreased by approximately$15K for Communication expenditures. • Operation and Maintenance Expenditures are budgeted at $3.539M o Compared to FY16/17 estimated budget this is an increase of$17K (.5%) o This includes service and supply expenditures, rent, utilities and repairs and maintenance expenditures. NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES(INCREASED 99%= $1.399M) • Capital Outlay remains flat at $31,690 • Transfers Out are Budgeted at$2.787M-an increase of $1.399M (101%) o To General M&R-decreased from $61 OK to $300K for current year with any additional monies being transferred as needed with approval o To Debt Service Fund -increased from $778K to $1.472M-due to Fire Station Debt payment for bonds and tax note. o To Capital Fund-increased from $0 to $1.015M - 1000 of all anticipated Entrada fees ENTERPRISE FUNDS • Revenues decreased by$25K (-1%) due to one-time contributions received in the prior year offset by an increase in charges for services. • Operating expenses decreased by$190K (4%) due primarily to savings in service expenditures of$259K; this is due to a reconstruction of services for Southlake wastewater and TRA wastewater treatment. Anticipating new meter stations going online and this will result in payments being made directly to TRA for sewer services along with an anticipated decrease in cost of service. • Transfers out decreased $222K due to one-time transfers out to the General Fund in the prior year for Fort Worth Impact Fees and a decrease in transfers out to UMR fund 510. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS • Revenues decreased $933K due to one-time funds received in the prior year: o Transfer in from Utility M&R Fund to General M&R Fund decreased $380K o Transfer in from Utility Fund to Utility M&R Fund decreased $100K o Transfer in from General Fund to General M&R Fund decreased $31 OK o Contributions for General M&R Fund decreased $11 OK o Misc income for sales of surplus/scrap items decreased $13K o Other sources for insurance proceed decreased $8K • Maintenance and replacement projects decreased $860K due to one-time projects in the prior year. • Transfers out from Utility M&R fund to General M&R fund increased $380K (see offset above). 111 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Long Term Forecast Assumptions SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS • Visitors Association Fund o Payroll Transfers Out were reduced due to reallocation of percentage of time by personnel allocated to each fund. o Transfer in from General fund was decreased by approximately$15K for Communication expenditures. o Transfers Out- reduced by A&S debt service payment- moved to tax supported debt service DEBT SERVICE FUNDS • Fund 301 (Property Tax Supported Debt) o Increased property tax by$0.01669 per$100 valuation to pay an additional $162,400 for the Arts and Sciences Center in addition to the Street bond payment CAPITAL PROJECT FUND • Based on adopted CIP FY 18- 19 AND BEYOND PROJECTION GENERAL FUND: REVENUES • Sales Tax Revenue o Increase 3%annually o Schwab one-time revenue of$200K added in FY18/19 in anticipation of a situs agreement • Property Tax Revenue o Increase 3%annually o Estimated value on the roll two years from date of permit for new construction- separate line-item on forecast o Fidelity Abatement ends FYI 9/20 o Deloitte Abatement ends FY21/22 o Schwab abatement proposed to start FYI 9/20 • Building permits/inspection/plan review fee are based on estimated schedule of annual permits for commercial and residential growth shown separately • Franchise Fees increase annually by 1% • Fines and Forfeitures increase annually I% • All other revenues-are increased 1%to 2.5%annually based on analysis 112 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 2 Financial Analysis Long Term Forecast Assumptions OPERATING EXPENDITURES • Salary and wages increase annually by 2.5% annually • Service Expenditures increase annually by 1% • Rent and Utilities increase annually by 1 • Supplies increase annually by 1.5% • Insurance increase annually by 1.25% • Repair and Maintenance increase annually 1.250 • Debt remains flat • Westlake Academy reserve - $315K/annually • Capital project impact to budget is based on proposed CIP • Capital Outlay remains flat for FYI 8/19 thru FY21/22 OTHER SOURCES AND USES • Transfers in o From Utility Fund increase annually by 1 • Transfers Out o To Debt Service Fund -represents payment of additional funds needed after sales and property tax revenues used o To Maintenance and Replacement Funds - $200K to $300K as needed o To Capital Fund - 1000 of all Entrada fees transferred UTILITY FUND • Revenues and Other Sources increase annually by I% • Payroll Transfers Out to General Fund increase annually by 2.50 • All other expenditures increase annually 1%to 2% • Restricted Funds were added for Hillwood and Fort Worth Water VISITORS ASSOCIATION FUND • Revenues and Other Sources increase annually by 1 • Transfers Out- reduced by A&S debt service payment- moved to tax supported debt service • Expenditures increase annually 1% 113 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds ESTIMATED 1 2 3 4 DESCRIPTION FY 16-17 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 GENERAL ----- Sales Tax (ongoing 100%minus one time) 4,550,000 r r r r 4,686,500 4,827,095 4,971,908 4,976,252 Schwab One Time O r r 400,000 0 0 0 Allocation to 4B (1,137,500) rr (1,271,625) (1,206,774) (1,242,977) (1,244,063) Allocation to ED (102,000) r r r r (202,000) (102,000) (102,000) (102,000) Sales Tax Subtotal 3,310,500 3,510,500 3,612,875 3,518,321 3,626,931 3,630,189 Property Tax 1,479,500E.1, 1,241,361 1,278,602 1,316,960 1,318,111 Fidelity Abatement Ends 00 104,338 107,468 107,562 Deloitte Abatement Ends 0 0 0 0 120,621 Schwab Abatement Starts 00 (122,535) (123,760) (114,366) Additional Property Tax 0 350,326 636,178 931,562 1,213,034 Property Tax Subtotal 1,479,500 1,205,205 1,591,687 1,896,583 2,232,230 2,644,961 Granada 292,703 43,905 0 0 0 Entrada 256,233 1,081,871 1,081,871 1,081,871 370,114 Vaquero 206,063 206,063 206,063 206,063 206,063 Quail Hollow 103, 31206,063�. 206,063 206,063 206,063 206,063 Carlyle Court 58,541 14,635 14,635 0 0 Terra Bella 131,716 14,635 0 0 0 All Other Residential 160 987 73 176 73 176 73,176 73,176 Entrada Commercial 73,8541 368,872 88,839 0 0 Schwab Commercial 1,000,000 0 0 314,524 314,524 All Other Commercial 186,331 0 0 0 0 Permits and Fees(Building Residential&Commercial) 2,469,457 2 137 122 2,009,219 1 670 646 1,881,696 1 169 939 Liquor Permit Fees 3,080 3,111 3,142 3,173 3,205 Administrative Fees 1,860 :. 1,879 1,897 1,916 1,936 Reforestation Tree Escrow 17,265 17,438 17,612 17,788 17,966 Erosion Control Fees 43,500 43,935 44,374 44,818 45,266 Re-Inspection Fees 200205 210 215 221 Gas Well Misc Fees 22,950 23,180 23,411 23,645 23,882 Insurance&Surety Review Fees 3,000 3,030 3,060 3,091 3,122 is Renewal Fees 1,000 1,010 1,020 1,030 1,041 Engineer Review/Civil 15,000 15,150 15,302 15,455 15,609 Development Fees 63,815 46,046 46,506 46,971 47,441 Contractor Registration Fees 16,575 16,741 16,908 17,077 17,248 EMS Revenues 100,000 101,000 102,010 103,030 104,060 Firefighter Equipment Fees 2,000 2,020 2,040 2,061 2,081 Fire Code Inspections 525 530 536 541 546 Fire Inspection Permits 20,625 20,831 21,040 21,250 21,462 Administrative Fees 8,975 9 065 9,155 9,247 9,339 Misc Permits and Fees(Not Related to Building Permits) 320,370 302,145 305,169 308,224 311,310 314,426 Sales of Surplus/Scrap Items 2,100 2,121 2,142 2,164 2,185 Insurance Refund/Equity Return 10,535 10,640 10,747 10,854 10,963 Misc Revenue 30,100 3,434 3,468 3,503 3,538 Misc Revenue 250 253 255 258 260 Misc Revenue 1,500 0 0 0 0 Misc Revenue 24,220 0 0 0 0 Facility Rental 2,000 r r r 2,020 2,040 2,061 2,081 Facility Rental 275 278 281 283 286 Misc Income 70,980 18,560 18,746 18,933 19,122 19,314 AT&T/SBC 470,000 479,447 484,241 489,084 493,975 Verizon 45,000 45,905 46,364 46,827 47,295 TXU/Atmos Gas 34,500 35,193 35,545 35,901 36,260 Charter 19,500No 19,695 19,892 20,091 20,292 One Source 4,8004,899 4,947 4,997 5,047 Southwestern Bell 180187 189 191 193 Tri-County Electric 300,000 306,030 309,090 312,181 315,303 Trinity Waste/AWIN Mgmt 51,150 r 51,662 52,178 52,700 53,227 Misc.Franchise Fees 49,640 50,636 51,143 51,654 52,171 Franchise Fees 974,770 983 815 993,653 1,003,590 1 013 626 1,023,762 Citation Revenue 727,200 734,472 741,817 749,235 756,727 CourtTechology 16,320 r' 16,483 16,648 16,815 16,983 Court Security 12,240 r 12,362 12,486 12,611 12,737 Warrant Fees 41,820 42,238 42,661 43,087 43,518 NSF Check Fees 5,240 5,292 5,345 5,399 5,453 Court Efficiency Fees 765 773 780 788 796 Law Enforcement Stds/Edu 685 692 699 706 713 Collection Fees 5,610 5 666 5 723 5,780 5,838 Fines and Forfeitures(Court) 809,880 809,880 817,979 826,159 834,420 842,764 Beverage Tax 62,500 01011 63,125 63,756 64,394 65,038 Beverage Tax 62,500 62,500 63,125 63,756 64,394 65,038 Interest Income Dept 11 41,600 .00 42,016 42,436 42,861 43,289 Interest Income Dept 15 1,500 1,515 1,530 1,545 1,561 Interest Income 43,100 43 100 43,531 43,966 44,406 44,850 Contributions Dept 11 35 0 0 0 0 Contributions 35 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues 9,541,092 9,072,827 9,455,984 9,350,178 10,028,134 9,755,243 114 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds ESTIMATED 1 2 3 4 DESCRIPTION FY 16-17 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Transfer In-OF 500 for Impact Fees 170,258 50,500 51,005 51,515 52,030 Transfer In-VA 220 for Dept 22 61,020 0 0 0 0 Total Transfers In 231,278 50,000 50,500 51,005 51,515 52,030 TOTAL REVENUES AND TRANSFERS IN 9,772,370 9,122,827 9,506,484 9,401,183 IW79,649 9,807,273 Payroll Salaries Full Time (2,884,203) : : (3,494,034) (3,581,385) (3,670,920) (3,762,693) Payroll Salaries Part Time (341,644) (237,775) (243,720) (249,813) 256 058 Pavroll Salaries Overtime (110,543) (136,459) (139,871) (143,368) (146,952) Pavroll Salaries Premium Pay (8,200) .1 (13,899) (14,246) (14,603) (14,968) Pavroll Salaries Car Allowance (21,100) (26,100) (26,100) (26,100) (26,100) Payroll Salaries Phone Allowance (7,680) .: (7,680) (7,680) (7,680) EEL Pavrolllnsurance Medical (524,847) (585,451) (629,360) (676,562) (727,305) Pavrolllnsurance Dental (28,459) (29,406) (29,700) (29,997) (30,297) Pavrolllnsurance Life (25,803) (26,405) (26,537) (26,670) (26,803) Pavroll Taxes SS FICA (204,361) (242,842) (248,913) (255,136) (261,514) Payroll Taxes Medicare (47,871) (56,717) (58,135) (59,589) (61,078) Payroll Taxes Unemployment (8,099) (8,878) (8,967) (9,056) (9,147) Payroll Taxes Workers Comp (38,355) (42,814) (43,242) (43,674) (44,111) Payroll Retirement TMRS (407,503) (480,402) (492,412) (504,722) (517,341) Payroll Retirement ICMA (27,270) 1 (27,270) (27,270) (27,270) (27,270) Payroll Transfers In 146,806 165,224 169,354 173,588 177,928 Payroll Transfers In 237,055 359,937 368,935 378,159 387,613 Payroll Transfers In 52,156 58,041 59,492 60,979 62,503 Payroll Transfers In 222,641 203,919 209,017 214,242 219,598 Payroll Transfers In 42,05246,604 47,769 48,963 50,187 Payroll Transfers In 10,635 1• 12,379 12,688 13,006 13,331 Payroll Transfers In 205,801 236,067 241,968 248,018 254,218 Total Pavroll and Related (3,768,792) (4,204,869) (4,333,965) (4,468,316) (4,608,206) (4,753,939) General Services (445,728) (363,159) (366,790) (370,458) (374,163) Administrative (29,524) (29,819) (30,117) (30,419) (30,723) Planning&Development (311,415) (285,679) (288,535) (291,421) (294,335) Town Secretary (45,360) •• (53,520) (54,055) (54,596) (55,142) Fire Department (96,815) (99,909) (100,908) (101,917) (102,937) Municipal Court (104,176) (105,218) (106,270) (107,333) (108,406) Public Works (108,230) (76,487) (77,252) (78,025) (78,805) Facilities Maintenance (58,265) (58,265) (58,265) (58,265) (58,265) Finance Department (53,851) (35,538) (35,893) (36,252) (36,615) Parks&Recreations (35,240) (35,240) (35,240) (35,240) (35,240) Information Technology (114,220) (92,198) (93,120) (94,051) (94,992) Human Resources (30,740) (29,406) (29,700) (29,997) (30,297) Communications (8,235) (8,317) (8,401) (8,485) (8,569) Police Services (888,486) (946,904) (961,107) (975,524) (990,157) Total Service Expenditures (2,330,285) (2,213,639) (2,219,658) (2,245,654) (2,271,981) (2,298,644) Office Rent (159,600 (354,200) (354,200) (354,200) (354,200) Electric Service (27,440) (35,000) (35,000) (35,000) (35,000) Electric Service-Fire Station (4,430) (4,474) (4,519) (4,564) (4,610) Electric Service-Public Works (2,595) (2,621) (2,647) (2,674) (2,700) Electric Service-Parks/Rec (8,780) (8,868) (8,956) (9,046) (9,137) Electric Service-Parchman (80) (81) (82) (82) (83) Telephone Service -Town (3,380) (3,414) (3,448) (3,482) (3,517) Telephone Service -Fire Dept (4,295) (4,338) (4,381) (4,425) (4,469) Internet Service-Town (7,661) (7,738) (7,815) (7,893) (7,972) Internet Service-Fire Dept (6,885) (6,954) (7,023) (7,094) (7,165) Internet Service-Facilities (500) • :r r (808) (816) (824) (832) Water Service-Fire Dept (2,450) (2,475) (2,499) (2,524) (2,549) Water Service-ROW Irrigation 0 (133,320) (134,653) (136,000) (137,360) Water Service-Parks&Rec (855) (864) (872) (881) (890) Gas Service-Fire Station (1,605) 1, 621 (1,637) (1,654) (1,670) Total Rent&Utilities (380,306) (445,316) (566,774) (568,550) (570,343) (572,155) General Services (28,459) (28,886) (29,319) (29,759) (30,205) Administrative (2,534) (2,572) (2,611) (2,650) (2,689) Planning&Development (29,290) (29,729) (30,175) (30,628) (31,087) Town Secretary (3,775) (3,832) (3,889) (3,947) (4,007) Fire Department (69,945) (69,945) (69,945) (69,945) (69,945) Municipal Court (13,076) (13,110) (13,306) (13,506) (13,709) Public Works (4,510) (4,578) (4,646) (4,716) (4,787) Facilities Maintenance (29,180) (29,180) (29,180) (29,180) (29,180) Finance Department (6,660) .. (6,760) (6,861) (6,964) (7,069) Parks&Recreations (11,705) (9,790) (9,937) (10,086) (10,237) Information Technology (5,850) (5,938) (6,027) (6,117) (6,209) Human Resources (4,270) (4,334) (4,399) (4,465) (4,532) Communications (7,500) (7,613) (7,727) (7,843) (7,960) Total Supplies (216,754) (252,284) (216,265) (218,022) (219,806) (221,616) General Services (20,085) (20,336) (20,590) (20,848) (21,108) Planning&Development (500) (506) (513) (519) (525) 115 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED •' 1 2 3 4 FY 16 17 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Fire Department (11,905) 1 (12,054) (12,204) (12,357) (12,512) Municipal Court (545) (552) (559) (566) (573) Facilities Maintenance (590) •• (597) (605) (612) (620) Total Insurance (33,625) mmmmmJP33625 (34,045) (34,471) (34,902) (35,338) Fire Department (54,345) (55,024) (55,712) (56,409) (57,114) Municipal Court (300) r r (304) (308) (311) (315) Public Works (38,295) (38,774) (39,258) (39,749) (40,246) Facilities Maintenance (34,225) r (68,182) (69,034) (69,897) (70,771) Parks&Recreations (82,300) •• (83,329) (84,370) (85,425) (86,493) Total Repair&Maintenance (209,465) (242,580 (245,612) (248,682) (251,791) (254,938) General Service Debt (36,680) •.: (36,680) (36,680) (36,680) (36,680) K-5 Westlake Reserve Slots (315,000) • r' •• (315,000) (315,000) (315,000) (315,000) Total Debt (351,680) (351,680) (351,680) (351,680) (351,680) (351,680) Capital Operating Impact-Facilities 0r' (10,747) (136,692) (140,763) (144,956) Capital Operating Impact-Parks/Rec 0 • 0 (4,000) (4,120) (4,244) Capital Operating Impact-Roads 0 • (400) (400) (10,400) (15,788) Total Capital Operating Impact 0 0 (11,147) (141,092) (155,283) (164,988) Planning&Development (490) (490) (490) (490) (490) Fire Department (27,900) (27,900) (27,900) (27,900) (27,900) Public Works (500) r r (500) (500) (500) (500) Finance Department (1,800) (1,800) (1,800) (1,800) (1,800) Parks&Recreations (1,000) ••• 1000 1000 1000 1000 Total Capital Outlay (31,690) (31,690) (31,690) (31,690) (31,690) (31,690) Total Expenditures non-payroll) (3,553,805) (3,570,814) (3,676,872) (31839,842) (3,887,476) (3,931,049) Transfer Out-GMR 600 (610,550) r r r r r (300,000) (200,000) (200,000) (200,000) Transfer Out-VMR 605 0 (125,000) (110,000) 0 0 Transfer Out-DS 300 (778,003) (1,131,546) (1,196,965) (1,152,074) (1,154,625) Transfers Out-Operating (1,388,553) (1,772,568) (1,556,546) (1,506,965) (1,352,074) (1,354,625) Transfer Out-CP 410 (Entrada) 0 (1,015,324) (1,450,742) (1,170,710) (1,081,871) (370,114) Keep Entrada Permit Fees 0 0 0 0 0 0 Transfers Out-Non O eratin 0 (1,015,324) (1,450,742) (1,170,710) (1,081,871) (370,114) Total Transfers Out11 (1,388,553) (2,787,892) (3,007,289) (2,677,675) (2,433,945) (1,724,739) TOTAL PAYROLL,EXPENDITURES AND TRANSFERS OUT (8,711,145) (10,563,575) (11,018,126) (10,985,832) (10,929,627) (10,409,727) NET CHANGE TO FUND Beginning Fund Balance 8,553,121 9,614,347 8,173,598 6,661,957 5,077,307 4,227,330 Ending Fund Balance 9,614,347 8,173,598 6,661,957 5,077,307 4,227,330 3,624,876 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 553,197 555,202 283,146 283,146 283,146 283,146 Unassigned Ending Balance 9.061.150 7.618.396 6.378.811 4.794.161 3.944,184 3.341.730 Operating Cost per Day 23,866 26,160 26,212 26,891 26,980 27,506 Operating Days 380 291 243 178 146 121 %of Operating Expenditures without transfers 255% 213% 173% 125% 101% 85% CEMETERY 8 ----- Section Sales 11,125012,82.5 11,125 11,125 11,125 11,125 Perpetual Care-Section 15% 150 150 150 150 150 Perpetual Care-interment 100% 5050 50 50 50 Marker Sales 250250 250 250 250 Private Contributions 50,0000 0 0 0 Contractor Fee 350350 350 350 350 Interest Income 900 909 918 927 937 Total Revenues 12,852 12,862 Attorney-Boyle&Lowry (240) 1 (240) (240) (240) (240) Engineering 0 oil 0 0 0 0 Contract Services (225) (225) (225) (225) (225) Irrigation R&M (395) oil (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) Contract Landscaping (6,375) (6,375) (6,375) (6,375) (6,375) Computer Eqpmt/Software (225) 1 (350) (350) (350) (350) Grounds R&M (225) (2,000) (2,000) (2,000) (2,000) Training/Meetings/Seminars (225) (225) (225) (225) (225) Dues&Memberships (75) (75) (75) (75) (75) Land Improvements 0 off 0 0 0 0 Cost of Sales-Cemetery Lots (700) •• (700) (700) (700) (700) Total Expenditures = (15,190) (15,190) (15,190) NET CHANGE TO FUND Beginning Fund Balance 158,238 212,378 193,013 190,657 188,310 185,972 Ending Fund Balance 212,378 193,013 190,657 188,310 185,972 183,644 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 212,378 193,013 190,657 188,310 185,972 183,644 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 116 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED �' 1 2 3 4 FY 16-17 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 UTILITY FUND ----- Water Revenue 2,600,500 11 2,665,895 2,692,554 2,719,479 2,746,674 DS-Hillwood Service Area 48,000 off 48,480 48,965 49,454 49,949 DS-Town Service Area Accts 43,000 off 43,430 43,864 44,303 44,746 Waste Management 5,705 5,853 5,911 5,971 6,030 Sewer Revenue-Westlake 921,400 944,577 954,023 963,563 973,199 Sewer Revenue-Keller 1,260 1,293 1,306 1,319 1,332 Water Tap Fees 31,410 :• 32,209 32,531 32,856 33,185 Sewer Tap Fees 10,875 11,161 11,272 11,385 11,499 Fort Worth Impact fees 78,980 9 off 50,500 51,005 51,515 52,030 Charge For Service Total 3,741,130 3 765 740 3,803,397 3 841 431 3,879,846 3 918 644 Meter Repair&Replacement 18,200 18,382 18,566 18,751 18,939 Interest Income 14,120 ,1 14,261 14,404 14,548 14,693 Duct Bank Leases 30,965 31,275 31,587 31,903 32,222 TRA Wastewater Settle-Up 50,000 50,500 51,005 51,515 52,030 Duct Bank Permit Fees-other 4,200 88,779 89,667 90,563 91,469 Insurance Refund/Equity Return 750 758 765 773 780 Misc Reimbursements 3,020 3,050 3,081 3,112 3,143 Misc Revenue Dept 16 8,000 8,080 8,161 8,242 8,325 Administrative CC Fee 5,480 5,535 5,590 5,646 5,703 Total Misc Income 218,435 218,435 220,619 222,826 225,054 227,304 Bond Proceeds 0 2,600,000 0 0 0 Other Resources 0 0 2,600,000 0 0 0 Total Revenues&Transfers In 3,959,565 3,984,175 6,624,017 4,064,257 4,104,899 4,145,948 PR Transfer Out (437,145) (487,527) (492,402) (497,326) (502,300) Total Payroll and Related (437,145) (482,700) (487,527) (492,402) (497,326) (502,300) Office Rent (34,200) (75,900) (75,900) (75,900) (75,900) Electric Service (5,880) (7,500) (7,500) (7,500) (7,500) Telephone Service Dept 10 (724) (735) (746) (757) (768) Telephone Service Dept 16 (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Water-Pump Station Dept 16 (20,600) (20,909) (21,223) (21,541) (21,864) Electric-Pump Station Dept 16 (72,100) (73,182) (74,279) (75,393) (76,524) Electric-Lift Station Dept 16 (2,680) .: (2,720) (2,761) (2,802) (2,844) Internet Service Dept 10 (1,645) (1,670) (1,695) (1,720) (1,746 Total Rent&Utilities (138,829) (156,499) (183,630) (185,134) (186,660) (188,209) Computer Hardware/Software 0 ��� (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Mechanical Equipment (1,000) ��� (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Water Meters/Equipment (10,000) 1 pop (10,150) (10,302) (10,457) (10,614) Water Taps (8,780) :� (8,912) (9,045) (9,181) (9,319) Total Capital Outlay (19,780) 20 780 (21,092) (21,408) (21,729) (22,055) Insurance General Liability (980) (995) (1,010) (1,025) (1,040) Insurance Automobile (1,700) �� (1,726) (1,751) (1,778) (1,804) Insurance Property (6,070) (6,161) (6,253) (6,347) (6,442) Total Insurance (8,750) 8 750 (8,881) (9,014) 9,150 (9,287) Water ower Landscape R&M (7,000) (7,105) (7,212) (7,320) (7,430) Water Main R&M (42,545) (43,183) (43,831) (44,488) (45,156) Water Tower R&M (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Sewer Main R&M (19,715) (20,011) (20,311) (20,616) (20,925) Pump Station Landscape R&M (13,500) (13,703) (13,908) (14,117) (14,328) Lift Station R&M (6,000) (6,090) (6,181) (6,274) (6,368) Instrument R&M (9,750) (9,896) (10,045) (10,195) (10,348) Ground Storage Tank R&M (2,300) (2,335) (2,370) (2,405) (2,441) Generator R&M (4,000) (4,060) (4,121) (4,183) (4,245) Pump Station R&M (22,500) (22,838) (23,180) (23,528) (23,881) Duct Bank R&M (7,940) (8,059) (8,180) (8,303) (8,427) Meter Repair&Replacement (21,000) (21,315) (21,635) (21,959) (22,289) Vehicle R&M (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Total Repair and Maintenance Insurance (158,250) 158 250 (160,624) (163,033) (165,479) 167 961 Bank Service Charges (5,570) (5,654) (5,738) (5,824) (5,912) Engineering (775) (787) (798) (810) (823) Water Utility Engineering (37,555) (38,118) (38,690) (39,270) (39,860) Auditor (5,750) (5,836) (5,924) (6,013) (6,103) Attorney-Boyle&Lowry (15,000) (15,225) (15,453) (15,685) (15,920) Attorney-Lloyd Gosselink (15,835) (16,073) (16,314) (16,558) (16,807) Contract Labor (5,00 (5,075) (5,151) (5,228) (5,307) Contract Services (7,860) (7,978) (8,098) (8,219) (8,342) TRA-Wastewater Treatment (385,200) (621,180) (630,498) (639,955) (649,554) Southlake-Wastewater Treatment (500,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Testing-Water/Bacteria/Rgltry (30,000) (30,450) (30,907) (31,370) (31,841) Utility Billing (15,000) (15,225) (15,453) (15,685) (15,920) Line Location (5,660) (5,745) (5,831) (5,919) (6,007) Application Software Maint. (10,750) (10,911) (11,075) (11,241) (11,410) Keller Waste Water (1,300) 1 (1,320) (1,339) (1,359) (1,380) 117 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED �' 1 2 3 4 FY 16 17 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Mobile Phone (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Misc Rental/Lease (500) (508) (515) (523) (531) Travel Airfare (800) :�� (812) (824) (837) (849) Travel Car Rental/Parking (100) (102) (103) (105) (106) Travel Lodging (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Travel Meals (135) (137) (139) (141) (143) Training/Seminars/Meetings (3,000) (3,045) (3,091) (3,137) (3,184) Dues&Subscriptions (985) (1,523) (1,545) (1,569) (1,592) Printing (1,130) (1,147) (1,164) (1,182) (1,199) Licenses/Registrations 0 (711) (721) (732) (743) Courier Service (200) (203) (206) (209) (212) Total Service (1,051,110) 779 120 (790,807) (802,669) (814,709) 826 930 Safety Supplies (100) (102) (103) (105) (106) Misc Hand Tools (1,000) (1,015) (1,030) (1,046) (1,061) Chemical Supplies (350) (355) (361) (366) (371) Office Supplies (1,550) (1,573) (1,597) (1,621) (1,645) Postage&Shipping (400) (406) (412) (418) (425) Vehicle Fuel (3,000) (3,045) (3,091) (3,137) (3,184) Uniforms (500) (508) (515) (523) (531) Capital Operating Impact-Utility 0 26 735 (27,537) (28,363) (34,036) Total Supplies (6,900) (6,900) (33,739) (34,646) (35,578) (41,359) Water Purchases (934,500) (953,190) (972,254) (991,699) (1,011,533) Water Service Charge (600) (612) (624) (637) (649) Peak Payment (409,500) (417,690) (426,044) (434,565) (443,256) Total Water Purchase Expense (1,344,600) (1,344,600) (1,371,492) (1,398,922) (1,426,900) (1,455,438) Transfer Out-UMR Fund 510 (100,000) (25,000) (25,000) (25,000) (25,000) Transfer Out-VMR Fund 505 (8,335) (6,250) (6,250) (6,250) (6,250) Transfer Out-GF 100 Impact Fees (170,258) r r r r (50,500) (51,005) (51,515) (52,030) Total Transfers Out (278,593) (56,250) (81,750) (82,255) (82,765) (83,280) Fort Worth Payment-Phase 1 (888,160) 0 0 0 0 Fort Worth Payment-Phase II (1,711,840) 0 0 0 DS-Principal Keller OH Storage (104,145) r (108,950) (113,756) (120,165) 0 DS-Interest Keller OH Storage (16,395) (11,986) (7,393) (2,523) 0 DS-Hillwood Service Area (48,240) (48,722) (49,210) (49,702) (49,702) DS-Town Service Area (43,215) (43,647) (44,084) (44,524) (44,524) DS-TX Water Bd 30 Yr Note 0 0 (200,000) (200,000) (200,000) DS-Principal-2013 CO Ground Storage Tank (22,000) (22,550) (23,650) (23,650) (24,750) DS-Interest-2013 CO Ground Storage Tank (33,465) (32,576) (32,114) (31,582) (30,977) Total Debt (1,155,620) (1,155,174) (1,980,271) (470,206) (472,146) (349,953) Total Expenses&Transfers Out (4,599,577) (4,169,023) (5,119,813) (3,659,689) (3,712,442) (3,646,771) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCEi 1,504,204 404,568 Beginning Fund Balance 1,121,826 481,814 296,966 1,801,171 2,205,738 2,598,195 Ending Fund Balance 481,814 296,966 1,801,171 2,205,738 2,598,195 3,097,373 Restricted/Committed/Assigned Hillwood 0 0 1,670,000 1,670,000 1,670,000 1,670,000 Restricted/Committed/Assigned Deposits 235,651 238,007240,387 242,791 245,219 245,219 Unassigned Ending Balance 246.164 58.959 (109.217) 292.947 682.976 1.182.154 Operating Expenses 4,301,204 4,091,993 5,016,971 3,556,026 3,607,948 3,541,436 Operating Cost Per Day 11,784 11,211 13,745 9,743 9,885 9,703 Operating Days 41 26 131 226 263 319 UTILITY MAINT & REPLACEMENT ----- Interest Income 4,500 1 3,400 3,400 3,400 3,400 Transfers In from OF 500 100,000 u 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 Total Revenues&Transfers In 4,500 28,400 28,400 28,400 28,40 Sewer Easement Cleaning Machine 0 0 0 0 0 Repaint Ground Storage Tank 0 0 0 0 0 Pump Station Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer out to GMR Fund 600 (380,000) 0 0 0 0 jotalExpenditures&Transfers Out (380,0001 (245,000) 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE (240,500) 28,400 28,400 28,400 28,400 Beginning Fund Balance 722,939 447,439 206,939 235,339 263,739 292,139 Ending Fund Balance 447,439 206,939 235,339 263,739 292,139 320,539 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 447,439 206,939 235,339 263,739 292,139 320,539 Unassigned Ending Balance(projected) - GENERAL MAINT & REPLACEMENT ----- Contributions 5000 0 0 0 Firefighter Equipment Fees 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 118 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED •' 12 3 4 FY 16-17 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Interest Income 1,550W307550 1,750 1,750 1,750 1,750 Transfer in from UMR 380,0000 0 0 0 Transfer in from GF 610,550 300,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 Total Revenues&Transfers In 307 750 207,750 207,750 207,750 Public Works 0 0 0 0 0 0 Facilities WA (269,735) (200,000) (205,000) (151,000) (208,000) (208,000) Parks and Rec (22,000) (20,000) (20,000) (20,000) (20,000) I.T.Department (125,210) (30,000) (245,000) (67,500) (155,000) (67,500) Facilities Town (809,800) 27 000 (27,000) (27,000) (27,000) Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (1,226,745) (287,000) (265,500) (410,000) (322,500) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 20,550r i Beginning Fund Balance 228,768 623 21,173 (168,077) (225,827) (428,077) Ending Fund Balance 623 21,173 (168,077) (225,827) (428,077) (542,827) Restricted/Committed/Assigned 623 21,173 (168,077) (225,827) (428,077) (542,827) nassi med Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 VEHICLE MAINT & REP (Utility) ----- Sales of Surplus 8,650 • 0 0 0 0 Interest Earned 40 0 0 0 0 Transfer in from OF 16,670 • 6,250 6,250 6,250 6,250 Total Revenues&Transfers In 6,290 6,250 6,250 6,250 6,250 Public Works Vehicle 0 0 0 (50,000) 0 Total Expenditur ancforc nut 0 n 0 (50,000) 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND i i Beginning Fund Balance 0 25,360 31,650 37,900 44,150 400 Ending Fund Balance 25,360 31,650 37,900 44,150 400 6,650 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 25,360 31 650 37 900 44 150 400 6,650 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 VEHICLE MAINT & REP - w Sales of Surplus Dept 14 4,765 • 0 0 0 0 WA/WAF Contribution for Buses 110,000 1 0 150,000 0 0 Insurance Proceeds 8,715 • 0 0 0 0 Interest Earned 925 200 200 200 0 Transfer In from GF 0 • 125,000 110,000 0 0 Total Revenues&Transfers In 24,405 925 260 200 200 0 Academy Buses (110,000) ® 0 (150,000) 0 0 Fire Dept Vehicles (55,000) • (250,000) (60,000) 0 0 Facilities Vehicles 0 0 (50,000) 0 0 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (165,000) 0 (250,000) (260,000) 0 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 925 (124,800) 200 200 0 Beginning Fund Balance 177,574 136,979 137,904 13,104 13,304 13,504 Ending Fund Balance 136,979 137,904 13,104 13,304 13,504 13,504 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 136,979 137,904 13,104 13,304 13,504 13,504 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 a VISITORS ASSOCIATION FUND ---- Hotel Tax(Marriott; 772,000 787,517 795,392 803,346 811,380 Hotel Tax(Deloitte) 32,640 1 32,966 33,296 33,629 33,965 Total Hotel Tax 804,640 812,360 820,484 828,688 836,975 845,345 Interest Income 5,150 :3,283 02 5,254 5,306 5,359 Insur Refund/Equity Return 835 43 852 860 869 Misc Revenue 250 r 53 255 258 260 Membership Fees 1,775 93 1,811 1,829 1,847 Special Events Revenue 3,250 3,315 3,348 3,382 Sales of Printed Material 200 •• 02 204 206 208 Sponsors 3,000 30 3 060 3 091 3 122 Total Other Revenues 16,170 14,460 14,605 14,751 14,898 15,047 tal Revenues&Transfers In 826,820 Office Rent (34,200) (75,900) (75,900) (75,900) (76,659) Electric Service (5,880) •• (7,500) (7,500) (7,500) (7,575) Telephone Service (624) (630) (637) (643) (649) 119 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED •' 1 2 3 4 FY 16 17 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Internet Service (1,415) (1,429) (1,443) (1,458) (1,472) Total Rent and Utilities (42,119) 59 789 (85,459) (85,480) (85,501) (86,356) PR Transfer Out (480,002) • (523,695) (528,932) (534,221) (539,564) Total PR Transfer Out (480,002) 518 510 (523,695) (528,932) (534,221) (539,564) General Services (144,075) • (145,516) (146,971) (148,441) (149,925) Communications (109,680) (138,653) (140,039) (141,440) (142,854) Historical Board (7,405) (7,479) (7,554) (7,629) (7,706) Public Arts (35,000) (30,502) (30,807) (31,115) (31,426) Arbor Day 0 (2,525) (2,550) (2,576) (2,602) Total Service (296,160) (321 460 (324,675) (327,921) (331,201) (334,513) General Services 0 om (10,100) (10,201) (10,303) (10,406) Total Supplies 0 (10,000) (10,100) (10,201) (10,303) (10,406) Transfer Out-GF 100 (61,020) 0 0 0 0 0 Transfer Out-DS 300 (150,625) 0 0 0 0 0 Total Transfers Out (211,645) 0 0 0 0 0 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (1,029,926) (909,759) (943.91§§F(952,534) (961,226) (970,838) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE •: i i Beginning Fund Balance 1,011,947 802,831 719,892 611,051 501,956 392,603 Ending Fund Balance 802,831 719,892 611,051 501,956 392,603 282,158 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 151,700 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Ending Balance ■MMM 651.131 E719,892 611.051 392.603 282,158 4B ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND Sales tax (on-going) 1,137,500MIL 1,271,625 1,206,774 1,242,977 1,244,063 Transfer Out-DS 300 (1,137,500) (1,271,625) (1,206,774) (1,242,977) (1,244,063) NET CHANGE TO . :• Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 0 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Mng Balance 0 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND General Sales Tax 102,000 202,000 202,000 102,000 102,000 102,000 Hotel/Motel Tax 32,640 32,640 32,640 32,640 32,640 32,640 Economic Development for WA 1,010,000 750,000 840,000 810,000 810,000 310,000 Total Revenues&Transfers In 1,144,640 984,640 1,074,640 944,640 944,640JEL444,640 ED-Deloitte Sales Tax (102,000) • ••• (102,000) (102,000) (102,000) (102,000) ED-Deloitte Hotel Tax (32,640) (32,640) (32,640) (32,640) (32,640) ED-Schwab Sales Tax 0 •• ••• (100,000) 0 0 0 Transfer Out-WAE 412 (1,010,000) (840,000) (810 000) (810,000) (310,000) TotaL Expenditures&Transfers Out (1,144,640) (984,640) (1,074,640) (9 (944,640) (444,640) NET CHANGE TO FUND: • i i Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 0 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT M��� Development Fees(Platting) 10,000 0 0 0 0 Miscellaneous Reimbursments 85,000 • ••• 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 Total Revenues&Transfers In 95,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 Consultant Fees (260,000) M.11 0 0 0 0 Boyle&Lowry (10,000) 0 0 0 0 Admin Fees (5,500) 0 0 0 0 Construction Expense (24,500) 0 0 0 0 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (300,000) (60,000) 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND:ALANCE 0 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 Beginning Fund Balance 720,015 515,015 515,015 575,015 635,015 695,015 Ending Fund Balance 515,015 515,015 575,015 635,015 695,015 755,015 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 515,015 515 015 575 015 635,015 695,015 755,015 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 120 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds ESTIMATED •• 1 2 3 4 DESCRIPTION FY 16-17 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 LONE STAR 8 --- Revenues80 ®:• 81 82 82 83 Ex enditures 0 0 0 0 0 0 �NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE Beginning Fund Balance 13,679 13,759 13,839 13,920 14,002 14,084 Ending Fund Balance 13,759 13,839 13,920 14,002 14,084 14,168 Restricted/Committed/Assi ned 13 759 13,839 13,920 14,002 14,084 14,168 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 supported)DEBT SERVICE(revenue Transfer in-GF 100 778,0031,131,546 1,196,965 1,152,074 1,154,625 Transfer In-VA 220 150,625M., 0 0 0 0 Transfer In-4B 200 1,137,500 1,271,625 1,206,774 1,242,977 1,244,063 Total Transfers In 2,066,128 2,710,068 2,403,171 2,403,739 2,395,051 2,398,689 Principal-Issue 2011 GORB (275,000) (715,000) (730,000) (750,000) (770,000) Interest-Issue 2011 GORB (207,275) (171,425) (149,750) (127,550) (104,750) Principal-Issue 2013 CO (178,000) (182,450) (191,350) (191,350) (200,250) Interest-Issue 2013 CO (270,730) (263,568) (259,830) (255,525) (250,630) Principal-Issue 2013 GORB (130,000) Interest-Issue 2013 GORB (39,950) Principal-Issue 2014 GORB (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) Interest-Issue 2014 GORB (65,220) (64,860) (64,680) (64,500) (64,320) Principal-Issue 2017 CO (203,098) (205,000) (210,000) (215,000) (225,000) Interest-Issue 2017 CO (304,725) (298,500) (292,125) (285,525) Principal-Issue 2007 GORE (425,000) Interest-Issue 2007 GORB (146,804) • .�: Principal-Issue 2017 GORB (30,000) (35,000) (35,000) (35,000) Interest-Issue 2017 GORB (119,028) (227,025) (226,375) (225,675) (224,888) Principal-2017 Tax Note (212,000) (215,000) (219,000) (223,000) Interest-2017 Tax Note (22,118) (18,254) (14,326) (10,326) Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (2,066,705) (2,710,068) (2,403,171) (2,403,739) (2,395,051) (2,398,689) NET CHANGE TO FUND: Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 0 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 DEBT • .• ••. ----- Property Tax CY 2011 CO 95,010 523,919 527,441 530,743 529,874 Total Revenues 95,010 271,411 523,919 527,441 530,743 529,874 Bank Charge-2011 CO Road&Street 0 0 0 0 0 DS Principal-Issue 2011 CO (75,000) (83,000) (87,000) (91,000) (96,000) DS Interest-Issue 2011 CO Improvements (43,611) (34,356) (32,316) (30,180) (27,936) Bank Charge-2013 GORB Moved 0 0 0 0 0 Refunding of DS Principal-Issue 2013 GORB from Series 2008(A&5) 0 (135,000) (140,000) (145,000) (145,000) ��� DS Interest-Issue 2013 GORB ;nn 0 (34,463) (31,025) (27,463) (23,838) Bank Charge 2019 NEW Road&Street 0 0 0 0 0 DS Principal 2019 0 (237,100) (237,100) (237,100) (237,100) DS Interest 2019 ISSUE Improvements 0 0 0 0 0 Total Expenditures (118,611) (277,700) (530,743) (529,874) NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE '111IIIIIIIIIIIIff- Beginning Fund Balance 29,890 6,289 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 6,289 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 6,289 0 0 0 0 0 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 CAPITAL PROJECTS 8 --- Transfer in from GF 0 1,450,742 1,170,710 1,081,871 370,114 Payroll Transfers Out to GF 00 0 0 0 Interest Income 57,100 6,000 6,000 6,000 0 NET 57,100 998,759 1,456,742 1,176,710 1,087,871 370,114 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 480,180 0 0 0 121 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED �' 1 2 3 4 FY 16-17 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 ROANOKE ROAD RECON/DRAIN SOUTH 0 0 (480,180) 0 0 NET 0 0 480,180 0 0 0 Contribution 219,625 0 0 0 0 FM1938 TOWN IMPROVEMENTS 0 0 0 0 0 NET 219,625 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 281,960 0 0 0 SAM SCHOOL ROAD RECON&DRAINANGE 0 (281,960) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cash(Fund Balance) 0 0 0 0 0 E.DOVE ROAD RECON&DRAINAGE(Vaquero-TB) (696,260) 0 0 0 0 NET (696,260) 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 30,000 0 0 0 TRAIL CONNECTION AT 114/SOLANA 0 (30,000) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 300,949 0 0 0 TRAIL-WESTLAKE ACADEMY TO CEMETERY 0 0 (300,949) 0 0 NET 0 0 300,949 (300,949) 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 290,016 0 0 0 TRAIL-DOVE/PEARSON/ASPEN 0 (290,016) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 983,954 0 0 0 OTTINGER ROAD RECON&DRAINAGE 0 0 (983,954) 0 0 NET 0 0 983,954 (983,954) 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 404,125 0 0 0 PEARSON LANE RECON&DRAINAGE 0 (404,125) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Proceeds 9,204,300 0 0 0 0 0 Texas Tax Note Revenue 1,530,000 0 0 0 0 0 Contribution Revenue 1,200,000 0 0 0 0 0 Land Donation 1,750,000 0 0 0 0 0 FIRE STATION CONSTRUCTION and LAND (2,250,000) (1,819,575) 0 0 0 NET 11,434,300 (9,843,000) (1,819,575) 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 229,500 0 0 0 WAYFINDING SIGNAGE 0 (229,500) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 DOVE ROAD/FM 1938 SIGNALIZATION (285,000) 0 0 0 0 NET (285,000) (160,000) 0 0 0 0 Contribution Revenue 220,445 0 0 0 0 SOLANA/SH114 SIGNALIZATION 0 0 0 0 0 NET 220,445 0 0 0 0 0 SOLANA/FM1938 SIGNALIZATION (102,000) 0 0 0 0 NET 10,000 (10,000) 0 0 0 0 WAF Grant 60 0 135,000 0 0 WA-OUTDOOR LEARNING CENTER (97,690) 0 (123,595) 0 0 NET (97,630) 0 0 11,405 0 0 Grants(WAF$11750-HOC$5000-WAAC$2975) 15,175 0 0 0 0 WA-BLEACHERS AND FILM TOWER (4,590) 0 0 0 0 NET 10,585 0 0 0 0 0 Land Sale 4,010 0 0 0 0 LAND SALE EXPENSE (19,725) 0 0 0 0 NET (15,715) 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 80,000 0 0 0 FLASHING CROSSWALK LIGHTS 0 (80,000) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Contribution 150,000 ® 0 0 0 0 CEMETARY IMPROVEMENTS 0 �� ��� (50,000) 0 0 0 NET 150,000 (100,000) (50,000) 0 0 0 122 TOWN OF WESTLAKE FIVE YEAR FORECAST RETURN TO T.O.C. All Municipal Funds DESCRIPTION ESTIMATED •' 1 2 3 4 FY 16-17 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 82,000 0 0 0 WA-POND REPAIRS 0 • (82,000) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 90,000 0 0 0 SOLANA PAVEMENT REPAIRS 0 (90,000) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 54,450 0 0 0 WYCK HILL PAVEMENT RESURFACE 0 (54,450) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1M 0 80,000 0 0 0 FM1938 PAVEMENT REPAIRS 0 (80,000) 0 0 0 NET 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues&Transfers in 14,462,715 1,228,324 4,843,876 1,311,710 1,087,871 370,114 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (3,455,265) (10,342,565) (3,491,626) (1,888,678) 0 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE 000werem0: Beginning Fund Balance 2,161,162 13,168,612 4,054,371 5,406,621 4,829,653 5,917,524 Ending Fund Balance 13,168,612 4,054,371 5,406,621 4,829,653 5,917,524 6,287,638 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 13,168,612 4,054,371 5 406 621 4,829,653 5 917 524 6,287,638 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 k- WESTLAKE ACADEMY EXPANSIONInterest Earned 3,600 .•• 500 500 500 500 Transfer in from ED 200 1,010,000 840,000 810,000 810,000 310,000 Total Revenues&Transfers In 1,013,600 7 840,500 810,500 810,500 310,500 Construction Expense 0 0 0 0 0 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out 0 0 0 0 0 0 NET CHANGE TO FUND BALANCE .11 753,600 840,500 810,500 810,500 310,500 Beginning Fund Balance 397,127 1,410,727 2,164,327 3,004,827 3,815,327 4,625,827 Ending Fund Balance 1,410,727 2,164,327 3,004,827 3,815,327 4,625,827 4,936,327 Restricted Funds 1,410,727 2,164,327 3,004,827 3,815,327 4,625,827 4,936,327 Unassigned Ending Balance 0 0 0 0 0 0 123 RETURN TO T.O.C. ty S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLl��� L6Z�L 124 79. SECT E +E.RA' L + U D 4WWAM T + •' + i 1 4 (V l Awl, �w�yes �waaw• ■r i 6 - - -� t7/ Oil r � RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 126 General Fund 100 RETURN To T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY""7 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 3,345,688 $ 3,310,500 $ 3,310,500 $ 3,510,500 $ 200,000 6% Property Tax 1,318,059 1,437,050 1,479,500 1,205,205 (274,295) -19% Charge for Service - - - - 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax - - 0% Beverage Tax 61,476 62,500 62,500 62,500 - 0% Franchise Fees 930,042 966,370 974,770 983,815 9,045 1% Permits&Fees Other 478,890 247,885 320,370 302,145 (18,225) -6% Permits&Fees Building 1,472,709 2,287,557 2,469,458 2,137,121 (332,337) -13% Permits&Fees Utility - - - - - 0% Fines&Forfeitures 796,013 805,350 809,880 809,880 0% Investment Earnings 17,066 12,340R231,278 43,100 - 0% Contributions - - (35) -100% Misc Income 48,693 21,280 18,560 (52,420) -74% Total Revenues 8,468,635 9,150,832 9,072,826 (468,267) -5% Transfers In 269,545 66,030 50,000 (181,278) 100% Other Sources - - - 0% Total Other Sources 269,545 66,030 50,000 (181,278) 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 8,738,180 $ 9,216,862 $ 9,772,371 $ $ (649,545) -7% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ 2,990,927 $ 3,472,410 $ 3,373,370 $ 3,821,261 $ 447,891 13% Payroll Transfers In (892,998) (958,765) (917,146) (1,055,775) (138,629) 15% Total Payroll and Related 2,097,930 2,513,645 2,456,224 2,765,486 309,262 13% Debt 351,677 351,680 351,680 351,680 - 0% Economic Development - - - - - 0% Insurance 32,397 36,390 33,625 33,625 0% Payroll Transfers Out - - - - - 0% Repair&Maintenance 221,996 226,015 209,465 242,580 33,115 16% Rent&Utilities 376,587 573,655 380,306 445,316 65,010 17% Services 2,060,517 2,368,995 2,330,285 2,213,639 (116,646) -5% Supplies 173,578 217,905 216,754 252,284 35,530 16% Water Purchases - - - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 3,216,753 3,774,640 3,522,115 3,539,124 17,009 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 5,314,683 6,288,285 5,978,339 6,304,610 326,271 5% Capital Project Funds - - - - - 0% Capital Outlay 41057,718 208,015 31,690 31,690 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds - - - - 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 208,015 31,690 31,690 - 0% Transfers Out 1,103,635 1,388,553 2,787,892 1,399,339 101% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 1,103,635 1,388,553 2,787,892 1,399,339 101% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,075,410 1,311,650 1,420,243 2,819,582 1,399,339 99% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 6,390,0931 7,599,935 1 7,398,582 9,124,192 1,725,610 23% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 2,348,0861 1,616,927 2,373,790 (1,366) (2,375,156) 100% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 7,240,729 8,553,121 8,553,121 10,926,911 2,373,790 28% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 9,588,816 10,170,048 10,926,911 10,925,545 (1,366) 0% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 9,588,816 10,170,048 10,926,911 10,925,545 (1,366) 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - - $ - $ - 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 100 10110 00 000 $ 9,588,816 $ 10,170,048 $ 10,926,911 $ 10,925,545 $ (1,366) 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 9,588,816 $ 10,170,048 $ 10,926,911 $ 10,925,545 $ (1,366) 0% 127 GENERAL FUND RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary By Department FY 2017/2018 Twn Town General Manager's Planning and Secretary's Fire/EMS Municipal Public Facilities Services Office Development Office Department Court Works Maintenance REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 3,510,500 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Property Tax 1,205,205 Beverage Tax I 62,500 - Franchise Fees 983,815 - Permits&Fees Other 4,940 165,080 123,150 8,975 Permits&Fees Building - 2,137,121 - - Fines and Forfeitures - - 809,880 Investment Earnings 41,600 - 1,500 - Misc Income I 16,035 250 - 2,000 Total Revenues I 5,824,595 2,302,451 123,150 820,355 2,000 Transfers In I - - - Total Other Sources - TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 5,824,595 $ $ 2,302,451 $ $ 123,150 $ 820,355 $ $ 2,000 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES PR Wages I 41,657 389,708 323,470 123,385 1,347,465 239,026 304,269 82,640 PR Transfer in I - (161,194) - - - - (351,158) (56,625) PR Insurance I 11,1651 41,699 46,378 17,590 216,114 58,7351 62,741 12,138 PR SSM I 3,186 29,805 24,739 9,437 103,055 18,281 23,271 6,321 PR Taxes I 200 1,870 3,323 592 29,914 2,343 5,608 1,558 PR Retirement 5,340 74,231 41,469 15,818 151,544 30,643 42,007 10,594 Total Payroll&Related 61,548 376,119 439,379 166,822 1,848,092 349,028 86,738 56,626 Debt 351,680 - - - - Insurance I 20,085 500 11,905 545 - 590 Repair&Maintenance I - - 54,345 300 38,295 67,340 Rent&Utilities I 280,621 - - 19,665 - 2,595 800 Services I 359,563 29,524 282,850 52,990 98,920 104,176 75,730 32,915 Supplies I 28,459 2,534 29,290 3,775 102,945 12,916 4,510 33,930 Total Operations 1,040,408 32,058 312,640 56,765 287,780 117,937 121,130 135,575 Capital Outlay - 490 27,900 500 Total Capital 490 27,900 500 Transfers Out - Other Uses Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 1,101,956 408,177 752,509 223,587 2,163,772 466,965 208,368 192,201 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER)EXPENDITURES $ 4,722,639 $ (408,177) $ 1,549,942 $ (223,587) $(2,040,622) $ 353,390 $ (208,368) $ (190,201) 128 GENERAL FUND RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary By Department FY 2017/2018 Finance Parks and Information Human Commun- Police Transfers In Department Recreation Technology Resources ications Services and Out TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 3,510,500 Property Tax 1,205,205 Beverage Tax I 62,500 Franchise Fees 983,815 Permits&Fees Other 302,145 Permits&Fees Building 2,137,121 Fines and Forfeitures 809,880 Investment Earnings 43,100 Misc Income 275 18,560 Total Revenues I 275 9,072,826 Transfers In I - 50,000 50,000 Total Other Sources 50,000 50,000 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ $ 275 $ :vim $ 50,000 $ 9,122,826 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES PR Wages I 363,733 64,225 180,137 180,843 180,703 3,821,261 PR Transfer In I (198,945) (45,467) - (12,077) (230,309) (1,055,775) PR Insurance I 57,412 12,138 29,329 22,8031 11,753 599,995 PR SSM I 27,818 4,912 13,776 13,831 13,821 292,253 PR Taxes 1,746 1,426 864 868 868 51,180 PR Retirement 46,631 8,234 23,094 23,184 23,166 495,955 Total Payroll&Related 298,395 45,468 247,200 229,452 2 4,204,869 Debt - - - - 351,680 Insurance - 33,625 Repair&Maintenance 82,300 242,580 Rent&Utilities I 141,635 - - - 445,316 Services I 35,186 80,240 91,285 29,115 8,235 932,910 2,213,639 Supplies I 6,660 9,645 5,850 4,270 7,500 - 252,284 Total Operations I 41,846 313,820 97,135 33,385 15,735 932,910 3,539,124 Capital Outlay 1,800 1,000 - - 31,690 Total Capital 1,800 1,000 31,690 Transfers Out - - 2,787,892 2,787,892 Other Uses - Total Other Uses 2,787,892 2,787,892 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 342,041 360,288 344,335 262,837 15,737 932,910 2,787,892 10,563,575 EXCESS REVENUES OVER (UNDER)EXPENDITURES $ (342,041) $ (360,013) $ (344,335) $ (262,837) $ (15,737) $ (932,910) $(2,737,892) $(1,440,749) 129 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 General Fund Overview REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES Total General Fund revenues and other sources are budgeted to be $9,122,826. This represents a 7% decrease of $649,545 from prior year estimated revenues and other sources of $9,772,371. General Sales and Use Tax • Budgeted to be$3,510,500 and comprises 39%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 6%increase of$200,000 when compared to prior year estimates primarily due to a development agreement. o Sales taxes are collected on the sale of goods and services within the Town as authorized by the State of Texas. o The maximum sales tax allowed in the State of Texas is 8.25%per dollar on all taxable goods and services. 6.25%per dollar is kept by the State; municipalities receive a maximum of 2%. Funds are collected by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and remitted to the Town monthly. o An amount equal to 1.50%of taxable sales is appropriated to the Town's General Fund. This total includes .50%that is received for property tax reduction. o The Town also receives an additional .50%sales tax that is recorded in the 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund. Property Tax • Budgeted to be$1,205,205 and comprises 13%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 19%decrease of$274,295 when compared to prior year estimates. o This is due to a decrease in the M&O portion of the tax rate. o The Maintenance and Operating tax rate of$0.11133 reflects a 14%decrease of $0.01749 per$100 valuation Beverage Tax • Budgeted to be$62,500 and comprises 1%of General Fund revenues. o The Town collects a 14%gross receipt tax on mixed beverages. o Of this percentage, 10.70 of gross liquor receipts are remitted to the Town, and the remaining 3.3%is retained by the State of Texas. Franchise Taxes • Budgeted to be$983,815 and comprises 11%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 1%increase of$9,045 when compared to prior year estimates. o Fees are collected from utilities and telecommunications companies that use Town right-of-way. o A flat rate is charged to both telephone operators (adjusted annually) and Tri-County Electric based on the number of access lines and services rendered, respectively. Permits and Fees Other • Budgeted to be$302,145 and comprises 3%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 6%decrease of$18,225 when compared to prior year estimates. o Include fees charged by the Town for gas wells, EMS revenues,review and renewal fees, developments fees and contractor registration fees. 130 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 General Fund Overview Permits and Fees Buildings • Budgeted to be$2,137,121 and comprises 23%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 13%decrease of$332,337 when compared to prior year estimates. o Based on continuing growth in residential and commercial construction. Fines and Forfeitures(Court) • Budgeted to be$809,880 and comprises 9%of General Fund revenues. • This revenue is budgeted to remain flat for fiscal year 2017-2018. o Revenue generated from the Municipal Court is based on citations and warrants issued. o The Keller Police Department will continue to provide police services for Westlake. Miscellaneous Income • Budgeted to be$18,560 and comprises .2%of General Fund revenues. • This reflects a 74%decrease of$52,420 when compared to prior year estimates. o Includes fees charged by the Town for facility rentals,sales of surplus/scrap items, insurance refunds and equity returns. Other Sources/Transfers In • Budgeted to be$50,000 and comprises leo of General Fund revenues. • Reflects a 78%decrease of$181,278 from prior year estimated transfers in. o The prior year included transfer in from the Utility fund for one-time impact fees of $120,258,that will not be budgeted this year. o The prior year included transfers in from Visitors Association Fund of$61,020, that is not budgeted this year.The Communication's department operating expenditures have been removed from the Visitor Association Fund and will now be absorbed by the General Fund. EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Total General Fund operating expenditures and transfers out are budgeted to be $10,563,575 This represents a 21%increase of $1,852,425 from prior year estimated expenditures of$8,711,150. o As in recent years,Town staff continues to operate conservatively by controlling costs while maintaining the highest possible levels of service. o These goals are only possible through continued strategic planning and the innovative use of available resources. o Our overall budget philosophy focuses on meeting stated goals and objectives and maintaining a 90-day operating fund balance. Payroll & Related-Base Salaries,Taxes, Insurance and Retirement • Budgeted to be$4,204,869 and comprise 400 of expenditures and other uses. • Reflects a 12%increase of$436,077 from prior year estimated. o Market band pay adjustments of$167,000 o Addition of one full-time Project Manager for the Public Works department$90,950 o Addition of one full-time Network Manager for the I.T.department$81,687 o Medical, dental and life insurance increased by 4%equal to$20,886 o The estimated budget for FY16/17 has been decreased by$33,938 for employees who left mid-year,were hired later than budgeted,or hired at a lower wage than budgeted. 131 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 General Fund Overview • All payroll and related expenditures are paid via the General Fund. Portions of these expenditures are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitors Association Fund. o Total payroll transfers in are$1,055,775 • Utility Fund-$482,700 • Capital Project Fund $54,565 • Visitors Association Fund-$518,510 Operations and Maintenance Accounts • Budgeted to be$3,539,124 and comprise 34%of expenditures and other uses. • Reflects a .5%increase of$17,009 from prior year estimated. o Repair and Maintenance increased $33,115 due in large part to an increase in the facilities maintenance department for contracted repairs and maintenance of municipal buildings. o Rent and utilities increased$65,010 due to the leasing of new building space in July 2017. o Services decreased $116,646 due to one-time purchases in the prior year; Laserfische work processes$57K,facilities consultant$30K, IT contract services$28K. o Supplies increased $35,530 for fire department uniforms$1 OK and the purchase of a CPR machine$23k. Other Uses/Transfers Out • Budgeted to be$2,787,892 and comprise 26%of expenditures and other uses. • Reflects a 101%increase of$1,399,339 from prior year estimated. o Capital Projects Fund budgeted at$1,015,324; ■ A 100%increase from the prior year. • One-time Entrada planning and development fees. o Debt Service Fund budgeted at$1,472,568; ■ An increase of$694,565 (890) from prior year ■ Additional debt service payments associated with Westlake Academy facilities, Fire Station/EMS Complex and various street projects o General Maintenance and Replacement Fund-$300,000 ■ A decrease of$310,550 from prior year. ■ Planned transfer to cover future capital repair and replacement costs FUND BALANCE • The ending fund balance is projected to be$8,173,594 • This amount represents a 15%decrease of$1,440,749 from prior year estimated fund balance. • The unassigned balance of$7,618,392 represents coverage for 263 operating days. 132 RETURN TO T.O.C. ProgramGeneral Fund Departments Summaries. . ObjectiYes This section includes Program Summaries for every department within the General Fund as well as Goals & Objectives and Performance Measures. 133 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 134 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 10 General Services Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax 3,345,688 3,310,500 3,310,500 3,510,500 6.0% 200,000 Property Tax 1,318,059 1,437,050 1,479,500 1,205,205 -18.5% (274,295) Permits and Fees 2,144 2,170 4,940 4,940 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - 0.0% - Franchise Fees 930,042 966,370 974,770 983,815 0.9% 9,045 Contributions - - 35 - -100.0% (35) Beverage Tax 61,476 62,500 62,500 62,500 0.0% - Interest 16,562 10,840 41,600 41,600 0.0% Intergovernmental - - - - 0.0% Misc Income 23,671 13,800 42,735 16,035 -62.5% (26,700) GRAND TOTAL $ 5,697,642 $ 5,803,230 L$ 5,916,580 $ 5,824,595 -1.6?1. $ (91,985) EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay - - - 0.0% Debt Service 351,677 351,680 351,680 351,680 0.0% Economic Development - - - - 0.0% Insurance 24,053 26,590 20,085 20,085 0.0% Repair and Maintenance - - - - 0.0% Rent and Utilities 163,646 412,400 198,161 280,621 41.6% 82,460 Service 385,743 413,935 445,728 359,563 -19.3% (86,165) Supplies 38,189 32,235 28,459 28,459 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 963,309 $ 1,236,840 $ 1,044,113 $ 1,040,408 -0.4% 135 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 10 General Services Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Receptionist/Admin Asst - 0.25 1.00 1.00 0.0% - - - 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% - - 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% L 4-+ tw yM Receptionist •,,, Admin Asst Vf � a 3 0 PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 26,301 41,657 58.4% 15,356 Payroll Insurance 8,375 11,165 33.3% 2,790 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC - 127 200 57.7% 73 Payroll Taxes SS/M 7,690 2,011 3,186 58.4% 1,175 Payroll Retirement 317 3,372 5,340 58.4% 1,968 GRAND TOTAL $ $ 8,007 $ 40,186 $ 61,548 53.217. $ 21,362 136 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 10 General Services Strategic Theme & Objective(s) ®Theme Exemplary Service & Governance ®Objective(s) Increase Financial Capacity & Reserves Program Description ®The General Service Program is comprised of costs in the budget that may not be specifically identifiable to any operational budget. The activity is administered by the Finance Department and funds various charges that are not defined or directly related to any specific department or activity of the Town. ®Examples of cost include, electricity, insurance, professional services, contingencies, etc. These types of expenditures affect all budgets and are generally not prorated. 2017 Citizen Survey Results A large percent (96%) of the residents surveyed thought Westlake was an "excellent" or "good" place to live; The most important reasons that residents indicated they will continue to stay in Westlake over the next five years were: • The quality of life • Westlake Academy • Development standards • Quality of their subdivision • Small town feel The customer service items that residents were most satisfied with were • The friendliness of Town staff (92%), • Participation of Town staff in community events/neighborhood meetings (830). • Timeliness of addressing concerns (770) 137 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 10 General Services Performance Measures 11L a BenchAlIctual-Ai 015 2016 201��MarkEstimated Target INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Department Revenues n/a $5,924,924 $5,655,025 $5,803,230 2. Department Expenditures n/a $ 732,686 $ 918,904 $1,236,840 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output - the ability to do things well,successfully, and without waste) 1 Most Scenic City Award Yes Yes 2nd Year 3rd Year Gold Level Certification Valid till Valid for 5 Years 2020 2. Resident Rating by Survey Overall customer service 90% 90% n/a 90% Overall quality of governmental services 90% 85% n/a 90% Value received from tax dollars &fees 90% 71% n/a 90% 1 138 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 11 Town Manager's Office Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities 0.0% Service 17,476 30,620 29,524 29,524 0.0% Supplies 2,594 4,310 2,534 2,534 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 20,070 $ 34,930 $ 32,058 $ 32,058 0.0% $ 139 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 11 Town Manager's Office Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Town Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% - Assistant Town Manager 0.90 0.90 0.90 1.00 11.1% 0.10 Intern 0.50 0.50 0.50 - -100.0% (0.50) Assistant - - - 0.50 100.0% 0.50 TOTAL POSITIONS 2.40 2.40 2.40 2.50 4.2% 0.10 Municipalif Human Resources Assistant Town Information • •• ManagerZCity of Keller Police Services • • Department tw F 3Fire Department o Finance Department Westlake Academy G Town Secretary Public Works Parks&Recreastion Facilities Maintenance Planning and Developemnt Westlake Academy Foundation PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 333,877 373,125 382,9087389,708 1.8% 6,800 Payroll Transfers In (139,755) (151,130) (146,806) 61,194) 9.8% (14,388) Payrolllnsurance 43,898 59,675 41,699 41,699 0.0% - Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 1,051 1,795 1,838 1,870 1.7% 32 Payroll Taxes SS/M 19,577 28,540 29,285 29,805 1.8% 520 Payroll Retirement 67,543 70,350 73,359 74,231 1.2% 872 GRAND TOTAL $ 326,191 $ 382,355 $ 382,283 1 rs 376,119 -1.6% $ (6,164) 140 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 1 1 Town Manager's Office Strategic Theme(s) & Objective(s) ♦ Themes- Natural Oasis, Exemplary Service & Governance; Exemplary Education-Westlake Academy; High Quality Planning, Design, & Development • Objective(s) -Increase Citizen, Student, Stakeholder Satisfaction; Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Department Contact Information •Tom Brymer Town Manager tbrymer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 • Amanda DeGan Asst.Town Manager adegan@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5715 Program Broad Goals • Assure all growth is compliant with Westlake development standards. • Maintain and develop a competent and competitive municipal and academic work force. • Analyze and report new revenue , WNgenerating ventures as well as identify OF WESTLAIM&P-JE ways to partner with public and private sector service providers to control cost , Building and improve services. • Monitor the municipal and academic Public Woh Recreation budgets and oversee all finances of the Town so as to apprise the Council of the Town's financial condition and future needs in a timely manner. • Assist the Board of Trustees/Town Council with the growth and development of Westlake Academy. • Provide support for Council appointed advisory committees and commissions. •The Town Manager's Office participates in the following specific programs of service: o Municipal governance o Academic governance o Comprehensive Planning and Economic Development o Financial Development o Municipal Administration o Academic Administration o Citizen Engagement and Communication 141 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 11 Town Manager's Office Program Service Description ♦The Administration Department coordinates and manages all facets of the Town's operations. •The Town Manager, reporting to the Town Council, serves as the chief executive officer for all Town operations including serving as Superintendent for Westlake Academy. His duties include implementation of the goals and objectives established by the Town Council, preparation and submission of an annual municipal budget for Board review and adoption, as well as the implementation and oversight of the adopted budget throughout its effective fiscal year. •The Town Manager guides, coordinates, and facilitates recommendations to the Council on strategic planning DID YOU KNOW initiatives and policies as well as their implementation. • Responsible for attracting, retaining, and developing a Nine (9) of the municipal/educational work force for delivering top Department Directors quality municipal and academic services. have graduate degrees in public administration, Program Trends music, accounting, two • Current residential growth remains comparable with the (2) have bachelors in previous year's permit requests and is expected to trend kinesiology and consistently in the coming fiscal years. accounting and all have industry specific •The Town recently approved, Quail Hollow, a residential certifications. development consisting of 92 new homes at the corner of Dove Road and Davis Blvd. (FM 1938); Phase 1 is underway with 31 of the 36 lots having been prepared and sold. This 188 acre gated community will feature minimum lot size of 1 acre. ♦ Centurion American continues to develop the 85 acre tract on Hwy 114 as a mixed-use development site; construction for this project is in progress with the preparation of the infrastructure prior to the commercial/residential components. CVS and a Primrose Child Care facility are in operation and a portion of the housing component and a commercial corner will begin within the fiscal year. ♦ Facility related Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) have been approved by the Council for the coming fiscal year; with $12.2 million in expenditures for the building of the Fire and EMS Station, along with signalization and cemetery improvements. 142 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 11 Town Manager's Office ♦ Enrollment requests and lottery applications at Westlake Academy continue to remain strong, with approximately 2,250 students on the current waiting list. • Westlake is entering the eighth year of our assessment of an ad-valorem property tax. With the calculated effective tax rate at $.13615 per$100 of assessed valuation. 2016-2017 Highlights • Development related activities continued to progress over this fiscal year with the realization and mobilization of construction crews in both the new residential project, Quail Hollow, and on-going progress in the mixed-use development, Entrada. Phase 2 of Granada is also underway with many new lots/home sites commencing construction this year. • Graduated our eighth class of seniors from Westlake Academy with each student being accepted into at least one 4-year college; projected enrollment for 2017/2018 school year is expected to be 856 students (K- •` , 12); id ♦ Worked with staff to create a set of building standards that support our Comprehensive Plan and will help with future development in the community. • Continued work on the cascaded Tier Two Departmental Strategy Map for Westlake Academy. We will finalize their strategic initiatives this fiscal year. i • Restructured our development "- services department to provide an enhanced level of service to our stakeholders and additional oversight of our current development projects. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives Continue organizational development of the municipal and academic teams into a cohesive, unified entity with a focus on being a high performance organization. 143 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 1 1 Town Manager's Office *Streamline development services processes and procedures. Review the use of enhanced GIS capabilities and further institute permitting software and tracking capabilities. * Facilitate the Academy and Town's approved strategic plans along with the approved Balanced Scorecard structure and the corresponding strategy map objectives; link both strategy maps and initiatives to the budget processes. * Develop strategic initiatives for the academic department and report out on our progress to the Board of Trustees. Strengthen the municipal performance measures through additional refinement and professional development for staff. * Institute the concepts conveyed through SEI and LEAD to further develop high performance teams for both the academic and municipal staff. Further advancement of the vision, mission, and values created by the elected officials. Performance Measures Bench 2015 2016 2017 Mark Actual Estimated Target N P UTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 2.4 2.4 2.5 2. Department Expenditures n/a $ 28,719 $ 33,253 $ 34,930 3. Department Payroll n/a $289,030 $332,486 $382,355 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct, deliver, develop, train, provide,assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Town Council Update Monthly 12 12 12 2. Attend ICMA Conference Yearly Yes Yes Yes 3. Attend Chamber Meetings Monthly 12 10 12 4. Town Q2 meetings Quarterly 4 3 4 1 144 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 12 Planning and Development Adopted EstimatedAdopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - 0.0% Property Tax - - - - 0.0% Permits and Fees 332,065 105,615 183,305 1 165,080 -9.9% (18,225) Permits and Fees Building 1,472,709 2,287,557 2,469,458 2,137,121 -13.5% (332,337) Franchise Fees - - - - 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income - 250 250 250 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 1,804,774 $ 2,393,422 $ 2,653,013 $ 2,302,451 13.2% $ (350,562) EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay - 490 490 490 0.0% Debt Service - - - 0.0% Economic Development - - 0.0% Insurance 501 500 500 500 0.0% Repair and Maintenance - - - 0.0% Rent and Utilities - - - - 0.0% Service 263,758 393,775 311,415 282,850 -9.27o (28,565) Supplies 12,899 28,300 29,290 29,290 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 277,158 $ 423,065 $ 341,695 $ 313,130 -8.4% 145 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 12 Planning and Development Adopted EstimatedAdopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Planning&Development Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Customer Service Coordinator 0.33 - - - 0.0% Customer Service Representative 0.33 - - 0.0% Permit Clerk - 1.00 1.00 100.0% Chief Building Official 0.50 1.00 100.0% 0.50 Building Intern 0.50 - -100.0% (0.50) Coordinator - - 0.50 1.00 100.0% 0.50 TOTAL POSITIONS 1.67 1.00 3.50 4.00 14.3% ALA . Official W 3 M Planning & Coordinator c� Development L PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 205,863 385,280 333,924 323,470 -3.1% (10,454) Payroll Insurance 31,730 47,055 46,378 46,378 0.0% - Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 1,273 7,005 3,301 3,323 0.7% 22 Payroll Taxes SS/M 14,679 29,470 24,386 24,739 1.4% 353 Payroll Retirement 20,810 45,210 40,878 41,469 1.4% 591 GRAND TOTAL $ 274,355 $ 514,020 $ 448,867 $ 439,379 -2.1% $ (9,488) 146 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 12 Planning and Development Strategic Theme & Objective(s) •Theme High Quality Planning, Design, & Development ®Objective(s) Encourage Westlake's Unique Sense of Place Optimize Planning & Development Capabilities Department Contact Information ® Ron Ruthven Director rruthven@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5739 ® Pat Cooke Chief Building Official pcooke@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5726 ® Nick Ford Coordinator nford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5742 ® Dottie Samaniego Permit Clerk dsamaniego@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5745 Program Broad Goals •Amend existing ordinances as necessary to efficiently and logically guide development within the Town of Westlake. _ • Provide the administrative, technical, and clerical services necessary to professionally 4. regulate the codes and ordinances related to the construction and use of Commercial and ;. Residential structures and properties within the community. Z, *` ® Insure code and ordinance compliance ' through effective communication, accurate records management, and by taking appropriate action when necessary to obtain .,.. compliance rel.:. ®Add in-house GIS software in order to increase TAM {•it w effectiveness in service delivery •Streamline development review processes and A.- seek technological improvements where feasible in order to increase efficiency and effectiveness in service delivery. • Reinstate the Town's Unified Development Code ®Continue with maintenance and implementation of the comprehensive plan 147 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 12 Planning and Development Program Service Description ®The Planning and Development Department is responsible for processing platting and zoning requests and ensuring that proposed development will conform to the Town of Westlake's comprehensive plans. ®This also requires the continuous updating and amending of ordinances to address ever- changing development concerns. •The Building and Code Compliance Division is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Town's adopted building codes and ordinances to assure that development is executed and maintained in compliance with ordinances and approved development plans. Program Trends ® Permanent Population Growth: Residential and mixed-use developments have the potential to significantly increase our permanent population and as of late, we have had a marked increase in the number of residential homes being constructed ®The second phase of the infrastructure for the Granada residential subdivision, at the corner of Solana Blvd. and FM 1938/Davis Blvd., is complete with new homes being constructed. ®The Quail Hollow residential development located southeast of the intersection of Dove Road and FM 1938/Davis Blvd. should be completed in this budget year. ®The first phase of the Charles Schwab corporate campus located just south of the intersection of SH 170 and SH 114 is approved and under construction. This phase includes over 1,000,000 square feet. Completion is scheduled for 2019. ®The adopted Entrada mixed-use development, along SH 114, is planned to be constructed over the next several years. It will include both commercial and residential components and feature a Spanish village theme. ® Housing Start Increases: Westlake is expecting continued single family residential construction as a result of Granada, Quail Hollow and Entrada. At least 30 single family permits are estimated to be issued this year. ®Solana: Low supply and high demand in the suburban office market coupled with the robust growth along the SH 114 corridor have led to an increase in tenant finish-outs in the existing Solana buildings. Interest in the remaining undeveloped portions of the PD1 zoning district has also increased. ®Management of Development: As the economy and the surrounding cities in the Metroplex experience commercial development and the influx of individuals continue to make the 148 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 12 Planning and Development North Texas Region their home, we will need to manage our distinctive housing developments to ensure we maintain our community as an `oasis of natural beauty' as contained in our Vision statement. 2016-2017 Highlights ®MyGov permitting software fully implemented along with department web page upgrades and GIS improvements ®Two full-time positions added to the department for a total of four FTEs. • Numerous policy and process improvements leading to more effective, efficient department administration *Adopted several ordinances leading to more effective implementation of the comprehensive plan 2016-2017 Strategic Goals and Objectives ® Communicate planning and development information to stakeholders in the most effective manner possible • Add in-house GIS licenses • Maximize utilization of MyGov • Reinstate the Unified Development Code and provide policy enhancements where possible Performance Measures Bench 2015 2016 2017 2018 Mark L Actual ActugLrEJ111N&d Target N PUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 1.67 1.67 3.50 4.00 2. Department Revenues n/a $953,455 $1,442,552 $1,297,620 $2,418,980 3. Department Expenditures n/a $128,655 $277,158 $341,695 $313,130 4. Department Payroll n/a $196,942 $274355 $448,867 $439,379 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Permits Issued n/a 159 193 196 210 MEASURES OF E F F E CTI V E N ESS (the result or consequence of achieving your output-the ability to do things well,successfully, and without waste) 1. Resident Rating per Survey Enforcing sign regulations 90% 83% n/a 80% n/a Enforcing exterior regulations for property 90% 79% n/a 81% n/a 149 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 13 Town Secretary's Office Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities 0.0% Service 40,614 45,360 45,360 52,990 16.8% 7,630 Supplies 1,684 3,775 3,775 3,775 0.0% - GRAND TOTAL $ 42,298 $ 49,135 $ 49,135 $ 56,765 15.5% $ 150 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 13 Town Secretary's Office Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Town Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Assistant - 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 1.00 1.50 1.50 1.50 0.0% L tw 3 M Town Secretary Assistant M L PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 91,575 116,555 117,790 123,385 4.7% 5,595 Payroll Insurance 8,072 11,855 17,590 17,590 0.0% - Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 355 560 565 592 4.8% 27 Payroll Taxes SS/M 7,006 8,915 9,009 9,437 4.8% 428 Payroll Retirement 10,423 14,040 15,101 15,818 4.7% 717 GRAND TOTAL $ 117,431 $ 151,925 $ 160,055 $ 166,822 4.2%1 6,767 151 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 13 Town Secretary's Office Strategic Theme & Objective(s) • Theme - Exemplary Service & Governance • Objective(s) Increase Transparency, Accessibility & Communications Encourage Westlake's Unique Sense of Place Maximize Efficiencies & Effectiveness Department Contact Information ♦ Kelly Edwards Town Secretary kedwards@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5710 ♦Tanya Morris Admin. Assistant tmorris@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5741 Program Broad Goals • A commitment to leadership that ensures quality public service based on honesty, dependability, integrity, consistency, respectfulness, and fairness. • Maintain accurate records that are available to the public, Boards, and staff through a user- friendly records management program in compliance with state law and our ordinances. • Conduct elections accurately, efficiently, and in accordance with state law. ♦ Ensure the Code of Ordinances is updated as additions and revisions are approved by the Town Council. • Maintain the majority of records in digital form. Program Service Description • Perform tasks outlined in the Texas Municipal Law and Procedure for General Law Type A Cities. • Coordinating municipal elections • Providing support of the Town Council, Board of Trustees, Planning and Zoning Commission, and the Zoning Board of Adjustments. • Oversight of the Town's (municipal and academic) records management programs. •The Town Secretary is also responsible for the communicating meeting information to the community. Program Trends The duties and responsibilities of the department indicate an increase in the number of activities/functions that impact the workload of this office. • Additional agenda postings for boards and commission meetings. • An increase in meeting notifications spurred by development. • Assisting departments with the implementation of individual department records management storage within Laserfiche. • Assisting multiple departments with the design concept and implementation of workflows to streamline and automate records management within Laserfiche. 152 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 13 Town Secretary's Office Continue working with individual departments adding forms and workflows in an effort to increase efficiencies and streamlining processes. Town of Westlake ♦ Meetings continue to be scheduled once a month for the Town Council, Board of Trustees and Planning and Zoning Commission. Planning and Zoning meetings will continue increase with new development both commercial and residential. •Time required on pre and post meeting activities are impacted by the actual number of meetings per year and the information generated for each meeting packet. The amount of time has continued to increase based on the number of meetings. Agenda preparation includes: • Electronic packet preparation • Posting requirements • Distribution of meeting notifications • Preparation of minutes • Legal advertisements • Maintaining records associated with each meeting • Facility preparation for meeting 2016-2017 Highlights ♦ Continued a separate meeting email notification for residents through Constant Contact. ♦ Prepared agendas, electronic packets and minutes for approval in a timely manner. • Continued the implementation of Laserfiche Records Management software for Town and Academy records by Department. • Completed Municipal Clerks certification training to obtain 3rd re-certification. • Implemented an email retention policy. • Administered the 2017 General Election. •Training Administrative Assistant to serve as Planning & Zoning Commission Secretary. • Laserfiche department accomplishments include: • Opening a Laserfiche public access portal allowing the public to view agendas, ordinances, resolutions and minutes for the Town Council, Board of Trustees, Planning & Zoning and affiliate boards. • Finalize and implement the workflow automation to process Finance Accounts Payables. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives • Work with individual departments to design and implement forms improving and automating processes. • Attend the 2017 Legislative update. 153 RETURN TO T.O.C. W Goals and Objectives 13 Town Secretary's Office Attend Municipal Clerks training as necessary to maintain the Texas Municipal Clerk's certification. Continue destruction of paper records terminating off-site storage agreements. Complete an electronic records destruction. Performance Measures Bench 2016 2017 2018 Mark Actual Target INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 1 1.5 1.5 2. Department Expenditures n/a $ 24,775 $ 44,125 $ 49,135 3. Department Payroll n/a $108,776 $113,185 $151,925 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Post all Board meeting agendas to 100% 100% 100% 100% website at least 72-hours prior to the meeting date and time. 2. Complete Minutes of regularly 5 days 99% 99% 99% scheduled meetings and workshops 3. Response to open records request 10 days 99% 99% 100% 4. Texas Municipal Clerks State Yes Yes Yes Yes Certification 5. International Certified Municipal Yes Yes Yes Yes Clerk 6. Notary Public Yes Yes Yes Yes 154 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 14 Fire Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax 0.0% Property Tax - - - - 0.0% Permits and Fees 133,179 131,125 123,150 123,150 0.0% Permits and Fees Bldg - - - - 0.0% Franchise Fees - 0.0% Contributions - 0.0% Beverage Tax - 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental - 0.0% Misc Income - - 1,500 - -100.0% (1,500) [GRAND TOTAL $ 133,179 $ 131,125 $ 124,650 $ 123,150 -1.2% $ (1,500) EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 14,844 27,900 27,900 27,900 0.0% Debt Service - - - - 0.0% Economic Development - - - - 0.0% Insurance 6,946 8,395 11,905 11,905 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 50,837 70,595 54,345 54,345 0.0% Rent and Utilities 17,258 13,525 19,665 19,665 0.0% - Service 88,262 78,375 96,815 98,920 2.2% 2,105 Supplies 69,552 69,640 69,945 102,945 47.2% 33,000 GRAND TOTAL $ 247,698 $ 268,430 $ 280,575 $ 315,680 12.5% $ 35,105 155 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 14 Fire Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Fire Chief 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Lieutenants 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 0.0% Fire Marshal/Deputy Chief 0.75 0.75 0.75 1.00 33.3% 0.25 Firefighter Paramedics(full-time) 7.00 8.00 8.00 9.00 12.5% 1.00 Firefighter Paramedics(part-time) 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 0.0% - TOTAL POSITIONS 13.25 14.25 14.25 1 8.8% 1.25 L 4-0 bA M Fire Marshal •v Fire Chief snFirefighter QLieutenants Paramedics 3 L PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 982,958 1,226,950 1,065,100 1,347,465 26.5% 282,365 Payroll Insurance 126,992 184,335 210,865 216,114 2.5% 5,249 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 22,028 27,235 27,235 29,914 9.8% 2,679 Payroll Taxes SSW 70,732 93,835 78,500 103,055 31.3% 24,555 Payroll Retirement 98,987 127,890 116,200 151,544 30.4% 35,344 GRAND TOTAL $ 1,301,697 $ 1,660,245 $ 1,497,900 $ 1,848,092 23.4% $ 350,192 156 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 14 Fire-EMS Department Strategic Vision Points ® Theme Exemplary Service & Governance • Objective(s) Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Maximize Efficiencies & Effectiveness Increase Citizen, Student, &Stakeholder Satisfaction Department Contact Information ® Richard Whitten Fire Chief rwhitten@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5785 ®John Ard Fire Marshal jard@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5786 Program Broad Goals ® Provide safe, efficient, and professional emergency services to the Town. • Broaden the foundation of the department to initiate • superior programs and interact with the citizens. ®Work towards achieving the Texas Fire Chief's Best Practices. ® Develop the Department using the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CFAI) model. ®Continue efforts in professional development for personnel through multi-faceted avenues. ® Improve prevention and public education programs by providing a variety of all hazard safety and prevention classes for residents and corporate offices. ®Continue the advancement of prevention and inspection programs. ®Continue relationship building with the corporate business network group. Program Service Description The Fire - EMS Department provides for the public safety needs of the Town via a variety of programs and services. ®The majority of these services are Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) related but also includes hazardous materials mitigation, fire prevention and public education. ®Many civic organizations also benefit from these types of services through the training activities and inspection/prevention programs that the Department provides. •The Department will continue to provide the most efficient method of delivering the traditional services- Fire Protection, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Inspections and Public Education while continuing to seek further avenues of outreach into the community. 157 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 14 Fire-EMS Department Program Trends •The level of activity historically trends into four main areas: Emergency Operations, Training, Routine Activities, and Public Risk Awareness Activities. • Personnel continue to take advantage of joint training exercises and contracts, which reduces cost and increases familiarity with personnel and equipment of our mutual aid agencies. •Specialized training targets firefighter/paramedic development that enhances our current services through state certification levels. •Ongoing efforts to increase public involvement through education, relationship development, and services. • Daily activities and work details are the most time- consuming activities due to their nature. These activities are necessary to maintain the proper condition and operation of the equipment. DID YOU KNOW • Fires kill more Americans each 2016-2017 Highlights year than all natural disasters • Improved the ISO rating from a PPC 4 to a PPC 2. combined. • Home fires are the single most •Conducted numerous CPR, AED, and fire extinguisher common disaster across the classes. nation. •Crews moved into the new add-on built as a result of • Children under five and adults the fire station fire. over 65 are twice as likely to die • Added the third of three firefighters to shift,which will in a home fire than the rest of the provide four firefighters to all three shifts. US population. •Continued the design process for the new fire station. Retrieved from http://www.redcross.org 2017-2018 Strategies Goals and Objectives •Continue training the public in the use of CPR and AEDs (Automatic External Defibrillators). •Continue training the public in the use of fire extinguishers. • Implementing programs and policies to improve the Insurance Service Office (ISO) rating. •Conduct a Community Risk Analysis. 158 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 14 Fire-EMS Department * Develop a Standard's of Cover (SOC). ®Continue training for all personnel in all disciplines of certification and career development. ® Enhance our public education and prevention programs = within Westlake Academy. Target subjects include home safety principles, health and medical awareness - programs such as weather related safety programs, CPR and AED training, babysitting safety tips, and general operational and maintenance of home sprinkler systems. Performance Measures Benc 2016 2017 2018 Estimated Target N P U TS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials,equipment,technology,etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 14.25 15.50 15.50 2. Department Revenues n/a $ 170,700 $ 111,200 $ 131,125 3. Department Expenditures n/a $ 239,621 $ 241,791 $ 268,430 4. Department Payroll n/a $1,198,935 $1,322,490 $1,660,245 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate,etc. 1. Public Education Events 10 8 10 10 2. Medical Incidents n/a 286 265 290 3. Fire/Emergency Incidents n/a 356 345 380 4. Fire Inspections n/a 166 145 150 5. Pre-Fire Plans n/a 92 155 150 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output-the ability to do things well,successfully,and without waste) 1. Resident Rating per Survey Overall quality of EMS 90% n/a 90% n/a% Response time of Fire/EMS personnel 90% n/a 90% n/a% Overall quality of fire services 90% n/a 90% n/a% Emergency preparedness efforts 90% n/a 95% n/ado 2. Emergency Incident Response Response time of 6 minutes or less 100% 66% 60% 100% Response time of 5 minutes or less 95% 50% 41% 60% Response time of 4 minutes or less 90% 31% 25% 30% 159 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 15 Municipal Court Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax - - - - 0.0% Permits and Fees 11,501 8,975 8,975 8,975 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 796,013 805,350 809,880 809,880 0.0% Franchise Fees - - - - 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax - - - - 0.0% Interest 504 1,500 1,500 1,500 0.0% Intergovernmental - - - - 0.0% Misc Income - - 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 808,018 $ 815,825 $ 820,355j 820,355 1 0.0% EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 325 - 0.0% Debt Service - 0.0% Economic Development - - - - 0.0% Insurance 528 530 545 545 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 2,215 600 300 300 0.0% Rent and Utilities - - - - 0.0% Service 88,957 130,405 104,176 104,176 0.0% Supplies 13,864 12,350 13,076 12,916 -1.2% (160) GRAND TOTAL $ 105,564 $ 144,210 $ 118,097 $ 117,937 -0.1% $ (160) 160 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 15 Municipal Court Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Assistant Town Manager 0.10 0.10 0.10 - -100.0% (0.10) Administrator 10 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Deputy Clerk 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Judge 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Marshal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Part-Time Clerks 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 4.60 4.60 4.60 4.50 -2.2% (0.10) ++ tw M Court •,,, Administrator dd Part Time Clerks Deputy PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 256,590 224,880 231,234 239,026 3.4% 7,792 Payroll Insurance 57,010 60,085 58,735 58,735 0.0% - Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 3,324 2,185 2,237 2,343 4.7% 106 Payroll Taxes SS/M 18,107 17,200 17,684 18,281 3.4% 597 Payroll Retirement 27,137 25,075 29,644 30,643 3.4% 999 GRAND TOTAL $ 362,169 $ 329,425 $ 339,534 $ 349,028 2.8% $ 9,494 161 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 15 Municipal Court Strategic Theme & Objective(s) *Theme Exemplary Service & Governance Objectives) Maximize Efficiency & Effectiveness Increase Financial Capacity/ Reserves Department Contact Information *Jeanie Roumell Administrator jroumell@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5746 Troy Crow Marshal tcrow@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5716 *Martha Solis Deputy Clerk msolis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5748 *Christine Ellis Court Clerk cellis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5747 *Vickie Brown Court Clerk vbrown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5724 Program Broad Goals *Court staff will continue to provide excellent customer service in an efficient, professional and courteous manner. Court staff will work with the Keller Police Department to update the ►►►lxltttyl automated citations to electronically record the state mandated information set by the Legislature for 2017. .•,..••••••••.,.•Q�i�y •'% *The Court will conduct hearings and trials in a timely, professional i and dignified manner to provide an impartial setting for cases to be adjudicated by the Municipal Court Judge. ► •:�,. ,•.r �Court staff will continue to work in conjunction with the collection ' ��# .Wfic .'��►'�; agency and other involved agencies to reduce the number of I►tt����►/ outstanding arrest warrants. This process will include processing the outstanding citations to active warrant status on a monthly basis to insure cases are current and more collectible. Maintenance of aged uncollectible warrants will be updated on a quarterly basis. Court staff will work in partnership with the Texas Department of Public Safety to operate the driver's license suspension program for defendants who have outstanding or delinquent fines in the Court. *The court staff will make every effort to obtain the TMCEC court clerks certification. There are three different levels of certification. Our goal is to have all staff members certified at some level by the end of this calendar year. 162 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 15 Municipal Court Program Service Description *The Municipal Court performs the duties necessary to support municipal judicial functions, assist the public and manage court operations. The program will uphold the integrity of the Court and build public trust by providing unbiased quality service and accurate information delivered in an efficient, positive and professional manner. Program Trends *Processes consistent workload of approximately 7,000 new case filings annually. Legislative changes this year are requiring the courts to set show cause hearings on all cases that have not satisfied the conditions on their citation. This will require the court to set many more show cause hearings. Effective September 1, 2017, Judges will be required to assess the ability a defendant has to pay a citation. Payments plans or community service in lieu of payments must be offered if the defendant is determined to be indigent. *2016-2017 Highlights *State-wide Warrant Round-up participation; 748 warrants issued; 664 cleared. Two court staff members achieved their Level I court clerk's certification. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives *Audit outstanding warrants that are over 6 years old. Close DID YOU KNOW case files to reduce back log in the Court and Law Enforcement Systems. These cases are considered It is illegal to drive a car uncollectible or prosecutable by the prosecutor as well as without windshield wipers the Municipal Court Judge. in Texas? Improve procedures to eliminate excess paperwork and However, you can drive a car streamline proficiency in the customer service area. without a windshield! Identify and execute collections for high probability warrants and past due offenses. Limit efforts and time spent investigating and attempting to collecting low likelihood or uncollectible warrant cases. 163 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 15 Municipal Court .� lEstimated Performance Measures 2016 2017 2018Actual Target N PUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials,equipment,technology,etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 4.6 4.6 4.5 2. Department Revenues n/a $808,018 $773,330 $820,355 3. Department Expenditures n/a $105,564 $40,140 $117,937 4. Department Payroll n/a $362,169 $339,482 $349,028 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide, assess,facilitate,etc. 1. Police Initiated Case Filings n/a 7,931 6,894 7,100 2. Number of Speeding Violations n/a 4,189 2,864 2,500 3. Expired Dismissible Violations n/a 899 1,013 1,000 4. Number of Filed Violations n/a 8,984 7,146 7,000 5. Number of Cleared Arrest Warrants n/a 1,478 2,598 2,300 1 164 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 16 Public Works Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental - - 0.0% Misc Income (19,744) 6,730 24,220 -100.0% (24,220) GRAND TOTAL $ (19,744) $ 6,730 $ 24,220 $ -100.0% $ (24,220) EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 500 500 t500 100.0% Debt Service - - 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance - - - - 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 75,135 38,295 38,295 38,295 0.0% Rent and Utilities 184,991 137,595 152,345 2,595 -98.3% (149,750) Service 139,381 97,000 108,230 75,730 -30.0% (32,500) Supplies 3,486 4,510 4,510 4,510 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 402,993 $ 277,900 $ 303,880 $ 121,630 -60.0% $ (182,250) 165 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 16 Public Works Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Utility Technician 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Utility Billing Coordinator - - 1.00 1.00 0.0% Customer Service Coordinator 0.33 - - 0.0% Customer Service Representative 0.33 - 0.0% Project Manager - - - 1.00 100.0% 1.00 TOTAL POSITIONS 2.67 2.00 3.00 4.00 200.0% 2.00 Coordinator 1` 3 Director Technician M Project Manager PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 213,152 233,940 234,948 304,269 29.5% 69,321 Payroll Transfer In (217,745) (233,440) (237,055) (351,158) 48.1% (114,103) Payrolllnsurance 29,709 30,115 51,533 62,741 21.7% 11,208 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 5,428 1,125 4,157 5,608 34.9% 1,451 Payroll Taxes SS/M 15,218 17,895 17,967 23,271 29.5% 5,304 Payroll Retirement 24,263 28,180 33,120 42,007 26.8% 8,887 GRAND TOTAL $ 70,025 $ 77,815 $ 104,670 $ 86,738 -17.1% $ (17,932) 166 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 16 Public Works Strategic Theme & Objective(s) •Theme - Exemplary Service & Governance ®Objective(s) Improve Technology, Facilities, & Equipment Maximize Efficiencies & Effectiveness Department Contact Information •Jarrod Greenwood Director jgreenwood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5720 ® Paul Andreason Technician pandreason@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5731 ®Sherry Lewis Assistant slewis@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5732 Program Broad Goals •Maintain streets and shoulders in safe travelable condition. ®Maintain water and waste water infrastructure to provide safe and reliable potable water to Town customers. ®Maintain accurate inventory of streets and their current condition. ®Manage all Public Works capital projects to be on "- schedule and within budget. E Program Service Description •The Public Works Department is responsible for: the operation, maintenance, repair, and installation of the Town's traffic signs, signals, roadway markings, and approximately 10 miles of street pavement and storm drainage; maintaining public records and regulatory requirements; • Public Works also assists other departments, the Academy, and volunteer groups as needed: • Setting up for community events • Providing traffic control devices for DPS use • Supervision of community service workers • Provide back-up coordinating/inspecting work for facility maintenance Program Trends ®The Town's population continues to increase (see Planning & Development Section), which also generates a significant increase in the demand for Public Works services. 167 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 16 Public Works •With the continued influx of new residents we experience a demand for services that rivals surrounding municipalities as many are accustomed to receiving a broad base of public services. Staff manages these expectations and provides an accessible department that values the personal relationship with our residents. ®Commercial and Residential Developments will require DID YOU KNOW staff attention as our community continues to expand within the DFW Metroplex. Westlake and Keller have a shared elevated storage tank 2016-2017 Highlights that is a "tank inside of a tank" ®Completed signalization projects at FM 1938/Solana and design. It is the only one FM 1938/Dove intersections. known in existence.- ® Developed and implemented water quality monitoring plans for bacteriological and nitrate/nitrite sampling. ® Developed and implemented a Cross Connection Control Program. ® Performed sanitary sewer evaluation study. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives ® Restore FM 1938 landscaping. ®Continue to pursue transfer of N-1 sewer line to TRA. •Continue to work with the Entrada, Schwab, and Hillwood to ensure adherence to our } approved plans, Town standards, and 4 ` developer agreements. ®Work with TxDOT on SH 114 service roads and Solana/Kirkwood improvements. • Repaint 0.685 MG Ground Storage Tank. 168 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 16 Public Works Performance Measures Bench 2015 2016 2017 2018 Mark Actual Actual Estimated Target INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 2.67 2.67 3.00 4.00 2. Department Expenditures n/a $266,371 $277,900 $303,880 $121,630 3. Department Payroll n/a $ 36,824 $70,025 $104,670 $86,738 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Drainage ditch and culvert (LF) n/a 250 250 400 200 2. Streets (miles) n/a 10.25 10.25 10.25 10.25 3. Traffic Signals n/a 0 0 0 1 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output-the ability to do things well,successfully,and without waste) 1. Resident Survey Results Cleanliness of streets and 90% 86% N/A 85% 90% other public areas Condition of major streets 90% 85% N/A 81% 90% Condition of neighborhood streets 90% 81% N/A 81% 90% Traffic Flow and 90% 71% N/A 56% 90% congestion management 2. Class A water operator Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes certification 3. Class 2 waste water Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes operator certification 169 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 17 Facilities Maintenance Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental - - - 0.0% Misc Income 500 2,000 2,000 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ 500 $ 2,000 $ 000 EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 583 175,000 0.0% Debt Service - - 0.0% Economic Development - - 0.0% Insurance 370 375 590 590 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 18,769 34,225 34,225 67,340 96.8% 33,115 Rent and Utilities 534 500 500 800 60.0% 300 Service 9,129 56,305 58,265 32,915 -43.5% (25,350) Supplies 6,181 29,180 29,180 33,930 16.3% 4,750 GRAND TOTAL $ 35,566 $ 295,585 $ 122,760 $ 135,575 10.4% $ 12,815 170 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 17 Facilities Maintenance Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 0.500 0.500 0.500 0.50 0.0% Facility Technician(part-time) 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.25 0.0% Assistant(part-time) 0.500 0.500 0.500 0.50 0.0% Customer Service Coordinator 0.167 0.167 0.167 - -100.0% (0.167) Customer Service Representative 0.167 0.167 0.167 - -100.0% (0.167) TOTAL POSITIONS 1.584 1.584 1.584 1.25 -21.1% (0.334) L Assistant c C Director M Technician PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 81,796 83,610 82,252t(56,625) 0.5% 388 Payroll Transfer In (60,175) (55,245) (52,156) 8.6% (4,469) Payrolllnsurance 10,150 9,130 12,138 12,138 0.0% Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 1,588 1,575 1,556 1,558 0.1% 2 Payroll Taxes SS/M 5,851 6,395 6,291 6,321 0.5% 30 Payroll Retirement 8,796 9,770 10,545 10,594 0.5% 49 GRAND TOTAL $ 48,006 $ 55,235 $ 60,626 $ 56,626 -6.6% $ (4,000) 171 RETURN TO T.O.C. W Goals and Objectives 17 Facilities Maintenance Strategic Theme & Objective(s) *Theme Natural Oasis Objective(s) Improve Technology, Facilities, & Equipment Department Contact Information *Troy Meyer Director tmeyer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5735 *Kerry Wade Assistant kwade@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5768 Program Broad Goals *Ensure the Town has an effective long-range plan for facilities development and maintenance. *Facilities planning process will be communicated in a clear and concise format, including input from residents, Academy and Town staff. *Town facilities will be operated in a cost efficient and energy efficient manner. Program Service Description *The Town of Westlake will plan for and provide facilities to enhance present and future community and educational programs and endeavors. *Long-range plans include: maintenance, renovation, construction of facilities as related to civic use and educational programs-efficient facilities meeting program needs. *Westlake Civic Campus facilities are generally available to the community. The Town will continue to develop cooperative projects with the community and agencies. a i _ W. 41S AM 172 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 17 Facilities Maintenance Program Trends *Continued maintenance and oversight of the various capital assets for the community, including the facilitation of any expansion planning and construction along with temporary rental units. o Oversight of the rented facilities for municipal administration at the Solana office complex. o Acquisition and maintenance of the municiplic properties and the IOOF Westlake Cemetery. A facility master plan was drafted for the Westlake Academy campus in the spring of 2011 and updated by an additional architect firm. o Staff continues to oversee the evolution of the master plan with updates and evaluation according to building construction and student enrollment. *Completed the extension of the temporary fire station metal building to provide living quarters after the mobile home burned in December of 2014. *Westlake Academy increased the student population to approximately 825 in FY 2015-16. *Security remains a priority on campus, with a full security audit completed in April 2013 including the interviewing of staff, accessing security systems, written plans, and threat assessment. As a result the front office was remolded to improve how visitors check in and out of the school. *Repairs on the spillway location on the east side of the park were completed in August 2015.Two power racks in the park were also updated. *Completed fire station location study in the summer 2015. *Architect hired to complete a cost estimate and program plan for the future fire station August 2016. *Completed irrigation project for the cemetery in September 2015. *Completed Outdoor o— A.­��.�­— Learning Center master 0—.-- 0"h`"°" plan fall 2016 VdISTLAKE ACADEMY OUT DOOR LLAR N I NG AC 11 VI I ILS , } � T .■ 173 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 17 Facilities Maintenance 2016-2017 Highlights *Began replacing the fluorescent lamps with LED lamps at the Westlake Academy October of 2016. A five-acre tract was sold and approved by the Town Council in March 2017. *Final fire station budget of 12.9M was approved by Town Council December 2016. KNOW*Completed roofing project for Pod D Summer 2017. DID YOU KNO rY ♦Improved drainage along the trails in Glenwyck and Terra Westlake Academy Bella in 2017. *Completed phase one of the Outdoor Learning Station Campus has 51 cooling plan which included three planter boxes, a row garden units ranging from and two compost bins in May 2017. 2 to 20 tons units and *Negotiated a 10 year lease for office space,which included court and town administrations and court and one walk-in freezer council chambers. The lease increased our sq. ft. from and refrigerator. 13,000 to 20,000 feet.The new town office opened on July 26 2017. ♦Installed a 30-foot tower for the sports field at Westlake or Academy Summer 2017. *Made repairs to the retention pond located on the Westlake Academy campus in May 2017. *Negotiated the purchase of a 71-passenger activity bus for the Westlake Academy to be delivered in October 2017. 2017-2018 Strategies Goals and Objectives *Update the facility use policy and guidelines for the Westlake Academy facility, fire station and new town hall. *Ensure the Christmas Lighting, Arbor Day and Decoration Day events have a quality setting. *Manage the construction and budget of the new 18,000 sq. ft. fire station located at Dove and Davis Blvd. *Serve as back-up for the Public Works department *Create a safe working and learning environment for teachers, administration staff, students and visitors, by maintaining a quarterly and monthly maintenance agreement for Westlake Academy Campus, Solana Campus and Fire Station campus. 174 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 17 Facilities Maintenance Bench 2016 2017 2018 Performance Measures Mark Actual Estimated Target N PUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 1.584 1.25 1.25 2. Department Expenditures n/a $35,566 $122,760 $135,575 3. Department Payroll n/a $48,066 $60,626 $56,626 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct, deliver, develop, train, provide, assess,facilitate, etc. 1. HVAC maintenance Quarterly 4 4 4 2. Electric Systems Quarterly 4 4 4 3. Security Systems Semi Annual 2 2 2 4. Fire Sprinklers Annual 1 1 1 5. Alarm Systems Annual 1 1 1 6. Elevator Inspections Annual 1 1 1 7. Windows, Carpet, Tile Semi Annual 2 2 2 8. Cleaning Service Daily 365 365 365 9. Westlake Academy Mow, fertilize, weed control Weekly 52 52 52 Athletic Field mowing Semi annual 2 2 2 175 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 18 Finance Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures - 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ 0.07. $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 2,800 1,800 t1,800 100.0% Debt Service - - 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities - - - 0.0% Service 36,020 38,370 53,851 35,186 -34.7% (18,665) Supplies 8,324 6,340 6,660 6,660 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 44,344 $ 47,510 $ 62,311 $ 43,646 1 -30.0% $ (18,665) 176 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 18 Finance Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Supervisor 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Accounting Tech II- Municipal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Accounting Tech II-Academic 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 0.0% L 4-Jtw _ M � Municipal ,N Director • - • Q = 3 AcademicH L PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 339,918 374,955 372,819 363,733 -2.4% (9,086) Payroll Transfer In (222,940) (244,910) (222,641) (198,945) -10.6% 23,696 Payroll Insurance 66,568 79,750 66,981 57,412 -14.3% (9,569) Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 1,506 1,795 1,795 1,746 -2.7% (49) Payroll Taxes SS/M 24,547 28,675 26,864 27,818 3.6% 954 Payroll Retirement 38,717 45,170 45,109 46,631 3.4% 1,522 GRAND TOTAL $ 248,316 $ 285,435 $ 290,927 jb 298,395 2.6% $ 7,468 177 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department Strategic Theme & Objective(s) •Theme - Exemplary Service & Governance •Objective(s) Increase Financial Capacity/ Reserves Increase Revenue Streams Department Contact Information • Debbie Piper Director dpiper@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5712 • Jaymi Ford Supervisor jford@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5721 • Melinda Brown Accounting Technician II mbown@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5728 • Marlene Rutledge Accounting Technician II mrutledge@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5737 Program Broad Goals • Provide Town Council, management, departments and citizens with accurate and timely financial records and reports in the most efficient manner. • Maintain the accounting and financial reporting systems in conformance with all state and federal laws, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), standards of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). • Provide sound and conservative fiscal management in compliance with all state and federal regulations. • Adhere to policies established by the Public Funds Investment Act, applicable bond covenants, and the Town's adopted investment policy and ensure proper collateralization of bank deposits. LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL STATUTES, RULES, REGULATIONS • GAAP-Generally Accepted Accounting Practices • GASB-Government Accounting Standards Board • Federal,State, Local laws • Personal and Professional Ethics cc • Organizational Goals & Policies • Board/Council Adopted Financial Policies E � • Internal Controls • Mission, Vision, Values • Strategic Plan • Balanced Scorecard ENTITY RESPONIBILITIES • Town of Westlake, Municipal Government ' l • Westlake Academy, Charter School • Westlake Academy Foundation 178 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department Program Service Description FINANCE RESPONSIBILITIES The Finance Department is responsible for collecting, recording, summarizing, and reporting the results of all financial transactions of the following entities in a timely manner and in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles while ensuring compliance with applicable state and federal statutes, bond covenants and grant contracts by reviewing financial data and reporting such in a timely manner. • Payroll Processing - The Finance Department is responsible for the payment of salaries and wages according to established procedures on specified days according to the adopted payroll calendar. The Town of Westlake operates two payroll systems concurrently; one for employees who are on a normal 40-hour work week, and another cycle for DPS employees who work 24-hour shifts. This dual system is commonplace in cities to accommodate FLSA requirements. • Budgets-The Town's annual budget is prepared in the context of a five (5-8) year financial forecast. The proposed budget is submitted to the Council approximately thirty to forty-five days prior to the beginning of the fiscal year for their consideration. The Town's budget is allocated by fund and is designed to provide a clear picture of the Town's spending, allocation of financial resources, and priorities as well as how they are set to carry out the policy direction of the Council. • Westlake Academy - The Department works with the Education Service Center (Region 1 1) to help maintain Westlake Academy's financial system and fiscal controls, i.e. general ledger, and payroll. Accounts payable, accounts receivable and cash management have been brought in house with the addition of personnel. • Cash Collections - The establishment of strong internal controls for cash collections is necessary to prevent mishandling of funds and to safeguard against loss. In addition, strong internal controls are designed to protect employees from inappropriate charges of mishandling funds by defining employee responsibilities in the cash handling process. Cash is considered to include coin, currency, checks, money orders, and credit card transactions. •Audits - In conjunction with maintaining financial records, the Department is responsible for the preparation for and coordination of the annual external financial audits for the Town of Westlake, Westlake Academy and Westlake Academy Foundation. • Fraud - The Town of Westlake is committed to protecting its revenue, property, information and other assets from any attempt, either by members of the public, contractors, agents, intermediaries or its own employees, to gain by deceit, financial or other benefits. It is Westlake's intent to fully investigate any suspected acts of fraud, misappropriation or other similar irregularity. 179 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department Accounts Payable - The Accounts Payable section of the Finance Department is responsible for reviewing all invoices for making payments of all legally incurred and property authorized obligations. Payments will be issued in a manner to maintain the credit worthiness of the Town of Westlake and Westlake Academy and to take advantage of all available discounts. Program Trends • Finance and accounting are core functions that often expand in direct correlation with an organization that continues to expand • Staff experience has increased with the addition of a Finance Technician II to handle all financial matters related to the Academy and the Westlake Academy Foundation. • Plans for continued future expansion at Westlake Academy combined with residential population increases and economic development will continue to challenge the Finance Department's ability to maintain the highest levels of service and quality with existing staffing. 2016-2017 Highlights MUNICIPAL FINANCE AWARDS Prepared, submitted and received the Town's • Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association. Awards received for 2007 thru 2017. • Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association. Awards received for 2007 thru 2017. Received an unqualified audit opinion on the 09/30/2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. • Popular Annual Financial Reporting Award for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association. Awards received for 2011 thru 2017. • Transparency Star Award by the Texas State Comptroller for Financial Transparency. Awards received for the 2016 thru 2017. • Transparency Star Award by the Texas State Comptroller for Debt Obligation Transparency. Awards received for the first time in May 2017. ACADEMIC FINANCE AWARDS Prepared, submitted and received Westlake Academy's • Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association. Awards received for 2009 thru 2017. • International Award for Budget Excellence for recognition from the Association of School Business Officials International. Awards received for 2009 thru 2017. INTERNAL PROCESSES Workflow for Accounts Payable-The Finance Dept. is in the process of streamlining the accounts payable process using AP Workflow through Laserfiche and STW. The accounts payable (AP) process touches every Dept.within the organization and when the AP process is inefficient, it doesn't just make life difficult- it can cost money. We are making dramatic changes to the performance of our municipal AP function by digitizing and automating the process, slashing the time required to make payments and eliminating conflict, miscommunication, and re-work. Streamlining and automating our accounts payable process 180 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department can result in reduced processing time and more accuracy in your records and financial reports, therefore, giving our staff more time to work on bigger projects and goals. NOTE: this process was officially rolled out on October 2017. • OpenGov Cloud Based Software - OpenGov is the world's first integrated cloud solution for budgeting, operational performance and open data. In the past, we have struggled with outdated technology to access timely financial information and then communicate that data to citizens and elected officials. This platform will allow us to build cloud-based reports that contain relevant data for more informed decision making and better outcome for the public. This is another step we have DID YOU taken to use, and help us become a more open effective, accountable and transparent government. Goal is to have it KNOW available to the public in January 2018. • Laserfiche and Scanning - Finance documents continue to be Paper money is not scanned and available in Laserfiche for the Town, Academy and made from wood the Foundation. They can be retrieved not only by the Finance pulp, but form cotton. Dept. but all departments as well and has almost eliminated the This means it will not need to contact the Dept. for research. There is only 1 box of disintegrate in the Utility Billing documents left in storage that has not been scanned and has not reached its destruction date of October 31, 2018. laundry. On average, There are currently 11 boxes awaiting a destruction run as of the life span of an October 31, 2017. American dollar •TrakStar Performance Evaluation Software - Currently bill is 18 months. performance evaluations were previously completed manually by the employee and their Director and stored by the HR Department. A committee was formed of employees from several different departments to redesign the Performance Evaluation Form for the new FY 16/17. Debbie Piper and Jaymi Ford served on this committee. The Performance Evaluation Software (TrakStar) was officially rolled out in May 2017. • HR and Payroll Support Services for the Academy-these processes are still being performed ESC Region XI; We are reviewing the Position Control module in October 2017 for employee forecasting. We will be reviewing other modules to see if there are any processes that can be brought in house. STAFFING STRUCTURE Keeping with our team stated goal to continually improve and implement employees the HPO concepts in Westlake, we had an opportunity to review our current staffing structure and internal processes to implement efficiencies. job erspenel h�r� 'interview •The Finance Department had budgeted to hire another Accounting �g� man u1ces Technician in FY16/17; however due to the efficiency and organization VIAhu of the team,we were able to push out the hiring to FY 18/19. • Newest Academic Accounting Technician II joined the Finance Department in February 2016. She has brought years of expertise in payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivables, audits, budgets, banking, CIP and grants. 181 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department • In October 2016, the Academy Finance portion of TxEIS was brought in house eliminating the cost to the service center of$13,516. The financial portion of Westlake Academy was previously provided by Region 11. • Incorporated several new efficiencies and additional knowledge to the Finance Dept. conducting several training sessions with the Academy staff concerning ° Basics of TxEIS, the financial software used by the ESC Region 1 1 ° Policies, procedures and internal controls for all personnel • Forming a personal relationship between the finance and academic teams by becoming a board member of the WAAC as well as assisting and attending Academy events. TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS o In trying to keep current, the Finance department staff attended both Academy and Governmental trainings and/or webinars during the fiscal year related to: • Speed of Trust Training (on-going) -This program is based on character and competence and incorporates 13 behaviors as follows; Talk straight, demonstrate respect, create transparency, right your wrongs, show loyalty, deliver results, get better, confront reality, clarify expectation, practice accountability, list first, keep commitments, extend trust. • WA-Summary of Finance/Charter School First/Transparency star award requirements/Maintenance of Effort compliance/Travel Compliance/Sales Tax for Schools/Activity Funds/TXEIS Budget modules/Mid-Year PEIMS/Bank reconciliations/End-of year processing/1099 Accounts payable vendor training/TASBO conference • Governmental -Transparency stars award requirements/Security Awareness Training for IT/GFOAT conference/Trakstar Performance Evaluation software training/Payroll Law Seminar/Annual GAAP Update/Budget, Tax Rate & Audit/Transforming Local Government Conference • STW Annual Conference -STW is the Financial Software application used by the Municipal employees. STW was designed especially for government financial management and uses an integrated financial accounting and reporting system with specific innovative labor-saving applications. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives ON-GOING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES • Prepare and submit the budget for a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for recognition from Government Finance Officers Association for the Town of Westlake and Westlake Academy. • Prepare and submit the Town's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association recognition. 182 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 18 Finance Department • Receive an unqualified audit opinion on the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. • Prepare and submit the Town's Popular Annual Financial Report (PAFR) for recognition from the Government Finance Officers Association. • Continuous Training of Municipal and Academic staff related to financial processes, procedures and internal controls related to accounts payable, receivable, travel, etc. UPDATED GOALS AND OBJECTIVES •Streamline the accounts payable workflow process through Laserfiche. • Streamline the process of using the new cloud based software OpenGov. 2018 91 Target INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 4.00 4.00 4.00 2. Department Expenditures n/a $44,344 $62,311 $43,646 3. Department Payroll n/a $248,316 $290,927 $298,395 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate,etc. 3. Prepare CAFR/Audit (3 entities) Annual Annual Annual Annual 4. Prepare PAFR (1 entity) Annual Annual Annual Annual 5. Prepare Budget (2 entities) Annual Annual Annual Annual MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output) (the ability to do things well,successfully,and without waste) 1. Fund balance for General Fund 90 days 398 days 380 days 291 days Equal to or greater than 90 days ............................................. ............................................. 2. Standard & Poors Rating AAA/stable AA+/stable AAA/stable AAA/stable ............................................. ............................................. 3. CAFR with "clean opinion" Yes Yes Yes Yes ............................................. ............................................. 4. GFOA Award-CAFR Yes Yes Yes Yes ............................................. ............................................. 5. GFOA Award-PAFR Yes Yes Yes Yes ............................................. ............................................. 6. GFOA Award-Budget Yes Yes Yes Yes Overall Budget Score 907 83.3% 86.4% 87.0% • Introduction&Overview 90% 81.7% 85.0% 86.0% • Financial Structure,Policy,Process 90% 83.3% 88.9% 90.07 • Financial Summaries 907 80.07 85.07 86.07 • Capital and Debt 907 80.67 88.97 90.07 • Departmental Information 907 87.57 83.37 84.07 • Document Wide Criteria 907 87.57 87.57 88.07 ............................................. ............................................. 8. Texas Comptroller Star Awards • Traditional Finance (submitted 2016) Yes Yes Yes Yes ............................................. • Debt Obligation (submitted 2017) Yes No YesYes ............................................. • Economic Development(2018) Yes n/a n/a Yes ............................................. • Contracts&Procurement(2019) Yes n/a n/a n/a ............................................. • Public Pensions(2020) Yes n/a n/a n/a 183 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 19 Parks and Recreation Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental - - 0.0% Misc Income 275 275 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ 275 $ 75 EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 2,265 1,000 1,000 1,000 0.0% Debt Service - - - 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance - - - 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 75,040 82,300 82,300 82,300 0.0% Rent and Utilities 10,158 9,635 9,635 141,635 1370.0% 132,000 Service 25,582 35,000 35,240 80,240 127.7% 45,000 Supplies 1,620 9,645 11,705 9,645 -17.6% (2,060) GRAND TOTAL $ 114,666 $ 137,580 $ 139,880 $ 314,820 125.1% $ 174,940 184 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 19 Parks and Recreation Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 0.500 0.500 0.500 0.500 0.0% Customer Service Coordinator 0.167 0.167 0.167 - -100.0% (0.167) Customer Service Representatve 0.167 0.167 0.167 -100.0% (0.167) TOTAL POSITIONS 0.834 0.834 0.834 0.500 -40.0% (0.334) L 3 Director PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 74,941 10,085 64,225 64,225 0.0% Payroll Transfer In (54,124) (44,115) (42,052) (45,467) 8.1% (3,415) Payroll Insurance 10,117 9,135 12,138 12,138 0.0% Payroll TaxesTWC/WC 1,588 1,440 1,426 1,426 0.0% Payroll Taxes SS/M 5,326 4,960 4,912 4,912 0.0% Payroll Retirement 8,520 7,518 8,234 8,234 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 46,368 $ (10,977) $ 48,883 $ 45,468 -7.0% $ (3,415) 185 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 19 Parks and Recreation Strategic Theme & Objective(s) • Theme - Natural Oasis • Objective(s) Encourage Westlake's Unique Sense of Place Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Department Contact Information •Troy Meyer Director tmeyer@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5735 ♦ Kerry Wade Assistant kwade@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5768 Program Broad Goals • Provide park and common open spaces adequate in size and condition to serve our citizens. • Use the park system to preserve and protect environmentally significant areas for public enjoyment and education. • Maintain, secure and manage parks in a manner which encourages their appropriate use. ♦ Maximize public/private partnerships to assist in all ::::::....... aspects of parks and recreation planning and development. ' '. IP Program Service Description *The Park and Recreation Department maintains a 39.5-acre park and open spaces, which includes Glenwyck Farms, and Terra Bella sub-division. *The trees along roadways and the cemetery are also maintained to ensure the safety of drivers and _ pedestrians. ♦ 10 miles of trails and two pedestrian underpasses run throughout the community. * Westlake Academy, IOOF cemetery, and the town owned park, located in Glenwyck Farms, provide the facilities and space for recreational use to the public. These locations also host sporting events, facility rentals, Arbor Day, Bandana Bonanza, Christmas Tree Lighting and Decoration Day. Program Trends •The population growth, both permanent and daytime population, has increased the use of the park and trail system. •The Town prides itself on offering community stewardship opportunities to those within Westlake -to the benefit of our residents and those serving the surrounding communities. Listed below is just an example of these services: 186 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 19 Parks and Recreation o Community Storehouse continues to lease the Academy buildings for three weeks in July to provide a reading camp for 1 st and 2nd grade students of the surrounding communities. We are in our six year of this partnership. o Ongoing opportunities are provided for Eagle Scout projects ♦ In tandem with our CIP and partnership projects that include roadways,we are expanding our trail systems to promote `walk-ability' and fulfill our strategic outcome objective of "Encourage Westlake's Unique Sense of Place" by connecting these systems for our residents and visitors. This trend is anticipated to be a priority for the future. •The Town partnered with TD Financial to plant 10 trees in the Town's open space on Roanoke Road for the 2014 annual Arbor Day event. In April, 2014, the Town received its fifteenth (15th) Tree City USA award from the National Arbor Day Foundation. Due to the wet weather the 2015 Arbor Day event was canceled. Staff and students planted six trees on the WA campus and educated student on how to plant and prune trees and received our sixteenth (16th) Tree City USA award. • Completed trails and shade structures from Capital Parkway to Dove Rd. on the west side of FM 1938. •The Town's comprehensive plan was adopted in February 2015 which included elements that contain the parks and trail systems. • Parking improvement which included lighting in Glenwyck Park, repair to the pond on the east side of the park and updating the electrical panels. • New playground equipment was installed in August 2015 at the Westlake Academy campus. ♦ Published the Town's first trail map in August 2016. • Created four butterfly habitats, two located at the Westlake Academy and two in the park. 2016-2017 Highlights • Eagle Scout projects were completed in the cemetery. • Received 17th annual Tree City USA award. • Improved drainage on the west side of the park and in Terra Bella. • Created second butterfly habitats located at the Westlake Academy Campus. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives • Work with Planning and Development to coordinate park land acquisition with long range growth and development planning. ♦ Enhance and expand the linear park system along creeks and roadways. 187 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 19 Parks and Recreation • Recognize and promote the concept that parks and recreation needs evolve over time with changes in the population. • Design parks and open spaces that are durable, easily maintained and are not detrimental to surrounding uses. ♦ Utilize partnerships,wherever appropriate, to help develop, manage and maintain parks and recreation facilities. • Accelerate park system improvements. • Develop marketing strategies for the Westlake IOOF Westlake Cemetery, which will increase sales. Performance Measures Bench �� 2016 �� 2017 2018 iiiark Actual Estimated Target INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a .834 .834 .500 2. Department Expenditures n/a $114,666 $139,880 $314,820 3. Department Payroll n/a $46,368 $48,883 $45,468 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct, deliver, develop, train, provide, assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Open Space (acreage) n/a 27 27 27 2. Academy Playgrounds n/a 2 2 2 3. Softball/Soccer Field n/a 1 1 1 4. Football Field n/a 1 1 1 5. Outdoor Learning Station n/a 1 1 1 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output -the ability to do things well,successfully, and without waste) 1. Obtain Tree City Award Yes Yes Yes Yes Resident Survey 2017 • One of the top 3 major town services that residents felt were most important was parks and trails, open spaces and streetscaping • The parks and recreation services that residents were most satisfied with were: the maintenance of streetscaping and open spaces increased from 74%in 2015 to 82%in 2017 and the number of publicly-accessible parks/trails increased from 53%in 2009 to 75%in 2017. 188 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 20 Information Technology Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities 0.0% Service 56,865 106,065 114,220 91,285 -20.1% (22,935) Supplies 8,299 5,850 5,850 5,850 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 65,163 $ 111,915 $ 120,070 $ 97,135 -19.1% $ (22,935) 189 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 20 Information Technology Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Network Manager 1.00 100.0% 1 TOTAL POSITIONS 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 100.0% 1.00 L M M a L DirectorNetwork . I— LA a 3 PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 102,363 107,280 116,310 180,137 54.9% 63,827 Payroll Insurance 10,577 12,075 18,121 29,329 61.9% 11,208 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 355 515 558 864 54.8% 306 Payroll Taxes SS/M 7,568 515 8,894 13,776 54.9% 4,882 Payroll Retirement 11,772 12,925 14,911 23,094 54.9% 8,183 GRAND TOTAL $ 132,635 $ 133,310 $ 158,794 $ 247,200 55.7% $ 88,406 190 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 20 Information Technology Strategic Theme & Objective(s) Theme Exemplary Service & Governance Exemplary Education Westlake Academy Objective(s) Improve Technology, Facilities, & Equipment Department Contact Information Jason Power Director jpower@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5750 Ray Workman Coordinator rworkman@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5751 Mitch Wells Technician mwells@westlakeacademy.org 817-490-5752 Program Broad Goals Provide support to all Town departments (both municipal and academic) through the design, deployment, and maintenance of systems to support departmental objectives. Provide systems administration by maintaining IT systems with prudent provisions for security, data archiving, and disaster recovery. Program Description Information Technology works with the Town Manager to establish IT policy, evaluate and recommend technology solutions for specific 104 departmental needs and provide administrative support to network infrastructure, systems, and _ staff. Program Trends Information Technology is in a state of perpetual change, and policies, strategies, and system implementation must accommodate these realities. Network/system security requires ongoing analysis and adjustments to meet emerging threats. Equipment must be updated to remain reliable and secure. Data communication links between locations require evaluation of alternate information storage and backup process to ensure optimal performance. Service demands of internal and external customers continue to increase exponentially each year. 191 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 20 Information Technology 2016-2017 Highlights Overall: Reduced costs by keeping outsourced technical services to a minimum. Successful and timely resolutions to over 1100 IT-related incidents and requests reported through our SchoolDude tracking system since August 2016. Migrated more on-site systems to virtual servers, increasing our ability to backup and restore core services efficiently DID YOU KNOW and quickly. Replaced 802.11 N wireless network with 802.11 AC access points in all buildings for better coverage, accessibility, and Employees are the weakest throughput. link in network security, using weak passwords and falling for Academy: phishing and social Replaced almost 1000 iPad mini tablets with iPad Air 2 engineering attacks. tablets and cases as part of our continuing 1-to-1 device *** program. Added Apple Classroom as an option to help teachers manage their classes with the 1:1 deployment. This system allowed teachers to keep classes on track by monitoring iPad student use during class. Continued use of a managed printing/copying solution to better track use and costs associated with printing and copying on campus. Added storage and processing capacity to on-site virtual server host to allow for better performance, reliability, and the ability to quickly create and restore backups. Town Hall /Municipal Court/ Fire Department: Installed, configured and deployed new network switches, routers, and firewalls for the new Town Hall location. The new configuration handles over three times the capacity of the previous location. 2017-2018 Highlights Perform on-going security assessments to validate the efficacy of existing measures and to evaluate and deploy solutions for new threats. Identify and implement additional information technologies to improve the efficiency and/or security of business processes. _ Identify and implement additional information technologies to improve �( transparency to our citizens, stakeholders, and students. r �1 192 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 20 Information Technology Continue to reduce costs through the use of internal staff and third-party vendors. Continue to simplify our network where possible while maintaining the highest levels of security, reliability, and functionality for system users. Expand the effective use of technology in the classroom to maximize each child's learning potential. Explore and implement additional systems to enhance services provided to external customers. Ilk Performance Measures 2016 �� 2017 2018 Mar Actual Estimated Target N PUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials,equipment,technology,etc. INPUTS 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 1.00 2.00 2.00 2. Department Expenditures n/a $65,163 $120,070 $97,135 3. Department Payroll n/a $132,635 $158,794 $247,200 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/ EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output - (the ability to do things well,successfully, and without waste) 1. Network connectivity & 99.5% 99.8% 99.8% 99.8% telephone functionality 2. Response to all service 990 99.5% 99.50 99.50 requests with 24 hours 193 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 21 Human Resources Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures - 0.0% Franchise Fees - 0.0% Contributions - 0.0% Beverage Tax - 0.0% Interest - 0.0% Intergovernmental - 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ 0.0% $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities - 0.0% Service 13,697 20,580 30,740 29,115 -5.3% (1,625) Supplies 2,306 4,270 4,270 4,270 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 16,003 $ 24,850 $ 35,010 $ 33,385 -4.67. $ (1,625) 194 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 21 Human Resources Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Generalist 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% L M Director — Generalist Q 3 PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 169,261 173,660 171,304 180,843 5.6% 9,539 PR Transfer In (10,804) (11,365) (10,635) (12,077) 13.6% (1,442) Payrolllnsurance 16,526 18,630 22,803 22,803 0.0% (0) Payroll Taxes SS/M 710 835 822 868 5.6% 46 Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 12,790 13,280 13,102 13,831 5.6% 729 Payroll Retirement 19,270 20,900 21,961 23,184 5.6%1 1,223 GRAND TOTAL $ 207,754 $ 215,940 $ 219,357 $ 229,452 4.6% $ 10,095 195 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 21 Human Resources Strategic Vision Points *Service Excellence Department Contact Information *Todd Wood Director twood@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5711 �Blair Wilson Specialist bwilson@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5734 Program Broad Goals Continually monitor the external business environment for trends and issues related to compensation and benefits and _ make recommendations to maintain competitive and motivated work force. *Administer guidance and support for policy compliance to all Departments. Continually research, recommend and implement strategic organizational improvements. Develop and implement effective policies, procedures, and guidelines in support of the organization's stated mission, vision, values, goals, and objectives. Ensure compliance with pertinent laws and best practices through continual and proactive monitoring of the organization's work processes and procedures. Minimize liability exposure and property losses through identification of potential vulnerabilities, employee training, and implementation of policies and procedures to reflect best practices. *Maintain affordable and competitive insurance policies through comprehensive competitive bidding processes. NRecruit and retain the highest quality employees to deliver excellent customer service to all stakeholders reflective of a High-Performance Organization (HPO). Program Service Description *The HR & Administrative Services Department provides a diverse array of services to internal and external customers, as well as providing support to the organization's general operations. *These services include all HR functions, including General Administrative Services, Recruiting & Hiring, Payroll Processing, Benefits Administration, Organizational Training & Development, Policy Compliance, and Risk Management. Support is offered in partnership with other departments for bidding & purchasing, strategic planning, policy development, general administration, and finance. 196 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 21 Human Resources In addition to providing these services to the Town of Westlake, the department continues to successfully support Westlake Academy through our shared services model. *The Department also provides support services to all other Town Departments, including the Westlake Academy Foundation, Westlake Historical Preservation Society, and various groups and committees providing services to the organization. Program Trends *Continued growth of municipal and academic staff, resulting in higher annual administrative service demands, as well as expanded responsibilities in the areas of Human Resources, Risk Management, and Benefits Administration. Increases in cost, administration, and legislative regulations related to employee benefits. Volatile economic conditions combined with the unpredictability of sales tax collections and state school funding continue to create challenges in maintaining competitive employee compensation packages. New federal and state laws result in ongoing compliance challenges, resulting in constant /+ change of Human Resources best practices. j 2016-2017 Highlights DID YOU KNOW? Processed all payroll, benefit transactions, and regulatory filings in a timely manner in partnership In FY 16-17, the Town of with the Finance Department. Westlake HR Department *Facilitated all tasks and procedures pertaining to Risk received nearly 2000 job Management, in response to the organization's applications for 37 required service demands. advertised positions. Completed updates to the Town and Academy's personnel manuals with additional and amended policies. Facilitated the recruiting and/or onboarding process of 62 full-time and part-time municipal and academic employees. Completed comprehensive salary and benefit surveys to ensure competitive employee compensation packages to support our recruiting and retention efforts. Completed a full rollout of a new web-based evaluation system for municipal employees with enhanced employee/supervisor communication, goal setting, and task measurement. *Completed all regulatory filings, in accordance with Internal Revenue Service, Texas Workforce Commission, and Affordable Care Act requirements. 197 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 21 Human Resources *Completed a comprehensive municipal salary survey to update our broadbanding compensation plan. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives *Develop and implement a new comprehensive employee training program to maximize effective employee development and retention. Enhance the employee performance evaluation instruments to maximize the effectiveness of communication and achievement of goals and objectives. *Complete an annual risk assessment of all areas affected by potential property, liability, or worker's compensation losses. Provide greater transparency, communication, and accountability for Human Resources processes and services. Develop a performance pay component to complement the current teacher compensation system, including analysis of and improvements of current stipend and extra-duty payment practices in cooperation with the Westlake Academy LEAD Team. Review need for policy amendments, additions, and deletions 4�Development of administrative procedures of a comprehensive compensation plan for the Town of Westlake. Research and implement retention strategies across the organization. All positions analyzed by actual job duty and review of position descriptions. Develop and incorporate enhancements into the municipal and academic performance evaluation systems Performance Measures Bench 2016 2017 2018 Mark Actual Estimated Target N PUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 2.00 2.00 2.00 2. Department Expenditures n/a $ 16,003 $35,010 $33,385 3. Department Payroll & Related n/a $207,754 $219,357 $229,452 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output) (the ability to do things well,successfully, and without waste) 1. Time to fill vacant positions 45 37 32 30 198 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 22 Communications Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities 0.0% Service 6,547 8,100 8,235 8,235 0.0% Supplies 4,581 7,500 7,500 7,500 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ 11,128 $ 15,600 $ 15,735 $ 15,735 0.0% $ 199 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 22 Communications Department Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% Specialist 1.00 - - - 0.0% Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.0% TOTAL POSITIONS 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 0.0% L tw Director . : Q � PAYROLL&RELATED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 138,633 162,090 174,255 180,703 3.7% 6,448 Payroll Transfer In (167,236) (218,555) (188,549) (230,309) 22.1% (41,760) Payroll Insurance 21,039 23,765 11,753 11,753 0.0% - Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 710 780 837 868 3.7% 31 Payroll Taxes SS/M 10,104 12,395 13,327 13,821 3.7% 494 Payroll Retirement 15,646 19,525 22,339 23,166 3.7% 827 GRAND TOTAL $ 18,896 $ - $ 33,962 $ 2 -100.0% $ (33,960) 200 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department Strategic Theme & Objectives(s) ®Theme - Exemplary Service & Governance ®Objective(s) - Increase Transparency, Accessibili M Department Contact Information Ginger Awtry Director gawtry@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5719 ` #Jon Sasser Manager jsasser@westlake-tx.org 817-490-5736 Program Broad Goals ®Continue to develop key relationships z' with community affairs and public information strategies and programs r. designed to inform and engage f residents, parents, all Town/Academy employees, media contacts and members of the business community in order to increase awareness and promotion of both Town and Academy. • Increase the review, consistency, & transparency of information on the municipal and academic websites for relevant data and work with department directors as it relates to their respective content development; All communication department personnel are to serve as primary contact for municipal website updates and support personnel with their departmental website initiatives and help identify areas of improvement. ® Develop, implement, and collaborate on programs, tactics and initiatives related to all communication, promotion, public information, and citizen/parent engagement to build sense of community and community-mindedness for multiple target audiences. ®Communication department personnel serve as primary contact/Town representative to local chambers of commerce and provide support including attendance at meetings, events, etc. to increase knowledge of Westlake community while building relationships and assistance in economic development efforts. ®Communication department personnel serve as liaison to the Westlake Historical Preservation Society; attend board meetings and provide support when possible, and assist with WHPS related community events and promotion initiatives. 201 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department Program Service Description ®The department of Communications & Community Affairs is responsible for leadership and representation on matters related to Town (both municipal and academic) services' communications, promotion, and citizen/parent engagement. ®The Director position has senior level management duties and reports to the Assistant Town Manager. The position coordinates facilitation of neighborhood and WA parent meetings, publication of our email blasts, advertising, web site development, various community events and gatherings, social media, serves/supports our local chambers of commerce at meetings and events, assists in various economic development efforts for the Town, and serves/supports the Westlake Historical Preservation Society as Town liaison. ®The Communications Manager position reports to the director of communications and provides overall DID YOU KNOW. . . assistance as requested with department responsibilities. This position manages all aspects of the town's social media platforms; and is team lead Westlake Communications on website updates and maintenance, garnered a 15% increase in photography and video work, department's records overall satisfaction with its management with Laserfiche, and assists as Academy website after necessary with media relations and coordination implementing a new regarding press releases, events, and WHPS board redesign? efforts as needed. Hopefully the municipal website will also bring Program Trends increased satisfaction to residents as it will undergo a •While the 2017 DirectionFinders Residents' Survey new website redesign in the noted an 11% decrease in satisfaction of overall coming 2017-18 fiscal year! communication effectiveness since setting a national benchmark of 92%in 2015, a resident/stakeholder focus group was formed and utilized to provide deeper insight and collaboration for continuous improvement efforts. •The 2016 annual Westlake Academy Parents Survey revealed an increase of 7% in both, overall satisfaction with the quality of communications received and methods of communication. 202 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department • Benchmarks are being gathered with the implementation of the tier One Strategy Map for our Balanced Score Card system relative to the municipality's website, social media platform, and citizen engagement. •Simply Westlake, a monthly resident newsletter/magazine now in 5th year of publication, continues to garner even more support with each passing year with increased growth in resident contributors, advertisers, and requests to be a feature family now months in advance. •Advertising and events in major local and social publications/websites on a state level and in local DFW publications regularly occur throughout the year in order to maintain brand awareness and knowledge about Town of Westlake and Westlake Academy. This process has now been implemented on the international level and efforts continue to raise and/or maintain promotion on this additional level each year. ® Due to the continuing growth in the Westlake community and increasing demands on departmental personnel, utilize services of external marketing consultants to assist in branding, promotion, and strategic messaging efforts for continued success in citizen education and engagement efforts, local government awareness, and increased sense of community. 2016-2017 Highlights ® Implemented the Town's first Communications Focus Group to gather insight and assess Town communication and marketing effectiveness, citizen engagement efforts, and future initiatives. ® National award winning Simply Westlake resident publication completed its 5th year, with increased support and feedback from residents for their appreciation, satisfaction, and enjoyment; now experiencing a wait list for the featured families' cover. ®Garnered a 15% increase in overall satisfaction with the Academy's new website and a 7% increase in both quality and methods of communication ® Increased video coverage and production planning for both municipal and academic departments for cross-promotion and citizen education of initiatives across multiple communication platforms ® Increased social media usage and added new accounts of Instagram and Next Door to enhance citizen engagement; Also, streamed live video on Facebook for first time at appropriate Academy events with plans for municipal events' live streaming to follow. 203 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department • Experienced significant gains in citizen engagement via Social Media accounts since January 2017 as follows: Facebook Likes increased by 31% and Twitter Followers by 26%; Facebook Reactions and Comments increased 29%and 82%respectively while Twitter Mentions and Engagements increased by 24% and 26%respectively ®Completed necessary website analytics and procured contract for upcoming municipal website 1 ,so redesign and new mobile app in 2017-18 ® Executed comprehensive communication plan specific to new fire and emergency services facility • Finalized informational and promotional components of new welcome basket program to be personally delivered to all new residents in upcoming years •Completed departmental operations review and development of communications plan with presentation to Council •Completed enhancements of new resident information packet distributed at Town Hall •Completed coordination, development, and production,with area chamber of commerce, for regional economic development video •Selected to serve on Westlake Academy Emergency Operations Team and began work on developing an emergency operations plan, defining roles, and participating in emergency operations drills and exercises • Hosted and coordinated our 8t" annual graduation ceremony for Westlake Academy at the Hurst Conference Center with 64 Class of 2017 graduates and over 850 people in attendance. • Hosted and coordinated the 2016 Alumni Reunion & IB Diploma Ceremony with over 65% of alumni class returning to attend this event. 2017-2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives ®Complete development and roll-out of new Town of Westlake website redesign and mobile app; Coordinate training for all municipal departments of new website and mobile app features and create communication plan for promotion to residents and stakeholders. ® Develop and implement a strategic messaging communication plan for a series of educational and informational topics to educate residents and stakeholders new to our 204 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department community over the last several years' growth;Topics will range from contact/accessibility to Town staff and leaders, from Westlake's governance structure and Academy charter to records & financial transparency initiatives, from water rates and shared services model to our development standards and vision, values, and mission. This plan will also include another communication series regarding Westlake Academy informational hot topics from college prep and curriculum initiatives to Academy ratings and academic outcomes. ®Create and produce a series of brief informative video vignettes to enrich related communication channels regarding our defined strategic messaging topics-all done to help education and fully engage our residents and stakeholders in their local government; Channels to include appropriate emails,website and social media postings, and creation/distribution of print pieces •Complete planning for production of a new comprehensive municipal services video to be used for economic development and promotional purposes; And, continue in production of Westlake Academy's second promotional video regarding student life •Continue efforts to implement and improve our new resident welcome program to grow relationships and sense of community with new residents, either prior to their arrival or shortly after their move into Westlake •Continue to serve on Westlake Academy's EOP committee, developing the EO plan and participating in additional preparation exercises ®Continue monitoring of benchmarks and measures in municipal social media and on-going academic social media; review growth and engagement efforts for on-going enhancements to current programs and assess new channels of engagement while continuing to hone our Balanced Scorecard metrics and outcomes •Continue with and train new departmental personnel to complete records management with Laserfiche as an on-going effort with current communication materials and for remaining department items such as advertisements, resident mail outs, meeting notes, event flyers and programs. R ®Continue and seek ways to enhance the annual } -- J resident and Academy parent meetings to continue success in citizen/parent engagement, support, and open/transparent lines of communication. ®Continue department personnel's attendance at minimum of two related professional development organizational conferences and/or training seminars for both municipal & academic services; share information with other staff members to improve internal and external communication at All Staff Q2 Sessions. 205 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 22 Communications Department 2017 Performance Measures7 Actual Estimated MT INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production &delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time, money, materials, equipment,technology, etc. 1. Full Time Equivalents n/a 2 2 2 2. Department Expenditures n/a $16,018 $13,770 $15,600 3. Department Payroll n/a $167,236 $188,549 $230,309 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually aVERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver, develop,train, provide,assess,facilitate, etc. 1. Neighborhood meetings Quarterly 4 4 4 2. New resident/parent meetings Annually 2 2 2 3. Resident email blasts Monthly 12 12 12 4. Simply Westlake Issued Monthly 12 12 12 5. Westlake Wire Year End Review Yearly 1 1 1 6. Social Media Posts Monthly 12 12 12 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output - (the ability to do things well,successfully,and without waste) 1. Resident Rating per Survey Effectiveness of Town 92% 92% 81% 95% Communications 2. 3CMA Savvy Award Yearly N/A July 2016 Yes National award for excellence for external publications- Simply Westlake Magazine 3. Certified Public Communicator n/a July 2015 n/a n/a TAMIO-TCU (Director) 206 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 23 Police Services Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget Vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUE CATEGORIES General Sales Tax - - - - 0.0% Property Tax 0.0% Permits and Fees 0.0% Fines&Forfeitures 0.0% Franchise Fees 0.0% Contributions 0.0% Beverage Tax 0.0% Interest 0.0% Intergovernmental 0.0% Misc Income 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES Capital Outlay 0.0% Debt Service 0.0% Economic Development 0.0% Insurance 0.0% Repair and Maintenance 0.0% Rent and Utilities 0.0% Service 888,486 915,105 888,486 932,910 5.0% 44,424 Supplies - - - 0.0% - GRAND TOTAL $ 888,486 $ 915,105 $ 888,486 $ 932,910 5.0% $ 44,424 207 Program Summary RETURN TO T.O.C. Department 23 Police Services Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated EMPLOYEE STAFFING Police Services are Contracted 0.0% thru the City of Keller Police Dept TOTAL POSITIONS 0.0% L Q) bA +M•+ M City of Keller •� Police Department Q � 3 H PAYROLL&REALTED CATEGORIES Payroll Wages 0.0% Payroll Insurance 0.0% Payroll Taxes TWC/WC 0.0% Payroll Taxes SS/M 0.0% Payroll Retirement 0.0% GRAND TOTAL $ $ $ $ 0.0% $ 208 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 23 Police Services Strategic Theme & Objective(s) ®Theme Exemplary Service & Governance ®Objective(s) Preserve Desirability & Quality of Life Department Contact Information ®Keller Police Department *Telephone: 817-743-4500 •Dispatch Non-Emergency: 817-743-4522 •Fax Number: 817-743-4591 ®Mailing Address: P.O. Box 770, Keller, TX 76244-0770 ®Physical Address: 330 Rufe Snow Dr, Keller, TX •Email: police@cityofkeller.com ®Administration Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday •Police Station: Open 24 hours Program Broad Goals ®Deliver the highest quality of police services to the Town of Westlake with a fully staffed and equipped nationally and state accredited agency. •Continue to develop and maintain personal relationships with our partners-including, residents/stakeholders within the community, Westlake staff members, and surrounding municipalities. Program Service Description ®The Keller Police Department has provided law enforcement services for the Town of Westlake since June of 2002. The communities entered into an interlocal agreement, which benefits both organizations through the �. provision of police related services for the �' , Westlake citizens and brings additional staff es resources via the contract commitments for the City of Keller. JR loll'! A.WESR The Department is in the distinguished group of the 2% of police departments in the United ; States who are accredited. The police department also received Texas Law Enforcement Best Practices Recognition in 2013 making it the only municipal police agency in Texas, at that time, to be dual accredited. 209 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 23 Police Services Jail, Emergency Communications, and Animal Services are provided through a regional configuration-serving the communities, of Westlake, Keller, Roanoke, Southlake and Colleyville. Program Trends •Westlake experienced 13, Part 1 Crimes in 2016, down from 20 in 2015-a 35%decrease. :g 4- •The frequency and severity of motor vehicle collisions ; on the streets within the Town remains a priority for the police department and they continue to monitor traffic enforcement and utilize directed enforcement F in an attempt to change driver behavior and - -- maintain the lowest possible number of injuries and accidents. -- ®Over the course of our service provision arrangement and as the community has continued to grow, we noted the following: o Citizen calls for service decreased approximately 4.7%from 2015 (2,693 in 2015 to 2,567 in 2016) o Animal control calls have increased approximately 23%from 2015 (60 in 2015 to 74 in 2016) *School security and the safety of the students at Westlake Academy also remains a high priority and the department has been working with Academy staff to take steps to improve school security. — 2016 - 2017 Highlights The Campus Patrol Program increased police presence at the school on a daily basis. ®Continued to utilize social media to improve traffic safety. Y!• •Attended several neighborhood meetings with staff. f g g ®Provided K-9 drug prevention services to corporate DID YOU KNOW campuses. *The launch of Siren GPS enhanced 911 services for mobile The Keller Police device users. Department is pursuing CALEA Gold Standard 2017- 2018 Strategic Goals and Objectives Accreditation status in 2018. ®Continue an emphasis on school security and safety with the Campus Patrol Program. 210 RETURN TO T.O.C. Goals and Objectives 23 Police Services ®Attend neighborhood meetings with elected officials and staff. ®Assess and monitor traffic safety on the newly improved roadways and formulate enforcement/ prevention strategies to mitigate traffic collisions. ®Work with developers to prevent thefts at construction sites. ®Continue to provide Crime Prevention material through the Director of Communication and Community Affairs and social media. •Continue to be proactive and highly responsive to the corporate campuses in Westlake. •Work to expand enrollment into Siren GPS to enhance emergency response times. M= Performance Measures 2017 � "' Estimated Tar INPUTS (the resources that contribute to the production&delivery of outputs) Usually a NOUN-we use staff,time,money,materials,equipment,technology,etc. 1. Department Expenditures n/a $863,720 $888,486 $932,910 OUTPUTS (The final product/service that was produced/delivered from your input-is measurable) Usually a VERB/QTY-we conduct,deliver,develop,train,provide,assess,facilitate,etc. 1. Keller Police Information Motor Vehicle Stops n/a 10,432 11,100 11,000 Traffic Accident Investigations n/a 398 461 440 Part 1 Reported Crime n/a 20 13 20 DWI Arrests n/a 62 66 80 MEASURES OF EFFECTIVENESS/EFFICIENCY (the result or consequence of achieving your output-(the ability to do things well,successfully,and without waste) 1. Commission on Accreditation for Law Yes Yes Yes Yes Enforcement Agencies 2. Commission on Accreditation for Law Yes Yes Yes Yes Enforcement Agencies Gold Standard Assessment 2. Resident Rating per Survey Police response time to emergencies 90% 89% n/a 90% Efforts of Town to prevent crime 90% 83% n/a 85% Satisfaction with local police station 90% 81% n/a 85% Level of Traffic Enforcement 90% 73% n/a 75% Visibility of police in the neighborhood 90% 70% n/a 75% Quality of public safety services 95% 92% n/a 95% 211 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 212 S ]� CTIO'N + + +1 {PRI S uNiD. .. , . . + # + 1 4 (V AM! bw l �laa �f r. RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 214 ENTERPRISE FUNDS RETURN TO T.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES 8 OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ $ 0% Property Tax 0% Hotel Tax - 0% Charge for Services 3,836,457 3,565,755 3,752,705 3,777,315 24,610 1% Beverage Tax - - - - - 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Buildings - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility 125,812 152,265 168,865 168,865 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 10,716 7,760 15,020 15,020 0% Contributions - - 50,000 - (50,000) -100% Misc Income 16,932 17,030 35,800 35,800 0% Total Revenues 3,989,917 3,742,810 4,022,390 3,997,000 (25,390) -1% Transfers In - - 0% Other Sources - 0% Total Other Sources 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 3,989,917 $ 3,742,810 1 $ 4,022,390 $ 3,997,000 $ (25,390) EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ 18,942 $ $ $ $ 0% Payroll Retirement 14,107 0% Total Payroll and Related 33,049 07. Debt 1,934,078 1,155,620 1,155,620 1,155,174 (446) 0% Economic Development - - - - 0% Insurance 8,188 8,250 8,750 8,750 - 0% Payroll Transfer Out 404,494 437,145 437,145 482,700 45,555 10% Repair&Maintenance 217,354 161,035 158,870 165,250 6,380 4% Rent&Utilities 86,739 185,580 138,829 156,499 17,670 13% Services 936,009 582,475 1,058,950 798,960 (259,990) -25% Supplies 10,979 7,150 7,125 7,250 125 2% Wafer Purchases 1,358,068 1,344,600 1,344,600 1,344,600 - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 4,955,909 3,881,855 4,309,889 4,119,183 (190,706) -47. TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 4,988,958 3,881,855 4,309,889 4,119,183 (190,706) -47. Capital Project Funds 39,271 96,435 - - - 0% Capital Outlay 9,402 24,780 19,780 25,780 6,000 30% Maintenance&Replacement Funds - - - - 0% Total Capital 48,673 121,215 19,780 25,780 6,000 307. Transfers Out 564,578 158,765 278,593 56,250 (222,343) -80% Other Uses - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 564,578 158,765 278,593 56,250 (222,343) -80% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 613,252 279,980 298,373 82,030 (216,343) -73% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 5,602,210 4,161,835 4,608,262 (407,049) -9% Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (1,612,293) (419,025) (585,872) (204,213) 381,659 1 65% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 1,280,064j1,280,064 1,280,064 694,191 (585,873) 46% FUND BALANCE,ENDING (332,228) 861,039 694,192 48978 (204,214) 29% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds (332,228) 861,039 694,192 489,978 (204,214) -29% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS Cash $ (332,228) $ 861,039 $ 694,192 $ 489,978 $ (204,214) -29% 0% 0% 0% 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS I $ (332,228) $ 861,039 1 $ 694,192 $ 489,978 $ (204,214) 215 ENTERPRISE FUIRETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expen,....-..... ...... . ...... _...ance FISCAL YEAR 2016/2017 Cemetery Fund Utility Fund TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax - - - Property Tax - - - Charge for Services 11,575 3,765,740 3,777,315 Hotel Tax - - - Beverage Tax - - - Franchise Fees - - - Permits and Fees - - - Permits and Fees Building - - - Fines and Forfeitures - - - Investment Earnings 900 14,120 15,020 Contributions - - - Misc Income 350 35,450 35,800 Total Revenues 12,825 3,815,310 3,828,135 Transfers In - - - Other Sources - Total Other Sources - - - TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 12,825 $ 3,815,310 $ 3,828,1341 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ - Payroll Transfers In - Total Payroll&Related - Debt - 1,155,174 1,155,174 Economimc Development - - - Insurance - 8,750 8,750 Payroll Transfers Out - 482,700 482,700 Repair&Maintenance 7,000 158,250 165,250 Rent&Utilities - 156,499 156,499 Services 19,840 779,120 798,960 Supplies 350 6,900 7,250 Water Purchases - 1,344,600 1,344,600 Total Operations&Maintenance 27,190 4,091,993 4,119,183 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 27,190 4,091,993 4,119,183 Capital Project Funds - - Capital Outlay 5,000 20,780 - Maintenance&Replacement Funds - - - Total Capital 5,000 20,780 Transfers Out 56,250 56,250 Other Uses - - Total Other Uses - 56,250 56,250 TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 5,000 77,030 56,250 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 32,190 $ 4,169,023 $ 4,175,433 Excess Revenus over(under) Expenditures (19,365) (353,713) (373,078) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 212,378 481,814 694,192 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 193,013 1 $ 128,101 1 $ 321,11 216 RETURN TO T.O.C. Utility• • M a The Utility Fund is an enterprise or business fund. This means that the direct beneficiaries of the "business" pay for all costs through fees or rates. Water, sewer service, and garbage service revenues generated through our rates, as well as the expenses for providing these services are accounted for in this fund. Prudent financial management and bond requirements make it necessary to have healthy reserves. 217 Utility Fund 500 RETURN To T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ $ $ 0% Property Tax - - - - - 0% Charge for Service 3,825,342 3,554,180 3,741,130 3,765,740 24,610 1% Hotel Occupancy Tax - - - - 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility 125,812 152,265 168,865 168,865 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 10,501 7,620 14,120 14,120 - 0% Contributions - - - 0% Misc Income 16,932 16,680 35,450 35,450 - 0% Total Revenues 3,978,587 3,730,745 3,959,565 3,984,175 24,610 1% Transfers In - - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources - - - 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 3,978,587 $ 3,730,745 $ 3,959,565 $ 3,984,175 $ 24,610 1% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ 18,942 $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Payroll Transfers In - - - - - 0% Total Payroll and Related 18,942 - - 0% Debt 1,934,078 1,155,620 1,155,620 1,155,174 (446) 0% Economic Development - - - - - 0% Insurance 8,188 8,250 8,750 8,750 - 0% Payroll Transfers Out 404,494 437,145 437,145 482,700 45,555 10% Repair&Maintenance 217,354 160,535 158,250 158,250 - 0% Rent&Utilities 86,739 185,580 138,829 156,499 17,670 13% Services 928,629 577,550 1,051,110 779,120 (271,990) -26% Supplies 10,529 6,900 6,900 6,900 0% Water Purchases 1,358,068 1,344,600 1,344,600 1,344,600 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 4,948,079 3,876,180 4,301,204 4,091,993 (209,211) -5% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 4,967,021 3,876,180 4,301,204 4,091,993 (209,211) -5% Capital Project Funds 39,271 96,435 - - - 0% Capital Outlay 9,402 24,780 19,780 20,780 1,000 5% Maintenance&Replacment Funds - - - - - 1 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 48,673 121,215 19,780 20,780 1,000 5% Transfers Out 564,578 158,765 278,593 56,250 (222,343) -80% Other Sources - - - 0% Total Other Uses 564,578 158,765 278,593 56,250 (222,343) -80% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 613,252 279,980 298,373 77,030 (221,343) -74% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 5,580,272 4,156,160 4,599,577 4,169,023 (430,554) _971A 1 Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (1,601,685) (425,415) (640,012) (184,848) 1 455,164 1 71% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 3,226,933 1,121,826 1,121,826 481,814 (640,012) -57% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1,625,247 696,411 481,814 296,966 (184,848) -38% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 1,625,247 696,411 481,814 296,966 (184,848) -38% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 500 10110 00 000 $ 1,625,247 $ 696,411 $ 481,814 $ 296,966 $ (184,848) -38% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 1,625,247 $ 696,411 $ 481,814 $ 296,966 $ (184,848) -38% 218 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 Enterprise Funds Utility Fund Overview The Utility Fund is responsible for water,wastewater, and ductbank services. All activities related to the provision of these services are accounted for in the fund, including administration, operations, maintenance, financing and related debt service, billing, and collection. Capital and operating costs associated with Town utility services are financed primarily through user charges. The Town continues to use advanced automated technologies to control storage facility inflows and minimize annual peak payment charges from the City of Fort Worth. Revenues and Other Sources • Total revenues and other sources are budgeted to be$3,984,175 • This represents a 1%increase of$24,640 from prior year estimated revenues of$3,959,565. o Charges for services increased $24,610 due to anticipated population growth. o The following revenues will remain flat for FY 17/18. ■ Permits and fees of$168,865 ■ Investment earnings of$14,120 ■ Miscellaneous income of$35,430 Utility Fund revenue is primarily comprised of fees for water and wastewater services. The fund also receives a small portion of its revenue through tap fees and interest income, and currently serves as a mechanism for collecting and distributing debt service and impact fees. • Water Revenue$2,706,013 The Utility Fund is the recipient of all revenue generated from water sales in the Town. As Westlake's customer base continues to expand,additional demands will be placed on the utility system, requiring incremental expansion and maintenance of infrastructure. • Wastewater Revenue$834,395 Wastewater revenue is the second largest component of the Utility Fund. Revenue is expected to grow proportionate to future non-irrigation water demands. • Ductbank Permit Fees$83,700 The ductbank is a series of Town owned conduit that houses underground telecommunication infrastructure in portions of Westlake. Revenues are contingent upon utility companies leasing out portions of the ductbank.The Town continues to anticipate growth in new ductbank leases with telecommunications companies. • Tap and Impact Fees $93,135 These revenues are a direct reflection of new home starts. • Waste Management$5,415 The Town receives a 12%fee from its franchisee. The current rate for solid waste and recycling service remains unchanged since 2008. 219 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 Enterprise Funds Utility Fund Overview The Utility Fund budget is designed to fully recover all system costs as well as provide for capital improvements and maintenance of Westlake's water and wastewater infrastructure. • Water and wastewater rates are based on a rate study conducted in November 2016 and approved by the Town Council at the January 2017 Town Council meeting. • Staff is committed to maintaining an up to date utility rate analysis to maintain the integrity of the fund. To that end town staff will update the rate study completed in November 2016 which will help guide future rate policy. Operating Expenditures • Total operating expenditures are budgeted to be$4,091,993 • This represents a 5%decrease of$209,211 from prior year estimated expenditures of$4,301,204. o Debt decreased $446 when compared to prior year estimate. The FYI 7/18 debt includes$888K for the Fort Worth water line. This is the second year that this payment will be made. o Payroll transfers out to the General Fund increased $45,555;due to additional public works project manager that will be added in fiscal year 2017/2018. o Rent and utilities increased$17,670; due to the leasing of new building space in July 2017. o Services decreased $271,990 when compared to prior year estimate. • Southlake wastewater treatment is budgeted at$1,000 which is a decrease $499,000;anticipating new meter stations going online and this will result in payments being made directly to TRA for sewer services. ■ TRA wastewater treatment budgeted at$612,000 is an increase of$226,800; increased to include the Southlake flow and payment as noted above along with an anticipated decrease in cost of service. Non-Operating Expenditures • Non-operating expenditures to be$77,030. • This represents an 74%decrease of$221,343 from prior year estimated transfers out of$298,373. o Capital outlay increased $1,000 when compared to prior year estimate for the purchase of a computer for new project manager.Transfers out to General Fund decreased $120,258; due to one-time impact fees transferred in the prior year. o Transfers out decreased $222,343 ■ Transfer Out to Vehicle M&R Fund decreased $2,085. ■ Transfers out to Utility M&R decreased $100,000. A decision was made to decrease this transfer for one year as the fund balance in Utility M&R is currently stable. Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are projected to be$(184,848) • The beginning fund balance is projected to be$481,814. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$296,966. 220 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 Enterprise Funds Utility Fund Overview The Utility Fund is burdened with three outstanding long-term obligations. • The long-term liability of the loan from Hillwood to the Town to construct 16" and 20" transmission water lines and the US 377 Pump Station. o The Town is contractually obligated to pay for this infrastructure through a surcharge on water rates. The Town is divided into two service areas, one being the Circle T Ranch, and the remaining areas within the Town's limits which constitute the "Town" service area. The Town pays Hillwood $.25 cents per 1,000 gallons of water distributed to consumers in these two service areas. Each service area pays its respective portion of the overall debt based on the volume of water used. o The contract clearly stipulates that this debt is not a general obligation of the Town. It is, however,required to be paid back through this assessment being attached to the water rate. The rate would have to be significantly increased to pay this debt off in the twenty years contemplated under the agreement. o Hillwood has stated that once the Town and Hillwood agree on proportionate future infrastructure funding,this liability will be erased. Nevertheless,the obligation does exist and water rates should always be reviewed with this obligation in mind. • The long-term liability of the joint Westlake/Keller water tower. o This tower was constructed to provide necessary water storage and pressures within Westlake. • The proportionate buyout of infrastructure owned by the Hunt Trust which sold the Circle T Ranch to Hillwood. o The Town agreed with Hillwood that in exchange for the dissolution of existing Municipal Utility Districts (MUDs),the Utility Fund will reimburse Hillwood the share of purchased MUD infrastructure for each development based upon the acres removed from the MUDS. o Hillwood, in turn, must deposit these funds into an escrow account owned by the Hunt Trust. 221 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 222 RETURN TO T.O.C. Cemetery Fund The cemetery was donated and conveyed by deed to the Town during FY2008-09. This fund includes all operations associated with the 5.5 acre cemetery located on J.T. Ottinger Road . This includes interment, lot sales, record keeping, and all maintenance associated with the grounds, fences, trees and flower beds. 223 Cemetery Fund 255 RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ $ $ 0% Property Tax - - - - - 0% Charge for Service 11,115 11,575 11,575 11,575 - 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax - - 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 215 140 900 900 0% Contributions - - 50,000 (50,000) -100% Misc Income - 350 350 350 0% Total Revenues 11,330 12,065 62,825 12,825 (50,000) -807. Transfers In - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources - 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 11,330 $ 12,065 $ 62,825 $ 12,825 $ (50,000) -80% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ $ $ 0% Payroll Transfers In - - - - - 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out - - 0% Repair&Maintenance 500 620 7,000 6,380 1029% Rent&Utilities - - - - 0% Services 7,381 4,925 7,840 19,840 12,000 153% Supplies 450 250 225 350 125 56% Water Purchases - - - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 7,831 5,675 8,685 27,190 18,505 213% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 7,831 5,675 8,685 27,190 18,505 213% Capital Project Funds - - - - 0% Capital Outlay - 5,000 5,000 100% Maintenance&Replacment Funds - - - - - 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 5,000 5,000 100% Transfers Out - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses - - - - - 07. TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - 5,000 5,000 100% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 7,831 5,675 8,685 3U90 23,505 271% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 3,500 6,390 54,140 1 (19,365) 1 (73,505) 136% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 154,738 158,238 158,238 212,378 54,140 34% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 158,238 164,628 212,378 193,013 (19,365) -9% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 158,238 164,628 212,378 193,013 (19,365) 9% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 255 10110 00 000 $ 62,345 $ 68,885 $ 117,180 $ 98,512 $ (18,668) -16% Inventory Lots 255 15100 00 000 95,893 95,743 95,197 94,500 (697) -1% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 158,238 $ 164,628 $ 212,378 $ 193,013 $ (19,365) -9% 224 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 4 Enterprise Funds Cemetery Fund Overview The Cemetery Fund includes all operations associated with the 5.5 acre cemetery located on J.T. Ottinger Road. Program activities include interment, lot sales, record keeping, and all maintenance associated with the grounds, fences, trees and flower beds. The cemetery was donated and conveyed by deed to the Town during FY 2008/09. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be$12,825 • This reflects a 80%decrease of$50,000 when compared to prior year estimated revenues of $62,825. o One-time private contributions$50,000 received in the prior year will be used in fiscal year 2017/2018 for operations and maintenance to the cemetery. Operating Expenditures and Other Uses • Operating expenditures are budgeted to be$27,190 • This represents a 213%increase of$18,505 when compared to prior year estimated expenditures of$8,685. o Repairs and maintenance increased $6,380;for items related to the irrigation and grounds. o Services increased $12,000;for items related to engineering and landscaping. o Capital outlay increased $5,000;for land improvements to the cemetery. Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures is projected to be$(19,365) • The beginning fund balance is projected to 212,378. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$193,013 225 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 226 79.I� CTIO-N + 11T E• SIT +• • ��+� -E• • vIc. E+.' • • 11�D.L R 1 4 Oil RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 228 INTERNAL SERVICE FUISRETURNTOT.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 _ Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 16/17 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 15/16 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ $ $ 0% Property Tax 0% Hotel Tax 0% Charge for Services 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - 0% Permits&Fees Other 4,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 0% Permits&Fees Buildings - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 4,225 4,470 7,015 7,015 0% Contributions 13,299 - 110,500 - (110,500) -100% Misc Income 16,693 4,765 - (4,765) -100% Total Revenues 38,217 10,470 128,280 13,015 (115,265) -907. Transfers In 768,333 458,335 1,090,550 300,000 (790,550) -72% Other Sources - 8,715 - (8,715) -100% Total Other Sources 768,333 458,335 1,099,265 300,000 (799,265) 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 806,550 $ 468,805 $ 1,227,545 $ 313,015 $ (914,530) EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfer In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 11,570 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfer Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 11,570 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 11,570 - - - - 0% Capital Project Funds - 0% Capital Outlay - - - - 0% Maintenance&Replacement Funds 345,358 783,700 1,391,745 532,000 (859,745) -62% Total Capital 345,358 783,700 1,391,745 532,000 (859,745) -62% Transfers Out - - 380,000 - (380,000) -100% Other Uses - 0% Total Other Uses 380,000 (380,000) -100% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 345,358 783,700 1,771,745 532,000 (1,239,745) -70% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 356,928 783,700 1,771,745 532,000 (1,239,745) 70% Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures 449,622 1 (314,895) (544,200) (218,985) 325,215 1 60% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 679,660 1,129,282 1,129,282 585,082 (544,200) -48% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1,129,282 814,387 585,082 366,097 (218,985) 37% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 1,129,282 814,387 585,082 366,097 (218,985) -37% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING 111111JU $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS Cash $ 1,129,282 $ 814,387 $ 585,082 $ 366,097 $ (218,985) -37% 0% 0% 0% 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 1,129,282 $ 814,387 $ 585,082 $ 366,097 $ (218,985) 37% 229 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNRETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expenditures an FISCAL YEAR 2016/2017 UMR Fund 510 GMR Fund 600 ( VMR Fund 505 VMR Fund 605 TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Charge for Services Hotel Tax Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits and Fees Other 6,000 6,000 Permits and Fees Building - - Permits and Fees Utility Fines and Forfeitures - - - - - Investment Earnings 4,500 1,550 40 925 7,015 Contributions - - - - - Misc Income - - - Total Revenues 4,500 7,550 40 925 13,015 Transfers In 300,000 6,250 306,250 Other Sources - - - Total Other Sources 300,000 6,250 306,250 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 4,500 $ 307,550 $ 6,290 $ $ 319,265 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ $ $ Payroll Transfers In Total Payroll&Related Debt Economimc Development Insurance Payroll Transfers Out Repair&Maintenance Rent&Utilities Services Supplies Water Purchases Total Operations&Maintenance TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES Capital Project Funds Capital Outlay - Maintenance&Replacement Funds 245,000 287,000 532,000 Total Capital 245,000 287,000 532,000 Transfers Out - - - Other Uses Total Other Uses - TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 245,000 287,000 - - 532,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES 245,000 287,000 532.000 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (240,500) 20,550 6,290 925 (212,735) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 447,439 623 25,360 136,979 610,402 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 206,939 1 $ 21,173 1 $ 31,650 1 $ 137,904 1 $ 371,684 230 RETURN TO T.O.C. Utility Maintenance• & Replacement Fund • The Utility Maintenance & Replacement Fund was created to provide a mechanism for repair and replacement of capital assets such as pump stations, lift stations, elevated and ground storage facilities, etc. 231 Vehicle Maintenance and Repla'RETURN TO T.O.C. ' Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 I FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - 0% Investment Earnings 2,379 2,370 4,500 4,500 0% Contributions - - 0% Misc Income - - - - 0% Total Revenues 2,379 2,370 4,500 4,500 07. Transfers In 300,000 100,000 100,000 - (100,000) 100% Other Sources - - 0% Total Other Sources 300,000 100,000 100,000 - (100,000) 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 302,379 $ 102,370 $ 104,500 $ 4,500 $ (100,000) -96% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 07. Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 232,500 245,000 245,000 100% Total Capital and M&R Projects 232,500 245,000 245,000 100% Transfers Out - 380,000 - (380,000) -100% Other Sources - 0% Total Other Uses 380,000 (380,000) -100% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 232,500 380,000 245,000 (135,000) -36% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 232,500 380,000 245,000 (135,000) -367. Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 302,379 1 (130,130) (275,500) (240,500) 35,000 1317o FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING f 722,939 722,939 447,439 (275,500) -38% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 592,809 447,439 206,939 (240,500) -54% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 592,809 447,439 206,939 (240,500) 54% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ $ $ - $1 07. RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 510 10110 00 000 $ 722,939 $ 592,809 $ 447,439 $ 206,939 $ (240,500) -54% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 722,939 $ 592,809 $ 447,439 $ 206,939 $ (240,500) -54% 232 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Internal Service Funds Utility Maintenance & Replacement Overview The Utility Maintenance & Replacement Fund (UMR) was created to provide a mechanism for repair and replacement of existing capital assets such as pump stations, lift stations, elevated and ground storage facilities, water and sewer lines, etc. This fund receives planned revenue transfers from the Utility Fund that are intended to cover the cost of future capital repair and replacement. Similar to the General Maintenance and Replacement Fund, the UMR was created to help avoid future bond programs and encourage a conservative pattern of spending that minimizes reliance on elastic revenue streams. Projects are included each year from a long-range maintenance schedule which incorporates routine scheduled maintenance, recommended replacement guidelines and evaluations, and upgrades of lines and permanent capital assets. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted at$4,500. • This represents a 96%decrease of$100,000 from the prior year estimated of$104,500. o Transfers in from the Utility Fund were$100,00 in the prior year and have been decreased to zero for the current year. Expenditures and Other Uses • Expenditures and other uses are budgeted at$245,000. • This represents a 36%decrease of$135,000 from the prior year estimated of$380,000. o Maintenance and replacement projects reflect a 100%increase of$245,000. o The following projects are budgeted for FYI 7/18: ■ Pump Station Equipment$100,000 ■ Repaint Ground Storage Tank$100,000 ■ Sewer Easement Cleaning Machine$45,000 o Transfers out are budgeted to decrease 100%when compared to prior year estimate of$380,000. This is due to one-time transfers out to the General M&R Fund budgeted in the prior year for furniture,fixtures, etc.related to the new municipal building. Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are projected to the$(240,500). • The beginning fund balance is projected to be$447,439. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$206,939. 233 UTILITY RETURN TO T.O.C. Maintenance & Replacement Fund 61 Five Year Forecast Fstimated -eq C Description Account Numb., EFY 16-17 1 FY 17-18 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES Interest Income 510-36110-00-000 $ 4,500 $ 4,500 $ 3,400 $ 3,400 $ 3,400 $ 3,400 Transfer in from OF 510-52550-88-000 100,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $104,500 $ 4,500 $ 28,400 $ 0 $ 28,400 1 $ 28,400 MAINTENANCE/REPLACEMENT PROJECTS Pump Station Equipment 510-44123-16-000-000005 $ - %245 $ - $ $ - $ - Sewer Easement Cleaning Machine 510-44114-16-000-000014 Repaint Ground Storage Tank 510-44119-16-000-000015 TOTAL PROJECTS OTHER USES Transfer Out to GMR 510-62600-99-000 380,000 TOTAL OTHER USE 380,000 Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (275,500) (240,500) 28,400 28,400 28,400 28,400 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 722,939 447,439 206,939 235,339 263,739 1 292,139 ENDING FUND BALANCE $447,439 $ 206,939 11 $ 235,339 $ 263,739 $ 292,139 1 $ 320,539 234 RETURN TO T.O.C. General Maintenance & Replacement Fund A The General Maintenance & Replacement Fund was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of large capital assets such as HVAC, walls, floors and ceilings, plumbing, electric, roadways, etc. 235 General Maintenance and Repla RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 I FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 4,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 0% Permits&Fees Building - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 1,285 1,550 1,550 1,550 - 0% Contributions 13,299 - 500 - (500) -100% Misc Income 8,043 - - - 0% Total Revenues 26,628 7,550 8,050 7,550 (500) -6% Transfers In 350,000 350,000 990,550 300,000 (690,550) 100% Other Sources - - - 0% Total Other Sources 350,000 350,000 1 990,550 300,000 (690,550) 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 376,628 $ 357,550 $ 998,600 $ 307,550 $ (691,050) 69% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 07. Debt 11,570 0% Economic Development - 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 11,570 07. TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 11,570 07. Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay - - 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 345,358 496,200 1,226,745 287,000 (939,745) -77% Total Capital and M&R Projects 345,358 496,200 1 1,226,745 287,000 (939,745) -77% Transfers Out - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 345,358 496,200 1,226,745 287,000 (939,745) -77% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 356,928 496,200 1,226,745 287,000 (939,745) -77% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 19,6991 (138,650) (228,145) 20,550 248,695 1 109% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 209,069 228,768 228,768 623 (228,145) -100% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 228,768 90,118 623 21,173 20,550 3297% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 228,768 90,118 623 21,173 20,550 3297% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 600 10110 00 000 $ 228,768 $ 90,118 $ 623 $ 21,173 $ 20,550 3297% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 228,768 $ 90,118 $ 623 $ 21,173 $ 20,550 32977. 236 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Internal Service Funds General Maintenance & Replacement Overview The General Maintenance & Replacement Fund (GMR) was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of large capital assets such as HVAC, walls, floors and ceilings, plumbing, electric, roadways, etc. This fund receives planned revenue transfers from each operating fund that owns and maintains capital assets. Accumulated funds are intended to cover the cost of future capital repair and replacement. The GMR is designed to (1) avoid future bond programs, (2) encourage a conservative pattern of spending, (3) minimize reliance on revenue streams that are vulnerable to fluctuations in the economy, such as the sales tax, and (4) prevent excessive maintenance and repair costs via the timely replacement of capital assets. Project lists are developed annually from a long-range facility maintenance schedule and incorporated into a routine schedule for maintenance and replacement of major facility equipment, infrastructure and permanent capital assets. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and Other Sources are budgeted to be$307,750. • This represents a 69%decrease of$691,050 from the prior year estimated budget of$998,600 due to the decrease in the following: o Transfers in from the General Fund-$310,550. o Transfers in from the Utility Maintenance & Replacement Fund -$380,000. Expenditures and Other Uses • Expenditures and Other Uses are budgeted to be$287,000. • This is a 77%decrease of$939,745 from the prior year estimated budget of$1,226,745. o The prior year budget included $800K for construction costs related to the new town hall building. • Projects for fiscal year 2017/2018 are noted below: Dept# Project Na� Amount q1 Dept. 17 Academy Facilities $ 200,000 Dept. 19 Parks,Trails, Recreation 32,000 Dept.20 Information Technology 30,000 Dept.26 Municipal Facilities 25,000 �6TOTAI.PROJECTS $ 287,000 Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are projected to be$20,550. • Beginning fund balance is projected to be$623. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$21,173. 237 GENERAL RETURN TO T.O.C. Maintenance & Replacement Fund 600 Five Year Forecast Description Account Number EFYr16 t17 FY 17ed -18 LIFY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES Firefighter Equipment Fees n/a 600-34008-14-000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 Interest Income n/a 600-36110-00-000 1,550 1,550 1,750 1,750 1,750 1,750 Contributions n/a 600-33700-14-101 500 - - - - - Transfer in from UMR n/a 600-52541-88-000 380,000 - - - - - Transfer in from GF n/a 600-52510-88-000 610,550 300,000 300,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 998,600 07,550 $ 307,750 $ 207,750 $ 207,750 $ 207,750 MAINTENANCE/REPLACEMENT PROJECTS WA-Irrigation System 7 600-43340-17-000-000007 $ 10,000 $ 9,000 $ 5,000 $ 15,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 WA-Carpet/VCT Flooring 8 600-45908-17-000-000008 25,000 29,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 WA-Ext Environmental Improvements Irrig 9 600-44306-17-000-000009 7,500 9,000 10,000 - 12,000 12,000 WA-Envrnmt Bldg UG light/water 10 600-45908-17-000-000010 5,000 4,000 10,000 - 5,000 5,000 WA-Exterior Paint&Wood R&M 11 600-45909-17-000-000011 11,000 7,000 4,000 4,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Painting/Cloth Wall R&M 12 600-44220-17-000-000012 6,250 9,000 8,000 10,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Roof Repairs 13 600-45909-17-000-000013 56,615 45,000 9,000 15,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Parking Lot 15 600-44306-17-000-000015 8,555 - 25,000 - - - WA-Refurbish Classrooms 17 600-45908-17-000-000017 15,000 24,000 30,000 35,000 25,000 25,000 WA-Update Security System 18 600-43354-17-000-000018 20,000 4,000 25,000 5,000 8,000 8,000 WA-Update Security Cameras 19 600-43354-17-000-000019 15,000 9,000 - 2,000 12,000 12,000 WA-Interior Building R&M 23 600-45908-17-000-000023 40,000 7,000 15,000 10,000 15,000 15,000 WA-15 Ton Split HVAC System 24 600-43347-17-000-000024 11,250 9,000 15,000 10,000 25,000 25,000 WA-2 Ton Roof Top Units 25 600-43347-17-000-000025 13,200 9,000 5,000 15,000 10,000 10,000 WA-AC ton/7.5 ton server room 26 600-43347-17-000-000026 5,000 9,000 5,000 - 20,000 20,000 WA-Heater Boilers 29 600-44219-17-000-000029 - 4,000 5,000 25,000 25,000 WA-HVAC System Replacement 32 600-43347-17-000-000032 10,000 9,000 10,000 - 5,000 5,000 WA-Plumbing Repair/Replacement 36 600-45904-17-000-000036 4,965 4,000 9,000 1 15,000 5,000 5,000 WA-Furniture/Interior Bldg 45 600-47415-17-000-000045 5,400 - - - - - TOTAL ACADEMY FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Department 17 269,735 200,000 205,000 151,000 208,000 208,000 Park R&M 43 600-45911-19-000-000043 10,000 20,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Trail Repairs 14 600-43343-19-000-000014 12,000 12,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 TOTAL PARKS&RECREATION Department 19 22,000 32,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 Servers&Network Storage 20 600-43405-20-000-000020 25,000 15,000 40,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 Network Printers/Peripheal Dev 21 600-43405-20-000-000021 7,500 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Network Equipment 27 600-43405-20-000-000027 75,000 - 115,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 Principal Expense 27 600-47120-20-000-000027 - - - - - - Phone System/Peripheal Devices 28 600-45305-20-000-000028 5,000 5,000 65,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Server Replacements 33 1 600-43405-20-000-000033 12,710 5,000 20,000 12,500 100,000 12,500 TOTAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Department 20 125,210 30,000 245,000 67,500 155,000 67,500 Town-Irrigation R&M 7 600-43340-26-000-000007 - - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Town-Env Bldg UG light/water 10 600-45908-26-000-000010 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Town-Parking Lot 15 600-44306-26-000-000015 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 Town-Heater 29 600-44219-26-000-000029 3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000 Town-HVAC System Replacement 32 600-43347-26-000-000032 - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Town-Furniture/Interior Bldg 45 1 600-47415-26-000-000045 809,800 25,000 - Town-Open Space Improvements 52 600-43343-26-000-000052 - TOTAL TOWN FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Department 26 809,800 25,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 ,RAND TOTAL PROJECT1,226,745 410,000 322,500 Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (228,145) 20,5501 (189,250) (57,750) (202,250) (114,750) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 228,768 623 21,173 (168,077) (225,827) (428,077) ENDING FUND BALANCE $ $ 21,173 $ (168,077) $ (225,827) $ (428,077) $ (542,827) 238 RETURN TO T.O.C. V _ hicle Maintenance • = ' Replacement Guidelines The Town of Westlake owns, operates, and maintains a fleeet of vehicles and recognizes that deferred maintenance and not anticipating capital replacement needs increases future capital costs. These guidelines provide a fiscally responsible vehicle and equipment replacement policy that enables the Town to maximize vehicle and equipment utilization, while maintaining the Town's desired public image and high-quality program of services for our residents. 239 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement BUDGETING FOR RECURRING CAPITAL EXPENDITURES Planning for non-periodic recurring capital expenditures may at first glance seem like a difficult endeavor, but in fact dealing with them can be as simple as setting aside a small portion of revenue over time. For example, if a piece of necessary capital has been estimated to have an operational life of 10 years and costs $10,000, the town could set aside $1,000 toward the recurring capital expenditures account each year. Then, when it comes time to replace the unit, there will be little, if any, disruption to the town's cash flow. Note that changing market forces, such as inflation, also need to be accounted for in the calculation, since an item that cost $10,000 a decade ago likely costs more today. EXAMPLE OF RECURRING CAPITAL EXPENSE IN TRANSPORTATION Municipalities that rely on motor vehicles for their livelihood face a recurring, though sometimes unpredictable, capital expense in the form of vehicle repairs and replacement. A few different approaches are available that can be used to deal with the realities of this expense. The most common and simplest way is to make repairs as vehicle damage crops up and replace the vehicles once they are completely unusable, which under most circumstances is a reasonable policy. The Town has approved guidelines for replacement based on a point system. Staff reviews each vehicle annually to determine the feasibility of the service length of the vehicle based on the total points. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT Annually, available funds will be evaluated during the budget process and a percentage of each operating fund's budget will be recommended to the Council for transfer. Upon approval by the Council, the recommended amount will be transferred to the appropriate funds (General or Utility Maintenance Replacement Fund) for major maintenance/ replacement of street, building roof, flooring, air conditioning, equipment, etc. Vehicle and equipment replacement criteria will be developed according to each item anticipated useful service life. Typically, this is based upon the type or "category" of the vehicle/equipment and its usage. Each item will be surveyed annually and assigned a score based upon the Point Range and Guideline document. A vehicle will be replaced according to the established criteria unless the Department Head(s) and the Town Manager's office determine that: 1) mechanical failure or vehicle damage warrants earlier replacement, or 2) the vehicle is still serviceable and may serve additional years beyond its original anticipated service life. 240 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Funding for vehicle/equipment replacement should be incrementally allocated from department operating funds to a restricted Capital Maintenance and Replacement Fund, subject to funding availability on an annual basis. Future vehicle/equipment replacements should be funded from this restricted fund, which receives accumulated operating fund transfers based upon the Vehicle and Equipment Depreciation Schedule. Funding will consist of an annual set-aside based upon a straight-line depreciation for each vehicle over the course of its useful life and budgeted as part of the annual budget development process. Depreciation fees should commence the same fiscal year of each new and replacement vehicle/equipment purchase. Likewise, depreciation expenses should be expensed from the respective department operating budget and deposited into the Capital Maintenance and Replacement Fund. Depreciation expenses shall continue through the service life of the new vehicle/equipment and shall cease upon retirement of said vehicle/equipment. REPLACEMENT AND DEPRECIATION GUIDELINES Purpose - To provide a fiscally responsible vehicle and equipment replacement and depreciation policy, which will enable the Town of Westlake to maximize asset utilization while maintaining a positive public image and being fiscally responsible in our budgeting and fleet replacement programs. Policy - Replacement criteria for Town-owned vehicles and equipment will depend primarily on a point system, which is based upon the following factors: • Age • Miles/Hour Usage • Type of Service • Reliability • Maintenance and Repair Costs (not to include incident repairs) • Condition Point Range Chart Note: The Town may decide to retain a vehicle beyond the stated criteria after an evaluation of anticipated usage, repairs and operating costs. Each Town vehicle and small equipment have been placed in a specific category (as listed below) in order to allow for uniformity in our replacement standards. 241 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Category "A" - This category consists of the one (1) 18-passenger and one (1 ) 20- passenger school bus. The life span for school bus is 10 years. The Fire Department which includes engines, ladder truck, ambulances, and attack truck which are used primarily as a front-line response vehicle. The front-line life-span of the Engine is 15 years and has a reserve life-span for additional five years. The ambulance front-line life-span is seven years and has a reserve vehicle life-span for additional seven. The Town currently has one (1 ) Engine, one (1) Attack Truck and two (2) Ambulances. Category "B" - This category consists of Maintenances and Public Works vehicles which are used to serve the public on a day-to-day basis and pull trailers. Due to the heavy use, these vehicles may be scheduled for replacement at 100,000 miles provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than vehicles of the same type. The Town currently has two (2) Public Works trucks. Category"C" - This category consists of all other cars and pickups, which include administration pool car, building inspection truck, warrant officer public safety vehicle. These vehicles are generally assigned to a designated staff member and should not be replaced earlier than 100,000 miles provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than vehicles of the same type. Category "D" - This category consists of other off-road equipment (mule and mowers) that are used to serve the public on an "as needed" basis. Replacement of this category may be made after 2,500 operating hours, or provided the maintenance cost is considerably higher than equipment of the same type. The Town currently has one (1) Kawasaki utility vehicle and (1) mower. Category "E" - This category consists of light equipment (weed-eaters, chain saw and pumps, generators, trailers, and other small hand-operated equipment) which are used to serve the public on an "as needed" basis. Replacements in this category may be made after the total maintenance cost exceeds the original purchase price of a particular piece of equipment. The cost of upgrading a piece of equipment will be the responsibility of the operating division. The Town currently has one weed-trimmer, chain saw, blower, small generator and a trailer. GUIDE FOR EARLY REPLACEMENT OF TOWN-OWNED VEHICLES Early Replacement - The consideration of early replacement of a vehicle often arises when major expenditures are necessary to restore it to a safe operating condition (e.g., major component failure or incident damage). The economic effect of such repairs cannot be avoided because the cost to the Town is normally about the same 242 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement whether the vehicle is sold in un-repaired condition or restored to repaired condition. However, replacement prior to the normal criteria for vehicles will result in an acceleration of all future replacement cost cycles required to satisfy a continuing vehicle need. This acceleration of cost cycles causes a sizable increase in the total present value cost of all fixture cycles and should be avoided whenever possible. Major vehicle repairs should always be made, with two exceptions: 1 . Major expenditures for repair should not be made when the cost of the repair plus the vehicle salvage in un-repaired condition exceeds its wholesale value in repaired condition. 2. Major deferrable expenditures should not be made when a vehicle is in the final six months of its retention cycle. During this period, the penalty for early replacement is small and, therefore, the vehicle should be replaced rather than repaired. Depreciation Formula - Current acquisition price of each vehicle divided by the utilization cycle mileage or total maintenance cost) will provide the yearly depreciation allowance. EXAMPLE A-Vehicles Mileage: $30,000 vehicle divided by the target replacement cycle of 100,000 miles will give you a depreciation cost of $.30 per mile. $0.30 times the number of miles (20,000) the vehicle was driven the previous year will give you the yearly depreciation amount $6,000. EXAMPLE B -Small Equipment Maintenance Cost: depreciate the original purchase price by 15% per year, for power hand tools, trailers, etc. Replace the item only when the maintenance cost reaches the original purchase price. 243 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Factor Points Description Age Usage 1 Each 10,000 miles of usage Type of 1 Standard sedans, SUV's and pickups Service 2 Each year of chronological age 3 Vehicles that pulls trailer, haul heavy loads and continued off-road usage 4 Any vehicle involved in ice or snow removal or road treatment 1 In shop one time within 3-month time period, no major Reliability breakdowns/road side assistance call with 3-month period Preventive 2 In shop one time within three-month time period, 1 breakdown/ Maintenanc road side assistance call within 3-month period e Work Not 3 In shop, more than once within 3-month time period, 1 or more Included breakdown/road side assistance call within same period 4 In shop, more than twice within one-month time period, 1 or more breakdowns/road side assistance call in same time period 5 Two or more breakdowns within one-month time period M&R Cost 1 Maintenance cost are less than or equal to 200 of replacement Incident 2 Maintenance cost are 21-400 of replacement cost Repair Not 3 Maintenance cost are 41-600 of replacement cost Include 4 Maintenance cost are 61-800 of replacement cost 5 Maintenance cost are greater than or equal to 81% of replacement cost Condition 1 No visual damage or rust 2 Minor imperfections in body and paint, interior fair (no rips, tears, burn) 3 Noticeable imperfections in body and paint surface, minor rust, minor damage for add-on equipment, won interior (one or more rips, tears, burns). 4 Poor paint and body condition, rust (holes), interior (rips, tears, burns, cracked dash) and major damage for add-on equipment 5 Previous accident damage, poor paint and body condition, rust (holes), interior (rips, tears, burns, cracked dash) and major damage for add-on equipment TOTAL 60 244 :RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds Guidelines for Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Point Ranges for Replacement Consideration Point Scale Condition Description 20 points & under Excellent Do not replace 21 to 25 points Very Good Re-evaluate for the following year's budget 26 to 31 points Fair Qualifies for replacement if M/R cost exceed 600 of cost 32 to 37 points Poor Replacement if budget allows Above 38 points failed Needs priority replacement Below are two examples on how the point range and guidelines for Category"B" and "C" would work. Data Description Points Year 1999 26 Type Crown Victoria Passenger Car 1 Mileage 64,000 6 Maintenance Repair driver side window motor 2 Condition Poor paint and body condition, hail damage, rust spots, 5 small dents, interior has rips, tears, stains, cracking on seat covers Total Points 40 Staff recommendation = Replacement this year Data Description Points Year 2005 14 Type Silverado F150 extended cab truck 1 Mileage 35,000 3 Maintenance low 1 Condition Very good exterior and interior condition 1 notal Points 20 Staff recommendation = Include the replacement cost in the five-year forecast Point range and guidelines for Category "B" and "C" Point Ranges Condition Description 0-20 Excellent Do not replace 21-25 Very Re-evaluate for next year' budget (5-year forecast) Good 26-31 Good Qualifies for replacement this year if M/R cost exceed 600 of cost 32-37 Fair Qualities for replacement this if budget allows 38+ Poor Needs priority 245 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 246 RETURN TO T.O.C. Fund � Vehicle Maintenance & 50 Replacement Fund ( Utility ) The Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Fund was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of the Town's Utility Fund vehicles. 247 Utility Vehicle Maintenance & Rei RETURN TO T.O.C. 505 Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16L17 FY 16 17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ $ $ - $ 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - - - - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - - 0% Investment Earnings - - 40 40 - 0% Contributions - 0% Misc Income 8,650 - (8,650) -100% Total Revenues 8,690 40 (8,650) -1007. Transfers In 16,670 6,250 (10,420) 100% Other Sources - - 0% Total Other Sources 16,6701 6,250 (10,420) 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ - $ - $ 25,360 6,290 $ (19,070) -757. EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ $ $ 0% Payroll Transfers In - - - - - 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development - - - - - 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance - - - - - 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases - - - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - - - 0% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds - - - - - 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses - - - - - 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - - - 07, TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES - - - - 0% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures I 25,360 6,290 (19,070) 75% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING - - - 25,360 25,360 100% FUND BALANCE,ENDING - - 25,360 31,650 6,290 25% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 25,360 31,650 6,290 25% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 505 10110 00 000 $ - $ - $ 25,360 $ 31,650 $ 6,290 25% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ - $ - $ 25,360 $ 31,650 $ 6,290 25% 248 RETURN TO T.O.C. _ Section 5 Internal Service Funds Utility Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement [replacement. Utility Fund Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Fund (VMR) was created to provide a hanism for the long-term repair and replacement of Town Utility Fund vehicles. fund receives planned revenue transfers from each operating fund that owns and maintains cles. Accumulated funds are intended to cover the cost of future vehicle repair and The VMR is designed to avoid future bond programs and encourage a more servative pattern of spending that minimizes reliance on elastic revenue streams. Vehicles are designated for replacement based on a long-range depreciation schedule, periodic evaluations of repair versus replacement costs, and recommended replacement guidelines. Routine scheduled maintenance is also factored into VMR funding calculations. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted at$6,290 • This represents a 75%decrease of$19,070 from the prior year estimated of$25,360. o Miscellaneous income is budgeted to decrease$8,650 due to one-time funds received from sales of surplus and scrap material in the prior year. o Transfers in from the Utility Fund are budgeted to decrease$10,420. Expenditures and Other Uses There are no expenditures budgeted for this fiscal year. Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are budgeted to be$6,290. • The beginning fund balance is projected to be$25,360. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$31,650. 249 UTILITY RETURN TO T.O.C. Vehicle Maintenance & Replacemen, Five Year Forecast r Estimated Adopted 12 3 4 Description A6AccountNumber FY 16-17 FY 17-18 FY 18.19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES Transfer in from Utility Fund 505-52550-88-000 16,670 6,250 6,250 6,250 6,250 6,250 Sales of Surplus 505-34144-16-000 8,650 - - - - Insurance Proceeds 505-39100-16-000 - Interest Income 505-36110-16-000 40 40 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 25,360 $ 6,290 $ 6,250 $ 6,250 $ 6,250 $ 6,250 EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Public Works Vehicle 505-47410-16-000 $ $ - $ 50,000 $ - TOTAL EXPENDITURES 50,000 Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 25,360 6,290 6,250 1 6,250 1 (43,750) 6,250 BEGINNING FUND IN- 0 31,650 150 EN DING FUND BALANCENCE $ 25,360 25,360 $ 37,900 $ 37;900 44-400 $ 6,650 250 RETURN TO T.O.C. Fund " Vehicle Maintenance • 605 ' � Replacement The Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Fund was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of Town vehicles. 251 General Vehicle Maintenance & RETURN To T.O.C. id 605 Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Property Tax - 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 560 550 925 925 0% Contributions - - 110,000 - (110,000) -100% Misc Income 8,650 4,765 (4,765) -100% Total Revenues 9,210 550 115,690 925 (114,765) -99% Transfers In 118,333 8,335 - - - 100% Other Sources - - 8,715 (8,715) -100% Total Other Sources 118,333 8,335 8,715 (8,715) 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 127,543 $ 8,885 $ 124,405 $ 925 $ (123,480) -99% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% Capital Project Funds - 0% Capital Outlay - 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 55,000 165,000 (165,000) -100% Total Capital and M&R Projects 55,000 165,000 (165,000) -100% Transfers Out - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 55,000 165,000 (165,000) -1007o TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 55,000 165,000 (165,000) o Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 127,543 1 (46,115)1 41,520 102% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 50,031177,574 177,574 136,979 (40,595) -23% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 177,574 131,459 136,979 137,904 925 1% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 177,574 131,459 136,979 137,904 925 1% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ - $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 605 10110 00 000 $ 177,574 $ 131,459 $ 136,979 $ 137,904 $ 925 1% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 177,574 $ 131,459 $ 136,979 $ 137,904 $ 925 1% 252 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 5 Internal Service Funds General Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement The Vehicle Maintenance & Replacement Fund (VMR) was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of Town vehicles. This fund receives planned revenue transfers from each operating fund that owns and maintains vehicles. Accumulated funds are intended to cover the cost of future vehicle repair and replacement. The VMR is designed to avoid future bond programs and encourage a more conservative pattern of spending that minimizes reliance on elastic revenue streams. Vehicles are designated for replacement based on a long-range depreciation schedule, periodic evaluations of repair versus replacement costs, and recommended replacement guidelines. Routine scheduled maintenance is also factored into VMR funding calculations. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be$925. • This represents a 99%decrease of$123,480 from the prior year estimated of$124,405. o Contributions decreased $110,000 due to one-time funds from the Foundation$105,250 and Westlake Academy$4,750 for the purchase of a 73-passenger school bus. o Miscellaneous Income decreased $4,765 due to one-time funds received in the prior year for sales of surplus and scrap material. o Other Sources decreased due to one-time funds received in the prior year for auto insurance claims made on town vehicles. Expenditures and Other Uses • There are no expenditures or other uses budgeted for this fiscal year. • This represents a 100%decrease of$165,000 from the prior year estimated. o One-time purchase in the prior year for the Fire Marshal vehicle$55K and a 73- passenger bus for Westlake Academy$11 OK Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are projected to be$925. • The beginning fund balance is projected to be$136,979. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$137,904. 253 GENERAL RETURN TO T.O.C. Vehicle Maintenance & Replacemeni Five Year Forecast Description Account Number Estimated r17 FY 17118 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 Ifffl I REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES Transfer In from General Fund 605-52510-88-000 $ $ $ 125,000 $ 110,000 $ - $ - Transfer in from Utility Fund 605-52550-88-000 - - Contributions(WA Foundation) 605-33700-10-000 110,000 150,000 Sales of Surplus 605-34144-16-000 - - Sales of Surplus 605-34144-14-000 4,765 Insurance Proceeds 605-39100-14-000 8,715 - - - Interest Income 605-36110-00-000 925 925 200 200 200 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 124,405 $ 925 $ 125,200 $ 260,200 $ 200 $ EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Westlake Academy Buses 605-47410-10-000 $ 110,000 $ - $ - $ 150,000 $ - $ Fire Dept-Fire Marshal Vehicle 605-47410-14-000 55,000 - - Fire Dept-Ambulance M&R 605-47410-14-000 - 250,000 60,000 Fire Dept-Ladder Truck 605-47410-14-000 - - Municipal Court-Marshal Vehicle 605-47410-15-000 - Facilities Maintenance Vehicle 605-47410-17-000 - 50,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 165,000 250,000 260,000 Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (40,595) 925 (124,800) 200 1 200 BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 177,574 136,979 137,904 13,104 13,304 13,504 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 136,979 $ 137,904 $ 13,104 $ 13,304 $ 13,504 $ 13,504 254 SECT -I0-N � + + + + -1. r + . sp.i: CIAL+.+. . REVE-riIJE - + .1 -.N-DS .. 1 4 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 256 SPECIAL REVENUE FUN RETURNTOT.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16 17 LY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 1,263,835 $ 1,239,500 $ 1,239,500 $ 1,439,500 $ 200,000 16% Property Tax - - - 0% Hotel Tax 822,489 837,280 837,280 845,000 7,720 1% Charge for Services - - - - 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees 752,370 10,000 10,000 (10,000) -100% Permits&Fees Buildings - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility - 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - - - 0% Investment Earnings 3,656 2,930 5,230 5,230 0% Contributions - 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) 100% Misc Income 184,583 90,350 96,020 69,310 (26,710) -28% Total Revenues 3,026,932 3,390,060 3,198,030 3,109,040 (88,990) -3% Transfers In 35,758 - - - 0% Other Sources - 0% Total Other Sources 35,758 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 3,062,691 $ 3,390,060 $ 3,198,030 $ 3,109,040 $ (88,990) -3% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfer In 0% Total Payroll and Related - 0% Debt 35,758 - - 0% Economic Development 141,779 134,640 134,640 234,640 100,000 74% Insurance - - - - - 0% Payroll Transfer Out 488,503 521,615 480,002 518,510 38,508 8% Repair&Maintenance - - - - 0% Rent&Utilities 35,159 87,870 42,119 59,789 17,670 42% Services 570,058 715,610 596,160 381,460 (214,700) -36% Supplies 15,094 - - 10,000 10,000 #DIV/01 Water Purchases - - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 1,286,352 1,459,735 1,252,921 1,204,399 (48,522) -47o TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,286,352 1,459,735 1,252,9211 1,204,399 (48,522) .4% Capital Project Funds - - - - 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacement Funds 0% Total Capital - 0% Transfers Out 1,307,931 2,505,350 2,359,145 1,987,500 (371,645) -16% Other Uses - - - 0% Total Other Uses 1,307,931 2,505,350 2,359,145 1,987,500 (371,645) -16% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,307,931 2,505,350 2,359,145 1,987,500 (371,645) -16% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 2,594,282 3,965,085 3,612,066 (420,167) -127 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures 468,4081 (575,025) (414,036)11 331,177 1 80% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 1,277,233 1,745,641 1,745,641 1,331,605 (414,036) -24% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1,745,641 1,170,616 1,331,605 1,248,746 (82,859) -6% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 1,745,641 1,170,616 1,331,605 1,248,746 (82,859) -6% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS Cash $ 1,745,641 $ 1,170,616 $ 1,331,605 $ 1,248,746 $ (82,859) -6% 0% 0% 0% 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 1,745,641 $ 1,170,616 $ 1,331,605 $ 1,248,746 1 $ (82,859) -67o 257 INTERNAL SERVICE FIRETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expenditures FISCAL YEAR 2016/2017 VA Fund 220 4B Fund 200 ED Fund 210 PID Fund 215 LS Fund 418 q1w REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ 1,237,500 $ 202,000 $ $ $ 1,439,500 Property Tax - - - Charge for Services - - Hotel Tax 812,360 32,640 845,000 Beverage Tax - - - Franchise Fees Permits and Fees Permits and Fees Building Fines and Forfeitures - - Investment Earnings 5,150 - 80 5,230 Contributions - 750,000 - 750,000 Misc Income 9,310 - 60,000 69,310 Total Revenues 826,820 1,237,500 984,640 60,000 80 3,109,040 Transfers In Other Sources Total Other Sources TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 826,820 $ 1,237,500 $ 984,640 $ 60,000 $ 80 $ 3,109,040 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ $ $ $ Payroll Transfers In Total Payroll&Related - Debt - Economimc Development 234,640 234,640 Insurance - - Payroll Transfers Out 518,510 518,510 Repair&Maintenance - - Rent&Utilities 59,789 59,789 Services 321,460 60,000 381,460 Supplies 10,000 - 10,000 Water Purchases - - Total Operations&Maintenance 909,759 234,640 60,000 1,204,399 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 909,759 234,640 60,000 1,204,399 Capital Project Funds Capital Outlay Maintenance&Replacement Funds - - - Total Capital - - Transfers Out 1,237,500 750,000 1,987,500 Other Uses - - Total Other Uses 1,237,500 750,000 1,987,500 TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,237,500 750,000 1,987,500 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 909,759 $ 1,237,500 $ 984,640 $ 60,000 $ $ 3,1 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (82,939) 80 (82,859) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 802,831 (0) 515,015 13,759 1,331,605 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 719,892 $ $ 515,015 1 $ 13,839 1 $ 1, 258 RETURN TO T.O.C. Fund Visitors Association • 220 The Visitors Association Fund was established in late FY 1999-2000 and collects a 7% hotel occupancy tax from the Marriott Solana and any future Westlake hotels. 259 Visitor Association Fund 220 RETURN To T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service - - 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 792,164 804,640 804,640 812,360 7,720 1% Beverage Tax - - - - - 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - - 0% Investment Earnings 3,609 2,900 5,150 5,150 0% Contributions - - - - 0% Misc Income 14,814 5,350 11,020 9,310 (1,710) -16% Total Revenues 810,587 812,890 820,810 826,820 6,010 0.7% Transfers In - - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 810,587 $ 812,890 $ 820,810 $ 826,820 $ 6,010 0.7% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development - - - 0% Insurance - 0% Payroll Transfers Out 488,503 521,615 480,002 518,510 38,508 8% Repair&Maintenance - - - - - 0% Rent&Utilities 35,159 87,870 42,119 59,789 17,670 42% Services 187,216 262,610 296,160 321,460 25,300 9% Supplies 15,094 - - 10,000 10,000 100% Water Purchases - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 725,973 872,095 818,281 909,759 91,478 11% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 725,973 872,095 818,281 909,759 91,478 11% Capital Project Funds - - - - 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 155,550 157,850 211,645 (211,645) -100% Other Sources - - 0% Total Other Uses 155,550 157,850 211,645 (211,645) -100% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 155,550 157,850 211,645 (211,645) -100% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 881,5231 1,029,945 1 1,029,926 909,759 (120,167) -127. Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (70,935) 1 (217,055)1 126,177 1 60% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 1,082,882 1,011,947 1,011,947 802,831 (209,116) -21% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1,011,947 794,892 802,831 719,892 (82,939) -10% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 1,011,947 794,892 802,831 719,892 (82,939) -10% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ $ - $ $ - RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 220 10110 00 000 $ 1,011,947 $ 794,892 $ 802,831 $ 719,892 $ (82,939) -10% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 1,011,947 $ 794,892 $ 802,831 $ 719,892 $ (82,939) -10% 260 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Special Revenue Funds Visitors Association Fund The Visitors Association Fund was established in late FY 1999-2000 and collects a Hotel Occupancy Tax from the Marriott Solana, Deloitte,and any future Westlake hotels. A 7%tax is levied on the cost of nightly room rentals,the maximum allowable under State law. Funds generated by the occupancy tax are generally restricted to uses that directly promote tourism and the convention and hotel industry. However, Westlake has broader statutory authority under State law than most cities,and may spend hotel/motel occupancy tax funds for any municipal purpose, and so the Town has used these funds to cover various operational costs and capital projects. Since FY 2004/05,the Town has used Visitors Association Fund revenues to sponsor a shuttle service and a "Group Business Incentive Program" in partnership with the Marriott Solana that have drawn additional visitors to Westlake. This fund also accounts for activities related to the Westlake Historical Board, Public Art Committee,and Westlake's annual Arbor Day celebration. In prior years,the Visitors Association Fund was used (via transfer out) to make the debt service payment for the Westlake Academy Arts and Sciences building; however, as of FY17/18 the series 2013 refunding debt payments (originally series 2008) for has been moved to Debt Service Fund 301 to be covered by property tax revenues as these bonds are tax supported. Revenues • Total revenues are budgeted to be$826,820 • This represents a .7%increase of$6,010 from prior year estimated revenues of$820,810. o Hotel Occupancy Tax revenues are projected to increase$7,720. o Miscellaneous income is projected to decrease$1,710. Operating Expenditures • Total operating expenditures are budgeted to be $909,759. • This represents an 11%increase of$91,478 from prior year estimated expenditures of$818,281. o Payroll transfers out to the General Fund are budgeted to increase$38,508 to cover two full time salaries in the Communications department being paid from the Visitors Association Fund;also, a percentage of Administrative, Facilities, Parks, Finance and Human Resources are paid from the Visitors Association Fund. o Rent and Utilities are budgeted to increase$17,670 due to the leasing of new building space in July 2017. o Service expenditures increased $25,300 as a result of an increase for a marketing/branding video, photo shoot; marketing collateral, logo and tagline. o Supply expenditures increased$10,000 because to the Community Tree Lighting is being reinstated for December 2017. Non-Operating Expenditures • There are no budgeted non-operating expenditures for this fiscal year. • This represents a 100%decrease of$211,645 from prior year estimated transfers out. o Transfers out to the Debt Service Fund have been removed from the Visitors Association Fund and moved to the property tax supported Debt Service Fund 301. These funds were originally used for debt service payments on Series 2013 General Obligation Refunding Bonds related to the construction of the Westlake Academy Arts and Sciences Center. o Transfers Out to General Fund for the Communication's department operating expenditures have been removed from the Visitors Association Fund;these expenditures will now be absorbed by the General Fund. Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are budgeted to be$(82,939). • The beginning fund balance is projected to$802,831. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$719,892. 261 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 262 RETURN TO T.O.C. AB Economic Development • • Fund The 4B Economic Development Fund collects a 1/2 cent sales tax to be allocated to qualified development projects. The 4B Fund has been committed to the repayment of the debt incurred for the Town's Civic Campus project. 263 413 Economic Development Fund RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15 16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY lijillIll FY 16/17 Estimate REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 1,152,381 $ 1,137,500 $ 1,137,500 $ 1,237,500 $ 100,000 9% Property Tax - - - - - 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 0% Contributions 0% Misc Income - - - - 0% Total Revenues 1,152,381 1,137,500 1,137,500 1,237,500 100,000 9% Transfers In - - - - - 100% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 1,152,381 $ 1,137,500 $ 1,137,500 $ 1,237,500 $ 100,000 9% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ - $ $ $ - 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 07. Transfers Out 1,152,381 1,137,500 1,137,500 1,237,500 100,000 9% Other Sources - - - - - 0% Total Other Uses 1,152,381 1,137,500 1,137,500 1,237,500 100,000 9% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,152,381 1,137,500 1,137,500 1,237,500 100,000 9% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 1,152,381 1,137,500 1,137,500 1,237,500 100,000 9-/- Excess %Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (0) I 0% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 0 0% FUND BALANCE,ENDING (0) 0% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds (0) 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ $ $ $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 200 10110 00 000 $ (0) $ $ $ $ 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ (0) $ $ $ $ 0% 264 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Special Revenue Funds 4B Economic Development Fund Overview The 4B Economic Development Fund collects a half-cent sales tax to be allocated to qualified development projects. Since FY 2006 the 4B Fund has been committed to the repayment of the debt incurred for the Town's Civic Campus project. Revenues • Revenues are budgeted to be $1,237,500 o This amount represents an 8.8%increase of$100,000 from prior year estimated. Transfers Out • Transfers out to the Debt Service Fund are budgeted to be $1,237,500, representing 1000 of revenues. o This amount represents an 8.8% of$100,000 increase from prior year estimated. 265 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 266 RETURN TO T.O.C. Economic Development Fund • The Economic Development Fund was set up to maintain all receipts and disbursement of funds pertaining to agreements between the Town and various corporations for economic development. 267 Economic Development Fund 211 RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16 17 FY 16/17 FY 17 18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ 111,454 $ 102,000 $ 102,000 $ 202,000 $ 100,000 98% Property Tax - - - - - 0% Charge for Service - - - 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 30,325 32,640 32,640 32,640 0% Beverage Tax - - 0% Franchise Fees - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings - - 0% Contributions 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% Misc Income - - - 0% Total Revenues 141,779 1,344,640 1,144,640 984,640 (160,000) -14% Transfers In 35,758 - - 100% Other Sources - 0% Total Other Sources 35,758 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 177,537 $ 1,344,640 $ 1,144,640 $ 984,640 $ (160,000) -14% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 35,758 - - 0% Economic Development 141,779 134,640 134,640 234,640 100,000 74% Insurance - - - - - 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 177,537 134,640 134,640 234,640 100,000 74% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 177,537 134,640 134,640 234,640 100,000 74% Capital Project Funds - - - - - 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% Other Sources - 0% Total Other Uses 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 177,537 1,344,640 1,144,640 984,640 (160,000) -14% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (0) 0% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING (0) (0) (0) 0% FUND BALANCE,ENDING (0) (0) (0) (0) 07. Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds (0) (0) (0) (0) 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ $ $ - $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 210 10110 00 000 $ (0) $ (0) $ (0) $ (0) $ 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ (0) $ (0) $ (0) 1 $ (0) $ 07. 268 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Special Revenue Funds Economic Development Fund Overview The Economic Development Fund was created to transparently account for all receipts and disbursements related to economic development agreements. Currently, revenues and transfers in are used to: • Fulfill incentive obligations negotiated with Fidelity Investments and Deloitte University as part of their relocation to Westlake • Transfer funds to the Westlake Academy Expansion Fund as part of development agreement The economic development agreement with Deloitte University includes a 50%reimbursement of the 1%general sales tax receipts and 50%of the hotel/motel tax receipts generated through business activities in Westlake. The agreement with Maguire Partners-Solana Land LP includes a $10,000 per lot contribution for the benefit of Westlake Academy from the final platting of lots in the Granada residential subdivision and Entrada development. Revenues and Other Sources • Total revenues and other sources are budgeted to be$984,640. • This represents a 14%decrease of$160,000 from the prior year estimated of$1,144,640. o General sales tax increased$100,000 due to Schwab one time monies. o Hotel occupancy tax remained flat at$32,640. o Contributions for the expected platting of 75 lots is budgeted at$750,000; a decrease of$260,000 from the prior year estimated. Note;these payments are recorded in the Economic Development Fund and transferred to the Westlake Academy Expansion Fund. Operating Expenditures • Total operating expenditures are budgeted to be$234,640. • This represents a 74%increase of$100,000 from the prior year estimated of$134,640. o Economic development increased $100,000 in sales tax. o $32,640 anticipated increase in hotel/motel tax. Non-Operating Expenditures • Total non-operating expenditures are budgeted to be$750,000. • This represents a 26%decrease of$260,000 from the prior year estimated of$1,010,000 o Transfers out to the Westlake Academy Expansion Fund of$750,000 for the expected platting of 75 lots. 269 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 270 RETURN TO T.O.C. Funlw� Local Public Improvement 215 40 0 D , st r i ct The Local Public Improvement District Fund accounts for monies received from bond proceeds, inspection fees and payments related to the Solana Public Improvement District. The District was created by ordinance in February 2014 to finance the construction of public infrastructure (such as water lines and streets) in the Entrada subdivision. 271 Local Public Improvement Distric RETURN To T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees - - 0% Permits&Fees Other 752,370 10,000 1 10,000 (10,000) -100% Permits&Fees Building - - - 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 0% Contributions - - - - 0% Misc Income 169,768 85,000 85,000 60,000 (25,000) -29% Total Revenues 922,138 95,000 95,000 60,000 (35,000) -37% Transfers In - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources 0% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 922,138 $ 95,000 $ 95,000 $ 60,000 $ (35,000) -37% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 07. Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance - - - 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 382,842 453,000 300,000 60,000 (240,000) -80% Supplies - - - - 0% Water Purchases - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 382,842 453,000 300,000 60,000 (240,000) -80% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 382,842 453,000 300,000 60,000 (240,000) -80% Capital Project Funds - - - 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 07. Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 382,842 453,000 300,000 60,000 (240,000) -80% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 539,2961 (358,000)1 205,000 1 100% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING ff720,015 720,015 720,015 515,015 (205,000) -28% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 362,015 515,015 515,015 0% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 362,015 515,015 515,015 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ - $ - $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 215 10110 00 000 $ 720,015 $ 362,015 $ 515,015 $ 515,015 $ 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 720,015 1 $ 362,015 $ 515,015 $ 515,015 $ 07. 272 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Special Revenue Funds Local Public Improvement District Overview The Public Improvement District (PID) Fund (Local) accounts for monies received from the original bond proceeds, inspection fees and payments related to the Solana Public Improvement District. The District was created by ordinance in February 2014 to finance the construction of public infrastructure (such as water lines and streets) in the Entrada subdivision. This fund was created to segregate "Local" PID expenditures from the Capital Project Fund. Revenues deposited into the PID Fund are used to cover engineering, consulting,legal, and advertising costs attributable to Entrada development and construction. Revenues and Transfers In • Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be$60,000. • This represents a 37%decrease of$35,000 from the prior year estimated of$95,000. o Permits and fees decreased $10,000 o Miscellaneous income decreased $25,000 Expenditures and Transfers Out • Expenditures and other uses are budgeted to be$60,000 • This represents an 80%decrease of$240,000 from the prior year estimated of 300,000. o Service expenditures decreased $240,000 due decreases in the following: ■ Consultant fees-$200,000 ■ Attorney fees-$10,000 ■ Administrative fees-$5,500 • Construction expense-$24,500 Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be$515,000. 273 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 274 RETURN TO T.O.C. Funde Lone Star Public • 418 The Lone Star Public Fund was founded in 1996 and was designed to provide for the acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, repair, equipping, furnishing and placement in service of public facilities in an orderly, planned manner and at the lowest possible borrowing costs. 275 Lone Star Public Fund 418 RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 47 30 80 80 0% Contributions 0% Misc Income 0% Total Revenues 47 30 80 80 07. Transfers In 100% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 47 $ 30 $ 80 $ 80 $ 03 EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ $ $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 0% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 47 30 80 80 I 07. FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 13,632 13,679 13,679 13,759 80 1% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 13,679 13,709 13,759 13,839 80 1% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 13,679 13,709 13,759 13,839 80 1% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ $ - $ - $ 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 418 10110 00 000 $ 13,679 $ 13,709 $ 13,759 $ 13,839 $ 80 1% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 13,679 $ 13,709 $ 13,759 1 $ 13,839 $ 80 1% 276 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 6 Special Revenue Funds Lone Star Public Facilities Overview In 1996,the Westlake Board of Aldermen authorized the creation of the Lone Star Public Facilities Corporation,a nonprofit corporation designed to "assist the Town of Westlake,Texas in financing, refinancing, or providing public facilities." It was anticipated that the Corporation would issue bonds to finance the purchase or construction of public facilities, and then lease those facilities to qualifying tenants. The Lone Star Public Facilities Fund was created to account for the financial activities of the Corporation. No bonds were ever issued. The fund is earning interest annually. Existing fund balance is due to corporate donations that were received shortly after the Fund was created. Revenues Total revenues are budgeted to be are$80 in interest earnings. Expenditures There have been no fund expenditures since inception. Fund Balance • The ending fund balance is projected to be$13,839. 277 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 278 � SgCTIO + + + + + + + + + + +• DE 'BSI' '' tRV.I . N . . + . 1 4 gab Af* al RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 280 DEBT SERVICE FUNDS RETURN TO T.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 161,393 88,635 95,010 271,411 176,401 186% Hotel Tax - - - - 0% Charge for Services 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Buildings 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 0% Contributions - 0% Misc Income (0) - - - 0% Total Revenues 161,393 88,635 95,010 271,411 176,401 186% Transfers In 1,856,591 2,033,385 2,066,128 2,710,068 643,940 31% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Sources 1,856,591 1 2,033,385 1 2,710,068 643,940 1 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 2,017,984 $ 2,122,020 $ 2,161,1 $ 2,981,479 $ 820,341 387. EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ - $ $ $ - 0% Payroll Transfer In 0% Total Payroll and Related - 017. Debt 2,006,831 2,150,396 2,183,716 2,987,768 804,052 37% Economic Development - - - - 0% Insurance - 0% Payroll Transfer Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities - - - 0% Services 1,600 1,600 1,600 (1,600) -100% Supplies - - - 0% Water Purchases - - - - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 2,008,431 2,151,996 2,185,316 2,987,768 802,452 37% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 2,008,431 2,151,996 2,185,316 2,987,768 802,452 37% Capital Project Funds - - - - 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacement Funds 0% Total Capital 07. Transfers Out 0% Other Use 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES L 2,151,996 2,185,316 802,452 3717o Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures 9,5531 (29,976) (24,178)11 17,889 1 74% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 20,915 30,468 30,468 6,289 (24,178) -79% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 30,468 492 6,289 0 (6,289) -100% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 30,468 492 6,289 0 (6,289) -100% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS Cash $ 30,468 $ 492 $ 6,289 $ 0 $ (6,289) -100% - - - 0% 0% 0% - - - 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 30,468 $ 492 $ 6,289 $ 0 $ (6,289) -100% 281 DEBT SERVICE FUNDS RETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expenditures Fiscal Year 2017/2018 DS Fund 300 DS Fund 301 TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ Property Tax 271,411 271,411 Charge for Services - - Hotel Tax Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits and Fees Permits and Fees Building Fines and Forfeitures Investment Earnings Contributions Misc Income - Total Revenues - 271,411 271,411 Transfers In 2,710,068 2,710,068 Other Sources - Total Other Sources 2,710,068 2,710,068 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 2,710,068 $ 271,411 $ 2,981,479 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ Payroll Transfers In - Total Payroll&Related - - Debt 2,710,068 277,700 2,987,768 Economimc Development - - - Insurance Payroll Transfers Out Repair&Maintenance Rent&Utilities Services Supplies Water Purchases Total Operations&Maintenance 2,710,068 277,700 2,987,768 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 2,710,068 277,700 2,987,768 Capital Project Funds Capital Outlay Maintenance&Replacement Funds Total Capital - - Transfers Out Other Uses Total Other Uses TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES - - - TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 2,710,068 $ 277,700 $ 2,987,768 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (6,289) (6,289) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE I 6,2891 6,289 NDING FUND BALANCE 282 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Funds Overview The two Debt Service Funds for the Town of Westlake are used to manage payments on all general government related debt associated with the construction of Westlake Academy facilities. Any future debt issuances will also be paid from these two funds. Town Council and staff are dedicated to a conservative pattern of debt issuance that ensures property tax rates remain among the lowest in the region and attractive to prospective businesses and residents. Recognizing that long-term debt is usually a more expensive financing method, alternative financing sources will be explored before debt is issued. When debt is issued, it will be used to acquire major assets with expected lives which equal or exceed the average life of the debt issue. Debt Management Practices Debt management policies are written guidelines and restrictions that affect the amount and type of debt issued by a state or local government, the issuance process, and the management of a debt portfolio. A debt management policy improves the quality of decisions, provides justification for the structure of debt issuance, identifies policy goals, and demonstrates a commitment to long-term financial planning, including a multi-year capital plan. Adherence to a debt management policy signals to rating agencies and the capital markets that a government is well managed and should meet its obligations in a timely manner. Debt levels and their related annual costs are important long-term obligations that must be managed within available resources. An effective debt management policy provides guidelines for a government to manage its debt program in line with those resources. The Town of Westlake debt management policies are reviewed annually and revised as necessary and address the following: ✓ Direct Debt- debt payable from ad valorem ISIS tax, and other available fund of the Town. ✓ Interfund Borrowing- loans for short-term cash flow needs. Debt Approval Process Town Manager and Staff Identify Capital Projects to Fund T Reviewed by Town Council at Budget Workshop Approved Not Approved Added to CIP and Budget "Moved to Unfunded Status 283 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Funds Overview Debt Limits Define specific limits or acceptable ranges for each type of debt. Limits are generally set for legal, public policy, and financial reasons. For the Town of Westlake there is no legal limit to debt except by way of a tax rate limit. a. Legal limits are determined by: o State constitution and/or law which limit the Town's ad valorem rate. o Local charter, by-laws, resolution or ordinance, or covenant. b. Public Policy limits include: o Purposes for which debt proceeds may be used or prohibited, o Types of debt that may be issued or prohibited, o Relationship to and integration with the Capital Improvement Program, o Policy goals related to economic DID You KNOW? development, capital improvement Westlake holds a financings, tax increment financing, AAA/Stable bond rating and public-private partnerships. from Standard & Poor's. c. Financial limits generally reflect policy or other financial resource constraints. Their assessment reflects Appropriate debt limits can positively the Town's historically impact bond ratings, if the government strong finances and demonstrates adherence to such policies management. over time. Financial limits are often expressed as ratios customarily used by A strong rating allows credit analysts. Different criteria for Westlake to keep determining credit worthiness i.e. credit borrowing costs low. rating). Direct Debt can be measured or limited by the following ratios o Debt per capita, o Debt to personal income, o Debt to taxable property value o Debt service payments as a percentage of general fund revenues or expenditures. Debt Issuance Analysis All consideration of debt issuance for major capital assets will be prepared within the framework of a Council approved multi-year capital improvement plan and forecast for all Town facilities and infrastructure. 284 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Funds Overview Debt Structuring Practices Includes specific policies regarding the debt structuring practices for each type of bond, including: • Maximum term (often stated in absolute terms or based on the useful life of the asset), • Average maturity, • Debt service pattern such as equal payments or equal principal amortization, • Use of optional redemption features that reflect market conditions and/or needs of the government, • Use of variable or fixed-rate debt, credit enhancements, and short-term debt, and limitations as to when each can be used, and • Other structuring practices should be considered such as capitalized interest, deferral of principal and/or other internal credit support, including general obligation pledges. Debt Issuance Practices Provides guidance regarding the issuance process,which may differ for each type of debt. These practices include: • Criteria for determining the sale method (competitive, negotiated, placement) and investment of proceeds, • Criteria for issuance of advance refunding and current refunding bonds, • Selection and use of professional service providers, • Use of comparative bond pricing services or market indices as a benchmark in negotiated transactions, as well as to evaluate final bond pricing results, and • Use of credit ratings, minimum bond ratings, determination of the number of ratings, and selection of rating services. Analysis of Debt Issuance and Debt Issuance Alternatives Staff will explore alternatives to the issuance of debt for capital acquisitions and construction projects. These alternatives will include, but not be limited to, • Grants • Use of reserves • Use of either current on-going general revenues or one-time revenues • Contributions from developers and others • Leases • Userfees • Impact fees Use of Debt Financing The useful life of the asset or project shall,at a minimum,exceed the payout schedule of any debt the Town assumes. 285 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Funds Overview 1. Debt financing instruments to be considered by the Town may include: o General obligation bonds -These must be authorized by a vote of the citizens of Westlake. o Revenue bonds-These bonds generate capital requirements necessary for continuation or expansion of a service which produces revenue and for which the asset may reasonable be expected to provide for a revenue stream to fund the debt service requirement. o Certificates of obligation -These can be authorized by Council approval with debt service by either general revenues or backed by a specific revenue stream or a combination of both. o Lease/purchase agreements-These shall only be used to purchase capital assets that cannot be financed from either current revenues or fund balance/retained earnings and to fund infrastructure improvements and additions. 2. Assumption of Additional Debt-The Town shall not assume more tax-supported general purpose debt than it retires each year without first conducting an objective analysis as to the community's ability to assume and support additional debt service payments. 3. Affordability Targets-The Town shall use an objective multi-year analytical approach to determine whether it can afford to assume new general purpose debt beyond what it retires each year.This process shall compare generally accepted standards of affordability to the current values for the Town.The process shall also examine the direct costs and benefits of the proposed expenditures. The decision on whether or not to assume new debt shall be based on these costs and benefits and on the Town's ability to "afford" new debt as determined by the aforementioned standards. The Town shall strive to achieve and/or maintain these standards at a low to moderate classification. 4. Debt Structure-The Town shall structure its debt payment schedules for general purpose debt to ensure level principal repayment schedules.The Town shall not assume any debt with"balloon'repayment schedules which consist of low annual payments and one large payment of the balance due at the end of the term.While balloon payment structures minimize the size of debt payments during the period,they force a large funding requirement on the budget of the final year.Given the uncertainties of the future,level payment schedules improve budget planning and financial management. 5. Sale Process-The Town shall use a competitive bidding process in the sale of debt unless the nature of the issue warrants a negotiated bid.The Town shall award bonds based on a true interest cost (TIC) basis as long as the financial advisor agrees that the TIC basis can satisfactorily determine the lowest and best bid. 6. Bond Rating Agencies Presentations-Full disclosure of operations and open lines of communication shall be made to the bond rating agencies.Town staff,with assistance of 286 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Funds Overview financial advisors,shall prepare the necessary materials and presentation to the bond rating agencies. 7. Continuing Disclosure-The Town is committed to continuing disclosure of financial and pertinent credit information relevant to the Town's outstanding securities. 8. Debt Refunding-Town staff and the financial advisor shall monitor the municipal bond market for opportunities to obtain interest savings by refunding outstanding debt.As a general rule,the present value savings of a particular refunding should exceed 3.5%of the refunded maturities. Debt per Capita In order to make apples-to-apples comparisons of debt levels between different municipalities, analysts often use measures like debt per capita, or the amount of bonded debt outstanding for each resident. It does not include interest expense. Total debt outstanding at 9/30/17 is $35,257,700. Gross Debt per Capita (shown in thousands) $32 $2 1 $2 $27 $27.7 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 It is important to note, the rating agencies take into consideration Net Bonded Debt per Capita not only gross debt ratios, but more notably net debt ratios. (shown In thousands) While the Town's bonded debt is ultimately secured by a pledge of $2.11 $2.50 $1.89 its ad valorem tax, the majority of it is actually paid from municipal $1.54 $1.44 $1.36 sales tax revenues and other sources. Currently only the 2011 COs for street repairs and Series 1 0 2013 GO-Refunding Bonds for the I I 1 0 k 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Arts and Sciences Center with a combined current balance of$3,177,000 are being paid with property taxes. This comparison results in a more accurate reflection of the Town's net debt per capita. 287 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 288 RETURN TO T.O.C. o ' Debt Service Fund f We (non-property tax reyenue supported) This section provides a summary of the annual principal and interest payments for all outstanding bonded debt and capital leases. The Town's debt is funded through dedicated, self-supporting revenue streams such as sales tax revenues. The Town issues general obligation bonds and certificates of obligation to provide for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities and infrastructure. 289 Debt Service Fund 300(Non-Tax Reven RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 0% Contributions 0% Misc Income 0% Total Revenues 07. Transfers In 1,856,591 2,033,385 2,066,128 2,710,068 643,940 100% Other Sources - - - - 0% Total Other Sources 1,856,591 2,033,385 2,066,128 2,710,068 643,940 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 1,856,591 $ 2,033,385 $ 2,066,128 $ 2,710,068 $ 643,940 31% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 07. Debt 1,856,591 2,031,785 2,065,105 2,710,068 644,963 31% Economic Development - - - 0% Insurance - 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities - - - 0% Services 1,600 1,600 1,600 (1,600) -100% Supplies - - - 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 1,858,191 2,033,385 2,066,705 2,710,068 643,363 31% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 1,858,191 2,033,385 1 2,066,705 2,710,068 643,363 31% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay - - - - - 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 07. Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 1,858,191 2,033,385 2,066,705 2,710,068 643,363 31% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (1,600) (578) 0 578 100% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING ff2,178 578 578 (0) (578) -100% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 578 (0) (0) 0% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 578 (0) (0) 0% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ - $ $ 07. RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 300 10110 00 000 $ 578 $ 578 $ (0) $ (0) $ 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 578 $ 578 $ (0) $ (0) $ 07o 290 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Fund 300 Overview This Debt Service Fund is used to manage payments on all general government related debt except for property tax supported debt which is paid through Fund 301. Town Council and staff are dedicated to a conservative pattern of debt issuance that ensures property tax rates remain among the lowest in the region and attractive to prospective businesses and residents. Recognizing long-term debt is usually a more expensive financing method, alternative financing sources are explored before debt is issued. When debt is issued, it will be used to acquire major assets with expected lives which equal or exceed the average life of the debt issue. Transfers from 4B Economic Development Fund and the General Fund comprise the bulk of this debt service fund revenues. Revenues and Other Sources • Total Transfers In are budgeted to be $2,710,068, • This represents a 31% increase of $643,940 from prior year estimated transfers in of $2,066,128. Expenditures and Other Uses • Debt service expenditures are budgeted to be $2,710,068 • This represents a 31% increase of $644,963 from prior year estimated expenditures of $2,065,105. • This increase is due primarily to the issuance of debt for the Fire Station Complex and Series 2017 GO refunding of Series 2007 debt. • As of FY17/18 the series 2013 refunding debt payments (originally series 2008 noted below) for the Westlake Academy Arts and Sciences building has been moved to Debt Service Fund 301 to be covered by property tax revenues as these bonds are tax supported. Bond Issuances for Westlake Academy • $12,400,000 Series 2002 Certificates of Obligation for Phase 1 Construction • $ 6,410,000 Series 2003 Certificates of Obligation for Phase 2 Construction • $ 2,500,000 Series 2008 General Obligation Bonds for Arts & Science Building • $ 8,500,000 Series 2013 Certificates of Obligation for WA expansion of 3 Buildings Bond Refundings for Westlake Academy • 7,465,000 Series 2007 General Obligation Refunding Bonds o Refunding of Series 2002 • $7,375,000 Series 2011 General Obligation Refunding Bonds o Refunding of Series 2002 and 2003 • $ 1,980,000 Series 2014 General Obligation Refunding Bonds o Refunding of Series 2003 • $5,795,000 Series 2017 General Obligation Refunding Bonds o Refunding of Series 2007 Bond Issuances for the Fire Station/EMS Complex • $9,204,000 Series 2017 Certificates of Obligation • $1,530,000 Series 2017 Tax Note 291 Debt Service I RETURN TO T.O.C. Revenue Supported Debt Fire Station Complex Fire Station Complex Fire Station Complex SERIES 2017 Texas Tax Note 5 SERIES 2017 CO Pymt Fiscal Program 16 TOTAL Program 17 TOTAL No. Year Principal Interest Principal F Interest 1 2018 202,000 32,173 234,173 200,000 310,800 510,800 2 2019 212,000 22,118 234,118 205,000 304,725 509,725 3 2020 215,000 18,254 233,254 210,000 298,500 508,500 4 2021 219,000 14,326 233,326 215,000 292,125 507,125 5 2022 223,000 10,326 233,326 225,000 285,525 510,525 6 2023 227,000 6,254 233,254 230,000 278,700 508,700 7 2024 232,000 2,100 234,100 235,000 271,725 506,725 8 2025 - - - 245,000 264,525 509,525 9 2026 - - - 250,000 257,100 507,100 10 2027 - - - 260,000 249,450 509,450 11 2028 - - - 265,000 241,575 506,575 12 2029 - - - 275,000 233,475 508,475 13 2030 - - - 285,000 225,075 510,075 14 2031 - - - 290,000 216,450 506,450 15 2032 - - - 300,000 207,600 507,600 16 2033 - - - 310,000 198,450 508,450 17 2034 - - - 320,000 189,000 509,000 18 2035 - - - 330,000 179,250 509,250 19 2036 - - - 340,000 169,200 509,200 20 2037 - - - 350,000 158,850 508,850 21 2038 - - - 360,000 146,400 506,400 22 2039 - - - 375,000 131,700 506,700 23 2040 - - - 390,000 116,400 506,400 24 2041 - - - 410,000 100,400 510,400 25 2042 - - - 425,000 83,700 508,700 26 2043 - - - 440,000 66,400 506,400 27 2044 - - - 460,000 48,400 508,400 28 2045 - - - 480,000 29,600 509,600 30 2046 - - - 500,000 10,000 510,000 TOTAL $ 1,530,0001 $ 105,5501 $ 1,635,550 $ 9,180,000 1 $ 5,565,1001 14,745,100 Issued By: Texas Tax Note US Bank Original Issue: $1,530,000.00 $9,204,000.00 Issue Date: March 2017 March 2017 292 Debt Service I RETURN TO T.O.C. Revenue Supported Debt Westlake Academy Refunding of 2007 (orig 2002) Refunding of 2003 SERIES 2017 GO-Refundir FF SERIES 2014 GO-Refunding Pymt Fiscal Program 15 TOTAL Program 14 TOTAL No. Year Principal Interest Principal Interest 1 2018 30,000 227,625 257,625 5,000 65,040 70,040 2 2019 30,000 227,025 257,025 5,000 64,860 69,860 3 2020 35,000 226,375 261,375 5,000 64,680 69,680 4 2021 35,000 225,675 260,675 5,000 64,500 69,500 5 2022 35,000 224,888 259,888 5,000 64,320 69,320 6 2023 35,000 223,925 258,925 5,000 64,140 69,140 7 2024 40,000 222,800 262,800 5,000 63,960 68,960 8 2025 605,000 210,100 815,100 5,000 63,780 68,780 9 2026 625,000 185,500 810,500 5,000 63,600 68,600 10 2027 645,000 160,100 805,100 5,000 63,420 68,420 11 2028 675,000 133,700 808,700 5,000 63,240 68,240 12 2029 715,000 105,900 820,900 350,000 56,150 406,150 13 2030 735,000 76,900 811,900 360,000 41,950 401,950 14 2031 775,000 46,700 821,700 375,000 27,250 402,250 15 2032 780,000 15,600 795,600 395,000 9,874 404,874 16 2033 - - - - - - 17 2034 - - - - - - 18 2035 - - - - - - 19 2036 - - - - - - 20 2037 - - - - - - 21 2038 - - - - - - 22 2039 - - - - - - 23 2040 - - - - - - 24 2041 - - - - - - 25 2042 - - - - - - 26 2043 - - - - - - 27 2044 - - - - - - 28 2045 - - - - - - 30 2046 - - - - - - TOTAL $ 5,795,000 $ 2,512,813 $ 8,307,813 $ 1,535,000 $ 840,764 $ 2,375,764 Issued By: US Bank US Bank Original Issue: $5,795,000.00 $1,980,000.00 Issue Date: March 2007 January 2014 293 Debt Service I RETURN TO T.O.C. Revenue Supported Debt Westlake Academy Partial refunding of 2002 & 2003 Westlake Academy Expansion SERIES 2011 GO-Refunding SERIES 2013 CO Pymt Fiscal Program 10 TOTAL Program 12 TOTAL No. Year Principal Interest Principal Interest 1 2018 700,000 192,650 892,650 178,000 267,172 445,172 2 2019 715,000 171,425 886,425 182,450 263,568 446,018 3 2020 730,000 149,750 879,750 191,350 259,830 451,180 4 2021 750,000 127,550 877,550 191,350 255,525 446,875 5 2022 770,000 104,750 874,750 200,250 250,630 450,880 6 2023 790,000 81,350 871,350 204,700 245,056 449,756 7 2024 820,000 55,150 875,150 213,600 238,781 452,381 8 2025 260,000 36,250 296,250 213,600 232,373 445,973 9 2026 260,000 27,150 287,150 226,950 225,765 452,715 10 2027 275,000 17,100 292,100 231,400 218,601 450,001 11 2028 290,000 5,800 295,800 240,300 210,936 451,236 12 2029 - - - 347,100 200,956 548,056 13 2030 - - - 360,450 188,574 549,024 14 2031 - - - 369,350 175,803 545,153 15 2032 - - - 529,550 158,748 688,298 16 2033 - - - 280,350 142,550 422,900 17 2034 - - - 293,700 131,069 424,769 18 2035 - - - 307,050 119,054 426,104 19 2036 - - - 320,400 106,505 426,905 20 2037 - - - 329,300 94,129 423,429 21 2038 - - - 342,650 81,950 424,600 22 2039 - - - 356,000 69,287 425,287 23 2040 - - - 369,350 55,447 424,797 24 2041 - - - 382,700 40,406 423,106 25 2042 - - - 400,500 24,742 425,242 26 2043 - - - 418,300 8,366 426,666 27 2044 - - - - - - 28 2045 - - - - - - 30 2046 - - - - - - TOTAL $ 6,360,000 1 $ 968,9251 $ 7,328,925 $ 7,680,700F$ 4,265,823 $ 11,946,523 Issued By: US Bank US Bank Original Issue: $7,375,000.00 $8,500,000.00 Issue Date: December 201 1 April 2013 294 Deb RETURN TO T.O.C. nd 300 Revenue Supported Debt GRAND TOTAL Interest TOTAL 1 2018 1,315,000 1,095,460 2,410,460 2 2019 1,349,450 1,053,721 2,403,171 3 2020 1,386,350 1,017,389 2,403,739 4 2021 1,415,350 979,701 2,395,051 5 2022 1,458,250 940,439 2,398,689 6 2023 1,491,700 899,425 2,391,125 7 2024 1,545,600 854,516 2,400,116 8 2025 1,328,600 807,028 2,135,628 9 2026 1,366,950 759,115 2,126,065 10 2027 1,416,400 708,671 2,125,071 11 2028 1,475,300 655,251 2,130,551 12 2029 1,687,100 596,481 2,283,581 13 2030 1,740,450 532,499 2,272,949 14 2031 1,809,350 466,203 2,275,553 15 2032 2,004,550 391,822 2,396,372 16 2033 590,350 341,000 931,350 17 2034 613,700 320,069 933,769 18 2035 637,050 298,304 935,354 19 2036 660,400 275,705 936,105 20 2037 679,300 252,979 932,279 21 2038 702,650 228,350 931,000 22 2039 731,000 200,987 931,987 23 2040 759,350 171,847 931,197 24 2041 792,700 140,806 933,506 25 2042 825,500 108,442 933,942 26 2043 858,300 74,766 933,066 27 2044 460,000 48,400 508,400 28 2045 480,000 29,600 509,600 30 2046 500,000 10,000 510,000 TOTAL $ 32,080,700 1 14,258,975 $ 46,339,675 Issued By: Original Issue: Issue Date: 295 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 296 RETURN TO T.O.C. Debt Service Fund (Property Tax Supported) —AMM This section provides a summary of the annual principal and interest payments for all outstanding bonded debt that is funded through property tax revenue. The Town issues general obligation bonds and certificates of obligation to provide for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities and infrastructure. 297 Debt Service Fund 301 (Property Tax Su RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15 16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 161,393 88,635 95,010 271,411 176,401 186% Charge for Service - - - 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax - - 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 0% Contributions 0% Misc Income 0% Total Revenues 161,393 88,635 95,010 271,411 176,401 186% Transfers In - - - - - 100% Other Sources 0% Total Other Sources 100% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 161,393 $ 88,635 $ 95,010 $ 271,411 $ 176,401 186% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ - $ - $ - 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 150,241 1 18,61 1 1 18,61 1 277,700 159,089 134% Economic Development - - - - 0% Insurance - 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies - - 0% Water Purchases - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 150,241 118,611 118,611 277,700 159,089 134% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 150,241 118,611 118,611 277,700 159,089 134% Capital Project Funds - - - - 0% Capital Outlay - 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES - 0% 89 TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 150,241 118,611 118,611 277,700 159,0 134% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures 11,153 (29,976) (23,601) (6,289) 17,312 1 73% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 18,738 29,890 29,890 6,289 (23,601) -79% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 29,890 (86) 6,289 (6,289) -100% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 29,890 (86) 6,289 (6,289) 100% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ - $ $ - 07o RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 301 10110 00 000 $ 29,890 $ (86) $ 6,289 $ $ (6,289) -100% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 29,890 1 $ (86) $ 6,289 $ $ (6,289) -100% 298 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 7 Debt Service Funds Debt Service Fund 301 Overview Required by Texas law, the Debt Service Fund (Property Tax) is used to manage payments related to the Interest and Sinking (I&S) component of the ad valorem (property) tax rate. In most Texas municipalities, the Interest &Sinking levy funds the majority of annual debt service payments. The Town has separated the Debt Service Fund into two separate funds to more clearly denote the debt being paid with ad valorem tax which is a small portion of the Town's total debt. Currently this Debt Service Fund is used to manage debt service payments associated with the various street projects. As of FYI 7/18 this fund will absorb the series 2013 refunding debt payments (originally series 2008) of the Westlake Academy Arts and Sciences building. This debt payment was originally in Debt Service Fund 300 and was paid via a transfer in from the Visitors Association Fund. The decision was made to move this payment to Debt Service Fund 301 to be covered by property tax revenues as these bonds are tax supported. Revenues and Other Sources • Ad valorem property tax revenues are budgeted to be $271,411 • This amount represents a 185%increase of$176,401 from the prior year estimated revenues of$95,010 o This increase is due to the inclusion of the Series 2013 Arts and Science Center refunding debt payment as noted above. Expenditures and Other Uses • Debt service expenditures are budgeted to be $277,700 • This amount represents a 134%increase of$159,089 from the prior year estimated expenditures of$1 18,61 1. o This increase is due to the inclusion of the Series 2013 Arts and Science Center refunding debt payment as noted above. Bond Issuances • $ 2,095,000 Series 2011 Certificates of Obligation o Street infrastructure improvements Bond Refundin-gs • $2,200,000 Series 2013 General Obligation Refunding Bonds o Refunding of Series 2008 for construction of the Arts and Sciences Building 299 Debt Service Fund 301 RETURN TO T.O.C. Tax Supported Debt Refunding of 2008(A&S Bldg) Street Infrastructure Improvements SERIES 2013 GO-REFUNDING SERIES 2011 CO GRAND TOTAL Pymt Fiscal Program 13 Program 11 TOTAL TOTAI No. Year Principal Interest Principal Interest 1 2018 125,000 37,400 162,400 79,000 36,300 115,300 204,000 73,700 277,700 2 2019 135,000 34,463 169,463 83,000 34,356 117,356 218,000 68,819 286,819 3 2020 140,000 31,025 171,025 87,000 32,316 119,316 227,000 w 290,341 4 2021 145,000 27,463 172,463 91,000 30,180 121,180 236,000 57,643 293,643 5 2022 145,000 23,838 168,838 96,000 27,936 123,936 241,000 51,774 292,774 6 2023 150,000 20,375 170,375 101,000 25,572 126,572 251,000 45,947 296,947 7 2024 145,000 17,130 162,130 106,000 23,088 129,088 251,000 40,218 291,218 8 2025 155,000 13,830 168,830 111,000 20,484 131,484 266,000 34,314 300,314 9 2026 165,000 10,063 175,063 117,000 17,748 134,748 282,000 27,811 309,811 10 2027 160,000 6,000 166,000 123,000 14,868 137,868 283,000 20,868 303,868 11 2028 160,000 2,000 162,000 129,000 11,844 140,844 289,000 13,844 302,844 12 2029 - 136,000 8,664 144,664 136,000 8,664 144,664 13 2030 143,000 5,316 148,316 143,000 5,316 148,316 14 2031 150,000 1,800 151,800 150,000 1,800 151,800 15 2032 - 16 2033 - - - 17 2034 18 2035 19 2036 20 2037 21 2038 22 2039 23 2040 24 2041 2042 26 2043 TOTAL $ 1,625,000 $ 223,585 $ 1,848,585 $ 1,552,000 $ 290,472 $ 1,842,472 $ 3,177,000 514,057 3,691,057 ssued By: US Bank Independent Bank Originallssue: $2,200,000.00 $2,095,000 Issue Date: February 2013 March 29,2011 300 . +Sr..,C •IONt + + � + WEIT,tlL+K- E .- -- I .E. Y . -+ + + + + # + 1 4 gab ' bw RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 302 WESTLAKE ACADEMY RETURN TO T.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16L17 FY 16/17 1 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES Transportation $ 9,763 $ 28,400 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ - 0% Parking 13,005 25,050 15,050 15,000 (50) 0% Athletic Activities 97,938 90,724 90,724 90,700 (24) 0% Interest Earned 3,126 3,000 4,500 3,000 (1,500) -33% WAF Blacksmith Donation 932,728 1,000,000 1,025,000 1,000,000 (25,000) -2% WAF Salary Reimbursement 60,389 66,432 66,432 67,800 1,368 2% Town Contribution-Westlake Reserve 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 - 0% Town Contribution 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 0% Other Local Revenue(BTS,Tech&Other) 21,889 143,256 95,886 58,800 (37,086) -39% Fund raiser(Back to School) - - 16,000 16,000 - 0% Food Services 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,100 100 2% Total Local Revenues 1,459,838 1,677,862 1,644,592 1,582,400 (62,192) -4% TEA-Foundation School Funds 5,856,979 5,606,212 5,539,350 5,781,200 241,850 4% CTE Funding(additional TEA-FSP Funds) - 356,475 299,605 572,200 272,595 91% TEA-Available School Funds 153,204 308,298 287,790 191,300 (96,490) -34% TEA-IB Training - - 6,300 6,300 - 0% TRS On-behalf/Medicare Part B 398,957 450,326 450,326 450,700 374 0% Total State Revenues 6,409,140 6,721,311 6,583,371 7,001,700 418,329 6% TOTAL REVENUES&OTH L 7,868,978 $ 8 8,227,963 $ 8,584,100 EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Function 11 -Instructional $ 5,369,349 $ 4,788,354 $ 4,759,616 $ 4,975,270 $ 215,654 5% Function 12-Resources&Media 73,982 84,089 82,639 82,639 - 0% Function 13-Curriculum&Staff Development 147,558 127,802 86,623 84,545 (2,078) -2% Function 21 -Instructional Leadership 210,590 276,548 278,148 206,623 (71,525) -26% Function 23-School Leadership 860,150 851,510 853,935 757,692 (96,243) -11% Function 31-Guidance&Counseling 248,153 236,600 228,950 223,973 (4,977) -2% Function 33-Health Services 62,327 68,024 68,024 66,024 (2,000) -3% Function 36-Co/Extracurricular Activities 140,141 175,826 246,013 218,358 (27,655) -11% Function 41-Administrative 372,961 276,495 307,126 260,167 (46,959) -15% Function 51-Maintenance&Operations 895,335 940,838 893,738 960,743 67,005 7% Function 53-Data Processing 164,331 192,401 176,401 195,505 19,104 11% Function 61-Community Services 118,429 122,020 122,020 124,460 2,440 2% Function 71 -Debt Service 91,092 257,238 257,238 166,200 (91,038) -35% EXPENDITUR $ 8,754,398 $ 8,397,745 $ 8,360,471 8,322,199 $ (38,272) OTHER SOURCES AND USES Other Resources-Local 474,300 - 80,000 60,000 (20,000) -25% Transfer in-Campus Activity Fund - 37,090 - (37,090) -100% Other Uses-Local (60,000) (60,000) - 0% L$ 474,300 $ Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures (411,120) 1,428 (75,418) 261,901 337,319 -447% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 1,482,157 1,071,037 1,071,037 995,619 (75,418) -7% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 1,071,037 1,072,465 995,619 1,257,520 261,901 26% Assigned-Bus Maintenance - 37,090 24,090 (13,000) -35% Assigned-Technology/FFE 125,000 - - - - 0% Assigned-Uniform/Equip replacement 5,000 11,000 11,000 15,000 4,000 36% $ 941,037 $ 1,061,465 $ 1,218,430 $ Dollars per Operating Day 22,685 23,008 22,905 22,801 1 (105) 0% Number of Operating Days(365) 41 46 41 54 12 29% 303 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 8 Academic Funds Westlake Academy Overview Founded in 2003, Westlake Academy is an open enrollment charter school that is owned and operated by the Town of Westlake. The Academy is the Town's largest operating department, and is required under state law to publish a separate budget document. The Westlake Academy Fund was incorporated into the Town's budget structure in FY2010/11 in order to capture the total cost of municipal programs and services in a single document. Note that revenues and expenditures are aligned with the school fiscal year, which begins on September 1 and ends on August 31. For detailed information concerning Academy revenues and expenditures, see Westlake Academy's 2017/2018 operating budget, available online at www.westlakeacademy.org. Revenues • General Fund adopted revenues and other sources are $8,584,100. Expenditures • General Fund adopted expenditures and other uses total$8,322,199. Fund Balance Ending fund balance is projected to be$1,257,520. REVENUES State Revenues Local 82% Revenues 18% W 65XX Debt Service 2% q 64XX EXPENDITURES Other Operating Costs 6% ►� 63XX Supplies&Materials 61XX 5% Salaries 75% ►, 62XX Contracted Services 12% 304 RETURN TO T.O.C. August 7, 2017 Honorable Board of Trustees, As Superintendent of Westlake Academy, and in tandem with the administrative teams for both municipal and academic services, I am pleased to submit for your consideration, the Academic Budget for FY 2017/18. On behalf of our entire learning community, I would like to thank the Board for their leadership, dedication to excellence, and support in making Westlake Academy and the Town of Westlake a truly shining example of what can be accomplished when people come together with a common purpose: great educational success can happen! I . INTRODUCTION Westlake Academy has faced several challenges and opportunities over the last several years, including decreased state funding, increasing rigor in state assessments, recruitment and retention of legacy teacher issues, space constrictions and subsequent facility expansion, and unprecedented growth within our student population. The students, staff, and faculty have shown an enormous amount of resiliency and determination to continually hold to our vision and rise to any challenge we have faced. Keeping this in mind, we present this year's budget theme, "I=E3: Inquiry is the Solution ... Engage ... Explore ... Empower!" A public school operating budget is legally required to include the Academy's General, Debt Service, and Food Service Funds. Because the Academy does not maintain the latter two funds, the General Fund is the only legally adopted fund. For informational purposes only, budgets for Special Revenue Funds are included throughout the presentation. GENERAL FUND BUDGET SUMMARY Amended Proposed $ Increase % Increase John FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18 _ (Decrease) (Decrease) Total Revenues $ 8,227,963 $ 8,584,100 $ 356,137 4% Total Expenditures 8,360,471 8,322,199 (38,272) -0.458% Other Resources 117,090 60,000 (57,090) -100% Other Uses (60,000) (60,000) Excess Revenues Over(Under)Expenditures (75,418) 261,901 337,319 -447% FUND BALANCE BEGINNING 1,071,036 995,618 (75,418) -7% FUND BALANCE ENDING 995,618 1,257,519 261,901 26% Assigned 48,090 39,090 (9,000) -19% FUND BALANCE ENDING(Unassig #Days Operating(Based on 365) 41 53 13 29% Daily Operating Expenditure 22,905 22,801 $ 105 0% Students Enrolled 830 856 26 3% TEA Funding per Student $ 7,382 $ 7,646 $ 264 4% Operating Cost per Student $ 10,073 $ 9,722 $ (351) -3% Teachers 66 66 0.04 0% Student/Teacher Ratio 13 13 0.39 3% 305 RETURN TO T.O.C. II. THE CHALLENGES The Town of Westlake, and therefore Westlake Academy,finds itself in one of DFW's most desirable executive housing corridors- located along State Highway 114. Growth associated with the area necessitates that we not only understand and deal with the associated changes, but also understand the impact the future growth presents. As our state charter is held by the municipality, any challenge or opportunity experienced by the community as a whole also affects the Academy. The most pressing challenges are: WESTLAKE'S PERMANENT POPULATION GROWTH: This is the portion of our population considered to be our permanent residents. From the 1990 population of 185 to 2016's population of 1,264 represents an increase of 583%equal to 1,079 additional residents. We will continue to monitor and plan for increases in these numbers considering our Comprehensive Plan's (Forging Westlake)forecast of approximately 7.21%annual population growth between now and 2040. This would bring us to around 7,000 residents. The number of Westlake residents who are selecting Westlake Academy as the educational choice for their students has doubled in the past five years. Resident surveys continually indicate that the Academy is a strong motivator for our residents to locate in Westlake, and one of the top three (3) reasons why they plan to remain in our community. For example, the 2017 municipal services survey results indicate 75%of the new residents say enrollment at Westlake Academy was extremely important/important to their decision to live in the community. With the majority of those residents then listing this as the number one (1) reason they will remain in Westlake over the next five (5)years. Planning for Academy growth in the face of residential development continues to be a challenge. Wherever possible,the Town has entered economic development agreements with residential developers to provide funding for Westlake Academy facilities to lessen the impact of their residential development on the Academy's enrollment. Westlake Academy has experienced steady enrollment growth from 491 students in SY 2009-10 to a projected 856 in SY 2017-18.The current increase of student population is a result of the Phase I expansion efforts on the Academy campus and our development. Our growth requires that we carefully manage our student enrollment processes to provide adequate space for children of Westlake residents. Approximately 39,000 sq.ft. of new facilities space was opened on campus in SY 14/15. It was comprised of a secondary classroom building,field house, and a primary years' multi-use hall. These buildings increased our capacity and allowed for decompression of our current school facilities.The lottery waiting list for student admissions from our secondary boundaries continues to grow from 705 in 2011 to over approximately 2,250 students for this coming school year. PUBLIC EDUCATION FUNDING SHORTFALL: State funding of public education was decreased by the State Legislature in 2011. While it has increased somewhat since then,the allocation has not kept pace with basic cost increases. And, in the Legislature's most recent 2017 session,the per student funding for public education was not increased for the next biennium. This negatively impacts Westlake since, as a charter school, we receive approximately 80%of our operational funding from the State. The municipal government continues to allocate significant resources to the school to deal with State funding limitations, maintain high quality educational services, provide for the Academy's facilities and support services, as well as preserve space for the children of Westlake residents. 306 RETURN TO T.O.C. Additionally,the Westlake Academy Foundation (WAF) raises significant operating funds for the Academy, without which the school could not operate. STAFFING LEVELS, INSURANCE COSTS,AND RETENTION: Our investment in the school must be facilitated in tandem with staffing considerations to maintain our dynamic teaching teams, and be competitive with our surrounding school districts.This includes keeping our compensation/benefit package competitive to attract and retain excellent employees. For the 2017/2018 budget year, in accordance with the Boards financial policies regarding Academy employee compensation, Staff recommends an average 2%salary increase for the Academy faculty and staff. This is in addition to maximizing efficiencies and processes that will control large expenditure drivers such as employee health insurance. CONTINUED EMPHASIS ON LONG-RANGE FINANCIAL PLANNING: This budget contains an updated Long-Range Financial Forecast which identifies key revenue and expenditure drivers while assessing historical financial trends and their potential impact upon the town's financial stability.The forecast must be monitored and updated during the budget formulation process, as well as reviewed with the Board of Trustees as the budget is prepared. Staff will also continue to produce quarterly financial reports for the Board that monitors and analyzes trends.The report serves as a valuable tool to assist in developing a proactive, rather than reactive, approach to our changing financial trends. DFW METRO AREA EMPLOYMENT AND POPULATION GROWTH: Since 1970, the DFW Metro area has grown by more than 150%-a faster pace than the state and nation. At 9,500 square miles, it is larger in total area than 5 of our states. With a population of nearly 6.8 million, it is the fourth largest metropolitan area in the country. Forecasts from the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) predict employment to grow, in this 12-county standard metropolitan statistical (SMSA) area, by almost 70%over the next 30 years. Population growth over this same 30-year period is also forecasted to be 69%. This regional growth will impact Westlake and the demand for enrollment opportunities at the school. III . SHARED SERVICE MODEL The Academy operates under a shared services model whereby the municipal operations team provides support services to the school. General maintenance and replacement of infrastructure and equipment for the school is also expensed to the municipal budget. The support services for the Academy that generate indirect costs paid by the Town of Westlake are: • Human Resources • Information Technology • Facility Maintenance Services • Finance and Accounting Services • General Managerial Oversight (Superintendent) • Town Secretary records maintenance and election administration • Board Support Services including policy advisement and strategic planning 307 RETURN TO T.O.C. The shared services model was an integral part of the state charter application process that helped bolster the Town's case for having a community school. This model conserves resources and avoids the duplication of efforts across the municipal and academic functions. DEBT SERVICE As part of the Academy's unique financial structure the Town of Westlake is responsible for debt service payments associated with the Academy's capital infrastructure. The Municipal Debt Service Fund is used to manage debt service payments, and Academy debt is accounted for in the annual municipal budget. CAPITAL PROJECTS Note that there are no major capital projects budgeted or planned through FY 18/19, and there are no future Academy capital projects discussed in the Town of Westlake's Capital Improvement Plan. However, retaining professional expertise to update the Academy's master facility plan will be discussed with the Council in the near future. MUNICIPAL ALLOCATIONS Amended Adopted $ Increase % Increase FY 16/17 FY 17/18 (Decrease) (Decrease) Municipal-Transfer to WA Operating Budget $ 315,000 $ 315,000 $ - 0.00% Annual Debt Service (Municipal budget) 1,874,385 1,869,870 (4,515) -0.24% Major Maintenance and Replacement 279,565 200,000 (79,565) -28.46% In-direct Operating Costs 674,130 727,659 53,529 7.94% Total Municipal Costs $ 3,143,080 $ 3,112,529 $ (30,551) -0.97% IV. FYI 7/18 GENERAL FUND BUDGET This budget encompasses all teaching and extra-/co-curricular operating expenditures as well as State public school funding and private donations used to support the daily operations of Westlake Academy. The FY 17/18 General Fund budget totals$8,322,199,which represents a 0.46% decrease from the prior year. It is important to note that$39,090 was earmarked in the Academy's fund balance for Athletic uniform and equipment replacement and bus maintenance, as well as additional days for the staff during August. As such, the 2017/2018 projections increased fund balance by$270,901 for an ending total of$1,219,857 (54 operating days). As mentioned previously, Westlake Academy's enrollment increase has been driven by the growth of residential developments and housing opportunities within the Town of Westlake. This trend will continue with the addition of another housing development and new homes that are currently under construction. With the estimated increase of 26 students, total enrollment will rise to a projected 856 this school year. This will be the Academy's largest student enrollment census to date, exceeding the projections in the school's Facility Master Plan adopted in November of 2012. 308 RETURN TO T.O.C. With this trend of growth in the Academy's resident (primary boundary)student population, a corresponding trend will likely be that overall lottery enrollment opportunities for secondary boundary students will decline. Growth will be monitored and managed until financial resources become available and the Board of Trustees reviews and approves any update to the Facility Master Plan. COMBINED: GENERAL FUND ACADEMIC AND MUNICIPAL SERVICES Amended Adopted $Increase %Increase FY 16/17 FY 17/18 (Decrease) (Decrease) Operating Expenditures $ 8,045,471 $ 8,007,199 $ (38,272) -0.48% Municipal-Transfer to WA Operating Budget 315,000 315,000 0.00% Total Academic Costs 8,360,471 8,322,199 (38,272) -0.46% Annual Debt Service(Municipal budget) 1,874,385 1,869,870 (4,515) -0.24% Major Maintenance and Replacement 279,565 200,000 (79,565) -28.46% In-direct Operating Costs 674,130 727,659 53,529 7.94% Total Municipal Costs 2,828,080 2,797,529 (30,551) -1.08% TOTAL EXPENDITURE COSTS $ 11,188,551 $ 11,119,728 $ (68,823) -0.62% Number of Students 830 856 26 3.13% Total Expenditure Cost per Student $ 13,480 $ 12,990 $ (490) -3.63% Over the last year, many hours have been spent to further develop our vision of the future, determining the best opportunities that lay before us to help accomplish our mission and truly become the "shining school on the hill." While we have many successes to celebrate,we are constantly striving to improve the Academy through multiple avenues, including "getting the right people on the bus", ensuring that we are consistently taking measure of our course, and adjusting as we move towards our goal. It is through our talented faculty, staff, students, and their supportive families,that we can unfailingly rise to challenges and hold to our vision. The daily operation of the Academy is made possible through our partnerships with the Town of Westlake,the Westlake Academy Foundation, and our affiliate groups. As with all good teams, it becomes necessary to draw attention to individual performers and teams who go above and beyond to help us accomplish our goals. I would like to recognize the hard work of the Academic and Municipal Leadership Teams, and specifically the Finance Department and Dr. Mechelle Bryson for their efforts in completing this award-winning document. I know with the teams we have in place, we will continue to "build a collective legacy of excellence." Westlake Academy is an ZB World Sc600C whose mission is to.yrovide students with an Thomas E. Brymer internationaCly minded education of the Town Manager/Superintendent Westlake Academy highest quaCity, so they are weCC balanced and respectfuCCfe-Gong Learners." 309 RETURN TO T.O.C. WESTLAKE ACADEMY LEADERSHIP TEAM *THOMAS E. BRYMER DR. MECHELLE BRYSON SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR *Amanda DeGan Alan Burt Assistant Director of Athletics Town Manager Student Life Coordinator *Debbie Piper Rod Harding Director Primary (PYP) of Finance Principal *Troy Meyer Beckie Paquin Director Primary (PYP) of Facilities Assistant Principal *Jason Power Alison Schneider Director of PYP Coordinator Information Technology Primary Curriculum Coordinator *Ginger Awtry Stacy Stoyanoff Director of Communications Secondary Principal & Community Affairs (MYP/DP) *Todd Wood Jennifer Furnish Director of Human Resources Secondary Assistant Principal And Administrative Services TEA/Charter Compliance Coordinator Terri Watson *Asterisk denotes shared services MYP/DP coordinator personnel between the academic Secondary Curriculum Coordinator and municipal service teams of Dr. Shelly Myers the Town of Westlake. Executive Director of the WAF & Director of Development 310 RETURN TO T.O.C. MISSION, VISION & VALUES Founded in 2003 with a mission to achieve academic excellence and develop life-long learners who Become well-balanced, responsible global citizens, Westlake Academy is the first and only municipally-owned charter school in the State of Texas.The Academy is the fifth school of only ten in the United States, and the only public school, to offer the full IB curriculum for grades K-12. During this year's budget retreat, great care and consideration was given to the mission and vision of the Academy and the impact that these have on both the long-term goals of the Academy and its day-to-day operation. The vision and mission statements represent the outcome of this discussion and evidence the Board's continued dedication to academic excellence and personal achievement. The values statements are currently being reviewed by the Board and are listed here for reference only. MISSION "Westlake Academy is an IB World School whose mission is to provide students with an internationally minded education of the highest quality, so they are well-balanced and respectful life-long learners." VISION "Westlake Academy inspires college bound students to achieve •• • their highest individual potential in a nurturing environment ■ that fosters the traits found in the IB learner profile." Inquirers, Knowledgeable, Thinkers, Communicators, Principled, Open-minded, Caring, Risk-takers, Balanced, and Reflective— VALUES • Maximizing Personal Development Academic Excellence • . + Respect for Self and Others • Personal Responsibility • �. Compassion and Understanding � � ■ DESIRED OUTCOMES The following desired outcomes summarize the goals and objectives established by the Board of Trustees and leadership staff at the Academy: High Student Achievement Strong Parent& Community Connections ■ Financial Stewardship&Sustainability • Student Engagement-Extracurricular Activities • Effective Educators&Staff 311 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 312 Ipp- ECT + TT +PR ' - . JI- ECT - V. . -D S.. ' iq + # + 1 4 (V l �laa - - -� - al ea RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 314 CAPITAL PROJECT FUNRETURNTOT.O.C. Combined Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ - $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Hotel Tax 0% Charge for Services 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Buildings 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures - 0% Investment Earnings 17,144 6,900 60,700 41,600 (19,100) -31% Contributions - 10,000 3,671,315 175,000 (3,496,315) -95% Misc Income - - - 0% Total Revenues 17,144 16,900 3,732,015 216,600 (3,515,415) -947. Transfers In 1,723,515 1,210,000 1,010,000 1,765,324 755,324 100% Other Sources 81456,145 8,500,000 10,734,300 (10,734,300) 100% Total Other Sources 10,179,660 9,710,000 11,744,300 1,765,324 (9,978,976) 1007o TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 10,196,804 $ 9,726,900 $ 15,476,315 1 $ 1,981,924 $(13,494,391) -87% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfer In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance - 0% Payroll Transfer Out 54,565 54,565 100% Repair&Maintenance - - 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases - - 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 54,565 54,565 100% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES - 54,565 54,565 100% Capital Project Funds 9,455,585 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% Capital Outlay - - - - - 0% Maintenance&Replacement Funds - - - 0% Total Capital 9,455,585 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% Transfers Out - - - - - 0% Other Uses 0% Total Other Uses - - - - 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 9,455,585 9,455,585 31455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 9,455,585 1 9,455,585 3,455,2651 10,342,56 6,887,300 9-illillilL Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures 741,2191 271,315 1 12,021,050 11 (20,381,691) 170% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 2,558,290 2,558,290 2,558,290 14,579,340 12,021,050 470% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 3,299,509 2,829,605 14,579,340 6,218,699 (8,360,641) -57% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 3,299,509 2,829,605 14,579,340 imi" (8,360,641) -57% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING - $ RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS Cash $ 3,299,509 $ 2,829,605 $ 14,579,340 $ 6,218,699 $ (8,360,641) -57% 0% 0% 0% 0% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 3,299,509 1 $ 2,829,605 $ 14,579,340 1 $ 6,218,699 $ (8,360,641) -57% 315 CAPITAL PROJECT FUNCRETURNTOT.O.C. Combining Revenues, Expenditures and Fur_ FISCAL YEAR 2016/2017 _ L Capital Fund Expansion Fund TOTAL I REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ $ Property Tax Charge for Services Hotel Tax Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits and Fees Permits and Fees Building Fines and Forfeitures Investment Earnings 38,000 3,600 41,600 Contributions 175,000 - 175,000 Misc Income - - - Total Revenues 213,000 3,600 216,600 Transfers In 1,015,324 750,000 1,765,324 Other Sources - - - Total Other Sources 1,015,324 750,000 1,765,324 TOTAL REVENUES AND OTHER SOURCES $ 1,228,324 $ 753,600 $ 1,981,924 EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ $ $ Payroll Transfers In Total Payroll&Related Debt Economimc Development Insurance - Payroll Transfers Out 54,565 54,565 Repair&Maintenance - - Rent&Utilities Services Supplies Water Purchases Total Operations&Maintenance 54,565 54,565 TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 54,565 54,565 Capital Project Funds Capital Outlay - - Maintenance&Replacement Funds 10,288,000 10,288,000 Total Capital 10,288,000 10,288,000 Transfers Out - - Other Uses Total Other Uses TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 10,288,000 10,288,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND OTHER USES $ 10,342,565 $ $ 10,342,565 Excess Revenus over(under)Expenditures (9,1 14,241) 753,600 (8,360,641) BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 13,168,612 1,410,727 14,579,340 ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 4,054,371 $ 2,164,327 $ 6,218,699 316 RETURN TO T.O.C. Capital Pro*lects Fund I , This fund tracks the infrastructure and building projects funded with general fund operating transfers, bond funds, intergovernmental revenue and other special fund sources. Capital projects are those projects over $25,000 that may extend over one fiscal year to complete and reflect multiple expense categories such as engineering, design and construction. 317 Capital Project Fund 410 RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ $ $ $ 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 7,272 6,000 57,100 38,000 (19,100) -33% Contributions 269,186 10,000 3,671,315 175,000 (3,496,315) -95% Misc Income - - - 0% Total Revenues 276,457 16,000 3,728,415 213,000 (3,515,415) -947. Transfers In - - - 1,015,324 1,015,324 100% Other Sources 8,500,000 10,734,300 - (10,734,300) -100% Total Other Sources 8,500,000 10,734,300 11015,324 (9,718,976) -91% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 276,457 $ 8,516,000 $ 14,462,715 $ 1,228,324 $ (13,234,391) -92% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 07. Debt 0% Economic Development - - 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 54,565 54,565 100% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operations&Maintenance 54,565 54,565 100% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 54,565 54,565 100% Capital Project Funds 260,278 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% Capital Outlay - - - - - 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds - - - - - 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 260,278 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% Transfers Out - - - - - 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 260,278 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,288,000 6,832,735 198% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USESIlly— 260,278 9,455,585 3,455,265 10,342,565 6,887,300 199% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures I 16,179 F (939,585)1 11,007,450 1 (9,114,241) F (20,121,691) 183% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 2,144,983 2,161,162 2,161,162 13,168,612 11,007,450 509% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 2,161,162 1,221,577 13,168,612 4,054,371 (9,114,241) 69% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 2,161,162 1,221,577 13,168,612 4,054,371 (9,114,241) -69% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ $ $ $ $ 0% RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 410 10110 00 000 $ 2,161,162 $ 1,221,577 $ 13,168,612 $ 4,054,371 $ (9,114,241) -69% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 2,161,162 $ 1,221,577 $ 13,168,612 1 $ 4,054,371 $ (9,114,241) 69% 318 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 9 Capital Project Funds Capital Project Fund Overview The Capital Project Fund tracks major equipment, land, and infrastructure projects of$25,000 or more financed with General Fund operating transfers, intergovernmental revenue, bond proceeds and Special Revenue Fund transfers. Project completion or procurement may extend across two or more fiscal years and reflect multiple expenditure categories such as engineering, design and construction. Completed capital projects often have a continuing fiscal impact on the Town's operating funds due to routine maintenance, repair, and daily operating costs. When an ongoing operating impact has been identified, it is included on the project description sheet, and costs are projected for the next three years. Upon approval of the project, the ongoing fiscal impact is integrated into the operating budget. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be $1,228,324. • This represents a 92% decrease of $13,234,391 from prior year estimated revenues and transfers in of$14,462,715 o Investment earnings decreased $19,100 o Contributions decreased $3,496,315 due primarily to one-time contributions (land $1.750M; private contribution $1.2M) received for the Fire Station/EMS Complex. o Transfers in from General Fund increased $1,015,324 for one-time planning and development building permit fees and revenues. o Other Sources decreased $10,734,300 due to one-time funds (bonds$9.2M,Tax note $1.5M) received for the Fire Station/EMS Complex. Operatinq Expenditures • Payroll transfers out to General Fund increased $54,565 to offset cost of Project Manager for the Public Works department. Non-Operating Expenditures • Capital Projects are budgeted to be$10,288,000 • This represents a 198%increase of$6,832,735 from prior year estimated projects of$3,455,265 • The following is a list of budgeted projects for FY 17/18. PROJECT NAME AMOUNT Fire Station/EMS Complex $ 9,843,000 Cemetery Improvements 100,000 Dove Rd/FM1938 Signalization 160,000 Solana/FM1938 Signal 10,000 WA Outdoor Science Project 175,000 TOTAL $ 10,288,000 Fund Balance • Excess revenues over(under) expenditures are projected to be$(9,114,241) • The projected beginning fund balance is$13,168,612. • The ending fund balance is projected to be$4,054,371. 319 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 9 Capital Project Funds Capital Project Fund Overview Impact of Capital on Operating Budget The purpose of the chart below is to show the impact to the operating budget if the capital expenditures were undertaken. Some major costs associated with capital improvement projects always involve personnel, insurance and utilities. Examples of specific information are as follows: • If a workforce increase is needed - how much money would be added to the budget for salaries and employee benefits. And what about a workforce decrease is needed once the project is finished? • How much will property and casualty insurance rise or fall because of this project? What is the estimate of the impact in utility costs once the construction is completed? Must a piece of equipment be purchased or needed once the construction is completed? Operating Budget Impact by Project Name FY 17/18 F� Fire EMS Station Complex $ 744,973 $743,843 $866,377 $ 868,813 $ 876,064 N Westlake Academy Outdoor Science Center - 2,000 3,060 3,122 3,185 Westlake Academy Pend Repair 7,800 7,862 7,925 Total Facility Improvement Projects 744,973 745,843 877,237 879,797 887,174 Trail Connection at Hwy 114 and Solana Blvd. 2100 2100 2100 2100 Wayfinding Signage - 16,065 16,065 16,065 Flashing Crosswalk Lights(Dove @ Pearson&Ottinger) 6,800 6,860 6,922 Cemetery Improvements 2,000 2,060 2,122 Total Parks and Recreation Improvement Projects .JJL_- 2,100 26,965 27,085 27,209 Roanoke Road Reconstruction and Drainage - 33,613 33,613 38,701 Sam School Road Reconstruction&Drainage 19,737 19,737 24,737 24,887 Solana Blvd Pavement Repair - 6,300 6,300 6,300 Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface 3,812 3,812 3,812 FM 1938 Pavement Repair 5,600 5,600 5,600 Dove Road Reconstruction and Drainage - 5,000 5,150 FM 1938 and Dove Road Signalization - - - FM1938 and Solana Blvd Signalization 200 200 200 200 200 Total Road/Street Improvement Projects ---- p Ottinger Road Reconstruction/Drainage and Trail = = 89,943 89,943 89,943 Pearson Lane Reconstruction/Drainage and Trail 48,591 48,591 48,591 Total Trail and Road Improvement Projects - - 138,534 138,534 138,534 TOTAL OPERATING IMP ----I$1,137,M Operating Budget Impact by Service Type IMPACT TYPE Services $ - $ $ 6,150 $ 6,305 $ 6,464 Insurance - - 4,893 5,040 5,191 Repair&Maintenance - 2,000 58,120 69,864 77,047 Rent&Utilities 200 200 64,780 66,717 68,713 Debt Service 744,973 765,680 978,055 976,752 980,152 320 CAPITAL PROJECT FUND 410 RETURN TO T.O.C. FIVE YEAR FORECAST PROJECT DESCRIPTIO EFY'16 17D FY 117-18L FY 18 19 FY 19-20 IF 0-21 FY 21-22 Transfer in from GF $ $ 1,015,324 $ 1,450,742 $ 1,170,710 $ 1,081,871 $ 370,114 Payroll Transfers Out to GF - (54,565) - - - - Interest Income 57,100 38,000 6,000 6,000 6,000 - NET 57,100 998,759 1,456,742 1,176,710 1,087,871 370,114 M Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M - - 480,180 - - - o Capital Project Expense - (480,180) a ROANOKE ROAD RECON/DRAIN SOUTH 480,180 (480,180) o Contribution 219,625 - o Capital Project Expense - - a FM1938 TOWN IMPROVEMENTS 219,625 o Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M - 281,960 'o Capital Project Expense (281,960) Q SAM SCHOOL ROAD RECON&DRAINANGE - Cash(Fund Balance) o Capital Project Expense �(696,260)E.DOVE ROAD RECON&DRAINAGE(Vaquero-T Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 30,000 o Capital Project Expense (30,000) - a TRAIL CONNECTION AT 114/SOLANA c-4 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 300,949 LO Capital Project Expense - (300,949) Q TRAIL-WESTLAKE ACADEMY TO CEMETERY 300,949 (300,949) - Um Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 290,016 'o Capital Project Expense (290,016) o TRAIL-DOVE/PEARSON/ASPEN - - Cash(Fund Balance) 'o Capital Project Expense o WY 377 LANDSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS(PHASE 1) � Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 983,954 'o Capital Project Expense - (983,954) o OTTINGER ROAD RECON&DRAINAGE 983,954 (983,954) - Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 404,125 'o Capital Project Expense - (404,125) o PEARSON LANE RECON&DRAINAGE Bond Proceeds 9,204,300 r, Texas Tax Note Revenue 1,530,000 � Contribution Revenue 1,200,000 Land Contribution 1,750,000 Land Sale Contribution 4,010 Land Sale Expense (19,725) Fire Station Project Expense (2,250,000) (9,843,000) (1,819,575) FIRE STATION CONSTRUCTION and LAND 11,418,585 (9,843,000) (1,819,575) Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M - 229,500 'p WAYFINDING SIGNAGE - - (229,500) - - - o WAYFINDING SIGNAGE - 321 CAPITAL PROJECT FUND 410 RETURN TO T.O.C. FIVE YEAR FORECAST PROJECT DESCRIPTIO ESTIMATED ADOPTED 1 2 3 4 i FY 16 17 FY 17-18 FY 18 19 FY 19-20 FY 20-21 FY 21-22 co Cash(Fund Balance) 10 o Capital Project Expense (285,000) (160,000) a DOVE ROAD/FM1938 SIGNALIZATION (285,000) (160,000) Contribution Revenue 220,445 10 o Capital Project Expense a SOLANA/SH114 SIGNALIZATION 220,445 o Contribution Revenue 112,000 - o Capital Project Expense (102,000) (10,000) - a SOLANA/FM1938 SIGNALIZATION 10,000 (10,000) WAF Grant 60 175,000 135,000 o Capital Project Expense (97,690) (175,000) (123,595) Q WA-OUTDOOR LEARNING CENTER (97,630) 11,405 Grants(WAF$11750-HOC$5000-WAAC$2975) 15,175 - o Capital Project Expense (4,590) - Q WA-BLEACHERS AND FILM TOWER 10,585 Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M - 80,000 o Capital Project Expense - (80,000) a FLASHING CROSSWALK LIGHTS - Contribution 150,000 o Capital Project Expense - (100,000) (50,000) a CEMETARY IMPROVEMENTS 150,000 (100,000) (50,000) Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 82,000 o Capital Project Expense (82,000) QYVA-POND REPAIRS - ,co Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 90,000 'o Capital Project Expense (90,000) Q-SOLANA PAVEMENT REPAIRS - Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 54,450 o Capital Project Expense (54,450) a WYCK HILL PAVEMENT RESURFACE - Co Bond Revenue-Issue$3.1 M 80,000 o Capital Project Expense (80,000) a FM1938 PAVEMENT REPAIRS - - - - Total Revenues&Transfers in 14,462,715 1,228,324 4,843,876 1,311,710 1,087,871 370,114 Total Expenditures&Transfers Out (3,455,265) (10,342,565) (3,491,626) (1,888,678) - - NET CHANGE • FUND : � (9,114,241) 1,087,871 370,114 Beginning Fund Balance 2,161,162 13,168,612 4,054,371 5,406,621 4,829,653 5,917,524 Ending Fund Balance 13,168,612 4,054,371 5,406,621 4,829,653 5,917,524 6,287,638 Restricted/Committed/Assigned 13,168,612 4,054,371 5,406,621 4,829,653 5,917,524 6,287,638 Unassigned Ending Balance 322 RETURN TO T.O.C. Westlake Academy• I Expansion • The Westlake Academy Expansion Fund tracks and accumulates resources intended to finance future expansions projects at the Academy. 323 Westlake Academy Expansion Func RETURN TO T.O.C. Program Summary Fiscal Year 2017/2018 Adopted Estimated Adopted FY 17/18 Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Budget vs FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 16/17 Y 17 FY 16/17 Estimated REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax $ $ - $ - $ $ - 0% Property Tax 0% Charge for Service 0% Hotel Occupancy Tax 0% Beverage Tax 0% Franchise Fees 0% Permits&Fees Other 0% Permits&Fees Building 0% Permits&Fees Utility 0% Fines&Forfeitures 0% Investment Earnings 1,374 900 3,600 3,600 0% Contributions - - - - 0% Misc Income - - 0% Total Revenues 1,374 900 3,600 3,600 0% Transfers In - 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% Other Sources - - - 0% Total Other Sources 1,210,000 1,010,000 750,000 (260,000) -26% TOTAL REVENUES&OTHER SOURCES $ 1,374 $ 1,210,900 $ 1,013,600 $ 753,600 $ (260,000) -26% EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES Payroll Salaries $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 0% Payroll Transfers In 0% Total Payroll and Related 0% Debt 0% Economic Development 0% Insurance 0% Payroll Transfers Out 0% Repair&Maintenance 0% Rent&Utilities 0% Services 0% Supplies 0% Water Purchases 0% Total Operaflons&Maintenance 0% TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% Capital Project Funds 0% Capital Outlay 0% Maintenance&Replacment Funds 0% Total Capital and M&R Projects 0% Transfers Out 0% Other Sources 0% Total Other Uses 0% TOTAL NON-OPERATING EXPENDITURES 0% TOTAL EXPENDITURES&OTHER USES 0% Excess Revenues over(under)Expenditures I 1,3741 1,210,900 11 (260,000) 26% FUND BALANCE,BEGINNING 395,753 397,127 397,127 1,410,727 1,013,600 255% FUND BALANCE,ENDING 397,127 1,608,027 1,410,727 2,164,327 753,600 53% Restricted/Assigned/Committed Funds 397,127 1,608,027 1,410,727 2,164,327 753,600 53% UNASSIGNED FUND BALANCE,ENDING $ - $ $ - $ $ 0 RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITED FUNDS Cash 412 10110 00 000 $ 397,127 $ 1,608,027 $ 1,410,727 $ 2,164,327 $ 753,600 53% TOTAL RESTRICTED/ASSIGNED/COMMITTED FUNDS $ 397,127 $ 1,608,027 $ 1,410,727 $ 2,164,327 $ 753,600 53% 324 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 9 Capital Project Funds Westlake Academy Expansion Overview The Westlake Academy Expansion (WAE) Fund tracks and accumulates resources intended to finance future Academy expansions. In FY 2012/13, approximately 8.5 million dollars of bond proceeds were used to fund construction of three new buildings at Westlake Academy with the final expenditures continuing into FY 13/14: • Cafetorium-includes stage, dressing area, storage and catering kitchen for dining and general purposes; approximately 9,600 sf. • Three story Secondary School -includes 15 classrooms, flex and office space; designed to allow for future addition if needed; approximatelyl8,900 sf. • Field-house- houses locker rooms used for both athletics and PE, including a visiting team locker room; storage for equipment; offices and space to be used for the PE program; approximately 9,600 sf. In February of 2013, an Economic Development Agreement was executed that requires the developer to pay$10,000 for each residential lot associated with the Granada subdivision. The Quail Hollow subdivision will require the developer to pay$5,000 for each residential lot. In FY 14/15 the Town received $410,000 associated with the completion and acceptance of Granada Phase I infrastructure. The estimated budget for FY 16/17 is$1.010 million and the projected budget for FY 17/18 is $750,000; these receipts are part of Granada Phase 11, Entrada and Quail Hollow subdivisions. Note these payments are recorded in the Economic Development Fund and transferred to the WAE Fund. Revenues and Other Sources • Revenues and other sources are budgeted to be $753,600. This represents a 26% decrease of$260,000 from the prior year estimated revenues of$1,013,600. o Investment earnings are budgeted to remain flat at$3600 o Transfers in from the Economic Development fund are budgeted to be $750,000; this reflects a 26%decrease of$260,000 Operating Expenditures There are no budgeted operating expenditures. Non-Operating Expenditures • There are no budgeted non-operating expenditures. IFund Balance Excess revenues over(under) budget are projected to be$753,600 • Beginning fund balance is projected to be$1,410,727 The ending fund balance is projected to be$2,164,327 Current Unfunded Academy Expansion Projects • Westlake Academy Phase I • Westlake Academy Phase 11 325 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 326 IN 1 iz � + + API+TA • 1V� V M ENT . P T + ••+ + ' + + + • 1 46- 4k-'. ' IVIAN .: T - - - -� _ -mal ea4 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 328 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section I I Capital Improvement Plan CIP Overview CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN OVERVIEW OVERVIEW The Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) presents the Town's plan for infrastructure development and improvements and is evaluated annually by the Town leadership to determine the financial availability of resources for design, construction, operations, and maintenance. Balancing these priorities, while at the same time being cognizant of the fiscal challenges of our Town, continues to be a priority for our staff team and elected officials. This document provides a comprehensive plan of capital improvements that are to be undertaken by the Town over the next five (5) years. Cost estimates and financing methods for the improvements are included and are referenced by individual project. The development of the Capital Improvement Plan is one of the more complex and multi-faceted processes of the Town. Striking a balance between the needs and interests of the residents and our financial capacity is a challenging proposition. For this community vision to have meaning, it must be accompanied by deliberate planning that leads the organization and community to its desired future. This requires clearly defined goals, proactive strategies, committed leadership, effective management and above all, the resources to carry out these plans and objectives. WHAT IS A CIP? CIP is a realistic plan designed to fulfill the strategic goals and objectives necessary to achieve the mission and vision of the community. The CIP is a multi-year document that summarizes the capital needs of a community over a specific time period. It outlines the individual capital projects, their strategic value and relationship to the community's long-term goals and objectives as well as the fiscal impact that they pose to the community. WHY HAVE A CIP? • Informs the employees, departments, elected officials and the public of an entity's intent to invest in its infrastructure and community • Represents a long-term financial plan and identifies resources or financing strategies that an entity plans to use to fund the plan • Identifies projects by functionality to ensure a balanced approach to our reinvestment in the community • Establishes priorities and serves as a planning document or blueprint for an organization's investment in capital infrastructure both short-term and long-term • Provides a breakdown of major project costs and phasing as necessary • DOES NOT appropriate money WHAT IS A CAPITAL PROJECT? Capital includes all long-lived infrastructures such as water facilities, sewers, streets, parks and buildings along with major equipment like fire trucks, radio systems, vehicles, computers and fixtures. Capital projects are the individual action plans that make up a Capital Improvement Plan. The capital projects in this CIP have been categorized into the following groups: Parks & Recreation, Facilities,Transportation, Vehicles and Utilities. CIP PRIORITIZATION STRATEGY-PRESERVE*PROTECT*PLAN • Preserve the past by investing in the continued upgrade of town assets and infrastructure • Protect the present with improvements and/or additions to facilities, roads, and capital investments • Plan for the future of the organization 329 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section I I Capital Improvement Plan CIP Overview CAPITAL ASSETS BY CATEGORY AND TYPE When most people think of the Town's capital assets, they naturally think of the Westlake Academy campus. While the campus is certainly a very important and visible asset owned by the Town, it is but one of many. Included in the assets of the Town are all the Town's infrastructure such as its streets, water, water towers, and sewer mains, vehicles and other equipment. In preparing this year's CIP, the staff utilized our annual audit to determine the value of the Town's assets. FUNDING CONSIDERATIONS In all communities, the cost associated with capital projects far outweighs the available resources necessary to pay for them; in short there is not enough money.This requires prioritization of the projects based upon their perceived impact on the community. Due to the vast number of individual desires it is near impossible to satisfy everyone and requires a collaborative effort to create situations where the benefits are shared equitably with community stakeholders. In addition, dedicated revenues will, in most cases, determine which projects get funded. For example, the Utility Fund may only contribute towards capital projects that improve water and wastewater projects. SOURCES OF FUNDING There are four primary funding sources for capital improvements: 1. Cash Funding (revenue sources such as sales, hotel/motel and property taxes) 2. State/Federal funding (public grants) 3. Private Funding (developmental impact fees or charitable donations) 4. Bond Issuance The projects in this CIP rely on bond proceeds and other revenues in the Governmental and Enterprise Funds as well as contributions from corporate partners for funding. There are two types of bonds: 1. General Obligation (GO) bonds which require voter approval 2. Certificates of Obligation (CO) bonds which do not require voter approval. HOW INFLATION IMPACTS THE CIP Inflation is defined as a rise in the price of all goods and services over time. This implies that the purchasing power, or value, of currency will decline in the future relative to costs. Therefore, more money will be required to fund CIP related expenditures and must be accounted for. This data is important in calculating the Town's future liability; by utilizing inflation trends to calculate future capital replacement costs, we can determine how `waiting' a year or more impacts the total project cost. Most are aware of the benefits of compounding when it comes to investing. Unfortunately, this same principle works in reverse as inflation causes costs to compound higher over time. FUNDED VS UNFUNDED UNDER DISCUSSION)CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS In prior years, the majority of capital improvements in Westlake have been unfunded. These projects represent capital needs that are subject to more discussion and are included to convey to the Town leaders and other interested parties the general parameters and breadth of those capital needs. These projects may be moved to the "Funded" section of this CIP or moved out into future years depending on priorities, funding availability, and other considerations. This multi-year capital plan will provide Council with a guide that communicates the program need or deficiency, as well as the funding requirements. It is important to note that projects which do not receive funding in a given year are moved out to the future years in order to communicate to those with decision making responsibility the need to provide necessary funding, or through evaluation, eliminate the project entirely. 30 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 11 Capital Improvement Plan CIP Impact to Operating Budget CIP IMPACT TO THE OPERATING BUDGET The Town of Westlake's operating budget is directly affected by the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budget. CIP projects can often increase or decrease costs. CIP investments in technology or significant improvements to existing maintenance intensive assets can reduce operating budget costs. However, new facilities and land acquisitions typically increase operating expenditures. Operating costs are carefully considered in deciding which projects move forward in the CIP budget. It is typically impossible to absorb many large increases in operating costs at once; therefore, projects are programmed to prevent shocks to operating budgets. Several projects are currently included in the Adopted CIP, and could have future impacts on the operating budget. OVERVIEW The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) guides new construction and improvements to the Town's infrastructure and facilities, ranging from road expansion to repairs on publicly owned buildings, to acquisition of new water sources. The CIP requires a sound operating budget and a solid financial base to allow for debt or cash financing of capital projects. A well prepared operating budget assists in raising or maintaining the bond rating of the Town. A higher bond rating means that the Town pays a lower interest rate for the bonds sold to finance capital projects. The annual budget process takes into account requirements of funding infrastructure, maintenance, and related operational costs. REVENUE SOURCES AND PROJECTIONS Development of the CIP has two phases. 1. The first phase is revenue projections. Like revenue projections for the operating budget, trends are studied, and performance assumptions are generated. From these assumptions, expenditure estimates are developed. Since the CIP involves long term planning, revenue projections must be made further into the future than those required for the operating budget. Components of revenue funding for the CIP are: o Sales tax revenue o Interest earnings on the fund balance and current revenues contribute to CIP o Transfers from other funds, such as the General Fund are considered in revenue estimating. o Other parts of CIP financing are budgeted as debt service in proprietary funds. 2. The second phase is existing debt service obligations. Existing debt is considered when estimating the additional amount of debt that can be assumed under the Town's policy. After the new debt for proposed projects is calculated and all revenue sources are identified, projects are prioritized and funds are allocated for long range planning.The revenues and debt service expenditures are managed through the two Debt Service Funds of the Town. PROJECT REVIEW The second phase of developing the CIP involves the project requests. Through a series of meetings, project plans are developed, studied and ranked according to criteria set forth by the Town Council. Projects proposed for the CIP are reviewed, evaluated, and recommended under the following guidelines: 331 RETURN TO T.O.C. _ Section I I Capital Improvement Plan CIP Impact to Operating Budget 1. General revenue-supported debt: Maintain a Capital Improvement Program within the debt limitations established by state law, and within a maximum local mill levy debt service established by the Town Council. 2. Capital improvement projects must meet the established useful life criteria to be financed: ife �ingl Public buildings 40 years 10 year New road construction 40 years 10 year Major road rehabilitation 15 years 10 year Water,sewer&drainage 40 years 20 year j Miscellaneous items Based on asset 10 year Local sales tax projects 10 year 15 year 3. Maintenance of the highway and street system to provide safe and effective vehicular access and efficient urban traffic flow emphasizing the following: • Include features in new projects which will reduce future maintenance requirements • Provide good streets and roadways to serve Town facilities 4. Emphasize projects without regard to the percentage of the total CIP funds available. 5. Develop a balanced capital maintenance program for all types of Town assets. 6. Include beautification and landscape improvements in projects, especially on arterials and highways, facilities, etc. 7. Insure an adequate water supply for existing neighborhoods and for the planned growth and development of the Town. ADOPTION OF THE CIP CIP recommendations are forwarded to the Town Manager and then to the Town Council. The Town Council may shift, add, or delete projects in the proposed CIP. Like the operating budget, the Town Council will adopt the CIP. IMPLEMENTATION After the CIP is adopted by the Town Council, departments use the CIP as a guide for implementing capital improvements. BUDGETING FOR ONGOING OPERATING COSTS OF CIP PROJECTS As a general practice, the CIP is developed and revised in a process that parallels development of the Town's operating budget. Departments provide estimated ongoing costs associated with CIP projects so all costs can be considered in the evaluation process. When a project is completed, the operating costs are included in the department's operating budget. 332 RETURN TO T.O.C. on Funded Capital Improvement Prolects A Capital Improvements Program (CIP) is for the purchase, construction or replacement of the physical assets of the Town. This section includes a listing of projects for the current year as well as projects that are planned for implementation over a five-year period. 333 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS FORF^"CT Formerly Adopted and New Proposed Prof RETURN TO T.O.C. * New Project Added this Year PROJECT_9EW ACTUALS FY 16-17 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 0 UDGET Project Description FY 15-16 BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET B TE1 TOTAL CP64 Fire-EMS Station $ 42,938 $ 500,000 $ 9,843,000 $ 1,819,575 $ - $ 12,205,513 CP64 Land Donation - 1,750,000 - - - 1,750,000 CP73 Land Sale Expenses - 19,725 - - - 19,725 Sub-Total-Municipal Facilities Improvements 42,938 2,269,725 9,843,000 1,819,575 - 13,975,238 CP71 WA Outdoor Learning Space 15,975 97,690 175,000 - 123,595 412,260 CP72 WA Bleachers&Tower 37,868 4,590 - - - 42,458 CP77 WA Pond Repairs - - - or 82,000 - 82,000 Sub-Total-Academic Facilities Improvements 53,843 102,280 175,000 82,000 123,595 536,718 CP42 Trail Connection at Hwy 114 and Solana Blvd. - - - 30,000 - 30,000 CP67 Wayfinding Signage - - - 229,500 - 229,500 CP75 Flashing Crosswalk Lights(Dove @ Pearson&Otfinger) - - - 80,000 - 80,000 CP76 Cemetary Improvements - - 100,000 50,000 - 150,000 Sub-Total-Trail/Park/Cemetery Improvements - - 100,000 389,500 - 489,500 CP34 Roanoke Road Reconstruction&Drainage South MMFV2,900 - - - 81084 0 483,080 CP40 Sam School Road Reconstruction&/Drainage - - - 281,960 - 281,960 CP78 Solana Pavement Repairs - - - 90,000 - 90,000 CP79 Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface - - - 54,450 - 54,450 CP80 FM 1938 Pavement Repairs - - - 80,000 - 80,000 CP41 Dove Rd Recon/Drainage(Vaquero/Terra Bella)Cash 69,825 330,260 - - - 766,085 CP41 Dove Rd Recon/Drainage(Vaquero/Terra Bella)Bonds - 366,000 - - - CP68 FM 1938/Dove Road Signalization 12,400 285,000 160,000 - - 457,400 CP70 FM 1938/Solana Traffic Signalization 259,540 102,000 10,000 - - 371,540 Sub-Total-Road/Street Improvements 344,665 1,083,260 170,000 506,410 480,180 2,584,515 CP52 Trail-Academy to Cemetery - - - - 300,949 1,284,903 CP58 Offinger Road Recon/Drainage - - - - 983,954 CP53 Trail-Dove/Pearson/Aspen - - - 290,016 - 694,141 CP60 Pearson Lane Recon/Drainage - - - 404,125 - Sub-Total-Trail and Road Improvements - - - 694,141 1,284,903 1,979,044 TOTAL GOVERNMENTAL PROJECTS 441,446 3,455,265 10,288,000 3,491,626 1,888,678 19,565,015 UF31 N 1 Sewer Line Transfer I&I - - - 96,435 - 96,435 TOTAL UTILITY FUND PROJECTS - - - 96,435 - 96,435 . � • '• � � r :: rrr ACTUALS FY 16-17 FY 17-18 FY 18-19 FY 19-20 PROJECT Fun • • Totals THRU ESTIMATED ADOPTED PROJECTED PROJECTED GRAND �Mm FY 15-16 BUDGET rGET BUDGET BUDGETTOTAL Contributions(Formerly adopted) $ 297,408 $ 1,856,590 $ 10,000 $ - $ - $ 2,163,998 Contributions(New requests)) 1001000 50,000 - 150,000 Foundation Contribution 15,975 97,690 175,000 - 123,595 412,260 TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS 313,3831 1,954,280 285,000 F 50,000 123,595 2,726,258 Cash(Formerly adopted) 128,063 615,260 160,000 96,435 - 999,758 TOTAL CASH 128,063 615,260 160,000 F 96,43.5 999,758 FY 10/11 Road Improvement Bonds(formerly adopted) - 366,000 - - - 366,000 FY 16/17 Fire Station-30 yr Bonds - 519,725 9,843,000 1,819,575 - 12,182,300 FY 18/19 Street/Trail-20 yr Bonds - - - 1,622,051 1,765,083 3,387,134 TOTAL BONDS 885,7251 9,843,000 3,441,626 1,765,083 15,935,434 GRAND TOTAL ALL PROJECTS • :: rrr ®r 334 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. E M E N T konic Fire-EMS Station Project Description: This project will provide an inconic Fire-EMS Station,which includes 4 bays,sleeping areas for staff members,kitchen/food preparation,storage,multi-purpose space to serve as a community/staff training,EOC room and offices for administration. The station is estimated to be approximately 18K square feet of usable space and would also include the Town's Emergency Operations Center(EOC)with a back-up generator for sustainability. It does not include any apparatus or a fire training facility. The project includes the acquisition of land by private donation, '�^ i s 410-72000-00-000-000064 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Consultant/Engineering 23,438 500,000 650,000 4,100 - - 1,177,538 Construction - - 6,248,000 1,559,975 - 7,807,975 Construction-Exterior only - 1,750,000 - 1,750,000 Design 19,500 332,500 180,500 532,500 FF&E 275,000 - 275,000 IT/Security 212,500 212,500 Land Sale Expense - 19,725 - - 19,725 Contingency - 75,000 75,000 150,000 Other(Foundation) - - 300,000 - 300,000 PROJECT EXPENDITURES 42,938 519,725 9,843,000 1,819,575 - 12,225,238 Land Purchase(in kind) 1,750,000 - - 1,750,000 PROJECT TOTAL 42,938 2,269,725 9,843,000 1,819,575 - 13,975,238 410-33501-00-000-000064 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) 42,938 277,232 - - - - 320,170 7 Year Tax Note(US Bank) - 1,500,768 - 1,500,768 Bonds 2016/17 CO Bonds 9,204,300 9,204,300 Sale of Land 1,200,000 1,200,000 FUNDING SUBTOTAL 42,938 12,182,300 - - - - 12,225,238 ' Land Contribution in kind - 1,750,000 1,750,000 FUNDING TOTAL 42,938 1 13,932,300 - - - - 13,975,238 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Services - - 3,900 5,150 5,305 5,464 Insurance - 3,700 4,893 5,040 5,191 Repair&Maintenance 38,000 50,000 51,500 53,045 Rent&Utilities - 48,500 64,580 66,517 68,513 Debt Service CO 2017 510,800 509,725 508,500 507,125 510,525 Debt Service Tax Note 2017 234,173234,118 233,254 233,326 233,326 OPERATING IMPACT - 744,973 837,943 r 868,813 335 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. E M E N T Westlake Academy - Outdoor Leaming Space Project Description: The outdoor classroom would greatly facilitate teachers'flexibility in their lessons to incorporate more hands-on science experiences. Establishing an area for on-going investigations would provide the students an authentic opportunity to connect their learning to the natural environment. Activities may include plant and animal investigations(including insects&small invertebrates),water chemistry projects using both our own pond as well as additional water sources housed within the facility,earth science,as well as understanding weather and weather patterns.The space will be located along the north drive and around the pond. Phase I was completed in May 2017 which includes the vegetable garden and planter boxes located north of the Gym. Phase 11 would be the Math&Science Plaza which ;;_ _ would include two concrete ads,one for the phase of the moon,sundial,compass,simple machine p p P P - rack and ruler,sidewalks and retaining walls. 410-74400-00-000-000071 Totals Thru Estimated PROJECT 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - Construction - 97,690 148,000 123,595 - 369,285 Design 15,975 - 10,000 25,975 FF&E 10,000 - 10,000 IT/Security - - Contingency - 7,000 7,000 Other(Foundation) - - Other Admin cost - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 61W15,975 1 97,690 175,000 123,595 - - 412,260 • 410-33700-00-000-000071 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Transfer in from General Fund - Transfer in from Utility Fund - - - - Grant-Foundation 102,200 175,000 135,000 412,200 Contribution - 60 60 FUNDING TOTALVVI 102,200 175,000 135,000 - IMPACT ON OPERATING Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Services - - - 1,000 1,000 1,000 Insurance - - - - - Repair&Maintenance 2,000 2,060 2,122 2,185 Rent&Utilities - - - Debt Service - Other OPERATING IMPACT 3,122 3,185 336 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c. E M E N T Project Description: ., .•t, The irrigation pond at the Westlake Academy is leaking on the east side with water running onto the property east of the campus. In March of 2017 a clay dam was installed which has slowed the water flow.This project will remove the silt from the pond and install a clay liner. s 410-73000-00-000-000077 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Engineering - - - 12,000 - - - 12,000 Construction 70,000 70,000 Design - Contingency Other(Foundation) - Other Admin cost EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 82,000 - - 82,000 410-10110-00-000-000077 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Transfer in from General Fund Transfer in from Utility Fund - - Bonds 2018/19 CO Bonds 82,000 - - 82,000 FUNDING TOTAL 82,000 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 22/22 Total Services - - - - - - Insurance - - - Repair&Maintenance 2,060 2,122 2,185 Rent&Utilities - - - Debt Service 5,740 5,740 5,740 Other OPERATING IMPACT 7,862 7,925 337 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. E M E N T Trail Connection ' and Solana • Project Description: This project would extend an existing 8 ft.concrete trail an estimated 1,000 feet from the west side of Hwy 114 to the east side of Hwy 114.This project will start at the same time the signal project for the intersection of Solana Blvd and Hwy 114 begins. 410-74400-00-000-000042 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - Construction 30,000 30,000 Design Contingency Other(Foundation) Other Admin cost qF EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 30,000 - - 30,000 410-33501-00-000-000042 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) Bonds FY 18/19 CO - 30,000 30,000 Transfer in from Utility Fund Other 30,000 - Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance Utilities Debt Service 2,100 2,100 2,100 2,100 OPERATING IMPACT 2,100 2,100 338 FUNDED CAF RETURN TO T.O.C. EMENT Wayfinding . . - Project Description: The"Wayfinding"Sign Project will showcase the town's major venues,direct visitors through major corridors that lead to various Town's destinations and trails.The project would include the locations,design and cost estimate to create and install the i-- wayfinding signage. The package would include but not limited to the following, •Development of a Master Plan to provide staff a guideline and template for wayfinding •Implementation. •Recognizable wayfinding system that is easily adaptable for future development •Create a signage system that blends into Westlake •Material selections •Define trail access points • • 410-74400-00-000-000067 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - - Construction - - 229,500 - - 229,500 Design - - - - - - Contingency - - - - Other - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - Wr - - 229,500 - - 229,500 A=0 410-33501-00-000-000067 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash/Transfers - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 229,500 - - 229,500 UnFunded - - - - - Other - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - 229,500 - Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services - - - - Insurance - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - Debt Service - - 16,065 16,065 16,065 OPERATING IMPACT 16,065 16,065 339 FUNDED CAF RETURN TO T.O.C. EMENT • CrosswalkLights (Dove I Pearson : • • Project Description: The town trail system currently starts and/or stops at the Westlake Academy campus.The use of the trail has increased over the past two years due to the growth of the cummunity and the Academy. Flashing light at the crosswalk would give vehicles a warning that pedestrians are -€�+ crossing the Dove and Ottinger roads.The project would include flashing signs and lights being installed in the pavement. Ottinger Road PROJECT EXPENSE 410-73000-00-000-000075 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - - Construction 55,000 55,000 Design 25,000 25,000 Contingency - Other(Foundation) - Other Admin cost - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 80,000 - - 80,000 410-33501-00-000-000075 Totals Thru Estimated , 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 80,000 - 80,000 Transfer in from Utility Fund - - Other - FUNDING TOTAL - 80,000 IMPACT ON OPERATING Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services - Insurance - - - - Repair&Maintenance 2,000 2,060 2,122 Utilities - - Debt Service 4,800 4,800 4,800 OPERATING IMPACT 6,860 6,922 340 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. E M E N T ImprovementsCemetety Project Description: 4 This project would include a new water well,storage tanks, irrigation system,fence on the southeast corner and underground power for the water well. �a 410-73000-00-000-000076 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15116 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - 10,000 - - - 10,000 Construction 90,000 50,000 140,000 Design - - FF&E - Contingency Other Admin cost - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 100,000 1 50,000 1 - 150,000 410-33700-000-000076 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Transfer in from General Fund Transfer in from Utility Fund - - Private Contribution 150,000 150,000 Other FUNDING TOTAL 10111� 150,0 - Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services - - Insurance - - Repair&Maintenance 2,000 2,060 2,122 Utilities - - Debt Service - OPERATING IMPACT 341 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. EMENT • • Road ' • • • I • South W (Highway1 south to Town Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6"of asphalt to approximately 4,000 LF of Roanoke Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Project improvements will be from Highway 170 south to the Town limits. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. '4 410-73000-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering 2,900 - - - 55,000 - - 57,900 Construction 403,000 403,000 Design Contingency 22,180 22,180 Other - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 483,080 410-10110-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) 2,900 - - - - - - 2,900 Contributions/Grants - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 480,180 480,180 Unfunded - - Other - - FUNDING TOTAL 2,90"iMff480,180 - • •- Totals Thru Estimated7FY 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services Insurance - Repair&Maintenance - 5,088 Rent&Utilities - - Debt Service 33,613 33,613 33,613 OPERATING IMPACT 33,613 33,613 38,701 342 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.O.C. EMENT am School ' • • Reconstruction and Drainage (Solana . Town limits) Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6"of asphalt to approximately 2,000 LF of Sam School Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches,consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing 2nd year from completion. Includes 150 linear feet of sidewalk. 410-73000-00-000-000040 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 117/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 120/21 121/22 Total Engineering - - - 49,308 - - - 49,308 Construction 232,652 232,652 Design - Contingency Other - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 281,960 410-10110-00-000-000040 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - Bonds 118/19 CO 281,960 281,960 Unfunded - - Other FUNDING TOTAL 281,960 - • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - Services Insurance - - Repair&Maintenance 5,000 5,150 Rent&Utilities - - - - Debt Service 19,737 1 19,737 19,737 19,737 OPERATING IMPACT 19,737 24,737 24,887 343 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c- E M E N T Solana PavementRepair Project Description: This project will provide repairs to several sections of concrete pavement _ failures on Solana Boulevard. The repairs will consist of removal/replacement of concrete and failed subgrade and traffic control. p+ k 410-73000-00-000-000078 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - 90,000 - - - 90,000 Construction - - Design Contingency Other EXPENDITURES TOTAL 90,000 410-33501-00-000-000078 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 90,000 90,000 Unfunded - Other FUNDING TOTAL • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance - Rent&Utilities - - Debt Service 6,300 1 6,300 1 6,300 OPERATING IMPACT 6,300 344 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c. E M E N T Wyck Hill Pavement Resurface Project Description: This project will provide for the removal and replacement of 1"to 2"of the existing 6"asphalt on Wyck Hill Lane. The existing subgrade is in excellent condition and does not require re-stabilization. w 410-73000-00-000-000079 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15116 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - Construction 54,450 - 54,450 Design - Contingency Other - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 54,450 410-33501-00-000-000079 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 54,450 54,450 Unfunded - - Other - FUNDING TOTAL EMEF 54,450 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 1 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance - Rent&Utilities - - Debt Service 3,812 1 3,812 3,812 OPERATING IMPACT 3,812 345 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-C- E M E N T FM1938 Pavement ' • air Project Description: �.�. This project will provide repairs to several sections of stamped/stained concrete pavement failures on FM 1938. The repairs will consist of removal/replacement of concrete and failed subgrade and traffic control p' 410-73000-00-000-000080 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15116 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - Construction 80,000 - 80,000 Design - Contingency Other EXPENDITURES TOTAL 80,000 410-33501-00-000-000080 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 80,000 80,000 Unfunded Other FUNDING TOTAL 11111111 iq�1111 I q1 1111 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19120 FY 20121 FY 21122 Total Supplies - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance Rent&Utilities Debt Service 5,600 5,600 5,600 OPERATING IMPACT 5,600 346 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c. E M E N T Dove Road ' - • • • Drainage (Vaq • - .• • to Terra Bella) Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6"of asphalt to approximately 6,500 LF of Dove Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches,consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study.Staff is working with the Southlake developer to include a portion of this project ► �, when the Southlake portion is realigned and reconstructed in 2016/17. 4 410-73000-00-000-000041 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - 100,000 - - 100,000 Construction - 596,260 596,260 Design 69,825 - 69,825 Contingency - Other - EXPENDITURES TOTAL wo,tsZo 696,260 PPREW 766,085 410-33501-00-000-000041 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) 69,825 330,260 - - - - - 400,085 Contributions/Grants - - Bonds 2011 Bond Issuance 366,000 366,000 Unfunded - - Other - FUNDING TOTAL 69,825 696,260 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17FY 17/18FY 18/19 I FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Services Insurance - - Repair&Maintenance 5,000 5,150 Rent&Utilities - - Debt Service OPERATING IMPACT 347 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c. E M E N T FM 1938 and Dove Road Signalization Project Description: This project will provide for the signalization of the FM 1938 and Dove Road intersection consistent with the enhancements at SH 114. The need to signalize is being caused by the proposed signalization of FM 1938 and Solana Blvd/Capital Pkwy that is currently included with the Entrada development improvements. The installation of a proposed traffic signal at FM 1938 and Solana Blvd/Capital Pkwy.in connection with the Granada and Entrada developments,the intersection would decrease traffic congestion and increase safety at the FM 1938 and Dove Road intersection. While FM 1938 is a TOOT • roadway,the cost to signalize will be the responsibility of the Town. Staff will continue to pursue TOOT funding for signalization of this intersection.pr ; • 410-73000-00-000-000068 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection 722,400 EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Engineering 12,400 10,000 - - Construction - 275,000 160,000 435,000 Design - - - Contingency Other EXPENDITURES TOTAL 457,400 •• • r 410-10110-00-000-000034 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) (13,989) 285,000 160,000 431,011 Contributions(Fidelity) 26,389 - - - - - - 26,389 Bonds - Unfunded - Other - - - FUNDING TOTAL 12,400 285,000 160,000 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance Rent&Utilities Debt Service OPERATING IMPACT 348 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-C- E M E N T FM • : and Solana Blvd Traffic Signalization Project Description: This project will provide for the signalization of the FM 1938 and Solana Blvd intersection consistent with the enhancements at SH 114. The installation of the proposed traffic signals is in connection with the Granada and Entrada developments that would decrease traffic congestion and frustration. Staff is also currently working with TxDot for a proposed signal at the FM 1938/Dove Road intersection. • 410-74400-00-000-000070 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - - Construction 259,540 102,000 10,000 371,540 Design - - - Contingency Other - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 371,540 •• • r 410-33700-00-000-000070 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Contributions/Grants - 112,000 - 112,000 Entrada PID 217,413 - - - 217,413 Granada 15,738 15,738 Fidelity 26,389 26,389 Cash(Fund Balance) - - FUNDING TOTAL 259,540 371,540 111111111111111111 iq�1111 I q1 1111 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15116 FY 16117 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19120 FY 20/21 FY 21122 Supplies - - - - - - Services Insurance Repair&Maintenance - - - - Rent&Utilities 200 200 200 200 200 Debt Service - OPERATING IMPACT 200 99 349 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c- E M E N T (NorthOttinger Road ReconstructionlDrainage & Trail of - Academy) Project Description: This project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 7"asphalt to approximately 4,000 LF of Ottinger Road(from Westlake Academy to SH 170)and replace/improve culverts and ditches, consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. In conjunction with this project,the existing Ottinger Road bridge will be M r replaced with new box culvert,much like the Dove Road improvements. Staff will determine ti . ' '0 through engineering design analysis the final design criteria including horizontal and vertical alignment. A trail will provide East to West interconnectivity within the Westlake trail system. Includes a primitive trail head on the Southeast corner of the cemetery property(primitive parking, restrooms and water fountain). Project52Trail $ 300,949 _ Project 58 R&D $983,954 _ 6 M:J.1qA 1144 410-74400-00-000-000052 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project 410-73000-00-000-000058 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Trail-Engineering/Design - - - - 32,999 - - 32,999 Trail-Construction 231,080 231,080 Trail-Design 46,870 46,870 Road/Bridge-Engineering 204,985 204,985 Road/Bridge-Construction 768,969 768,969 EXPENDITURES TOTAL 19 1,284,903 OIL • • r 410-33501-00-000-000052 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project 410-33501-00-000-000058 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 1,284,903 1,284,903 Unfunded - - Other - - FUNDING TOTAL 1,284,903 - 1,284,903 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - Trail-Services - Insurance Trail-Repair&Maintenance Trail-Rent&Utilities - - - Debt Service 89,943 89,943 89,943 OPERATING IMPACT 89,943 89,943 89,943 350 FUNDED CAF RETURN To T.0-c- E M E N T Pearson Lane Reconstruction & Drainage & Trail Dove '•. • Pearson R•. • Aspen Lane Project Description: This project will providetrail connectivity from Aspen Lane north to Dove Road along the east side of Pearson Road. This will include crosswalk devices at the corner of Dove and Pearson. In addition the project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 5"of asphalt to approximately 1,300 LF of Pearson Lane and replace/improve culverts and ditches,consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. Project 53 Trail $290,016 Project 60 R&D $404,125 410-74400-00-000-000053 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project 410-73000-00-000-000060 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21122 Total Trail-Engineering - - - 27,260 - 27,260 Trail-Construction 220,600 220,600 Trail-Contingency 45,156 45,156 Road-Engineering 57,505 57,505 Road-Construction 343,620 343,620 EXPENDITURES TOTAL 694,141 694,141 410-33501-00-000-000053 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project 410-33501-00-000-000060 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - Bonds FY 18/19 CO 694,141 694,141 Unfunded - - Other FUNDING TOTAL 694,141 - 694,141 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - Trail-Services - Insurance Trail-Repair&Maint Trail-Rent&Utilities - - - Debt Service 48,591 48,591 48,591 OPERATING IMPACT 48,591 48,591 48,591 351 FUNDED CAPITAL RETURN To T.O.C. IT REQUEST ' Assumptionof Project Description: a y es This project is intended to transfer ownership of a section of sewer line from Westlake and Southlake to TRA. It includes the design and construction of a '. •e.... metering station with SCADA equipment at the proposed Town of Westlake "Point of Entry." 1. r ! . .� 7FIY als Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering 42,847 - - - - - 42,847 Construction 242,545 - - 96,435 - - - 338,980 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL OW"285,392 - - 96,435 - 381,827 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash/Transfers 285,392 - - 96,435 - - - 381,827 Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bond Issuance - - - - - - - UnFunded - - - - - Other - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 285,392 - 96,435 - - 381,827 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT 352 RETURN TO T.O.C. IN Unfunded Capital Improvement Prolects This section includes a listing of projects over a five-year period that Town staff has identified but cannot be addressed given funding limitations. 353 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT.RETURN TO T.O.C. Unfunded / Under Discussion * New Project Added this Year ACTUALS FY 18-19 1 FY 19-20 1 FY 20-21 1 FY 21-2 Project Description • Budget Budget Budget Budgetl • FY 15/16 : . Hwy 377 Landscape Improvements(Phase I and II) $ - $ $ 411,100 $ 436,000 $ $ $ 847,100 SH114 and Schwab Way Traffic Signal Upgrade 257,500 - 257,500 Trail-Fidelity Campus to Westlake Parkway at Hwy 114 - 330,338 330,338 Hwy 170 and 377 Traffic Signal Upgrade 15,000 250,000 265,000 Dove Road&Randol Mill Traffic Circle - - 674,238 892,427 1,566,665 Hwy 170 and Roanoke Traffic Signal Upgrade 15,000 257,500 - 272,500 Glenwyck Farms Telecommunications Ductbank - - 806,400 806,400 Westlake Academy Pedestrian Underpass - 741,600 741,600 SH 114/170 Enhancements 239,433 - - - 830,592 1,070,025 Total Road/Street Improvements/Trails 239,433 683,600 1,031,338 931,738 3,271,019 6,157,1 Cemetery Improvements - - 73,609 77,904 151,513 15-30 Acre Community Park 8,033,126 183,706 8,216,832 Total Parks/Cemetery8,106,735 261,610 8,368,345 TOTAL • PROJECTS FOR FUTURE YEARS(TBD) Municipal Town Hall $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Fire Dept Ladder Truck WA Phase II Construction WA Phase III Construction TOTAL • BE DECIDED ® ® ®®®® 354 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISC I RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Hwy 377 . . - Improv7ements Project Description: The project will include streetscape enhancements(hardscape, landscape)along US Hwy 377 starting at Westport Parkway stretching north for 3/4 mile.The enhancements will only be located in the median ` and consist of native and naturalized plantings,trees, plant bed WORTH preparations, drip irrigation, and concrete edging/mowstrip. Since the project will be within state ROW,the Town will submit this project to WESTLAKE TxDOT for potential grant funding opportunities similar to the FM 1938 median landscape project. KELLER Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - 30,000 - - - 30,000 Construction Phase II - - - 381,100 - - - 381,100 Construction Phase II - - - - 436,000 - - 436,000 Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 411,100 436,000 847,100 PROJECT Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 411,100 436,000 - - 847,100 Other - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - 411,100 436,000 IMPACT ON OPERATING Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - 5,150 5,305 - Rent&Utilities - - - - - 10,300 10,609 - Debt Service - - - - - - I - I - OPERATING IMPACT J5,450 15,914 355 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISC I RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT - and Schwab Way Traffic Signal Upgrade Project Description: This project will upgrade the current signal poles at the SH 170/Roanoke Road l intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938.This project will upgrade the current signalization of the SH 170/Roanoke Road intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. The current configuration of ►�`: Roanoke Road will change once the main lanes of SH 170 are constructed, resulting in the reduction of the traffic signalization for northbound and southbound traffic 9 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - 15,000 - - - 15,000 Construction - - 242,500 - - 242,500 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 257,500 =iF-257,500 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 257,500 - - - 257,500 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL - 257,500 IMPACT ON OPERATING Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - 200 206 212 219 - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - 356 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Erail - Fidelity Campus • Westlake Parkway Project Description: This project will provide connectivity from Hwy 114 to Capital Parkway along the east side of Westlake Parkway. Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - 70,000 - - 70,000 Construction - - 115,000 - - 115,000 Design - - 145,338 - 145,338 Contingency - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 330,338 9 330,338 . Tell I=1144 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - 330,338 - - 330,338 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 330,338 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - 357 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Hwy 170 and 377 Traffic Signal N"k — Upgrade - Project Description: This project will upgrade the current signalization of the SH 170 and US 377 intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. - s��+ Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - 15,000 - - - 15,000 Construction - - - 250,000 - - 250,000 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 15,000 250,000 265,000 . Tell I=1144 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - 15,000 250,000 - - 265,000 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 15,000 1 250,000 265,9W W 000 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - 200 206 212 - Debt Service - - - - - 16,200 16,200 - OPERATING IMPACT 16,412 358 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Dove Road Randol Project Description: Reconstruction and reconfiguration of Dove Road and .- Randol Mill from a 3-way stop intersection to a traffic circle ... �• yc to improve traffic safety. Pavement construction will be yy consistent with 2011 Graham Pavement Evaluation Study. b°�°►?aRa n Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - 106,090 106,090 Construction - - - - - - 786,337 786,337 Design - - - - - 36,050 - 36,050 Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - 638,188 - 638,188 EXPENDITURES TOTAL IF - 674,238 892,427 1,566,665 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - UnFunded - - - - - 674,238 892,427 1,566,665 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 674,238 892,427 1,566,665 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - 2,971 3,060 - Rent&Utilities - - - - - 5,941 6,119 - Debt Service - - - - - - 1 94,200 - OPERATING IMPACT 11U.912 1 103,379 - 359 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Wwy 170 and Roanoke Road Traffic Signal Upgrade Project Description: This project will upgrade the current signalization of the SH 170/Roanoke Road I y r intersection with poles and internally illuminated street name signs consistent with the enhanced signals on FM 1938. The current configuration of Roanoke Road will change once the main lanes of SH 170 are constructed, resulting in the reduction of the traffic signalization for northbound and southbound traffic. Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - 15,000 - - 15,000 Construction - - - - 257,500 - 257,500 Design - - - - - - - - Painting - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - 00 15,000 257,500 272,500 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - 15,000 257,500 - 272,500 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 15,000 257,500 272,500 9W W EM • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - 200 206 212 - Debt Service - - - - - - 16,350 - OPERATING IMPACT 06 F 16,562 - 360 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Ductbank Project Description: This project will provide for the construction of approximately 11,000 LF of telecommunication ductbank within the Glenwyck subdivision to accomodate the installation of improved telecommunication lines. Additionally,this will provide a connection of the ductbank from Granda to Terra Bella. Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - 806,400 806,400 Construction - - - - - - - - Design - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 806,400 806,400 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - 806,400 806,400 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 111 W 806,400 806,400 9W W • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT 361 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT kINEW 'Dre stiake Academy - Pedestrian Underpass Project Description: T ■ This project will provide for the construction of a pedestrian underpass on to: 0 the south side of the Westlake Academy campus and connections to the a existing trail system. This will require the reconstruction of a section of .� 1 Ottinger Road and the relocation of water, gas, and telecommunications. ` Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - _ _ _ _ 61,800 61,800 Construction - _ _ _ _ _ 618,000 618,000 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - _ _ _ _ _ 61,800 61,800 Other - - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 741,600741,600 . - - 1=14i 9W Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - 741,600 741,600 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 111 W 741,600 741,600 9W W EM • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - 219 - Debt Service - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT - 362 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT �7 Project Description: This project was anticipated to be a cooperative effort between Westlake,Trophy Club, and Roanoke consisting of the design and construction of landscape and hardscape improvements to the SH 170&Hwy 114 interchange to include plantings, painting,and entry monuments. Maintenance is for irrigation only. To-date the Town has paid $239,433 for engineering and paintintg in FY 13/14. Project costs are estimated to be $3,000,000 for construction. Funding participation is anticipated to be 1/3 from each party. This project will be submitted for a TxDot grant(Green Ribbon). The Town _ anticipates getting$160,000 reimbursement of engineering costs in FY 15/16 from Trophy Club and Roanoke and will use those funds towards the final construction. If - project does not move forward,the funds will go to the Capital Projects fund balance. £ • Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 1 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - _ _ _ _ 830,592 830,592 Design - - - - - - - - Painting 239,433 - - - - - - 239,433 Other - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 239,433 - - 830,592 1,070,025 qW . • Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants 149,622 - - - - - 149,622 Bonds 2011 CO$2.095M 89,811 - - - - - - 89,811 Bonds - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - - 830,592 830,592 FUNDING TOTAL *112P39'A 830,592 1,070,025 •0 Eel- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - - - - - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT 363 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT Cemetery . . Project Description: These improvements will consist of section markers, roadways and landscaping. The project also anticipates a future trail head with rest facilities that will accomodate the future cemetery/academy trail. Based on current funding sources,this project will be dependent upon the future sale " of plots and would be completed in four phases. Phase I &II includes the - road improvements and Phase III&IV will consist of the landscaping and trail improvements. I-1z. New Stone Fence Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - - - - Construction - - - - - 73,609 77,904 151,513 Design - - - - - - - - Contingency - - - - - - - - Other - - - - - - - EXPENDITURES TOTAL - - - 73,609 77,904 151,513 • - • PEW AL Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - Bond Issuance - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - 73,609 77,904 151,513 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 73,609 77,904 151,513 • •- Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - - - - - - Services - - - - 5,614 5,782 5,955 - Insurance - - - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - - 16,841 17,346 17,866 - Rent&Utilities - - - - - - - - Debt Service - - - - - 9,000 - OPERATING IMPACT 22,455 23,128 32,821 364 UNFUNDED (UNDER DISCI RETURN TO T.O.C. ITAL IMPROVEMENT 0 Acre Community 7ark Project Description: This project would include the purchase of 15 to 30 acres of open space with the ability to add amenities such as small covered pavilions,trail - heads, playground stations,sports fields,general use open spaces,dog park, restroom,football field, running track,cross country trail,outdoor tennis and basketball courts, baseball and softball fields. The project - would include restrooms,concession area with outdoor eating area and parking. This facility would provide programs and activities to the Westlake community and Westlake Academy. r Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project EXPENDITURE TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Engineering - - - - - 655,805 67,473 723,278 Construction - - - - - 3,476,610 - 3,476,610 Design - - - - - 65,508 67,473 132,981 Contingency - - - - - 58,300 48,760 107,060 Land Purchase(390K for 10 Acres) - - - - - 4,367,200 - 4,367,200 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 8,623,423 183,706 8,807,129 ow -- • Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection Project FUNDING TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 1 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Total Cash(Fund Balance) - - - - - - Contributions/Grants - - - - - - - - Bond Issuance - - - - - - - - Unfunded - - - - - 8,623,423 183,706 8,807,129 Other - - - - - - - - FUNDING TOTAL 8,623,423 183,706 8,807,129 Totals Thru Estimated 5 Year Projection IMPACT TYPE FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 Supplies - - - 2,975 3,065 - Services - - - 17,851 18,387 - Insurance - - - - - - Repair&Maintenance - - - 2,975 3,065 - Rent&Utilities - - - 9,521 9,807 - Debt Service - - - - - - 528,600 - OPERATING 33,323 562,923 365 RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 366 3- + TION * , + + + + i + + AT . + +' + + + + + r + + + PAL Es. .OLI'Cl + + + + + + • 1 46- 4k-'. ' F S. 1 I i� .. ilq • - - -� - al ea RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 368 RETURN TO T.O.C. Fiscal & Budgetary Policies The overall intent of the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements is to enable the Town to achieve a long -term stable and positive financial condition. The watchwords of the Town's financial management include integrity, prudence, stewardship, planning, accountability, and full disclosure. 369 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies I. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The overall intent of the following Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements is to enable the Town to achieve a long-term stable and positive financial condition. The watchwords of the Town's financial management include integrity, prudence, stewardship, planning, accountability, and full disclosure. The more specific purpose is to provide guidelines to the Town Manager and Finance Director in planning and directing the Town's day-to-day financial affairs and in developing recommendations to the Town Manger and Town Council. The scope of these policies generally span, among other issues, accounting, purchasing, auditing, financial reporting, internal controls, operating and capital budgeting, revenue management, cash and investment management, expenditure control, asset management, debt management, and planning concepts, in order to: A. Present fairly and with full disclosure the financial position and results of the financial operations of the Town in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), and B. Determine and demonstrate compliance with finance related legal and contractual issues in accordance with provisions of the Texas Local Government Code and other pertinent legal documents and mandates. The Town Council will annually review and approve the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements as part of the budget process. II. SUMMARY OF POLICY INTENDED OUTCOMES This policy framework mandates pursuit of the following fiscal objectives: A. Operating Budget: Prepare, conservatively estimate revenues, present, and adopt the Town's annual operating plan. B. Revenues Management: Design, maintain,and administer a revenue system that will assure a reliable, equitable,diversified,and sufficient revenue stream to support desired Town services. C. Expenditure Control: Identify priority services,establish appropriate service levels,and administer the expenditure of available resources to assure fiscal stability and the effective and efficient delivery of services. D. Fund Balance/Retained Earnings: Maintain the fund balance and retained earnings of the various operating funds at levels sufficient to protect the Town's credit worthiness as well as its financial position from emergencies. 370 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies E. Debt Management: Establish guidelines for debt financing that will provide needed capital equipment and infrastructure improvements while minimizing the impact of debt payments on current revenues. F. Intergovernmental Relationships: Where feasible,coordinate efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives,share the cost of providing governmental services on an equitable basis and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal level. G. Grants: Seek,apply for and effectively administer within this policy's guidelines, Federal, State, and foundation grants-in-aid which address the Town's current priorities and policy objectives. H. Economic Development: Initiate where feasible,encourage,and participate in economic development efforts to create job opportunities and strengthen the local tax base and economy I. Fiscal Monitoring: Prepare and present regular reports that analyze,evaluate, and forecast the Town's financial performance and economic condition. J. Financial Consultants: With available resources,seek out and employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants in the management and administration of the Town's financial functions. K. Accounting,Auditing,and Financial Reporting: Comply with prevailing Federal,State and local statues and regulations. Conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB),the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). L. Capital Improvement Plan/Budget and Program: Multi-year planning,forecasting, preparation,and control of the Town's capital improvement plan/budget. M. Capital Maintenance and Replacement: Annually review and monitor the state of the Town's capital equipment and infrastructure,setting priorities for its replacement and renovation based on needs,finding alternatives, and availability of resources. N. Internal Controls:To establish and maintain an internal control structure designed to provide reasonable assurances that the Town's assets are safeguarded and that the possibilities for material errors in the Town's financial records are minimized. 371 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies III. OPERATING BUDGET A. Preparation: Budgeting is an essential element of the financial planning,control and evaluation process of municipal government. The "operating budget" is the Town's annual financial operating plan. The budget includes all of the operating departments of the Town,the debt service fund, all capital projects funds, and the internal service funds of the Town. The proposed budget will be prepared with the cooperation of all Town departments,and is submitted to the Town Manager who makes any necessary changes and transmits the document to the Town Council. A budget preparation calendar and timetable will be established and followed in accordance with State law. B. Revenue Estimates for Budgeting: In order to maintain a stable level of services,the Town shall use a conservative, objective, and analytical approach when preparing revenue estimates.The process shall include analysis of probable economic changes and their impacts on revenues, historical collection rates, and trends in revenues.This approach should reduce the likelihood of actual revenues falling short of budget estimates during the year and should avoid mid-year service reductions. C. Balanced Budget: As per State Law,current operating revenues,including Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax transfers (which can be used for operations),will be sufficient to support current operating expenditures. Annually recurring revenue will not be less than annually recurring operating budget expenditures (operating budget minus capital outlay). Debt or bond financing will not be used to finance current expenditures. D. Proposed Budget Process:a proposed budget shall be prepared by the Town Manager with the participation of all of the Town's department directors. • The proposed budget shall include four basic segments for review and evaluation: (1) personnel costs, (2) base budget for operations and maintenance costs, (3) service level adjustments for increases of existing service levels or additional services,and (4) revenues. • The proposed budget review process shall include Council participation in the review of each of the four segments of the proposed budget and a public hearing to allow for citizen participation in the budget preparation. • The proposed budget process shall allow sufficient time to provide review,as well as address policy and fiscal issues,by the Town Council. • A copy of the proposed budget shall be filed with the Town Secretary when it is submitted to the Town Council as well as placed on the Town's website. E. Budget Adoption: Upon the determination and presentation of the final iteration of the proposed budget as established by the Council, a public hearing date and time will be set and publicized. The Council will subsequently consider a resolution which,if adopted, such budget becomes the Town's Approved Annual Budget. The adopted budget will be effective for the fiscal year beginning October 1. The approved budget will be placed on the Town's web site. 372 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies F. Budget Award: Each year the Council approved operating budget will be submitted annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and consideration for the Award for Distinguished Budget Presentation. G. Budget Amendments: Department Directors are responsible for monitoring their respective department budgets. The Finance Department will monitor all financial operations. The budget team will decide whether to proceed with a budget amendment and, if so,will then present the request to the Town Council. If the Council decides a budget amendment is necessary,the amendment is adopted in resolution format and the necessary budgetary changes are then made. H. Central Control:Modifications within the operating categories (salaries,supplies, maintenance,services, capital, etc.) can be made with the approval of the Town Manager. Modifications to reserve categories and interdepartmental budget totals will be made only by Town Council consent with formal briefing and Council action. I. Planning:The budget process will be coordinated so as to identify major policy issues for Town Council by integrating it into the Council's overall strategic planning process for the Town. Each department shall have a multi-year business plan that integrates with the Town's overall strategic plan. J. Reporting: Monthly financial reports will be prepared by the Finance Department and distributed to and reviewed by each Director. Information obtained from financial reports and other operating reports is to be used by Directors to monitor and control departmental budget. Summary financial reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. K. Performance Measures& Productivity Indicators:Where appropriate, performance measures and productivity indicators will be used as guidelines to measure efficiency, effectiveness, and outcomes of Town services. This information will be included in the annual budget process as needed. L. Contingent Appropriation: During the budget process,staff will attempt to establish an adequate contingent appropriation in each of the operating funds. The expenditure for this appropriation shall be made only in cases of emergency, and a detailed account shall be recorded and reported. The proceeds shall be disbursed only by transfer to departmental appropriation. All transfers from the contingent appropriation will be evaluated using the following criteria: • Is the request of such an emergency nature that it must be made immediately? • Why was the item not budgeted in the normal budget process? • Why can't the transfer be made within the department? 373 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies IV. REVENUES MANAGEMENT A. Revenue Design Parameter: The Town will pursue the following optimum characteristics in its revenue system: • Simplicity-The Town,where possible and without sacrificing accuracy,will strive to keep the revenue system simple in order to reduce costs,achieve transparency,and increase citizen understanding of Town revenue sources. • Certainty-A knowledge and understanding of revenue sources reliability increases the viability of the revenue system. The Town will understand,to the best of its ability,all aspects of its revenue sources and their performance,as well as enact consistent collection policies to provide assurances that the revenue base will materialize according to budgets,forecasts,and plans. • Equity-The Town shall make every effort to maintain equity in its revenue system: i.e. the Town shall seek to minimize or eliminate all forms of subsidization between entities, funds,services utilities,and customer classes within a utility. • Administration-The benefits of a revenue source will not exceed the cost of collecting that revenue. Every effort will be made for the cost of collection to be reviewed annually for cost effectiveness as a part of the Town's indirect cost and cost of service analysis. • Adequacy,Diversification and Stability-The Town shall attempt,in as much as is practical,to achieve a balance in its revenue system. The Town shall also strive to maintain a balanced and diversified revenue system to protect the Town from fluctuations in any one source due to changes in local economic conditions which adversely impact that revenue source. B. Other Considerations. The following considerations and issues will guide the Town in its revenue policies concerning specific sources of funds: • Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development-The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are being considered to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as a part of the evaluation for each proposed economic development project. • Non-Recurring Revenues-One-time or non-recurring revenues will not be used to finance on-going operational costs. Non-recurring revenues will be used only for one- time expenditures such as long-lived capital needs or one-time major maintenance projects that occur infrequently. Non-recurring revenues will not be used for budget balancing purposes except to cover the one-time expenditures described above. 374 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies • Investment Income-Earnings from investment of available monies,whether pooled or not,will be distributed to the funds in accordance with the equity balance of the fund from which monies were provided to be invested. • Property Tax Revenues-The Town shall endeavor to avoid a property tax by revenue diversification,implementation of user fees,and economic development. C. User-Based(Demand Driven)Fees and Service Charges. For services that are demand driven and can be associated with a user fee or charge,the direct and indirect costs of that service will be offset by a fee where possible. The Town staff will endeavor to prepare a review of all fees and charges annually, but not less than once every three years,in order to ensure that these fees provide for,at minimum,full cost recovery of service. D. Enterprise Fund Rates. Utility rates and rate structures for water and sewer services will be constructed to target full cost of service recovery. Annually the Town will review and adopt water and sewer utility rates and a rate structure that generates revenue sufficient to fully cover operating expenses, meet the legal restrictions of all applicable bond covenants, provide for an adequate level of working capital,and recover applicable general/administrative costs. The Solid Waste function will have rates that fully recover all costs and maintain an adequate balance. The Cemetery Fund will be structured to operate on lot sales and endowments. • General and Administrative(G&A)Charges-Where feasible,G&A costs will be charged to all funds for services of indirect general overhead costs,which may include general administration,finance,customer billing,facility use,personnel,technology, engineering,legal counsel,and other costs as deemed appropriate. These charges will be determined through an indirect cost allocation study following accepted practices and procedures. E. Intergovernmental Revenues. As a general rule,intergovernmental revenues (grants) will not be utilized for on-going operating costs. Any potential grant opportunity will be examined to identify all costs related to matching and continuation of program requirements. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications. If it is determined that accepting a grant with on-going cost conditions is in the interests of the Town,all the operating and maintenance costs must be included in the financial forecast and their ultimate effect on operations and revenue requirements be known. F. Revenue Monitoring. Revenues as they are received will be regularly compared to budgeted revenues and variances will be investigated. This process will be summarized in the appropriate budget report. 375 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies G. Special Revenue/Educational Funds. Where feasible and practical,General and Administrative Charges (G&A) for special revenue and educational funds of the Town of Westlake will be determined on an annual basis and transfers will be made where sufficient revenue exists to cover the associated expenditures. V. EXPENDITURE CONTROL A. Appropriations-The point of budgetary control is at the department level in the General Fund and at the fund level in all other funds. When budget adjustments among Departments and/or funds are necessary,they must be approved by the Town Council. B. Current Funding Basis-The Town shall operate on a current funding basis.Expenditures shall be budgeted and controlled so as not to exceed current revenues plus the planned use of fund balance accumulated through prior year savings. (The use of fund balance shall be guided by the Fund Balance/Retained Earnings Policy Statements.) C. Avoidance of Operating Deficits-The Town shall take immediate corrective actions if at any time during the fiscal year expenditure and revenue re-estimates are such that an operating deficit (i.e., projected expenditures in excess of projected revenues) is projected at year-end.Corrective actions can include a hiring freeze,expenditure reductions,fee increases,or use of fund balance within the Fund. D. Balance/Retained Earnings Policy-Expenditure deferrals into the following fiscal year, short-term loans,or use of one-time revenue sources shall be avoided to balance the budget. E. Maintenance of Capital Assets-Within the resources available each fiscal year,the Town shall maintain capital assets and infrastructure at a sufficient level to protect the Town's investment,to minimize future replacement and maintenance costs,and to continue service levels. F. Periodic Program Reviews-The Town Manager shall undertake periodic staff and third- party reviews of Town programs for both efficiency and effectiveness. Privatization and contracting with other governmental agencies will be evaluated as alternative approaches to service delivery. Programs which are determined to be inefficient and/or ineffective shall be reduced in scope or eliminated. G. Salary-The Town shall strive to maintain competitive salary levels for municipal employees. A salary survey will be conducted through a sampling of surrounding and comparable municipal organizations to create a comparison. The Town will strive to maintain salary levels within three percent (3%) of the median of surveyed benchmark municipalities. L� 1 376 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies H. Purchasing-The Town shall make every effort to maximize any discounts offered by creditors/vendors.Staff shall also use competitive bidding in accordance to State law,as well as intergovernmental partnerships and purchasing cooperatives to attain the best possible price on goods and services. I. Prompt Payment-All invoices will be paid within 30 days of receipt in accordance with the prompt payment requirements of State law. VI. FUND BALANCE/RETAINED EARNINGS A. General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance-The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund undesignated fund balance at,or in excess of,90 days of operation. B. Retained Earnings of Other Operating Funds-In the Utility Fund,the Town shall strive to maintain positive retained earnings positions to provide sufficient reserves for emergencies and revenue shortfalls. C. Use of Fund Balance-The Council delegates the responsibility to assign funds to the Town Manager or his/her designee. The Council shall have the authority to assign any amount of funds. Assignments may occur subsequent to fiscal year-end. The Council will utilize funds in the following spending order: Restricted,Committed,Assigned, Unassigned Fund Balance will be targeted to only be used with Council approval and can be only be used for the following: • Emergencies, • non-recurring expenditures such as technology/FF&E (furniture,fixtures and equipment),or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. • Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund,recommendations will be made on how to restore it. • The Council shall approve all commitments by formal action. The action to commit funds must occur prior to fiscal year-end,to report such commitments in the balance sheet of the respective period,even though the amount may be determined subsequent to fiscal year-end. • A commitment can only be modified or removed by the same formal action. VII. DEBT MANAGEMENT A. Debt Issuance Analysis- All consideration of debt issuance for major capital assets will be prepared within the framework of a Council approved multi-year capital improvement plan and forecast for all Town facilities and infrastructure. 377 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies B. Analysis of Debt Issuance and Debt Issuance Alternatives-Staff will explore alternatives to the issuance of debt for capital acquisitions and construction projects. These alternatives will include, but not be limited to, • grants-in-aid • use of reserves • use of either current on-going general revenues or one-time revenues • contributions from developers and others • leases • user fees • impact fees C. Use of Debt Financing-The useful life of the asset or project shall,at a minimum,exceed the payout schedule of any debt the Town assumes. Debt financing instruments to be considered by the Town may include: • General obligation bonds-These must be authorized by a vote of the citizens of Westlake. • Revenue bonds-These bonds generate capital requirements necessary for continuation or expansion of a service which produces revenue and for which the asset may reasonable be expected to provide for a revenue stream to fund the debt service requirement. • Certificates of obligation-These can be authorized by Council approval with debt service by either general revenues or backed by a specific revenue stream or a combination of both. • Lease/purchase agreements-These shall only be used to purchase capital assets that cannot be financed from either current revenues or fund balance/retained earnings and to fund infrastructure improvements and additions. D. Assumption of Additional Debt-The Town shall not assume more tax-supported general purpose debt than it retires each year without first conducting an objective analysis as to the community's ability to assume and support additional debt service payments. E. Affordability Targets-The Town shall use an objective multi-year analytical approach to determine whether it can afford to assume new general purpose debt beyond what it retires each year.This process shall compare generally accepted standards of affordability to the current values for the Town.The process shall also examine the direct costs and benefits of the proposed expenditures.The decision on whether or not to assume new debt shall be based on these costs and benefits and on the Town's ability to "afford" new debt as determined by the aforementioned standards.The Town shall strive to achieve and/or maintain these standards at a low to moderate classification. 378 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies F. Debt Structure-The Town shall structure its debt payment schedules for general purpose debt to ensure level principal repayment schedules.The Town shall not assume any debt with"balloon'repayment schedules which consist of low annual payments and one large payment of the balance due at the end of the term.While balloon payment structures minimize the size of debt payments during the period,they force a large funding requirement on the budget of the final year.Given the uncertainties of the future,level payment schedules improve budget planning and financial management. G. Sale Process-The Town shall use a competitive bidding process in the sale of debt unless the nature of the issue warrants a negotiated bid.The Town shall award bonds based on a true interest cost (TIC) basis as long as the financial advisor agrees that the TIC basis can satisfactorily determine the lowest and best bid. H. Bond Rating Agencies Presentations-Full disclosure of operations and open lines of communication shall be made to the bond rating agencies.Town staff,with assistance of financial advisors,shall prepare the necessary materials and presentation to the bond rating agencies. I. Continuing Disclosure-The Town is committed to continuing disclosure of financial and pertinent credit information relevant to the Town's outstanding securities. J. Debt Refunding-Town staff and the financial advisor shall monitor the municipal bond market for opportunities to obtain interest savings by refunding outstanding debt.As a general rule,the present value savings of a particular refunding should exceed 3.5%of the refunded maturities. VIII. INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS The Town will pursue coordinated efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives,share the cost of providing government services on an equitable basis,and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal levels. A. Inter-local Cooperation in Delivering Services-In order to promote the effective and efficient delivery of services,the Town shall actively seek to work with other local jurisdictions in joint purchasing consortia,sharing facilities,sharing equitably the costs of service delivery,and developing joint programs to improve service to its citizens. B. Legislative Program-The Town shall cooperate with other jurisdictions to actively oppose any State or Federal regulation or proposal that mandates additional Town programs or services and does not provide the funding to implement them.Conversely,as appropriate, the Town shall support legislative initiatives that provide more funds for priority local programs. 379 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies IX. GRANTS A. Grant Guidelines-The Town shall apply,and facilitate the application by others,for only those grants that are consistent with the objectives and high priority needs previously identified above in these policies. The potential for incurring on-going costs,to include the assumption of support for grant funded positions from local revenues,will be considered prior to applying for a grant. B. Grant Review-All grant submittals shall be reviewed for their cash match requirements, their potential impact on the operating budget,and the extent to which they meet the Town's policy objectives.If there are cash match requirements,the source of funding shall be identified prior to application. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications related to additional expenditures in future years. C. Grant Program Termination-The Town shall terminate grant funded programs and associated positions when grant funds are no longer available unless alternate funding is identified. X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT A. Positive Business Environment-The Town shall endeavor,through its regulatory and administrative functions,to provide a positive business environment in which local businesses can grow,flourish and create jobs.The Town Council and Town staff will be sensitive to the needs,concerns and issues facing local businesses. B. Commitment to Business Expansion, Diversification,and Job Creation-The Town shall encourage and participate in economic development efforts to expand Westlake's economy to increase local employment.These efforts shall not only focus on newly developing areas but also on other established sections of Westlake where development can generate additional jobs and other economic benefits. C. Coordinate Efforts with Other Jurisdictions-The Town's economic development program shall encourage close cooperation with other local jurisdictions,chambers of commerce, and groups Interested in promoting the economic well-being of this area. D. Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development-The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are used to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as part of such evaluation for each prospect. Economic development agreements will contain performance language as to the business's proposed economic impact to Westlake in exchange for Town incentives with adequate "claw-back" provisions for the Town. 380 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies XI. FISCAL MONITORING A. Financial Status and Performance Reports-Quarterly reports comparing expenditures and revenues to current budget, projecting expenditures and revenues through the end of the year, noting the status of fund balances to include dollar amounts and percentages,and outlining any remedial actions necessary to maintain the Town's financial position shall be prepared for review by the Town Manager and the Council. B. Compliance with Council Policy Statements-The Fiscal and Budgetary Policies will be reviewed annually by the Council and updated,revised or refined as deemed necessary. Policy statements adopted by the Council are guidelines,and occasionally,exceptions may be appropriate and required. However,exceptions to stated policies will be specifically identified, and the need for the exception will be documented and fully explained. XII. FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS To employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants as needed in the management and administration of the Town's financial functions.These areas include but are not limited to investments, debt administration,financial accounting systems, program evaluation,and financial impact modeling.Advisors shall be selected on a competitive basis using objective questionnaires and requests for proposals based on the scope of the work to be performed. XIII. ACCOUNTING, AUDITING, AND FINANCIAL REPORTING To comply with prevailing local,state,and federal regulations relative to accounting,auditing, and financial reporting. Accounting practices and financial reporting shall conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB),the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, (AICPA),and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA).The Board shall select an independent firm of certified public accountants to perform an annual audit of all operations A. Accounting-The Town is solely responsible for the recording and reporting of its financial affairs,both internally and externally. The Town's Finance Director is responsible for establishing the structure for the Town's chart of accounts and for assuring that procedures are in place to properly record financial transactions and report the Town's financial position. B. External Auditing-Town will be audited annually by outside independent accountants (auditors). The auditors must be a CPA firm and must demonstrate significant experience in the field of local government auditing. They must conduct the town's audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and be knowledgeable in the 381 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement program. The auditors' report on Town's financial statements will be completed within a timely period of the Town's fiscal year-end. The auditor will jointly review the management letter with the Town Council,if necessary. In conjunction with this review,the Finance Director shall respond in writing to the Town Council regarding the auditor's Management Letter, addressing the issued contained therein. The Town will not require auditor rotation, but will circulate request for proposal for audit services on a periodic basis as deemed appropriate. C. External Financial Reporting-Town will prepare and publish a comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR). The CAFR will be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and will be presented annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and awarding of the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting. D. Responsibility of Auditor to Town Council-The auditor is retained by and it accountable directly to the Town Council and will have access to direct communication with the Town Council if the Town Staff is unresponsive to auditor recommendations or if the auditor considers such communication necessary to fulfill its legal and professional responsibilities. E. Internal Financial Reporting-The Finance Department will prepare internal financial reports sufficient for management to plan, monitor,and control Town's financial affairs. XIV. CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM A. Preparation-The Town's capital budget will include all capital projects funds and all capital resources. While the capital budget will be prepared annually on a project basis,it will be based on an on-going, multi-year capital improvement plan (CIP) that shows all funded and unfunded projects as identified by staff for all Town facilities and infrastructure. The multi-year CIP will be reviewed annually,updated by staff and presented to the Council for its review and approval. The annual capital budget will be prepared by the Finance Department with the involvement of responsible departments based on the multi- year CIP. B. Control-All capital project expenditures must be appropriated in the capital budget. The Finance Director must certify the availability of resources before any capital project contract is presented to the Town Council for approval. C. Program Planning-The capital budget will be taken from the capital improvements project plan for future years. The planning time frame for the capital improvements project plan should normally be five years,with a minimum of at least three years. The replacement and maintenance for capital items should also be projected for the next five years. Future maintenance and operational costs will be considered so that these costs can be included as appropriate in the annual budget. 382 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies D. Financing Programs-Where applicable and with Council approval,impact fees, pro-rata charges,assessments,or other fees should be used to fund capital projects which have a primary benefit to specific,identifiable property owners. Recognizing that long-term debt is usually a more expensive financing method,alternative financing sources will be explored before debt is issued. When debt is issued,it will be used to acquire major assets with expected lives which equal or exceed the average life of the debt issue. E. Reporting-Periodic financial reports will be prepared to enable the department directors to manage their capital budgets. Summary capital project status reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. XV. CAPITAL MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT The Town recognizes that deferred maintenance and not anticipating capital replacement needs increases future capital costs. Annually,available funds will be evaluated during the budget process and a percentage of each operating fund's budget will be recommended to the Council for transfer. Upon approval by the Council,the recommended amount will be transferred to the appropriate funds (General/Utility/Vehicle Maintenance Replacement Fund) for major maintenance and replacement of street,building roof,flooring,air conditioning,equipment, etc. XVI. INTERNAL CONTROLS A. Written Procedures-Whenever possible,written procedures will be established and maintained by the Finance Director for all functions involving purchasing,cash handling and/or accounting throughout the Town. These procedures will embrace the general concepts of fiscal responsibility set for in this policy statement. B. Department Directors' Responsibilities-Each department director is responsible for ensuring that good internal controls are followed throughout his/her department,that all directives or internal controls are implemented,and that all independent auditor internal control recommendations are addressed. Departments will develop and periodically update written internal control procedures. XVII. ASSET MANAGEMENT A. Investments-The Finance Director shall promptly invest all Town funds with the depository bank in accordance with the provisions of the current Bank Depository Agreement or in any negotiable instrument authorized by the Town Council. Further,investments shall be 383 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Fiscal & Budgetary Policies made in accordance with the Investment Policy approved by the Town Council for the Town of Westlake that meets the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act (PFIA), Section 2256 of the Texas Local Government Code. The Finance Director will issue quarterly reports on investment activity to the Town Council. B. Cash Management-Town's cash flow will be managed to maximize the cash available to invest. Such cash management will entail the centralization of cash collections,where feasibility,including utility bills, building and related permits and license,fines,fees,and other collection offices as appropriate. Periodic review of cash flow position will be performed to determine performance of cash management and conformance to investment policies. The underlying theme will be that idle cash will be invested with the intent to (1) safeguard assets, (2) maintain liquidity,and (3) maximize return. C. Fixed Assets and Inventory-Such assets will be reasonably safeguarded and properly accounted for and prudently insured. The fixed asset inventory will be updated regularly. D. Capitalization Criteria-For purposes of budgeting and accounting classification,the following criteria must be capitalized: • The asset is owned by the Town of Westlake • The expected useful life of the asset must be longer than one year,or extend the life on an identifiable existing asset by more than one year • The original cost of the asset must be at least$5,000 • The asset must be tangible • On-going repairs and general maintenance are not capitalized • New Purchases-All costs associated with bringing the asset into working order will be capitalized as part of the asset cost. This includes start-up costs,engineering or consultant type fees as part of the asset cost once the decision or commitment to purchase the asset is made. The cost of land acquired should include all related costs associated with its purchase • Improvements and Replacement-Improvement will be capitalized when they extend the original life of an asset or when they make the asset more valuable than it was originally. The replacement of assets components will normally be expenses unless they are a significant nature and meet all the capitalization criteria. E. Computer System/Data Security-The Town shall provide security of its computer/network system and data files through physical and logical security systems that will include, but are not limited to: network user authentications,firewalls,content filtering,spam/virus protection,and redundant data backup. 384 RETURN TO T.O.C. ,--tvestment Policy It is the policy of the Town of Westlake that the administration of its funds and the investment of those funds shall be handled as its highest public trust. 385 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Investment Policy I. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of the Town of Westlake (the "Town") that the administration of its funds and the investment of those funds shall be handled as its highest public trust. Investments shall be made in a manner which will provide the maximum security of principal invested through limitations and diversification while meeting the daily cash flow needs of the Town and conforming to all applicable state and Town statutes governing the investment of public funds. The receipt of a market rate of return will be secondary to the requirements for safety and liquidity. It is the intent of the Town to be in complete compliance with local law and the Texas Public Funds Investment Act (the "Act", Texas Government Code 2256). The earnings from investments will be used in a manner that best serves the public trust and interests of the Town. II. SCOPE This Investment Policy applies to all the financial assets and funds held of the Town. Any new funds created by the Town will be managed under the provisions of this Policy unless specifically exempted by the Town Council and this Policy. III. OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGY It is the policy of the Town that all funds shall be managed and invested with four primary objectives, listed in order of their priority: safety, liquidity, diversification and yield. These objectives encompass the following. • Safety of Principal -Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the Town. Investments shall be undertaken in a manner that seeks to insure the preservation of capital in the overall portfolio. The suitability of each investment decision will be made based on safety. • Liquidity-The Town's investment portfolio will remain sufficiently liquid to enable it to meet all operating requirements which might be reasonably anticipated. Investment decisions will be based on cash flow analysis of anticipated expenditures. • Diversification - Diversification is required in the portfolio's composition. Diversification of the portfolio will include diversification by maturity and market sector and will include the use of a number of broker/dealers or banks for diversification and market coverage. Competitive bidding will be used on each sale or purchase. • Yield -The Town's investment portfolio shall be designed with the objective of attaining a reasonable market yield, considering the Town's risk constraints and cash flow needs. A reasonable market yield for the portfolio will be defined as the six-month (180 day) U.S. Treasury Bill which compares to the portfolio's maximum weighted average maturity of six months. The authorized investment purchased will be of the highest credit quality and marketability supporting the objectives of safety and liquidity. Securities,when not matched to a specific liability, will be short term to provide adequate liquidity. The portfolio shall be diversified to protect against market and credit risk in any one sector. 386 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Investment Policy The maximum weighted average maturity of the portfolio will be no more than 180 days and the maximum stated maturity of any security will not exceed two years. The funds are combined for investment purposes but the unique needs of all the funds in the portfolio are recognized and represented. Effective cash management is recognized as essential to good fiscal management. Cash management is defined as the process of managing monies in order to ensure maximum cash availability. The Town shall maintain a cash management program which includes timely collection of accounts receivable, prudent investment, disbursement of payments within invoice terms and the management of banking services. IV. LEGAL LIMITATIONS, RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY Specific investment parameters for the investment of public funds in Texas are stipulated in the Public Funds Investment Act, Chapter 2256, Texas Government Code, (the"Act"). The Act is attached as Exhibit A. The Public Funds Collateral Act, Chapter 2257, Texas Government Code, specifies collateral requirements for all public funds deposits. The Collateral Act is attached as Exhibit B. The Interlocal Cooperation Act, Chapter 791, Texas Government Code, authorizes local governments in Texas to participate in a Texas investment pool established thereunder. V. DELEGATION OF INVESTMENT AUTHORITY The Finance Director, acting on behalf of the Council, is designated as the Investment Officer of the Town and is responsible for all investment management decisions and activities. The Council is responsible for considering the quality and capability of staff, investment advisors, and consultants involved in investment management and procedures. All participants in the investment process shall seek to act responsibly as custodians of the public trust. The Investment Officer shall develop and maintain written administrative procedures for the operation of the investment program which are consistent with this Investment Policy. Procedures will include safekeeping,wire transfers, banking services contracts, and other investment related activities. The Investment Officer shall be responsible for all transactions undertaken and shall establish a system of controls to regulate the activities of subordinate officials and staff. The Investment Officer shall designate a staff person as a liaison/deputy in the event circumstances require timely action and the Investment Officer is not available. No officer or designee may engage in an investment transaction except as provided under the terms of this Policy and the procedures established by the Investment Officer and approved by the Town Manager. 387 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Investment Policy VI. PRUDENCE The standard of prudence to be used in the investment function shall be the "prudent person"standard and shall be applied in the context of managing the overall portfolio. This standard state: "Investments shall be made with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing,which persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the probable safety of their capital as well as the expected income to be derived." Limitation of Personal Liability - The Investment Officer and those delegated investment authority,when acting in accordance with the written procedures and this Policy and in accord with the Prudent Person Rule, shall be relieved of personal liability in the management of the portfolio if deviations from expectations for a specific security's credit risk or market price change are reported in a timely manner and that appropriate action is taken to control adverse market effects. VII. INTERNAL CONTROLS The Investment Officer shall establish a system of written internal controls which will be reviewed annually with the independent auditor of the Town. The controls shall be designed to prevent loss of public funds due to fraud, employee error, and misrepresentation by third parties, or imprudent actions by employees of the Town. VIII. AUTHORIZED INVESTMENTS Acceptable investments under this policy shall be limited to the instruments listed below. The choice of high-grade government investments and high-grade, money market instruments are designed to assure the marketability of those investments should liquidity needs arise. • Obligations of the United States Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, not to exceed two (2) years to stated maturity and excluding mortgage backed securities; • Fully insured or collateralized certificates of deposit from a bank doing business in the State of Texas and under the terms of a written depository agreement with that bank, not to exceed one year to stated maturity; • No-load, SEC registered money market mutual funds. No more than 80%of the entity's monthly average balance may be invested in money market funds • Public Funds interest bearing accounts; and • Constant dollar, AAA-rated Texas Local Government Investment Pools as defined by the Public Funds Investment Act. If additional types of securities are approved for investment by public funds by state statute, they will not be eligible for investment until this Policy has been amended and the amended version adopted by the Council. 388 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Investment Policy Delivery versus Payment - All investment security transactions shall be conducted on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis to assure that the Town has control of its assets and/or funds at all times. IX. AUTHORIZED FINANCIAL DEALERS AND INSTITUTIONS Securities broker/dealers may be primary or regional broker/dealers and will meet other criteria as determined by the Investment Officer including state registration and completion of a Town Broker/Dealer questionnaire (attached as Exhibit D). The following criteria must be met by authorized firms. • annual provision of an audited financial statement, • proof of certification by the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) • proof of current registration with the Texas State Securities Commission, and • completion of the Town's broker/dealer questionnaire. Every bank and broker/dealer with whom the Town transacts business will be provided a copy of this Investment Policy to assure that they are familiar with the goals and objectives of the investment program. The firm will be required to return a signed copy of the Certification Form (attached as Exhibit C) certifying that the Policy has been received and reviewed and only those securities approved by the Policy will be sold to the Town. X. DIVERSIFICATION AND MATURITY LIMITATIONS It is the policy of the Town to diversify its investment portfolio. Invested funds shall be diversified to minimize risk or loss resulting from over-concentration of assets in a specific maturity, specific issuer, or specific class of securities. Diversification strategies shall be established and periodically reviewed. XI. SAFEKEEPING AND COLLATERALIZATION The laws of the State and prudent treasury management require that all purchased securities be bought on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis and be held in safekeeping by either an approved, independent third party financial institution or the Town's designated depository. Securities Owned by the Town - All safekeeping arrangements shall be approved by the Investment Officer and an agreement of the terms executed in writing. The safekeeping bank may not be within the same holding company as the bank from which the securities are purchased.The custodian shall be required to issue original safekeeping receipts to the Town listing each specific security, rate, description, maturity, CUSIP number, and other pertinent information. Collateral - Collateralization shall be required on all bank time and demand deposits for principal and accrued interest amounts over the FDIC insurance coverage of $100,000 (by tax identification number). To anticipate market changes and provide a level of additional security for all funds, collateral with a market value equal to 102% of the total deposits are required. The pledging bank will be made contractually liable for monitoring and maintaining the collateral levels at all times. All collateral will be held by an independent third-party bank outside the holding company of the bank, pledged to the Town. 389 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Municipal Investment Policy Authorized collateral will include only: • Obligations of the US Government, its agencies and instrumentalities to include mortgage backed securities which pass the bank test, • Municipal obligations rated at least A by two nationally recognized rating agencies. • The custodian shall be required to provide original safekeeping receipts clearly marked that the security is pledged to the Town. XII. REPORTING The Investment Officer shall submit quarterly reports to the Council containing sufficient information to permit an informed outside reader to evaluate the performance of the investment program and in full compliance with the Act. At a minimum, the report shall contain: • Beginning and ending market value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio • Beginning and ending book value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio • Change in market value during the period • Detail on each asset (book, market, description, par ad maturity date) • Earnings for the period • Overall weighted average maturity of the portfolio The report will be prepared jointly by all involved in the investment activity and be signed by the Investment Officer. It will contain all elements as required by the Act and be signed by the Investment Officers as in compliance with the Act and this Policy. Market prices for assignment of market values will be obtained from an independent source. The three-month Treasury Bill average yield for the reporting period will be reported as a gauge of performance and risk. XIII. DEPOSITORIES The Town will designate one banking institution through a competitive process as its central banking services provider at least every five years. This institution will be used for normal banking services including disbursements, deposits, and safekeeping of Town owned securities. Other banking institutions from which the Town may purchase only certificates of deposit will also be designated as a depository. All banking arrangements will be in written form in accordance with FIRREA which requires a resolution of approval of the agreement by the Bank Council or Bank Loan Committee. XIV. INVESTMENT POLICY ADOPTION BY COUNCIL The Town's Investment Policy and its incorporated strategies shall be adopted by ordinance annually by the Council. 390 RETURN TO T.O.C. on Employee Pay Plan Policy The purpose of this policy is to set out the philosophy, purpose, and intent of the Town of Westlake's pay system for municipal employees. 391 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Employee Pay Plan Policy I. SCOPE OF PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to set out the philosophy, purpose, and intent of the Town of Westlake's pay system for municipal employees. The Town of Westlake's mission is "to be a unique community, blending preservation of our natural environment and viewscapes, while serving our residents and businesses with superior municipal and academic services that are accessible, efficient, cost-effective, and transparent." The Town of Westlake believes that market-based salary, in combination with employee competence and their overall contribution to the Town's success, should largely determine their compensation and career advancement opportunities. The philosophy and objectives of this pay policy are as follows: • First, the Town's pay system should be internally equitable. It must ensure that pay ranges of each position within our organization reflects the value of comparable positions within our organization. To achieve this,we must pay employees fairly compared to their coworkers, and employees must also perceive that they are paid fairly compared to their coworkers. • Second, The Town's pay system must be externally competitive in the market place, so that the Town of Westlake support or strategic outcome objective to attract, recruit, and retain highly qualified employees who are vital to accomplishing the organization's vision and mission. • Third, to be motivational to our employees, providing the opportunity for future pay increases based upon individual work performance and development of job-related skills and competencies. II. DEFINITION With these objectives in mind, the Town's municipal compensation plan is a broad band pay system. A broad band pay system is markedly different than the traditional "step-in- grade" pay system. A broad band pay system is one that structures pay utilizing two primary steps. • First, the responsibilities and qualifications required of each position are analyzed. • Second, using this position analysis, pay for these positions are surveyed against the market to create a broad set of occupation groups that become the pay bands. Each pay band has a minimum, mid-point, and a maximum rate of pay; however,within each band there is flexibility for hiring and provision of performance pay. Utilization of a broad band pay system by an organization is intended to: • Reward employees for positive behaviors that contribute to the effectiveness of the Town's service delivery to our stakeholders; • Assist the Town in fulfilling its vision and mission by offering increased opportunities 392 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Employee Pay Plan Policy for career advancement and recognition of the Town's municipal employees; • Provide the organization's leadership greater flexibility with a pay system that can be used to adjust to changes in market conditions, enhance hiring practices, and reward outstanding performance; • Adjust to changes in market conditions as it relates to increases in pay for groups of employees within each band; ensuring the Town's pay system remains competitive to the comparable market. III. IMPLEMENTATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PAY PLAN For its first year of implementation (FY 16-17), most employees were placed within the established pay band for their position at their current rate of pay, with up to a three (3) percent market adjustment of the employee's base pay rate. To promote internal equity, positions that have surveyed further below market may receive a higher market adjustment, at the discretion of their supervisor. In subsequent years, depending on market survey results and availability of funding, the municipal broad band pay system may have both a market adjustment and performance pay component, as defined below. IV. CLASSIFICATION AND PAY BAND PLACEMENT The following criteria will be used when classifying positions to determine band placement: • Nature or type of work performed • Level of responsibility • Impact of position on the organization • Reporting relationships • Scope of duties • Complexity of work • Supervision received and/or exercised • Knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) required to perform required job duties. Factors that will not be considered in classifying a position: • Incumbent of the position • Performance of the employee or incumbent • Longevity of the employee or incumbent in position • Qualifications of the employee or incumbent that are not required by the position Employee pay progression within a band can occur if there is a market adjustment approved for that band. Progression in a band can also occur if an employee's job performance, as determined by review of job performance, results in a performance pay increase. Pay progression is defined as movement within a band that increases the employee's pay on an on-going basis. Other instances that can create employee progression in a pay band include: • Promotion • Significant increase in job skills,job-related education or training or competencies • Position reclassification: These instances can only occur after proper analysis and with criteria established by the Human Resources Department and approved by the Town Manager or their designate. 393 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Employee Pay Plan Policy V. PAY PLAN PARAMETERS To successfully practice this pay philosophy using this policy, as well as reach our objectives, the Town will use the following parameters to utilize this pay system: Internal Equity a. To maintain accurate position classifications, the Town of Westlake will conduct a position analysis of 1/3 (one-third) of the organization's positions each year. This ensures that all positions are reviewed on a rolling three-year basis. b. Upon review of the position analysis by the Director of Human Resources, and with the approval of the Town Manager or their designee, position classifications may be adjusted to a new band. This can occur if a new position classification is created, or if the duties, roles, and responsibilities have substantially evolved, resulting in a position that is greater similarity to another classification band. Performance Pay a. On-going performance pay may be awarded to individuals or teams who, as determined in their performance evaluation, have clearly gone "above and beyond" their traditional roles,job duties, and assignments over the evaluation period. b. Performance pay is awarded through the review process and the established criteria outlined by the HR department c. One-time performance pay may be offered to employees or teams who, based on performance evaluation, have been determined to have gone above and beyond expectations. One-time performance pay is a lump-sum, one-time payment and will not impact the base pay of the employee and will not move their pay within their position's assigned band. d. All performance pay,whether on-going or one-time adjustments, is dependent upon the availability of financial resources. Market-Based Pay a. The Town of Westlake will conduct an annual market salary study in the spring prior to budget preparation for the upcoming fiscal year. b. Depending on the results of the market study, and if funds are available, all or some of the salary bands will be proposed to the Town Council for adjustment based upon the results of the annual market salary study. Proposed adjustments to any pay band will not be proposed unless the market study indicates bands have increased by 2.5% or more. c. Employee salaries may receive a market adjustment if their current salary has shifted to become less than 97.5% of the market average. d. All new hires will be placed at the minimum rate of their band, unless a hiring manager recommends placement at a higher rate. This must be reviewed first by the Human Resources Department and approved by the Town Manager or their designee. Generally, new hires proposed to be paid higher than band minimum may be brought into the pay system within 3%above or below a band's midpoint; however, exceptional qualifications and experience of the new hire must be demonstrated by the hiring department to the Human Resources Department and the Town Manager for this to be approved. e. All market adjustments are dependent upon available financial resources. f. The market value for positions within the Town of Westlake will be determined 394 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Employee Pay Plan Policy annually through the completion of a survey of comparison communities identified by staff and approved by the Town Council. g. Employees with base compensation within 3%of the market average are considered to be "at market." h. Positions currently at or above the market will not qualify for any market-based adjustment, and will remain at their current rate of pay. i. If the market rate for a position declines, the salary of position holders will not be negatively impacted, but they will not receive any market-based adjustments. j. Market adjustments will impact the base pay of the employee and may only be applied if the Town of Westlake has adequate financial resources available to fund the adjustments. VI. BROADBAND CLASSIFICATIONS BROAD SUB SUB BAND BAND GRADE 10 4 Town Manager Coordinating E 3 Policy Top 9 2 Asst.Town Manager Policy Making Management 1 8 4 Directors and Fire Chief Coordinating Senior D 3 Programming Management 7 2 Asst.Directors(n/a) Programming 1 5 Communications 6 Coordinating 4 Manager Middle C 3 Interpretive Management 5 2 Fire Marshal Interpretive 1 Fire Dept Lieutenants, 4 4 Finance Supervisor, Coordinating B 3 Court Administrator Routine Skilled Accounting Technicians, 3 HR Generalist Routine 2 4 UB Coordinator Coordinating A 3 Firefighter Paramedics, Automatic Semi 1 2 Town Marshal, Automatic Skilled 1 Court Clerks, UB Technician O 0 Laborers Defined Defined Unskilled 395 _RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 1 1 Municipal Policies Employee Pay Plan Policy VII. DEFINITIONS FOR THE BANDS ARE AS FOLLOWS: • "BAND E" POLICY DECISION - These decisions are associated with board level management, and involve guiding the organization as a whole through policy development, setting the overall direction, and tone of the organization. Restrictions to these decisions are often only limited by the laws of the state (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND D" PROGRAMMING DECISION - These decisions are typically made by senior management or department directors and are generally tasked with executing the organization's policy through strategy development. Establishing guidelines by which further decisions are made. A typical senior management decision is made at the organizational or department level. For instance, the decision on how to set up the organization's network infrastructure is usually determined by management, while the decision to upgrade is based on policy (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND C" INTERPRETIVE DECISIONS - Middle management who have constraints placed upon them by them by senior management.These are usually made by business unit managers, such as a budget manager or project research analyst. Once overall strategy is developed by the senior managers, the middle managers decide how to utilize resources in order to meet deadlines. The unit manager should always know why certain staff members have been assigned to a particular job and may have to interpret situations not currently covered by rules or guidelines (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND B" ROUTINE DECISIONS - Skilled supervisors know the "how", the "where", and the "when" to set up equipment, systems, and are aware of the rules that govern these processes. They can decide which process is to be used in order to carry out the interpretive decisions as they have a firm handle on operations. For example, a billing clerk knows how to complete the utility billing process, including the way in which entries have to be made, as they have the book of rules and regulations to refer to as needed (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND A"AUTOMATIC DECISIONS - Each process is a cycle of operations.The process is decided by the supervisor who then sets up the process or the"how"of the task at hand. This is generally accomplished by a semi-skilled individual who completes the task as outlined,within the constraints of the process.This individual can decide where and when to carry out the operations needed for the task (Paterson, 1972). • "BAND O" DEFINED DECISIONS - "Band O" decisions are rarely seen in an organization. These decisions are those involving speed of completion of a task, and are usually left to unskilled, entry level, nonexempt employees (Paterson, 1972). 396 A+P.P IDIX. + ' +. L. + r 1 OR-. `_ . ....... ,,.. _�� - -_ - .fix • • - - tfV t7/ ea w RETURN TO T.O.C. S Q � tiS Z�lL�lLtL,�lLlL�� L6Z�L 398 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Ordinance to Adopt Budget TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO.835 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS, REVISING THE BUDGET FOR THE 201.6-2017 FISCAL YEAR; ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2017 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2018 INCLUDING INVESTMENT POLICY, PAY PLAN POLICY, FISCAL AND BUDGETARY POLICIES, RESTRICTED, COMMITTED AND ASSIGNED FUND BALANCES; PROVIDING AUTHORIZATION TO THE TOWN MANGER TO APPROVE APPROPRIATED FUNDS UP TO $50,000; PROVIDING THAT THE BUDGET TO BE KEPT IN CITY SECRETARY'S OFFICE; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, public notice of a public hearing on the proposed annual budget, stating the date,time,and place and subject matter of the public hearing,was given as required by the laws of the State of Texas and;and WHEREAS, a public hearing was duly held and all interested persons were given an opportunity to be heard for or against any item therein on September 11,2017;and, WHEREAS,as required by Texas Local Government Code 102.042,the budget officer has prepared a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year;and, WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Ordinance is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW,THEREFORE,BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS: SECTION I: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety SECTION 2: That the Town Council hereby adopts the revised budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1,2016 and ending September 30,2017 as shown within Exhihit`A." SECTION 3: That the Town Council does hereby approve the proposed Municipal Budget attached as Exhibit "A", adopting the budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2017 and ending September 30,2018. SECTION 4: That the Town Council hereby gives the Town Manager authorization to approve any appropriated funds up to the amount of$50,000. Ordinance 835 Page I of 2 399 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Ordinance to Adopt Budget SECTION 5: That a copy of the official adopted 2017-2018 budget document shall be kept on file in the office of the Town Secretary. SECTION G: If any portion of this Ordinance shall,for any reason,be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction,such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 11th DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2017. ATTEST: ii2t Lauri L.Wheat,Mayor Kelly Ed s,Town Sec N�� W�sT Thomas E.Bryme , o Onager �� ' APPROVED AS TO F ;. L.StarV6 Lowry,Towrr Atta AS Ordinance 835 Page 2 of 2 400 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Ordinance to Adopt Property Tax Rate TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 836 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS LEVYING TAXES TO BE ASSESSED ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTIES WITHIN THE TOWN LIMITS OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE FOR THE TAX YEAR 2017 [FISCAL YEAR 2017-201.8]; SETTING OUT EXEMPTIONS AND LIMITATION; NO STATE LAW STATEMENTS REQUIRED;PROVIDING FOR THE COLLECTION OF DELINQUENT TAXES AND A COLLECTION PENALTY TO BE ADDED TO DELINQUENT TAXES; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS,a public hearing on the proposed annual budget for the Town of Westlake, Texas,for the fiscal year beginning on October 1,2017 and ending on September 30,2418,was duly advertised giving the date,time,place and subject matter of the public hearing,and WHEREAS, a public hearing was set by the Town Council in a duly posted Town Council meeting on September 11, 2017, and all citizens were invited to participate and be heard;and WHEREAS, all requirements of state law were met, including Open Meetings Act, Texas Government Code chapter 551 requirements and the requirement of Texas Local Government Code 102.002 that the budget officer prepare a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year;and WHEREAS, it is deemed to be in the best interest of the citizens of the Town of Westlake,Texas to levy a tax as set forth below,on all taxable properties within the Town limits of Westlake in order to provide the necessary funds to provide municipal services to its citizens and to meet all municipal commitments;and WHEREAS,The Town of Westlake will raise more total property taxes than last year's budget by$49,640 or 3.37°/x,and of that amount,$57,674 is tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake has passed exemptions to certain applicable taxes which were previously adopted by earlier Resolution and recognized and adopted a tax limitation set out in the Town Municipal Code and such exemptions and limitation are included and adopted as part of this Ordinance;and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds the passage of this Ordinance to be in the best interest for the citizens of Westlake, for the preservation of public health,safety and welfare of the citizens of the Town. ordinance 836 Pagel Of3 401 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Ordinance to Adopt Property Tax Rate NOW,THEREFORE, HE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS: SECTION 1: That all matters stated in the findings hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirely. SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas shall hereby levy the following taxes on each One Hundred Dollars($144.04) of taxable valuation on all taxable property within the Town limits of the Town of Westlake,Texas to be assessed and collected by the Tax Assessor/Collector for the tax year 2017 (Fiscal year 2017-2018) for the purposes stipulated below,to-wit: (a) For General Fund Maintenance and Operations (M&O) levied on $100.00 of taxable valuation: $0.11133 (b) For Interest and Sinking Fund (debt service) levied on $100.00 of taxable valuation: $0.02482 SECTION 3: Exemptions:That the Town Council authorizes the following exemptions and limitations: (a) Homestead exemption-That it is the intent of the Town Council of the Town of Westlake to adopt the highest possible homestead exemption, which would be a homestead exemption in the amount of twenty percent (20%) of the value of the homestead, and in any event, the exemption shall be at least a minimum of Five Thousand dollars ($5,000). For purposes of this section "residential homestead" is defined as a structure (including a mobile home) or a separately secured and occupied portion of a structure (together with land, not to exceed ten(10) acres, and improvements used in the residential occupancy of the structure and the land and improvements have identical ownership) that (1) is owned by one or more individuals,either directly or through a beneficial interest is a qualifying trust;(2)is designed or adapted for a human residence; (3) is used as a residence; and (4) is occupied as his or her principal residence by an owner or, for property owned through a beneficial interest in a qualifying trust,by a trustee of the trust who qualifies for the exemption. (b) Over 65 or Disabled exemption - That an exemption for a resident over 65 or disabled,pursuant to section 11.13(b) of the Texas Tax Code shall be authorized in the amount of$10,000. A resident is eligible for an exemption under this section if the resident is over 65 or disabled,but the resident shall not be entitled to two exemptions under this section,as set out in section 11.13(b)of the Texas Tax Code. (c) The Town of Westlake previously adopted an ad valorem tax limitation in section 86-2 of the Town Code,for elderly and disabled citizens according to Article VIII,Section 1-b of the Texas Constitution and Texas Tax Code§ 11.261,which provides"The county,municipality, or junior college district may not increase the total annual amount of ad valorem taxes the county,municipality,or junior college district imposes on the residence homestead of a disabled individual or an individual 65 years of age or older above the amount of the taxes the county, municipality,or junior college district imposed on the residence homestead in the first tax year, Ordinance 836 Page 2 of 3 402 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Ordinance to Adopt Property Tax Rate other than a tax year preceding the tax year in which the county,municipality,or junior college district established the limitation described by Subsection(a), in which the individual qualified that residence homestead for the exemption provided by Section 11.13(c) for a disabled individual or an individual 65 years of age or older." This provision,commonly referred to as a "tax freeze"means that residents who are already eligible for the provisions of that section will not have any increase in their taxes from the time that they became eligible, as citizens of Westlake,for that section. SECTION 4: State Law Required Statements: (A) THIS TAX RATE WILL NOT RAISE MORE TAXES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS THAN LAST YEAR'S TAX RATE. (B) The tax rate for the upcoming fiscal year will be $0.13615 (M & O of$0.11133 and interest and sinking fund of$4.42482 totaling$0.13615). The taxes raised for maintenance and operations will be approximately$89.06 on a$100,000 home with a homestead exemption. SECTION 5: The Town of Westlake will pursue collection of delinquent taxes and adopts the provisions of Section 33.07 of the Texas Tax Code so that hereafter an additional penalty of Twenty (20) percent of the delinquent tax, penalty and interest on delinquent taxes will be imposed on taxes becoming delinquent as provided by the Texas Tax Code and the Town's collection agreement. SECTION 6: If any portion of this Ordinance shall,for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS II DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2017. ATTEST: N OF wE� p Laura L.Wheat,Mayor KeVy Edw s,To retary ' 'F Thomas E.Ary t, /Tw11 anager APPROVED AS TO FO lA J L.Stantin Lowry,T6tvn Attorney Ordinance 836 Page 3 of 3 403 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms • Account: A separate financial Allocation: A part of a lump- accounting firm retained by the reporting unit for budgeting, sum amount, which is Town Council, of organization management, or accounting designated for expenditure by financial statements and the purposes. All budgetary specific organization units utilization of resources. transactions,whether revenue and/or for special purposes, or expenditure, are recorded in activities, or objects. Balance Sheet: The basic accounts. financial statement,which • Amortization: Payment of discloses the assets, liability, • Activity: A service performed principal plus interest over a and equities of an entity at a by a department or division. fixed period. specific date in conformity with General Accepted Accounting • Accounts Payable: A liability • Appraised Value: Either the Principles. account reflecting amount of market value or value open accounts owed to determined by using another Balanced Budget: A budget private persons or organizations method of valuation according adopted by the Town Council for goods and services to the Property Tax Code and authorized by resolution received by a government (but Chapter 23. where the proposed not including amounts due to expenditures are equal to or other funds of the same • Appropriation: An authorization less than the proposed government or to other made by the legislative body of revenues plus fund balances. governments). a government,which permits officials to incur obligations Basis of Accounting: A term • Accounts Receivable: An asset against and to make used to refer to when revenue, account reflecting amounts expenditures of governmental expenditures, expenses, and owed to open accounts from resources. Specific transfers-and related assets private persons or organizations appropriations are usually and liabilities-are recognized for goods or services furnished made at the fund level and are in the accounts and reported in by the government. granted for a one-year period. the Town's financial statements. • Accrual Accounting: • Appropriation Ordinance: The Bond: A written promise to pay Recognition of the financial official enactment by the a specified sum of money, effects of transactions, events, legislative body establishing the called the face sum of money, and circumstances in the legal authority for officials to called the principal amount, at periods) when they occur obligate and expend a specified date or dates in the regardless of when the cash is resources. future, called the maturity received or paid. date(s), together with periodic • Assets: Resources owned or interest at a specified rate. • Adopted Budget: The budget held by the Town which has as modified and finally monetary value. Bond Covenant: A legally approved by the Town Council. enforceable agreement with The adopted budget is • Assessed Valuation: A value bondholders that requires the authorized by resolution that that is established for real or governmental agency selling sets the legal spending limits for personal property for use as a the bond to meet certain the fiscal year. basis for levying property taxes. conditions in the repayment of the debt. • Ad Valorem Tax: A tax based • Audit: An examination, usually on value (e.g., a property tax) by an official or a private 404 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms • Bond Ordinance: A law major alterations, construction made readily available to approving the sale of bonds of highways or utility lines, fixed finance current operations or to that specifies how proceeds equipment, landscaping or pay current liabilities. Those may be spent. similar expenditures. assets which will be used up or converted into cash within one • Bond Funds: Resources derived • Cash Basis: A basis of year.Some examples are cash, from issuance of bonds for accounting under which temporary investments, and financing capital transactions are recognized accounts receivable collected improvements. when cash changes hand within one year. • Budget: The Town's financial • Certificates of Obligations Current Liabilities: Debt or other plan for a specific fiscal year (CO's): Similar to general legal obligation arising out of that contains an estimate of obligation bonds except transactions in the past which proposed expenditures and the certificates require no voter must be liquidated, renewed, proposed means of financing approval. or refunded within one year. them. • Comprehensive Annual Debt Service Fund: A fund used • Budget Amendment: A revision Financial Report(CAFR): This to account for the moneys set of the adopted budget that, report summarizes financial aside for the payment of when approved by the data for the previous fiscal year interest and principal to holders Council, replaces the original in a standardized format. of the Town's general obligation provision. and revenue bonds, the sale of • Contingency: A budgetary which finances long-term • Budget Calendar: Schedule of reserve set aside for capital improvements, such as key dates which the Town emergencies or unforeseen facilities, streets and drainage, follows in the preparation and expenditures not otherwise parks and water/wastewater adoption of the budget. budgeted. systems. • Budget Document: Instrument • Contractual Services: The costs Deficit: The excess of used by the budget-making related to services performed expenditures over revenues authority to present a for the Town by individuals, during an accounting period; comprehensive financial plan businesses, or utilities. or, in the case of proprietary of operations to the Town funds, the excess of expense Council. • Cost:The amount of money or over income during an other consideration exchanged accounting period. • Budgetary Control: The control for property or services. Cost or management of the may be incurred before money Department: A major organization in accordance is paid; that is, as soon as administrative division of the with an approved budget for liability is incurred. Town that indicates overall keeping expenditures within the management responsibility for limitations of available • Council: The Mayor and five an operation or a group of appropriations and revenues. council members collectively related operations within a acting as the legislative and functional area. • Capital Expenditures: Any policymaking body of the town major non-recurring Depreciation: Change in the expenditure or expenditure for • Current Assets:Those assets value of assets (equipment, facilities, including additions or which are available or can be buildings, etc. with a useful life 405 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms of 5 years or more) due to the Expenses: Outflow of enterprise Fund: A fiscal and accounting use of the asset. funds paid or to be paid for an entity with a self-balancing set asset obtained or goods and of accounts recording cash • Effective Tax Rate: The rate services obtained. and other financial resources, that would generate the same together with all related amount of levy as the prior • fiscal Policy: The Town's liabilities and residual equities or year's rate based on the policies with response to balances, and changes current year's values. spending and debt therein, which are segregated management as they relate to for the purpose of carrying on • EMs: Emergency Medical government services, specific activities or attaining Services programs, and capital certain objectives in investments. accordance with special • Encumbrances: The regulations, restrictions, or commitment of appropriated • fiscal Year: A 12-month period limitations. funds to purchase an item or to which the annual operating service. budget applies and at the end Fund Accounting: A • Enterprise Fund: A fund of which a government governmental accounting established to account for determines its financial position system that is organized and operations that are financed and the result of its operations. operated on a fund basis. and operated in a manner The Town of Westlake's fiscal similar to private business year begins each October 1 st Fund Balance: The excess of a enterprises-where the intent of and ends the following fund's current assets over its the governing body is that the September 30th. current liabilities, sometimes costs of providing goods or called working capital or fund services to the general public Fixed Assets: Assets of a long- equity. A negative fund on a continuing basis be term character, which are balance is often referred to as financed or recovered primarily intended to continue to be a deficit. through user charges. held or used, such as land, buildings, improvements other GAAP-Generally Accepted • Excess Fund Balance: The than buildings, machinery, and Accounting Principles:_Uniform excess of a fund's current equipment. minimum standards and assets over its current liabilities guidelines for financial and required reserve limits. Franchise Fee: A fee levied by accounting and reporting. the Town Council on businesses They govern the form and • Exempt: Personnel not eligible that use Town property or right- content of the financial to receive overtime pay and of-way. This fee is usually statements of an entity. GAAP who are expected to work charged as a percentage of encompass the conventions, whatever hours are necessary gross receipts. rules and procedures necessary to complete their job to define accepted assignments. Full-Time Equivalent(FTE): The accounting practice at a time. measure of authorized They include not only broad • Expenditures: Outflow or non- personnel often referred to as guidelines of general enterprise funds paid or to be worker-years. The full time applications, but also detailed paid for an asset obtained or equivalent of 1 person (1 FTE) practices and procedures. goods and services obtained. approximately represents 2080 GAAP provide a standard by hours of work per year. which to measure financial presentations. 406 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms • GASB: Acronym for Grant: A contribution by a Liabilities: Probably future Government Accounting government or other sacrifices of economic benefits, Standards Board, an organization to support a arising from present obligations independent, non-profit function. Typically, these of an entity to transfer assets or agency responsible for the contributions are made to local to provide services to other promulgation of accounting governments from state or entities in the future because of and financial reporting federal governments. past transactions or events; procedures for governmental what you owe. entities. Infrastructure: Basic public investments such as streets, Lift Station: The Town's • GFOA: Government Finance storm drainage,water and collection system relies on Officers Association of the sewer lines, street lights and gravity to collect water. When United States and Canada sidewalks. the system gets to an unreasonable depth, a lift • General Fund: The fund used to • Inter-fund transfer: The transfer station pumps the water to a account for all financial of money from one fund to higher elevation so the gravity resources except those another. process can begin again. required to be accounted for in another fund.The General . Investments:Securities and real Line-item budget: A budget Fund is tax supported. estate held to produce format in which departmental revenues in the form of interest, outlays are grouped per the • General Obligation Bonds: dividends, rentals, or lease items that will be purchased. Bonds sold and guaranteed by payments. the Town, in which the full faith MGD: Million gallons per day. and credit of the Town is ISO: Insurance Service Office. pledged for repayment. The system to determine the Maintenance and Operations rating of a fire department. A (M&O): Taxes that are • Governmental Funds: The funds scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being generated by the taxing unit for through which most the best score. This ISO rating general expenses. governmental functions schedule examines many typically are financed.The factors relating to local fire Maior Funds: Funds whose acquisition, use, and financial departments, especially revenues, resources and the related focusing on training and expenditures/expenses, assets, current liabilities are accounted equipment, and examines the or liabilities (excluding for through governmental funds locations of the fire stations in extraordinary items) are at least (General, Special Revenue, the community. 10 percent of corresponding Capital Projects, and Debt totals for all governmental or Service Funds). • L.F. (Linear feet): Length in feet. enterprise funds and at least 5 percent of the aggregate • Goal: Generalized statements • Levy: To impose taxes, special amount for all governmental of where an organization assessments, or service charges and enterprise funds. desires to be at some future for the support of Town time regarding certain activities. Also, the amount of Maintenance: The upkeep of operating elements (e.g. tax for an individual property or physical properties in condition financial condition, service the sum of all individual for use or occupancy. levels provided, etc.) amounts of tax. Examples are the inspection of 407 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms equipment to detect defects • Objectives: Specific, days of receipt of invoice or the and the making of repairs. measurable targets set in goods or services, whichever relation to goals. comes later. If this is not • Modified Accrual Accounting: satisfied, the Town may be This method of accounting is a • Operating Budget: Plan for charged interest on the unpaid combination of cash and current expenditures and the balance at the rate of 1% per accrual accounting since proposed means of financing month. expenditures are immediately them. The annual operating incurred as a liability while budget is the primary means by • Property Tax: Taxes levied on revenues are not recorded until which most of the financing, both real and personal they are received or are acquisition, spending, and property according to the "Measurable" and "available service delivery activities of the property's valuation and the for expenditure". This type of Town are controlled. The use of tax rate. accounting basis is annual operating budgets is conservative and is required by State law. Property Tax Reduction Sales recommended as the standard Tax(PTR): '/2 cent sales tax for most government funds. • Operating Expenditure: approved by the Town of Expenditure on an existing item Westlake voters in May 2006. • Municipal: Of or pertaining to of property or equipment that is Texas law allowed the Town to a Town or its government. not a capital expenditure. collect the new '/2 cent sales tax that does not share the • Non-departmental: Accounts Ordinance: An authoritative restrictive spending limitations for expenditures or professional command or order. This term is on revenues designated to the services and other general used for laws adopted by a 4A Economic Development government functions, which municipality. Fund '/2 cent sales tax. 4A sales cannot be allocated to tax was dissolved and replaced individual departments. Performance Measures: with this sales tax. Specific quantitative measures • Non-major Funds: Funds whose of work performed within an Proposed Budget: The financial revenues, activity or program. They may plan initially developed by expenditures/expenses, assets, also measure results obtained departments and presented by or liabilities (excluding through an activity or program. the Town Manger to the Town extraordinary items) are at least Council for approval. 10 percent of corresponding Personal Property: Items that totals for all governmental and can be owned but are not real Proprietary Funds: Operation enterprise funds. property-divided into two that operates like a private types: tangible and intangible. operation, in which services are • Non-exempt: Personnel eligible financed through user charges to receive overtime pay when Personnel Services: and expenditures include the overtime work has been Expenditures for salaries, wages full cost of operations. authorized or requested by the and related fringe benefits of supervisor. Town employees. • Public Hearing: An open meeting regarding proposed • Obiect Code: The standard • Prompt Payment Act: Adopted operating or capital budget classification of the in July 1985 by the State, the allocations,which provide expenditures such as office Act requires the Town to pay for citizens with an opportunity to supplies or rental of equipment. goods and services within 30 408 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Glossary of Terms voice their views on the merits or services in the town limits on • Transfer-In: Funds expended in of the proposals. a retail basis.The categories for one fund and received in other. taxation are defined by state • PVC: Acronym for polyvinyl law. Monies collected under . User Charges: The payment of chloride, a plastic compound authorization of this tax are for a fee for direct receipt of a used for water and sewer pipes. the use and benefit of the public service by the party town. benefiting from the service. • Reserve: An account used to indicate that a portion of fund SCADA: Acronym that stands Working Capital: Budgeted resources is restricted for a for Supervisory Control and working capital is calculated as specific purpose, or is not Data Acquisition. SCADA refers a fund's current assets less available for appropriation and to a system that collects data current liabilities and subsequent spending. from various sensors at a outstanding encumbrances. remote location and then Working capital does not • Resolution: A formal statement sends this data to a central include long-term assets or of opinion or determination computer which then manages liabilities. For budgetary adopted by an assembly or and controls the data. purposes, working capital, another formal group. rather than retained earnings, is • Special Revenue Fund: A fund generally used to reflect the • Resources: Total dollars used to account for the available resources of available for appropriations, proceeds of specific revenue enterprise funds. including estimated revenues, sources that are legally fund transfers, and beginning restricted to expenditure for fund balances. specified purposes. • Retained Earnings: The excess Supplies: A cost category for of total assets over total minor items (individually priced liabilities for an enterprise fund. at less than $5,000) required by Retained earnings include both departments to conduct their short-term and long-term assets operations. and liabilities for an enterprise fund. TMRS: Acronym for the Texas Municipal Retirement System, a � • Revenues: Funds that the pension plan for employees of government receives as member cities within the State income. It includes such items of Texas. ' a tax payment, fees from specific services, receipts from TRA: Trinity River Authority-A other governments, fines for separate governmental entity forfeitures, grants, shared responsible for providing water revenues and interest income. and wastewater services in the 40 Trinity River basin. The Town r • ROW: Acronym for right-of-way. contracts with TRA for c: treatment of wastewater. w - • Sales Tax: A general "sales tax"is levied on persons and • TXDOT: Texas Department of businesses selling merchandise Transportation 409 RETURN TO T.O.C. Section 12 Appendix Acronyms Listing TERM STANDS FOR TERM STANDS FOR ACCT Account HR Human Resources AP Accounts Payable: ISO Insurance Service Office AR Accounts Receivable IT Information Technology BS Balance Sheet LTL Long Term Liabilities CAFR Comprehensive Annual Financial MC Municipal Court Report CF Cemetery Fund MGD Million gallons per day. CIP Capital Improvement Plan OS Other Sources CO's Certificates of Obligations P&D Planning and Development CPA Certified Public Accountant P&R Parks and Recreation DS Debt Service PTR Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax EF Enterprise Fund R&M Repair and Maintenance EMS Emergency Medical Services ROW Right-of-way. FLSA Fair Labor Standards Act S&P Standard & Poor's FTE Full-Time Equivalent SCADA Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. FY Fiscal Year SLA Service Level Adjustment G&O Goals and Objectives SRF Special Revenue Fund GAAP Generally Accepted Accounting TMRS Texas Municipal Retirement System Principles GASB Government Accounting Standards TRA Trinity River Authority Board GF General Fund TXDOT Texas Department of Transportation GFOA Government Finance Officers UMR Utility Maintenance and Replacement Association Fund GL General Ledger VMR Vehicle Maintenance and Replacement Fund GMR General Maintenance and WA Westlake Academy Replacement Fund GO'S General Obligation Bonds XFR Transfer 410 _7 600, ESTL E TE AS 1' .al Blue and Burgundy mbolizes the strengthening position of Westlake as a State and Nationally recognized ed Cf ty WE Lone Stars 0 fs,:,UX" r Blacksmith Our proud home : and Anvil in the great state of Texas [ " [� Character, honor and strength Oak Leaves .► `� '-T I • ' The Globe Our commitment to EKE The symbol of the environment internationalism Dark Green Symbolizes the natural environment and financial growth of Westlake ;A _S t ,