Loading...
Res 13-25A Approving a Contract with Mesa Planning TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION 13-25A A RESOLUTION BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS APPROVING A CONTRACT WITH MESA PLANNING FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLAN REVIEW AND UPDATE SERVICES. WHEREAS, the Westlake Town Council has determined that the Town's Comprehensive Plan has not been examined and updated in its entirety in a holistic manner since its adoption in 1992; and, WHEREAS, the Westlake Town Council has identified reviewing and updating the Town's Comprehensive Plan as a high strategic priority; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council recognizes that this review and update is necessary in light of the passage of time since 1992, changes in conditions, development that has occurred in and around Westlake along the State Highway 114 corridor, as well as the types of development that are being undertaken today that did not exist in 1992; and, WHEREAS, the Westlake Town Council desires to utilize the services of a professional planning services firm with its team of subcontractors representing a number of disciplines necessary to perform this Comprehensive Plan review and update; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council has budgeted funding in the FY 13-14 Proposed Budget for this purpose; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: THAT, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. Resolution 13-25A Page 1 of 2 SECTION 2: THAT, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, hereby approves the attached Contract with Mesa Planning for planning services related to reviewing and updating the Town's Comprehensive Plan attached hereto as Exhibit "A"; and further authorizes the Town Manager to execute said agreement on behalf of the Town of Westlake. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 26TH DAY OF AUGUST, 2013. GCs��i Laura Wheat, Mayor ATTEST: Kelly Edwar Town Secretary Thomas E. BrymfT n Manager APPROV AST RM: l� � a"®SCS OF Stan Lowry,4<nAtforney '� < : m i;V A S Resolution 13-25A Page 2 of 2 Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 1 Of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) Contract Agreement Date: August 26, 2013 BETWEEN MESA Planning(hereinafter identified as the Architect)and Town of Westlake,Texas(hereinafter identified as the Owner): The Owner: Town of Westlake Owner's Representative-Thomas E. Brymer,Town Manager Town of Westlake 3 Village Circle, Suite 202 Westlake, Texas 76202 and the Architect: MESA Planning 11700 Preston Road Suite 660-229 Dallas, Texas 75230 for the following Project: Westlake, Texas, Comprehensive Plan Update The Owner and Architect agree as follows. Page 1 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 2 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) TABLE OF ARTICLES 1 INITIAL INFORMATION 2 ARCHITECT'S RESPONSIBILITIES 3 SCOPE OF ARCHITECT'S BASIC SERVICES 4 ADDITIONAL SERVICES 5 OWNER'S RESPONSIBILITES 6 COPYRIGHTS AND LICENSES 7 CLAIMS AND DISPUTES 8 TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION 9 MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS 10 COMPENSATION 11 SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS 12 SCOPE OF THE AGREEMENT ARTICLE 1 INITIAL INFORMATION § 1.1 This Agreement is based on the Initial Information set forth in this Article 1 and the Scope of Work set forth in Exhibit"A" incorporated into Section 12.2 of this agreement: § 1.2 The Owner's anticipated dates for commencement of construction and Substantial Completion of the Work are set forth below: .1 Commencement of construction date: November 1, 2013 .2 Substantial Completion date: July 31, 2014 § 1.3 The Owner and Architect may rely on the Initial Information. Both parties, however, recognize that such information may materially change and, in that event,the Owner and the Architect shall appropriately adjust the schedule,the Architect's services and the Architect's compensation if agreed to by both parties. ARTICLE 2 ARCHITECT'S RESPONSIBILITIES §2.1 The Architect shall provide the professional services as set forth in Section 12.2 of this Agreement. §2.2 The Architect shall perform its services consistent with the professional skill and care ordinarily provided by architects practicing in the same or similar locality under the same or similar circumstances. The Architect shall perform its services as expeditiously as is consistent with such professional skill and care and the orderly progress of the Project. §2.3 Robin H. McCaffrey AIA,AICP is a representative authorized to act on behalf of the Architect with respect to the Project. §2.4 Except with the Owner's knowledge and consent,the Architect shall not engage in any activity,or accept any employment, interest or contribution that would reasonably appear to compromise the Architect's professional judgment with respect to this Project. § 2.5 The Architect shall maintain Professional Liability insurance for the duration of this Agreement. If any of the requirements set forth below exceed the types and limits the Architect normally maintains, the Owner shall reimburse Page 2of17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 3 Of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) the Architect for any additional cost. The Architect's liability policy shall be a claims made policy in an amount not less than$1,000,000 per occurrence and$1,000,000 annual aggregate ARTICLE 3 SCOPE OF ARCHITECT'S BASIC SERVICES §3.1 The Architect's Scope of Work consists of those Work Tasks described in Section 12.2 of this agreement as Exhibit"A"and Exhibit"C". Said services under this contract can be generally described as comprehensive planning review and update services. Said services do not include any architectural design service. §3.1.1 The Architect shall manage the Architect's services, consult with the Owner, research applicable design criteria, attend Project meetings, communicate with members of the Project team and report progress to the Owner. §3.1.2 The Architect shall coordinate its services with those services provided by the Owner and the Owner's consultants. The Architect shall be entitled to rely on the accuracy and completeness of services and information furnished by the Owner and the Owner's consultants. The Architect shall provide prompt written notice to the Owner if the Architect becomes aware of any error, omission or inconsistency in such services or information. §3.1.3 The Architect shall perform the work in accordance with the timeline contained in Section 12.2 of this agreement as Exhibit"B". §3.1.4 The Architect shall not be responsible for an Owner's directive or substitution made without the Architect's approval. ARTICLE 4 ADDITIONAL SERVICES §4.1 Services requested, but not specifically included in the scope of services described in Exhibit"A"(such as additional meetings not specified in the task description),will be considered additional services. Modifications to the instruments of service, after approval by Owner, as a result of changes requested by Owner will be considered additional services and billed at an hourly rate as follows: Principal $185.00 Associate-Planning $130.00 Associate Landscape Architecture $130.00 Project manager $110.00 Designer-Planner $ 90.00 Graphics/Marketing/Administration $ 75.00 Engineer $220.00 Financial Consultant $240.00 Both the Owner and the Architect will agree to which billing rate specific parties are assigned for billing purposes. §4.2 Additional Services may be provided after execution of this Agreement, without invalidating the Agreement. Except for services required due to the fault of the Architect, any Additional Services provided in accordance with this Section 4.3 shall entitle the Architect to compensation pursuant to hourly fees specified in Section 4.1 and an appropriate adjustment in the Architect's schedule. § 4.3.1 Upon recognizing the need to perform the following Additional Services,the Architect shall notify the Owner with reasonable promptness and explain the facts and circumstances giving rise to the need. The Architect shall not proceed to provide the Additional Services until the Architect receives the Owner's written authorization.Additional Services include: .1 Services necessitated by a change in the Initial Information, previous instructions or approvals given by the Owner, or a material change in the Project including, but not limited to,size, quality, complexity,the Owner's schedule or budget for Cost of the Work, or procurement or delivery method; .2 Services necessitated by the Owner's request for extensive environmentally responsible design alternatives, such as unique system designs, in-depth material research, energy modeling, or LEED certification; .3 Changing or editing previously prepared Instruments of Service necessitated by the enactment or revision of codes, laws or regulations or official interpretations; .4 Services necessitated by decisions of the Owner not rendered in a timely manner or any other failure of performance on the part of the Owner or the Owner's consultants or contractors; Page 3 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 4 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) .5 Preparing digital data for transmission to the Owner's consultants and contractors, or to other Owner authorized recipients; .6 Preparation of design and documentation for alternate bid or proposal requests proposed by the Owner; .7 Preparation for, and attendance at, a public presentation, meeting or hearing, other then those specified in Exhibit"A"; .8 Preparation for, and attendance at a dispute resolution proceeding or legal proceeding, except where the Architect is party thereto; .9 Evaluation of the qualifications of bidders or persons providing proposals; .10 Consultation concerning replacement of Work resulting from fire or other cause during construction; .11 Assistance to the Initial Decision Maker,if other than the Architect. ARTICLE 5OWNER'S RESPONSIBILITIES § 5.1 Unless otherwise provided for under this Agreement,the Owner shall provide information in a timely manner regarding requirements for and limitations on the Project..Within 15 days after receipt of a written request from the Architect,the Owner shall furnish the requested information to the extent the Owner has such information and to the extent such information is such information is not available elsewhere and the information is necessary and relevant for the Architect to complete the Project. § 5.2 The Owner shall identify a representative authorized to act on the Owner's behalf with respect to the Project. The Owner shall render decisions and approve the Architect's submittals in a timely manner in order to avoid unreasonable delay in the orderly and sequential progress of the Architect's services. § 5.3 When requested, the Owner shall furnish any available City materials related to the economic assessment considerations described in Exhibit"A"such as the City Budget and economic development initiatives. § 5.4 Upon request The Owner shall furnish all Plans, Studies, Ordinances, Policies,Surveys, and/or regulations regarding the Planning Area. § 5.5 The Owner shall furnish any useful base maps, digital map files, development proposals, and/or zoning submittal documents in the possession of the Owner and as requested by the Architect. § 5.6 The Owner shall coordinate the services of its own consultants with those services provided by the Architect. Upon the Architect's request,the Owner shall furnish copies of the scope of services in the contracts between the Owner and the Owner's consultants to the extent those agreements or services are applicable to the Scope of Work in this Agreement, as determined by the Owner.The Owner shall furnish the instruments of service of consultants other than those designated in this Agreement when the Architect requests such information and demonstrates that they are reasonably required by the scope of the Project. ARTICLE 6 COPYRIGHTS AND LICENSES §6.1 The Architect and the Owner warrant that in transmitting Instruments of Service, or any other information, the transmitting party is the copyright owner of such information or has permission from the copyright owner to transmit such information for its use on the Project. If the Owner and Architect intend to transmit Instruments of Service or any other information or documentation in digital form,they shall endeavor to establish necessary protocols governing such transmissions. §6.2 The Architect and the Architect's consultants shall release all rights as the authors and owners of their respective Instruments of Service, including the Drawings and Specifications,which shall be considered a Work for Hire, and shall belong to the Town. Submission or distribution of Instruments of Service to meet official regulatory requirements or for similar purposes in connection with the Project is not to be construed as publication in derogation of the rights of the Town. However, nothing in this section prohibits the Architect and the Architect's consultants from utilizing summaries and provisions of the Instruments of Service, including the Drawings and Specifications, required by the Owner under this contract,for sales and marketing purposes. §6.3 Upon execution of this Agreement,the Architect grants to the Owner a non-exclusive license to use the Architect's Instruments of Service solely and exclusively for purposes of using, maintaining, altering and adding to the Instrument of Service, provided that the Owner substantially performs its obligations, including prompt payment of Page 4 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 5 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) all sums when due, under this Agreement. The Architect shall obtain similar nonexclusive licenses from the Architect's consultants consistent with this Agreement. The license granted under this section permits the Owner to authorize the City Staff and others as well as the Owner's consultants and separate contractors,to reproduce applicable portions of the Instruments of Service. If the Architect rightfully terminates this Agreement for cause as provided in Section 8.4,the license granted in this Section 6.3 shall terminate. ARTICLE 7 CLAIMS AND DISPUTES §7.1 GENERAL §7.1.1 The Owner and Architect shall commence all claims and causes of action, whether in contract,tort, or otherwise, against the other arising out of or related to this Agreement in accordance with the requirements of the method of binding dispute resolution selected in this Agreement within the period specified by applicable law, but in any case not more than 10 years after the date of Substantial Completion of the Work.The Owner and Architect waive all claims and causes of action not commenced in accordance with this Section 7.1.1. §7.1.2 To the extent damages are covered by property insurance, the Owner and Architect waive all rights against each other and against the contractors, consultants,agents and employees of the other for damages, except such rights as they may have to the proceeds of such insurance. The Owner or the Architect, as appropriate, shall require of the contractors, consultants, agents and employees of any of them similar waivers in favor of the other parties enumerated herein. §7.1.3 The Architect and Owner waive consequential damages for claims, disputes or other matters in question arising out of or relating to this Agreement. This mutual waiver is applicable, without limitation,to all consequential damages due to either party's termination of this Agreement,except as specifically provided in Section 8.7. §7.2 MEDIATION §7.2.1 Any claim dispute or other matter in question arising out of or related to this Agreement shall be subject to mediation as a condition precedent to binding dispute resolution. If such matter relates to or is the subject of a lien arising out of the Architect's services,the Architect may proceed in accordance with applicable law to comply with the lien notice or filing deadlines prior to resolution of the matter by mediation or by binding dispute resolution. §7.2.2 The Owner and Architect shall endeavor to resolve claims, disputes and other matters in question between them by mediation.A request for mediation shall be made in writing, delivered to the other party to the Agreement, and filed with the person or entity administering the mediation. The request may be made concurrently with the filing of a Petition or other appropriate demand for binding dispute resolution but, in such event,mediation shall proceed in advance of binding dispute resolution proceedings, which shall be stayed pending mediation for a period of 60 days from the date of filing, unless stayed for a longer period by agreement of the parties or court order. §7.2.3 The parties shall share the mediator's fee and any filing fees equally. The mediation shall be held in the place where the Project is located, unless another location is mutually agreed upon.Agreements reached in mediation shall be enforceable as settlement agreements in any court having jurisdiction thereof. §7.2.4 If the parties do not resolve a dispute through mediation pursuant to this Section 7.2,the method of binding dispute resolution shall be a trial in the District Court of Tarrant County,Texas pursuant to Section 7.3 of this Agreement ARTICLE 8 TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION §8.1 If the Owner fails to make payments to the Architect in accordance with this Agreement, such failure shall be considered substantial nonperformance and cause for termination or, at the Architect's option, cause for suspension of performance of services under this Agreement. If the Architect elects to suspend services,the Architect shall give seven days'written notice to the Owner before suspending services. In the event of a suspension of services,the Architect shall have no liability to the Owner for delay or damage caused the Owner because of such suspension of services. Before resuming services,the Architect shall be paid all sums due prior to suspension and any expenses incurred in the interruption and resumption of the Architect's services.The Architect's fees for the remaining services and the time schedules shall be equitably adjusted. §8.2 If the Owner suspends the Project,the Architect shall be compensated for services performed prior to notice of such suspension.When the Project is resumed,the Architect shall be compensated for expenses incurred in the interruption and resumption of the Architect's services. The Architect's fees for the remaining services and the time schedules shall be equitably adjusted. Page 5 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 6 Of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) §8.3 If the Owner suspends the Project for more than 90 cumulative days for reasons other than the fault of the Architect,the Architect may terminate this Agreement by giving not less than seven days'written notice. §8.4 Either party may terminate this Agreement upon not less than seven days'written notice should the other party fail substantially to perform in accordance with the terms of this Agreement through no fault of the party initiating the termination. §8.5 The Owner or Architect may terminate this Agreement for their convenience and without cause upon not less than seven days'written notice and their mutual consent to do so. § 8.6 In the event of termination not the fault of the Architect,the Architect shall be compensated for services performed prior to termination,together with Reimbursable Expenses then due. §8.8 The Owner's rights to use the Architect's Instruments of Service in the event of a termination of this Agreement are set forth in Article 6 and Section 10.9. ARTICLE 9 MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS §9.1 This Agreement shall be governed by the law of the place where the Project is located. §9.3 The Owner and Architect, respectively, bind themselves,their agents, successors, assigns and legal representatives to this Agreement. Neither the Owner nor the Architect shall assign this Agreement without the written consent of the other. §9.4 Nothing contained in this Agreement shall create a contractual relationship with or a cause of action in favor of a third party against either the Owner or Architect. §9.5 Unless otherwise required in this Agreement,the Architect shall have no responsibility for the discovery, presence, handling, removal or disposal of, or exposure of persons to, hazardous materials or toxic substances in any form at the Project site. §9.6 Subject to the provisions contained in Section 6.2,the Architect shall have the right to include photographic or artistic representations of the design of the Project among the Architect's promotional and professional materials. The Architect shall be given reasonable access to the completed Project to make such representations. However,the Architect's materials shall not include the Owner's confidential or proprietary information if the Owner has previously advised the Architect in writing of the specific information considered by the Owner to be confidential or proprietary. §9.7 If the Architect or Owner receives information specifically designated by the other party as"confidential"or "business proprietary,"the receiving party shall keep such information strictly confidential and shall not disclose it to any other person except to(1)its employees, (2)those who need to know the content of such information in order to perform services or construction solely and exclusively for the Project,or(3)its consultants and contractors whose contracts include similar restrictions on the use of confidential information. ARTICLE 10 COMPENSATION § 10.1 For the Architect's Basic Services described in Exhibit"A",the Owner shall compensate the Architect and total fee as follows: PART ONE:ASSESSMENTS $52,012 1.1 Information,Presentations,Graphics,Maps and other Tools 1.2 Population and Demographic Profile 1.3 Identify existing conditions 1.4 Circulation Analysis 1.5 Infrastructure Capacity Analysis 1.6 Land Developability 1.7 Assessment Findings Report PART TWO:VISIONING $16,309 2.1 Community Goals and Objectives 2.2 The Framework plan PART THREE:PLAN ELEMENTS $107,743 3.1 Land Use and Land Use Sustainability Page 6 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 7 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) 3.2 Transportation and Community Fabric Sustainability 3.3 Town Design 3.4 Park,Open Space,Trails,and Environmental Sustainability 3.5 Housing 3.6 Public Facilities 3.7 Solana Revitalization d Town center 3.8 Policy Recommendations and Plan Tabulations PART FOUR:IMPLEMENTATION $48,702 4.1 Economic Development Strategy 4.2 Growth Management Strategy 4.3 Plan Benchmarks 4.4 Code Performance Review PART FIVE:ENGAGEMENT/COMMUNICATION $94,077 5.1 Engagement 5.2 Communication SUBTOTAL(without Reimbursables) $318,843 REIMBURSABLES(not to exceed 6.3%of basic fee upon proof of allowable eexpense) $20,027 TOTAL FEE $338,950 § 10.2 For Additional Services,the Owner shall compensate the Architect in accordance with the following hourly fee schedule: Principal $185.00 Associate-Planning $130.00 Associate Landscape Architecture $130.00 Project manager $110.00 Designer-Planner $ 90.00 Graphics/Marketing/Administration $ 75.00 Engineer $220.00 Financial Consultant $240.00 Both the Owner and the Architect will agree to which billing rate specific parties are assigned for billing purposes. § 10.3 Compensation to the Architect shall be on a progress billing basis in which the Owner will be invoiced based on the percent of any Task(as described in Exhibit"A")completed at the time of the invoice. § 10.8 COMPENSATION FOR REIMBURSABLE EXPENSES § 10.8.1 Reimbursable Expenses are in addition to compensation for Basic and Additional Services, are subject to cap shown in Section 10.8.2, and include only actual proven expenses incurred by the Architect and the Architect's consultants directly related to the Project,as follows: .1 Transportation and authorized out-of-town travel and subsistence; .2 Long distance services, dedicated data and communication services,teleconferences, Project Web sites, acquisition of data,and extranets; .3 Fees paid for securing approval of authorities having jurisdiction over the Project, or other permit/ registration fees; .4 Printing,reproductions, plots, standard form documents, binding, scanning, digitizing; .5 Postage, handling and delivery; .6 Expense of overtime work requiring higher than regular rates, if authorized in advance by the Owner; .7 Renderings, models, mock-ups, professional photography,and presentation materials requested by the Owner; .8 Architect's Consultant's expense of professional liability insurance dedicated exclusively to this Project, or the expense of additional insurance coverage or limits if the Owner requests such insurance in excess of that normally carried by the Architect's consultants; [Unless this provision is applicable to this contract,take it out) .9 All taxes levied on professional services and on reimbursable expenses; .10 Site office expenses; and Other similar Project-related expenditures. Page 7 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 8 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) § 10.8.2 Reimbursable Expenses shall not exceed $20,027 without the Owner's consent. § 10.9 PAYMENTS TO THE ARCHITECT § 10.9.1 Unless otherwise agreed, payments for services shall be made monthly in proportion to services performed. Payments are due and payable within 45 days after presentation of the Architect's invoice. § 10.9.3 The Owner shall not withhold amounts from the Architect's compensation as a deferred payment or to impose a penalty or liquidated damages on the Architect, or to offset sums requested by or paid to contractors for the cost of changes in the Work unless the Architect agrees or has been found liable for the amounts in a binding dispute resolution proceeding. § 10.9.4 If the Owner fails to make payments to the Architect in accordance with this agreement, such failure shall be considered substantial non-performance and cause for termination or, at the Architect's option, cause for suspension of performance of service under this agreement. If the Architect elects to suspend service, prior to suspension of services,the Architect shall give seven(7)days written notice to the Owner. In the event of a suspension of services, the Architect shall have no liability to the Owner for delay or damage caused to the Owner because of such suspension of services. Before resuming services,the Architect shall be paid all sums due prior to suspension As agreed to by Owner. § 10.9.5 Records of Reimbursable Expenses shall be provided prior to receiving reimbursement. Expenses pertaining to Additional Services, and services performed on the basis of hourly rates shall be available to the Owner within 5 calendar days after request. ARTICLE 11 SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS Special terms and conditions that modify this Agreement are as follows: § 11.1 Not included are the following: a. Utility Design Engineering(water, sewer, storm, electrical, cable,telephone, etc.) b. Illustrative plans, models and drawings not specifically described in the Scope of Services c. TDLR Submittal j. As Built Drawings k. Architectural Public Facility Space Needs Assessment § 11.2 The Architect may subcontract consultants in the performance of any services described in this agreement(with Owner approval). Approved sub-contractors include Gresham Smith and Partners, RCLCO, Mosaic, Ashley Shook, and Eli Pearson. § 11.3 The Architect does not act as a General Contractor or Prime Contractor in any way, or accept responsibility, for poor workmanship on the part of others that are not part of this consultant team. § 11.4 The Texas Board of Architectural Examiners has jurisdiction over complaints regarding the professional practices of persons registered as Architects in Texas. Texas Board of Architectural Examiners, P.O. Box 12337, Austin, Texas 78711-2337;tele: 512.305.9000;fax: 512.305.9005; e-mail:www.tbae.state.tx.us. § 11.10 The Architect shall indemnify and hold the Owner harmless from and against any and all loss, claims, actions, damages, liability and expense in connection with loss of life, personal injury, damage to property or any other loss or injury arising directly from or out of the negligent performance of the Work. The Architect shall not be required, however, to indemnify any party against a claim arising from the willful misconduct or negligence of that party. § 11.11 Should any provision contained in this Agreement for any reason be held to be void, invalid, illegal or unenforceable, such determination shall not affect any other provision hereof and this Agreement shall be considered as if the entirety of such void,invalid or unenforceable provision had never been contained in this Agreement. Page 8 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 9 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) § 11.12 Notification to either party by the other that is required under this Agreement shall be personally delivered or mailed to such party at the following respective addresses: Town of Westlake: Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager Town of Westlake 3 Village Circle, Suite 202 Westlake, TX 76262 Phone: 817-490-5720 MESA Planning: Robin McCaffrey AIA, AICP MESA Planning 11700 Preston Road, Suite 660-299 Dallas,TX 75230 Phone: 214-535-7484 ARTICLE 12 SCOPE OF THE AGREEMENT § 12.1 This Agreement represents the entire and integrated agreement between the Owner and the Architect and supersedes all prior negotiations, representations or agreements, either written or oral. This Agreement may be amended only by written instrument signed by both Owner and Architect. § 12.2 This Agreement is comprised of the following documents listed below: .1 Document OAB101, Agreement Between Owner and Architect .2 Exhibit"A"Scope of Work to be done by MESA for Town, attached hereto and incorporated herein and MESA's Proposal, which is attached hereto and incorporated herein. .3 Exhibit"B"Timeline .4 Exhibit C, Town's Request for Proposal for Comprehensive Planning Update Services AND Architect's Response for Request for Proposal, shall serve as an interpretive document for Exhibits A and B. This Agreement entered into as of August 26, 2013. 01 ! i WNER(Si r,u u, C.HITEC (Signa re)11/ �Y1oYnc�.°J � . �Vmer Thomas E. Brymer, Town Manager Robin H. McCaffrey AIA, AICP, Senior Principal Town of Westlake Page 9of17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 10 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) This Page Blank Page 10 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 11 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) MESA + PLANNING EXHIBIT"A"SCOPE OF SERVICES: PREPARATION OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY MESA PLANNING FOR TOWN OF WESTLAKE PART ONE: ASSESSMENTS A CONTEXT FOR COMMUNITY VISION • 1.1. Information, Presentations, Graphics, Maps and other Tools -Architect will prepare information for the assessment report prior to Workshops. This information will be based upon Architect's investigations and analyses needed to inform Workshop participants of background,facts, legal framework, and other factors to allow participants to participate in the Workshops in an informed manner. • 1.2. Population and Demographic Profile —Architect will prepare a population and demographic profile of Town of Westlake, including benchmarks, comparison between Westlake and other cities in Tarrant and Denton counties, a comparison of population projections from MESA Planning and those from cities identified by the architect, and included in the assessment on the effect of population growth and area demographics on Westlake Academy and expansion plans. • 1.3. Identify existing conditions, including drainage patterns, natural corridors, activity centers, development patterns, cultural landmarks or features, economic indicators, as well as current plans, studies, zoning designations or instruments. The assessment will identify significant aspects of any of the above listed items in regard to future development, and will include strengths,weaknesses, opportunities and liabilities. • 1.4. Circulation Analysis. Prior to the first public workshop, the Planning Team will conduct a circulation analysis of the Town of Westlake. Circulation is a critical element of the Comprehensive Plan for the Town. The relationship of community elements to Highway 114,the existing patterns of use and development, and the potential alignment of future transit in relation to vehicular traffic patterns establish a need to investigate the efficiency and physical influence of the circulation system. Consideration will be given to external traffic demand on roadways within Westlake and the extent to which increased volumes influence land use suitability (discussed below). Of particular interest in this analysis is the extent to which existing PD ordinances identify right of way dedications and/ or other roadway provisions that in tum influence the overall character and operation of the local system. • 1.5. Infrastructure Capacity Analysis — includes public and private utilities, including neighboring utility systems, the effect on service to future population, including commercial development, identification of limitations and chokepoints within existing systems, and projection of future demand. • 1.6. Land Developability - Analysis Building upon the existing conditions and the circulation analysis (described above) the combined significance of built and natural systems as they coexist within the Town will be portrayed in a map based sequence which defines areas most and least suitable for development. This analysis includes such considerations as topography, drainage, protected resources, jurisdictional overlays, vegetative communities, existing/ on-coming land uses, and circulation patterns. Attention will be given to the relationship between land developability and the trajectory of land development trends (Task 1.2). • 1.7. Assessment Findings Report — MESA Planning will prepare a combined document that will include all the above described analysis and information and will include findings, opinions and conclusions in regard to land development trends and land developability. The combined document will include an original report, and all pertinent maps, charts, graphs, and ilustrations as well as a written summary of their significance to the Town. Of particular emphasis in this summation is the extent to which conditions informing the 1992 Comprehensive Plan are significantly changed and therefore necessitate targeted updates of the existing document(a performance review of the existing plan). Recommendation of specific updates will be made. At a minimum, updates will include those areas of concern identified in the RFP. 1.2 Deliverable for Part One: • A written information report and presentation to be given at the start of the first Workshop. • Written Assessment Findings Report(sub-component 1 of the Comprehensive Plan Update)with text and graphics for each of the tasks described above. • Written Assessment Findings presentation power point for Workshop 1 Meetings: • Workshop#1 (see engagement, Part Five) • Steering Committee meeting as specified in Steering Committee Engagement(Task 5.1) Page 11 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 12 of 17 Docu nt No. OAB101 (modified) a ive) • Milestone meeting with staff PART TWO: VISIONING A FRAMEWORK FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE The Vision Plan for the Town of Westlake must manifest the Goals and Objectives of the Community,while establishing a strategy for implementation that will effectively guide and direct future development within the Town. The Framework is the template of the Plan that assures its fulfillment of community aspirations and values. • 2.1. Development of Goals and Objectives for Comprehensive Plan — MESA Planning will use input from participants in the first public workshop to develop goals and objectives for the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update, including land use, traffic / transit and pedestrian systems, urban design, economic development, and the Town's relationship to Westlake Academy. MESA Planning will review and compare community input with Assessment Findings descried above in Part One and will determine which goals address the greatest range of issues. • 2.2. Framework Plan — Once Community Goals and Objectives are identified, they will be physically expressed in a Planning Framework for the Town of Westlake. This Framework will serve as a graphic representation of the goals and objectives (identified in 2.1 above), expressed in the graphic language of districts, edges, nodes, portals, linkages, zones, landmarks, and interfaces. In this way true agreement as to the application of goals and objectives can be accomplished in workshop 2 (described in the Engagement portion of this proposal). Deliverable for Part Two: • A summation of goals and objectives according to their strategic significance. • A graphic Framework Plan with associated text and support graphics. • A Goals and Objectives and Framework Power point for Workshop#2(see engagement section Part Five) Meetings: • Workshop#2(see engagement, Part Five) • Steering Committee meeting as specified in Steering Committee Engagement(Task 5.1) • 2 Milestone reviews, one with staff and one other as staff directs. PART THREE: PLAN ELEMENTS ARTICULATING THE VISION OF SUSTAINABILITY The Plan Elements identified for the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update will serve to direct and facilitate desired development in the future, preserving the form of the Town consistent with the vision manifested in the Planning Framework. • 3.1. Land Use and Land Use Sustainability—provide a Land Use Plan ("Plan")that will be more form based and relate the issues of form (density, square footage, value, and use ranges and the relationship of such items to ad valorem tax goals). Provide a Plan that will allow for growth of the ad valorem tax base to give the Town a better financial capacity needed to provide for health, safety, welfare and education needs of the future. The Plan will set out land use hierarchies and transitions. The Plan will consist of a plan graphic and associated designation of land use districts that apply land use performance standards. • 3.2 Transportation and Community Sustainability—MESA Planning will consider the relationship in Westlake between traffic densities, economic value, and community development. The Transportation Plan will address the regional and local systems of transit in the Town of Westlake, review the existing thoroughfare system and its potential for change in conjunction with the Future Land Use Plan and will consider the introduction of an alternative transportation system. A Transportation plan will then be defined that both accommodates anticipated traffic levels and reinforces the intent of the future land use plan. As a primary generator of value, transportation has the effect of stimulating the dynamic forces of transition (even though physical transition has not occurred) and therefore can precipitate instability (particularly in undeveloped areas where transportation often promotes speculation). Therefore, attaining a balance between land use and transportation is a key component of community fabric sustainability (preserving value). The Transportation Plan will include both thematic and functional elements as well as recommended improvements to the existing system. The Transportation Plan will consist of a plan graphic with associated designations.. Page 12 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 13 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) • 3. 3. Town Design Structure— The Town Design Structure Plan will be prepared as a written and graphic document that includes roadways, portals, district, core areas, public spaces, key intersections, and connections and will focus upon enhancement of the public realm in the Town of Westlake. It will identify design initiatives that can be incorporated within the management and design structure of the Town. • 3.4. Parks, Open Space and Trail Plan; and Environmental Sustainability — The Parks, Open Space and Trail Plan will set out in writing and graphically the green infrastructure of Westlake, defining and protecting the natural assets of the community. It will include both active and passive spaces; create a network of connectivity that includes parks, trails, recreational areas and passive open spaces as well as protected natural assets. The Parks, Open Space and Trail Plan will promote the role that surface water management plays in sustaining biodiversity, habitat and visual identity. The Parks, Open Space and Trail Plan will seek to connect natural assets and natural corridors and preserve distributions of water deposited soils, plant communities, and active water courses. • 3.5. Housing—MESA Planning will prepare a written and graphic Housing Plan that will consider expansion of housing options, while taking into account housing entitlements already existing in Planned Development Ordinances. The Housing Plan will investigate means by which existing housing trends (in price and community design) can co-exist with externally driven housing demands taking into account the ability to accommodate such demand in relation to established PD ordinances. The Housing Plan will identify housing availability(housing stock inventory)and developable land (within the context of the Land Use Plan) and identify where existing housing options will likely continue and where newer, more diverse housing option may emerge. These allocations will take into consideration emerging housing trends generally and the extent to which those trends are finding market success locally. • 3.6. Public Facilities—Written recommendations regarding public facilities as described in the RFP in Exhibit C will be provided. • 3.7. Revisions to the Zoning Section of Westlake Code of Ordinance (Chapter 102) — Based on the Comprehensive Plan elements described above, MESA Planning will make revisions to Chapter 102 of the Westlake Code of Ordinances which, in the opinion of MESA Planning, are necessary to beter implement the objectives of the Comprehensive Plan Update. These revisions will be prepared for review by the Tonw Attorney and subject to such review, MESA Planning will make such revisions as MESA Planning and the Town of Westlake deem necessary. • 3.8. Policy Recommendations and Plan Tabulations — Each of the above described plan elements portrays the build out of Westlake. Summations of the Plans described above will be presented that identify population capacity and economic implications of build out in terms of employment and value added to the Town's GDP. The Westlake Comprehensive Plan will consist of a number of physical and programmatic plan elements that will help direct future growth and development for the Town. Once these plan elements are identified, a list of written, clearly articulated policy recommendations will be generated and organized by plan element to facilitate implementation. Deliverable for Part Three: • A Plan Elements Report(sub-component 2 of the Comprehensive Plan Update that includes all the reports or graphics descried above)that brings the work of Part Two and Part Three into a single document(as described above)with text and graphics flowing from each of the tasks described above. • Assessment, Framework, and Plan Elements power point for Workshop 3 Meetings: • Workshop#3(see engagement, Part Five) • Steering Committee meeting as specified in Steering Comm Engagement(Task 5.1) • 2 Milestone reviews,one with staff and one other as staff s. `/ PART FOUR: IMPLEMENTATION REALIZING TH VISION To facilitate realization of the Community Vision, certain elements are needed for plan implementation. These speak to the regulatory instruments, agencies, and measures that collectively guide future growth and development. 4.1 Economic Development Strategy. As Westlake continues to grow, it will become even more important to define how development will occur within the town. The processes, roles, and responsibilities of both public and private interest will be articulated, in a written, clearly articulated, easy-to understand report so as to encourage the type of development desired and to provide the tax base necessary to support a quality of life preferred by the Westlake Community. MESA Planning will therefore work in conjunction with Council, Staff, Planning and Development Commission, the Planning Steering Committee, and the economic development committee to define an economic development strategy for the Town,Which will include features such as Funding Mechanisms/District Designations, Administration and Oversight, and Project Pdoritization criteria in the written report. Page 13 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 14 of 17 Document No. OAB101 (modified) The key role of economic development strategy in the Future Land Use Plan is to promote value while the growth management elements(described below) direct both capture of value and the transfer of value through good design. 4.2 Growth Management Strategy. The ultimate objective of the Comprehensive Plan is to provide a tool to assist in the direction and management of future growth and development. In the implementation strategy,to be prepared as a written, clearly articulated,easy to understand report, the attainment of values as represented by the Land Use Plan will be facilitated by allocation of various plan recommendations and actions to value related issues(such as capture of mature value and the transfer of value to promote orderly form and community viability). This will be presented as a growth management"tool kit,"which includes the Future Land Use Plan, proposed regulations as set out in 3.7,written recommendations, elements of which are related to the above described value considerations. 4.3 Plan Benchmarks. Over time, it will become necessary to access the relevance and applicability of the proposed Westlake Comprehensive Plan. Due to the potential for rapid change within the Highway 114 Corridor, it becomes important to be able to identify when the Comprehensive Plan requires recalibration and further updates. MESA Planning will work with the Town to develop an internal performance evaluation tool for the Comprehensive plan,to ensure the relevance of this plan in future years. This will allow for appropriate updates while preserving consistency and intent of the original document. 4.4 Code Performance Review. The institutionalization of entitlements within planned development ordinances,the changing conditions within Westlake, and the changing conditions outside of Westlake; challenge the effectiveness of existing zoning Chapter 102(to be revised by MESA Planning, see Task 3.7)and its relationship to other development relationship to other development related sections of the Code of Ordinances. Issues with the relationship between Chapter 102 and other parts of code related to development will be identified and recommendations made as to appropriate response. Deliverable for Part Four: • Reports and graphics as designated above. • An Implementation Interim Report(sub-component 3 of the Comprehensive Plan Update)with text and graphics flowing from each of the tasks described above. • Assessment, Framework, and Plan Elements power point for Workshop 3 Meetings: • Staff Work Session • Steering Committee meeting • Milestone review with staff. PART FIVE: ENGAGEMENT/COMMUNICATIONS GUIDING THE PLANNING PROCESS The foundation of this Comprehensive Plan Update is the public participation in its formulation and public support of its adoption. Therefore,the Engagement/Communications portion of this proposal is critically important. 5.1 Engagement. The engagement portion of this proposal will consist of workshops and focus groups engaged as follows: Workshop 1: Goals and Objectives Upon completion of the Assessments Identified in Part One, MESA will conduct public Workshop#1. At this workshop,the various assessments will be presented, as informed participation creates more meaningful dialogue concerning community vision. After the assessments are presented, workshop participants will break out into groups based upon character districts identified in the assessment analysis. Each of these breakout groups will have an appointed facilitator(from the Steering Committee). Within that breakout group, workshop participants will be encouraged to explore the issues and attributes that the comprehensive plan should address. This will provide direction for elements of the plan that include, but are not limited to land use, circulation(including traffic/transit analysis and pedestrian areas), urban design, and economic development and other factors identified above. Workshop 2: Planning Framework A Planning Framework will be fashioned through the process of Workshop 2. This workshop starts with a presentation of the goals and objectives identified in Workshop 1. These goals and objectives and their Page 14 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 15 of 17 Document No. OABI01 (modified) application to the Town are once again discussed in breakout groups (lead by Steering Committee members from Workshop#1)which will consider how those goals and objectives will take form in the Future Land Use Plan. These applications are summarized by the Planning Team in a diagrammatic form called the Framework Plan. The workshop participants are asked to determine whether the Framework Plan effectively represents the goals and objectives established in Workshop 1 . This Planning Framework is the publically crafted vision element that will guide the formulation of plan elements. Workshop 3: Putting It All Together At Workshop 3,the Planning Elements will be presented to all workshop participants. Key to the success of this project is the transition of the plan from MESA Planning and workshop participants to Steering Committee leaders. For this reason,the steering committee who up to this point serve as facilitators, will assume a more significant role in the presentation of plan elements. This change in duties is important in the transition of the plan from the MESA Planning Team to the community. The success of this plan will depend, to a large degree on their continued leadership, and this committee will ultimately advocate the plan with regard to future planning activity. Workshop#3 therefore, becomes the point of transition and ultimately, plan ownership by the community it is intended to serve. Steering Committee Engagement: The Steering Committee(appointed by the Town of Westlake)is a key player in the workshop process and in the adoption of the plan by the Town of Westlake. Therefore,a process whicyh parallels the public workshop process will be undertaken with the Steering Committee as follows: Meeting 1: The project kick-off meeting. At this meeting MESA Planning will review the scope of work,the outcomes proposed,the public engagement process,the role of the Steering Committee in that process as well as guiding the consultant at each stage. Workshop#1 Pre-meeting: MESA Planning will review all the materials to be presented at workshop#1 for Steering Committee review and comment. Considering input received and discussion thereof, additions or deletions from the workshop materials will be made by the consultant Workshop#2 Pre-meeting: MESA Planning will review all the materials to be presented at workshop#2 for Steering Committee review and comment. Considering input received and discussion thereof, additions or deletions from the workshop materials will be made by the consultant. Workshop#3 Pre-meeting: MESA Planning will review all the materials to be presented at workshop#3 for Steering Committee review and comment. Considering input received and discussion thereof, additions or deletions from the workshop materials will be made by the consultant. Workshop#3 Post-meeting: After the Workshop#3 and before further work on the plan elements,the consultant will conduct a work session with the Steering Committee to review the inputs received and what they may mean relative to changes to the plan. Further revisions to the Plan Elements will consider inputs received and discussion thereof in the Steering Committee work session. Committee Steering Committee Pre-adoption process work session: After completion of the final Plan Report and prior to moving forward with further presentations,the Consultant will conduct a work session with the Steering Committee to review the materials to be presented and to lay out the adoption process and key role to be played by the Steering Committee in this process. Also discussed will be the best role of the Steering Committee after adoption. 5.2 Communication. The communication portion of this proposal will consist of web portal and milestone touch points as follows: Interactive Web portal. The Planning Team will design and develop an interactive, user friendly website for the Comprehensive Plan Update capable of displaying maps, photos, commentary, presentation materials, and report summaries to inform the public about the plan process on an on-going basis. The website will enable citizens to post comments and to share the publications on social sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The website will also feature a Content Management System that will enable the administrator/editor of the site to upload photos or maps and input text so that updating the site is easy and instantaneous. The content management feature will have blogging and sharing abilities. Features of the website include: • A homepage that identifies the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update website(with link to it from the town website) • Links that correspond to the phases of the plan process. • Drop down menu or secondary navigation that has options such as maps, pictures, report summaries,workshops, citizen comments, etc. • A designated place for citizen comment Page 15 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 16 of 17 Document No. OAB1 U1 (modified) • Content management system for managing web content Steering Committee Meetings The Planning Team will attend a predetermined number of meetings with the Steering Committee(3 are recommended, one meeting before each workshop to review workshop material). The Steering Committee members will be appointed by the Client group. Milestone Updates. As indicated in the meetings itemized in the above work description,there are points along the way for milestone updates with staff and(where indicated)others identified by staff.These occur during Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four. These meetings are in addition to steering committee meetings, public hearings, focus groups,and interviews. Joint Council/Commission Staff Work Session. This joint council/commission/staff work session is critical to the use of the plan, by each body and the staff, as a growth management tool. During this work session,the planning team will walk through the Comprehensive Plan document, explaining its use in matters of zoning consideration. In this way,the joint session becomes a tutorial intended to make all parties conversant in the plan's use and content. Final plan Report. The final Comprehensive Plan Report will reflect comments gathered at the final workshop, staff review of the draft report and input from the joint work session. Upon completion of revisions,the planning team will provide 20 bound color copies and 2 digital pdf copies, provided that Town may request additional copies and Architect agrees to deliver such additional copies at cost or the Town may make its own additional copies at its own cost. The Client will have had opportunity to view the document through its component installments(described in the above deliverables)and thereby, will have had opportunity to comment on the plan as it is developing. Public hearings. The Planning team will present the Comprehensive Plan to both the Planning and Zoning Commission (public hearing to recommend approval)and Council (public hearing to consider approval). In accordance with the intent of the public process to promote community ownership of the plan,these presentations will be shared with members of the Steering Committee. Deliverable for Part Five: • A Complete Plan Report(including sub-components 1, 2, and 3 as well as the remaining project recommendations)which constitutes the Comprehensive Plan Update, with text and graphics flowing from each of the tasks described above. • Comprehensive Plan Power point for presentation to the joint work session and public hearings. Meetings: • Workshops 1,2, 3(as already indicated in meetings listed above) • 5 Steering Committee meetings(as already indicated in meetings listed above)plus 4 additional meetings if required by Owner • Milestone updates(as already indicated in meetings listed above) • Draft Plan review with Staff • Joint Council/Planning&Zoning Commission Work Session • Public hearings Page 16 of 17 Resolution 13-24A Agreement Between: Owner and Architect Page 17 of 17 Document No. OAB1 01 (modified) EXHIBIT"B": PROJECT TIMELINE Project Timeline Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Part One 1.1 Demographics 1.2 Existing Conditions 1.3 Circulation 1.4 Infrastructure 1.5 Land Developability 1.6 Assessment Summary Part Two 2.1 Goals and Objectives 2.2 Framework Part Three 3.1 Land Use 3.2 Transportation 3.3 Urban Design 3.4 Park, Open Space 3.5 Housing 3.6 Public facilities 3.7 Solana Revitalization 3.8 Policy Rec/tabulation Part Four 4.1 Economic Development 4.2 Plan Implementation 4.3 Plan benchmarks 4.4 Code performance review Part Five 5.1 Engagement Workshop #1 Workshop #2 Workshop#3 Focus group/interviews 5.2 Communication Web Portal Steering Committee Joint Work Session Final Report Public hearing Page 17 of 17 Resolution 13-24A _ REQUEST FOR PRC w. ,c •a .� ~ . `"�;'..• �_ ,r � ��,,�ic� � � ,, `,�\ .:..-�:x ,,fig; ldqg NIP �I o'c Es�� �. -- ►Qw *, IAC•.A03 '• SAKE ACA This page left intentionally blank Resolution 13-24A REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) Comprehensive Plan Revision and Update TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction and Purpose of this RFP--_--_ -------_-------- -----------___-_ .-___ __- . __- 01 2. Community Identity _ ___-_-_ ----_--.---____02 3. Westlake's"VVM",Challenges,and Opportunities _ _ _ ----------------.-_-03 4. Town of Westlake Profile 04 A. History ---- ------------- -04 B. Westlake Municipal Government ----------.------------------------------------------,---__ ------ --05 C. Town Operations ------------------------------------------------•----------------- ---------- - - -05 D. Westlake Community Events------------------------........--------------•---------------- _ -.._.. _-- - 06 E. Westlake Academy ................................ ------------------------------------------- -06 F. Westlake Facts& Figures --------------------------- ----------------- ---- -------- ..-_--- 07 G. Business Development and Area Employers ------------------_....-_-_-____ 08 H. Tax Rate Information 09 5. Rationale and Expectations Defined for the Revision and Update of the Town of Westlake Comprehensive Plan _ ----10 A. Scope of Services&Tasks -------------------------------------------10 B. Public Participation _ ---------------------------------- ------------------------------------ 13 C. Implementation ------------------ -------------------- _ _ _----------------------------------- 13 D. General Products Expected ------ --------------------------------- _ _ 14 - --------- --------- E. Study Schedule 14 6. Information for Consultants 14 A. Selection of Consultants 14 B. Method of Compensation ............ -------------------------- ----------------- -------------14 C. Willingness to Work with Other Town Designated.........................._...........•................-14 D. Applicable Documents _ ----------------------------------15 E. Stakeholders 15 F. Additional Information 16 7. Project Approach --------- ----------- 16 8. Instructions for Proposals ------------- -._.---.-._........................ _..__ _18 9. Appendix A. Appendix A- Survey Results from October 19,2013 Joint P&Z/Town Council Workshop Re: Survey Regarding Policy Resolution 13-24A REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) Comprehensive Plan Revision and Update 1. INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE OF THIS RFP The Town of Westlake,Texas(Town) is seeking creative and innovative proposals from qualified planning consultant firms for the purpose of reviewing, revising, and updating its Comprehensive Plan (Plan). The intent of this Request for Proposal (RFP) is to two-fold. First, is to provide potential proposers a clear idea of Westlake as community and municipal government so that responding firms can provide proposals that best meet the Town's needs for this engagement. Second, is to clearly outline the scope of work required by the Town to meet its expectations for this engagement. Westlake is a growing community located in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex on the border of Denton and Tarrant counties in North Central Texas. Since the adoption of its last comprehensive plan in 1992 when the Town's permanent population totaled an estimated 150, the community has grown to more than 900 permanent residents with significant development activity occurring over the last ten years. Westlake's day-time Monday through Friday population is currently estimated at 10-12,000 due to its corporate business community described in greater detail in this RFP. The Town has updated its Comprehensive Plan(Plan) periodically,however, limited Town staff resources coupled with increasing growth activity, has resulted in a Comprehensive Plan that needs review,updating, and possible revision to insure it meets the needs of an expanding community. As a result, Westlake's Comprehensive Plan is in need of review and possible revision to take into account its significant growth, revisit its vision,and, if necessary, update this Plan to fit Westlake's vision for its future. The Town is seeking through these Requests for Proposals(RFP's) a Comprehensive Plan that: • Provides a framework to promote orderly growth and development of the community consistent with it's the values,goals,and objectives. • Preserves and improves neighborhoods and the community's overall quality of life. • Promotes economic development and maintains community character. 1 Resolution 13-24A 2. COMMUNITY IDENTITY The term "unique"accurately reflects the Town of Westlake and how it perceives itself. This uniqueness is captured in the language one finds in its strategic plan as a one-of-a-kind community that is an oasis in the heart of the Fort Worth-Dallas metropolitan area. Westlake utilizes a land use plan and development standards that has created high- end inviting residential neighborhoods coupled with architecturally vibrant corporate campuses, while at the same time emphasizing open space preservation. Westlake is a "premier knowledge based community" owning the only municipal open enrollment charter school in Texas,and one of only a few in the nation. Additionally, this school, known as Westlake Academy, is a K-12 International Baccalaureate World School. While Westlake is a leader in public education,Westlake also is known for its shared service municipal service delivery model as well as for its innovative economic development partnerships between the Town and its corporate community. Westlake values environmental stewardship with its emphasis on public and private open space in its development standards along with services like its automated curbside residential recycling program. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake, as a community that is fully involved and invested in its rich heritage, vibrant present, and exciting, sustainable future. roe Hope Denton �meQtn L. tv7cKnmey- snacr L.IO+Elm Gmarg m,a287 .,..,lmn soy:-- Frisco 75 Famirew 'u 121 wr•, A.gyle Allen ra ,e,° �...�.n .. '.' rf•'1 The Colcny.Oyd 81 - a4: Plano Panni -- Flower LetnsvOle FaW 1 Ronna Mound s— vuryny 4 Rchardson Lm, r,e e, Haslet roppell Carrollton A&M,i SxOse o" Souitlate • 377 eller Grapevine Framers -aa 5-ng- r.ca... 121 ermceh Garland R.-Melt Azle 81 Cote Ile W' 97 114 +.Iaa.e,s 75 r - .,n,rr:,w. onh R and Hits Eutess s"g 183 Irving 4 .,; Hut ial;am Cl Hurst 67 c� 7 Dallas ~v-' Wo 80 ',.3 -- -- -- Grand Mesquite _ "• Arlington Prairie 1.1 77 eamn 67 il.mega hl 1 , 775 Springs ,s 360 :, .I.,: IL �•' _ Kennedale SL.-.. Cancanvl'ie Seapnvdh Jsa^uol Hu!rhex, na 'aa. p=Soto w.'.o ••c.. Westlake is conveniently located between DFW Airport and Alliance Airport, on the south side of State Highway 114, providing quick, easy access to all areas of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex. The unique location of Westlake is ideal for many of its major corporate campuses and residential communities. A common ideal shared by our corporate and individual residents is their support of the existing character and charm of the community,as well as a commitment to maintaining quality and excellence in new development. 2 Resolution 13-24A 3. WESTLAKE'S"VVM", CHALLENGES,AND OPPORTUNITIES In 2009,the Town Council approved its first Vision,Values,and Mission Statements as well as a Strategic Plan driven by this "VVM". In 2011, the Town began updating its VVM moving toward a strategic issues driven format for its strategic plan,as well as utilizing a balanced score card system for measuring the organization's performance. The Town's current VISION,VALUES,MISSION statements are: Town of Westlake Vision Statement Westlake is an oasis of tranquility and natural beauty amidst an ever expanding urban landscape. Vision Points Vision Points —A SENSE OF PLACE— Innovation Distinctive neighborhoods, architecturally vibrant 10° corporate campuses,grazing longhorns, Educational Leaders soaring red-tailed hawks,meandering roads lt�>' and trails,lined with natural stone Family Friendly and Welcoming and native oaks. 91 Engaged Citizens " WE ARE LEADERS Preservation of Our Natural Beauty A premiere place to live,leadership in public Strong Aesthetic Standards education,corporate and governmental -,>. partnerships, and high development standards. Transparent Government 1p, 9. Fiscal Responsibility "WE ARE A CARING COMMUNITY " 9. Informed residents, small town charm and values, historical preservation. EXEMPLARY GOVERNANCE"' Mission Statement Town officials, both elected and appointed,exhibit respect, "On behalf of the citizens, stewardship,vision, the mission of the Town of Westlake and transparency. 10- is to be a one-of-a-kind community that blends our rural atmosphere —SERVICE EXCELLENCE with our vibrant culture Public service that is responsive and metropolitan location.„ and professional,while balancing efficiency, effectiveness and financial stewardship. 3 Resolution 13-24A The Westlake Mayor and Town Council are united in their view that the community enjoys much strength and unique assets as well as an outstanding quality of life that must be carried forward. Its history of responsible planning and zoning,along with a growing corporate campus base,is viewed as a benefit to the community. The Mayor, Council and staff continue to anticipate, identify, and prepare for external conditions or activities, which would detract from the success and unique development of the Town. Special attention is given to practicing fiscal conservatism while delivering the highest quality of services to our residents. Westlake has had to deal with challenges in the past as well as recently. Some of those recent challenges have including dealing with oil and gas drilling within the Town, creating a retail base, developing sustainable revenue opportunities (including a Town property tax), efficient service delivery, public safety concerns, and the funding and development of Westlake Academy. 4. TOWN OF WESTLAKE PROFILE A. HISTORY The Town of Westlake has a short, but fascinating history. The geographic region, known as the place where the cross timbers met the prairie, holds tales of settlers from the Peters Colony, . •'" - Indian treaties signed by Sam Houston,tremendous archeological treasures,and some of the oldest settlements in north Texas. _ The region has always been known for its natural beauty, its trade value, and its wonderful people. The Town of Westlake ander; northeast Tarrant County has maintained that distinction over s the years, becoming one of the most desirable and sought after places to live in America. In 1956, Dallas lawyer Glenn Turner purchased about 2,000 acres along State Highway 114. The area came to be known as Circle T Ranch. Soon after, ranches and homeowners in the surrounding community incorporated, taking the name Westlake.The area included what is known today as Westlake, plus the area north,to the northern shore of Denton Creek. In the early 1970s, Houston developers Johnson and Loggins and professional golfer Ben Hogan approached Westlake about building a golf course,country club,and a housing development. Residents'interests differed. In 1973,Westlake disannexed this area from its corporate boundaries, clearing the way for that upscale housing development and golf course now known as the Town of Trophy Club. Nelson Bunker Hunt,a Texas oil millionaire, purchased the Circle T Ranch in the 1970s and it became a social hub for glamorous parties attended by celebrities from around the world. Hunt declared bankruptcy in 1989 and the Circle T Ranch was purchased by Ross Perot Jr. in 1993, owner of Hillwood Properties. While at times the Town and Hillwood have had disagreements over the type of TUMAM' (01'\T) development that should occur in Westlake, that r. _.2M. N c ) � „-- relationship today is strong and has had a huge positive impact on Westlake with Hillwood bringing substantial .` �4==~:'.� :• u4_ business and residential development to Westlake. These �; y �- ' developments include Fidelity Investments, Chrysler Y>, Financial,Vaquero Estates,and Deloitte University. I_ 'r- 4 Resolution 13-24A B. WESTLAKE MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT Taking its name from its location west of Lake Grapevine,the Town was incorporated in 1956 as a Type A General Law Town under the rules of the State of Texas. The Town Council is comprised of a Mayor and five Council Members who are elected at large for a two (2) year staggered term each May. In 1999 The Town, by referendum, adopted the council-manager form of government. The Council is entirely responsible for creating Town policy. The Council hires and directs the Town Manager who administers the daily operations of the Town, insures that Town policies are implemented and enforced, as well as serves as the Superintendent of Westlake Academy. The Westlake Town Council was recognized in 2012 by the Texas City Management Association as the City Council of the year for their commitment to good governance. ;Ak Laura Carol Michael Clifton Dave Rick Wheat Langdon Barrett Cox Levitan Rennhack Mayor Mayor Pro-Tem -------------------------------------Council Members------------------------------------- C. TOWN OPERATIONS The Town of Westlake has an approved an operating and capital improvement budget of approximately $29 million for Fiscal Year 2012/2013, and includes approximately 95 full-time equivalent employees (municipal and academic). The Town of Westlake provides a full level of public services to its citizens, as well as operates the only municipally owned charter school in Texas. The Town has received awards for its citizens, communications program as well as recognition for excellence in financial reporting. The Town has a rolling 5 year capital improvement program and has invested heavily in the last 3 years in maintaining and improving its infrastructure as well as public buildings at Westlake Academy. The Town of Westlake utilizes a service delivery model that is mixture of direct service delivery (example, school operations and fire/ems), as well as out-sourcing via the private sector and other local governmental entities. For example,a private firm is used for solid waste collection and disposal. Inter-local agreements are used to out-source police and water treatment services to neighboring municipalities and special districts are used to provide sewage treatment services for the Town. In the Town's most recent resident survey(2011),the services provided by the Town received the following satisfaction ratings: 01 . Overall Satisfaction With Town Services by Major Category 40'k. :i 1 Lit«:bv«,...ut iuwr,cum nwrnc ebur. 47"-.. ,'.". if)"L r...1M n•.d .rnh.r.w�..ar vl•-:.lr.rv..'hMY by T.�wn 4f)-,k �slfN ar ubb A'awvsc� :i ti":. ;Yl":. � iK F;r.i•. b.vis ro-'r y.bw,I fr5y.1'„G fv.'w.b✓. 44% .. u.... :O^� 40"`.. c;ri^. Eur•. .�_ .. =Vwy`.iab.b«7.�.1 Q+ababwl,41 C-1t•Iw.bat1. OU.waabsN�f<1 .I 5 Resolution 13-24A D. WESTLAKE COMMUNITY EVENTS Westlake is a family-friendly environment where events are held to help get our residents out and participating in activities with their children and neighbors. y1c i �"S Arbor Day. Held at Glenwyck Park this annual celebration is an afternoon of activities, f live entertainment, best cookie competitions, auctions, and a variety of great food. z' ` Kids' activities have included pony rides, face painting, games, crafts, and an obstacle , course. In addition, there are educational sessions on tree care advice, andj complimentary trees. Admission is free. The Town is an official "Tree City, USA" Ar or Day at Glenwyck Park community. - Decoration Day. The Westlake Preservation Historical Society sponsors its annual "Decoration Day" event each Memorial Day in Westlake at the Odd Fellow Cemetery. This community event is a public commemoration of veterans, both past and present, who have served our country and defended our freedom and liberties. Activities include live music,treasure hunts for the kids, and a homemade ice-cream competition. Past events have included live reenactments of people and events pertaining to Westlake's history.The event ends at sunset. Masterwork Concert Series. The Masterworks Music Series is a variety of free music programs. These free concerts are for arts lovers of all ages and feature instrumental and vocal music ranging from Country & Western to Blues & Jazz with the entertainment of local, regional and national artists. The concert season begins in April and features a performance each Thursday through the month of May. Performances are held at the Solana Village Center. E. WESTLAKE ACADEMY The Westlake Academy is an Open Enrollment Charter School that opened September 1, 2003. Westlake Academy distinguishes itself among neighboring educational offerings with a particular focus on producing students who are globally minded,critical thinkers. The campus is sited on a scenic 22 acre (approx.) site with approximately 60,000 of physical plant comprising its current facilities. The programs of the International Baccalaureate Organization (Primary Years Program, Middle Years Program, and Diploma Program) have been selected as the educational model utilized at the Academy. Use of educational technology is pervasive used to enrich the classroom curriculum. An environment rich with heritage, the Westlake Academy mission is to provide educational opportunities to each child in keeping with his or her individual needs. Westlake Academy is a K-12 public charter school, meaning it is a school of choice. It was recently recognized as a top 50 school (at#36) in the Washington Post Challenge Index for 2012. The Academy is a premier learning establishment that is ranked in the top three (3%) percent of all public schools in the State of Texas and prides itself on providing a learning environment where students have the resources and facilities to excel. Newsweek ranked the Academy at #18 in American high schools. In 2012 U.S. News& World Report ranked Westlake Academy#5 in Texas, #6 in U.S. charter schools,and#37 of 22,000 U.S.public high schools. Westlake Academy is the Town's largest operating unit with a staff of sixty(60) and a current enrollment of 665. The school serves children from the Town of Westlake (comprising approximately 30% of the school's enrollment, although this segment is growing), as well as children from its outer boundaries as defined with by the Texas Education Agency. Entrance into the Academy from these outer boundaries is through a wait list set by a yearly lottery as required by State and Federal law. Children living within the Town are automatically eligible to attend Westlake Academy, a factor that requires the Town to exercise close scrutiny on its residential growth patterns as well as residential land use and zoning. The Academy has a recently completed facility master plan that is integrated into the Town's overall capital improvement program. An $8.5 million dollar facility program to add 3 buildings to the campus is in its initial stages of implementation. Westlake Academy Campus Westlake is also served by three(3) excellent independent public school districts;Carroll ISD,Northwest ISD,and Keller ISD. Children of Westlake { residents also have the choice of sending their children to these public schools,depending on the location of their residence in Westlake. 6 Resolution 13-24A F WESTLAKE DEVELOPMENT FACTS AND FIGURES ' The Town of Westlake has experienced exponential growth in the last decade;the national census reported 207 permanent residents in 2000 and 992 permanent residents in 2010. The 2010 Census provides a benchmark of 302 households in Westlake as of the r, r summer of 2010. The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) estimates Westlake's population in 2012 at 1,010. Daytime population during the work week is estimated at 10 947 - 12,000. ,,�; Vaquero Estates The Town's land area covers 6.6 square miles, which is situated in the northern triangle of the Fort Worth-Dallas area in Northeast Tarrant County. Today, the Town of Westlake is home to several neighborhoods, all of which share a commitment to excellence, but each possess their own unique character and charm. All residents live in single-family homes and there is an award winning private golf course in Town. The median age in Westlake is 47, and 51% of the residents are female with 52% of the Town's residents having lived in Westlake for five(5)of less years. The Town is approximately 20-30% built out with the majority of new development continuing to be corporate > ,l � campuses. There has been an increase over the last decade a . V'' ' in high-end residential development located around the s, s I"fit Vaquero Golf Course, Glenwyck Farms, and Terra Bella. The Town's focus on high-quality development has led to more than 2.15 million square feet of commercial space, valued at over$600 million, being added since 2005 with an additional 750,000 square feet coming on line in the last 18 f _✓i months with the opening of Deloitte University(see below). • According to the Tarrant County Appraisal District's records, in 2012 the average market value of a Westlake residence is$1.3 million. In 2012 the Town has seen an upswing in residential building permits. While home construction in Westlake did slow in 2008-09 due to the impacts of the national economic recession,Westlake's residential construction size and value have increased steadily over the last 10 years. In 2010,the average size of new home construction was 13,500 square feet with an average estimated construction cost of$2.14 million. A 5 year history of residential building permits activity in Westlake is as follows: ➢ 2012—15 average value$1,940,763 ➢ 2011—12 average value$1,376,525 ➢ 2010— 7 average value $1,480,042 ➢ 2009— 9 average value$2,178,260 r ➢ 2008—10 average value$1,141,460 ti , a In August 2012 a study commissioned by the Town conducted by School District Strategies examined the impacts of developed and undeveloped residentially zoned property on Westlake Academy ` - enrollment, both current and future. That study determined that presently there were at that time 162 vacant developable lots available in Westlake for new home construction. Additionally, a Glen wyck Farms Entry new 84 lot single family residential subdivision was recently zoned and will soon be in the platting process with an estimated home value of $1.2 million. Additionally, new retail development recently opened in northwest Westlake at the intersection of State Highways 377 and 170. 7 Resolution 13-24A Westlake was recognized in 2010 as certified"gold level"Scenic City for its strong development, aesthetic, and open space standards. In 2011 Forbes Magazine named Westlake as having the highest per capita income of any community in the country. ?► --r �FM1938 The $15 million TxDOT project known as the F.M. 1938 (Davis , Artist Blvd) improvement project, begun in FY 09/10, was recently Rendering completed creating a new major north/south corridor in Westlake. Ultimately this road will be improved southward through Keller and Southlake to F.M. 1709(Southlake Blvd). This corridor significantly impacts mobility in the region and is now ----------- undergoing -----.undergoing significant streetscaping by the Town . In addition, Deloitte University, a $300 million, 107 acre, international corporate training facility was recently completed. The 700,000 sq. ft. facility features over 800 hotel rooms, office space, conference centers, amenity {: centers, as well as many on-site parks, trails, and water 13 r,t :,~a features. Deloitte University represents another step towards Westlake's goal to become an education- centered community and was recognized by the Texas Economic Development Council in 2012 with a Community r Economic Development award for the economic benefits that Westlake and the State of Texas derived from this project. Deloitte University Campus According to NCTCOG,estimates of Westlake's housing and population for 2012 is: January 1,2012 Estimate for Westlake Housing Type Housing Occupancy Household Population Units Rate Size Estimate Single Family 327 .941 3.285 1,012 Multi-family 0 .803 1.711 0 Other 0 .838 3.200 0 Group Quarters Population January 1,2012 Population Estimate(Calculated) 1,012 January 1,2012 Population Estimate(Published)* 1,010 )I v. Fidelity Campus 8 Resolution 13-24A G. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND AREA EMPLOYERS The DFW Metro area is home to more Fortune 500 companies than any other area in the United States. Some of those companies reside in Westlake,others are located nearby(as reflected in the list below). Companies located in Westlake draw a large work force to Westlake creating a large daytime population,Monday-Friday,of an estimated 10,000-12,000. This in turn affects the demand on municipal services and infrastructure. Some of the community's top employers are: Fidelity Investments,TD Auto Finance,and Core Logic. Several companies have offices in Solana,a high-profile corporate Courtyard at Solana Complex campus near State Highway 114.Solana's Village Circle also provides a mix of retail spaces and restaurants,plus offers the 296-room Marriott Solana hotel. Westlake's proximity to major highways as well as area airports further enhances its appeal as a corporate office location. Westlake is located 12 miles to the west of DFW Airport and 7 miles to the east of the Alliance Airport. The Solana Office Complex was the first of Westlake's corporate locations; originally built by IBM in the 1980's. Since then Westlake has collected additional corporate residents like, Fidelity Investments,Wells Fargo,CoreLogic(formerly First American Title), Chrysler Financial, Levi Strauss, and many more. A portion of Solana has gone into receivership. The receiver is making progress in filling vacant office space. Major Area Employers Employees AMR Corporation 15,143 Bell Helicopter/Textron 4,873 BNSF Railway 2,500 Sabre Holdings 3,000 Gaylord Texan Resort 2,000 DFW Airport 1,900 Healthmarkets 1,200 Marriott Solana Hotel Larger Local Employers Employees Fidelity Investments 3,600 CoreLogic 1,500 TD Auto Finance 650 _ Wells Fargo 585 Solana Hotel 150 Walco International 145 ,Marriott aquero Club 132 Solana Campus 9 Resolution 13-24A H. TAX RATE INFORMATION Sales Tax. Westlake's sales Tax Rate is 8.25%,with 6.25%going to the state, 1%as a local tax, .5%as a 4B economic development sales tax,and.5%as a property reduction sales tax(formerly a 4A economic development sales tax). Municipal Property Tax. The Town of Westlake instituted a property tax in 2010. The current adopted ad valorem tax rate is$.15684 of which,maintenance and operations (M&0) is$.141970, and debt service or interest&sinking(I&S) is $.014870. In addition to the property tax levied by the Town, there are also multiple taxing jurisdictions within Westlake's boundaries; whether or not a resident is required to pay tax to a particular jurisdiction is determined by where they live within Westlake and the boundaries of the respective taxing jurisdiction. Westlake's 2012-13 taxable valuation is over three quarter of a billion dollars($880 million). Currently,the following taxing jurisdictions collect property taxes in Westlake: • Carroll Independent School District • Denton County • Keller Independent School District • Northwest Independent School District • Tarrant County • Tarrant County College • Tarrant County Hospital mum • Trophy Club Municipal Utility District#1 Looking East from Westlake Academy Campus AltA do 4 .� 10 Resolution 13-24A 5. RATIONALE AND EXPECTATIONS DEFINED FOR THE REVISION AND UPDATE OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE'S COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The Town of Westlake's existing Comprehensive Plan (Plan or Comp Plan) was adopted in 1992 and has been amended periodically since its adoption. Although it has been updated and reasonably followed, the Town's governing body, the Town Council, identified the need to revisit the Comprehensive Plan. This is to insure its relevance and integrity as a guiding document for the Town's future planning and growth, particularly in light of any possible changes and trends in development that may have occurred since the Comprehensive Plan was originally conceived. Beginning in 2009, the Town Council identified in its strategic plan the need to review and possibly update the Town's current Comprehensive Plan. Because examination of the Town's Comprehensive Plan is a Council strategic priority,Town Staff has held workshops with the Town Council and the Chairman of the Planning & Zoning Commission (P&Z) to examine the current Comprehensive Plan. From the first such discussion,the consensus from that discussion was a general satisfaction in the development patterns that had occurred in Westlake under its current Comprehensive Plan,as well as the current Plan's content and direction (including its land uses, open space standards, development quality standards, and development patterns). Thus,Town Council direction to Staff at that time was to pursue a review of the Comprehensive Plan in that light,with the understanding to both preserve existing planning directions while,at the same time, examining revisions of areas in the Plan identified as needing to be studied because of changing conditions. This was to be done with an emphasis placed on preserving the quality and integrity of the planning and development that has occurred to date in Westlake. Since that first direction about updating the Town's Comprehensive Plan, on October 19, 2012 the P&Z and Town Council held a facilitated workshop to "drill down" further on issues related to updating the Plan. A number of questions were asked in a survey format. The results of the answers to those "drill down" survey questions about updating the Plan are contained in this RFP's Appendix and all proposers are strongly encouraged to read them. A. SCOPE OF SERVICES&TASKS The Comprehensive Plan is viewed primarily as a land use and urban design plan. However, by necessity it will need to address related issues. Westlake's Comprehensive Plan is also envisioned as both a physical plan and a policy plan to guide development throughout the Town, and is intended to serve as a framework for subsequent, more detailed planning. The Town has established the following plan elements to serve as a guide for the Plan's development note: the proposer is welcome to suggest creative or innovative additions or modifications to these components): • Town Wide Profile: Prepare a profile of the Town of Westlake, including history, location, and general physical characteristics. Include a background of the comprehensive planning process. • Development of Goals & Objectives: Prepare detailed goals, objectives and policy statements that will be used as a guide for evaluating development proposals in the Town. • Demographic&Population Analysis and Projections: Prepare a demographic and economic profile based on collection and analysis of data,including population projections and trends of socio-economic variables. 11 Resolution 13-24A • Inventory of Existing Conditions: Prepare a profile of existing conditions for land use, natural environment, thoroughfares and transportation, community facilities, educational facilities, and other salient topics. Provide general maps if applicable. • Land Use Plan: Clearly define all land use categories and establish criteria to be utilized in determining the location of these uses. Analyze the locations for future community and educational facilities. Provide a general land use map. • Transportation (Circulation) Plan: Define current and future circulation patterns for pedestrians, bikes and motor vehicles. Analyze existing thoroughfare system for improvement. • Open Space Plan: Define current open/green space and develop a plan to improve and connect trails, parks and open space. The successful consultant will provide a team that will have the primary responsibility, with appropriate support by Town staff(as determined by the Town),of developing: • A Plan Vision Framework: A vision framework element will provide a foundation for the future direction for the Town and serve to organize the Comprehensive Plan. The Plan update process shall start with a visioning process, crafted in cooperation with the Town and working under the "umbrellas' of the Town Council's vision, values, and mission found in the Town's strategic plan. As such, the Plan's vision framework shall identify current and future major issues and challenges, as well as identify new directions and opportunities. The Plan's vision statement will identify key themes to be used as a policy framework to update the Plan and as well as provide a mechanism to guide discussions about the future direction of the Town. • Land Use: Creating a land use category element that will provide meaningful and useful land use recommendations. The land use recommendations will be used as a guide for both rezoning petitions and potential Town sponsored re-zonings. Implementation of the Land Use element may also involve text changes such as the creation of new districts, new overlay districts, or the modification of existing districts. Note: Land use recommendations J must undergo financial sustainability analysis by other Town designated • ' }. consultants as referenced in Sections 6C of this RFP. Further, land use recommendations should demonstrate an understanding of the dynamic of residential growth on enrollment at Westlake Academy. s • Environment and Sustainability: In her book, Community Leadership 4.0, author and futurist Carolyn Corbin defines sustainability as "...the capacity of a system to maintain its vitality far into the future"(Corbin, pg 51). Certainly the Town wishes to take a pro-active leadership role in addressing the challenge of the growing array of environmental stresses caused by urbanization and for that reason,this element shall provide a thorough analysis of the natural systems that support Westlake's physical environment. However, a wide-ranging and long-term 5 ,..> perspective is encouraged in addressing sustainability that goes beyond environmental or economic sustainability, and considers community sustainability. For that reason, the Town wishes for respondents to this RFP to use Corbin's broader definition of sustainability when considering the Plan, i.e. the capacity of Westlake to maintain its Terra Bella Walking Trails vitality as a community far into the future. 12 Resolution 13-24A • Transportation (Circulation): The transportation element shall provide a reference for all transportation plans (vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle) impacting the Town, provide a structure in which the Town's transportation 71T investment priorities can be coordinated, compliment/reinforce the Town's economic development and land use priorities,as well as convey an understanding as to the transportation element's impact on the economic viability of land uses in the Town. • Economic Development: The economic development element of the Plan shall contain economic data and analysis and a comprehensive understanding of the regional economy and Westlake's place within it. An economic development element shall provide detailed policies with regards to non- residential land use and public investment priorities. These policies shall reinforce the City's desire to grow in a sustainable manner. Turner Lake at Circle T Ranch • Housing: The housing element of the Plan should provide information on current and future housing needs and should include a general inventory of housing stock and developable land. This element should look at changing demographic trends at a local,regional,and national level as well as current and forecasted housing trend impacts on the Town's sustainability. • Regional Coordination:The Plan shall reflect that Westlake is part of an economically interconnected region that shares transportation and public utilities infrastructure. This element shall address both how regional plans have impacted the Town's Comprehensive Plan and how Westlake's Plan will impact regional plans and those of adjacent communities. • Community Facilities: The location and design of public facilities have a significant impact on the neighborhoods in which they are located.When considering new municipal facilities,it is appropriate that the updated Plan identifies how the Town might both meet its future space and facilities needs, while also furthering its broader planning goals, including promoting Solana revitalization, and economic and environmental sustainability. • Integration of Parks, Public Open Space, Pedestrian Trail/Sidewalk Plans, and Recreation Plans: The updated Comprehensive Plan shall integrate these systems in a manner that meets current and future community needs. • Integration of Public Utilities Plans:The Town provides retail water and sewer services within its boundaries with the exception of the Solana area which is served by the Trophy Club Municipal Utility District . The Town's wholesale water supplier is the City of Fort Worth and its waste water treatment provider is the Trinity River Authority. The consultant shall prepare their recommendations for Westlake's Comprehensive Plan understanding the Town's water and sewer infrastructure capacity and the demands that various land uses will place on it. • Future Growth: The Town's remaining undeveloped property totals approximately 70-80% of its total land area. The consultant's proposal shall include build out estimates in terms of day time and permanent population growth conducted in conjunction with economic feasibility analysis of proposed land uses. 13 Resolution 13-24A The successful consultant team will be responsible for delivering drafts of all elements for which their team has primary responsibility. The team may also be asked to deliver interim documents related to these elements, such as background studies, technical memoranda, and draft policy recommendations. Specific deliverables, including a "turn-key", web based interactive comprehensive plan, will be worked out with the selected consultant team following awarding of the RFP and prior to finalizing the scope and contract for services under this engagement. Development of these components should include the following: • Review of current goals and objectives and the addition of new priorities identified by the consultant to meet changing conditions • Review and understand the Town's current zoning ordinance, districts, and entitlements including their potential for demand on service,fiscal impacts,and future development patterns • Comparison of existing zoning to current and recommended land use categories • Identify any need for incorporation of corridor and vicinity plans • Promotion of a sustainable community • Recommendations for possible revitalization and redevelopment of area known as Solana (PD-1), including areas of potential public/private partnerships. • Examination of fiscal impacts of current and recommended land uses • Identify needed revisions to land use categories to meet changing conditions • Incorporation of visuals in the Plan • Inclusion of a web based component for the Plan • Review of Town's ordinances to see if they support implementation of the consultant's recommendations The update of the Comprehensive Plan will look ahead for new opportunities and revisit the past by looking at those areas that require improvement. The update will include a review of the Plan's current goals and objectives and consideration of new goals, objectives, and policies identified to meet new or emerging conditions and trends,all of which will require alignment with the Town's Strategic Plan. The Town seeks to produce a Comprehensive Plan that is user friendly, practical, as well as highly visual, using maps,charts, renderings, photos,and other graphic tools to convey information and illustrate plan themes, goals, policies, and other plan elements. The consultant team will be responsible for the •� r creation of an interactive website version of the Comprehensive Plan,with maps and graphics to serve as a tool to inform the public about growth,planning,and development. While this RFP details the Town's expectations for its Comprehensive Plan updating process; the Town is expecting proposers to provide their own insights, thoughts, and ideas y, regarding the updating process. Responses to this RFP shall include innovative ideas on how to engage and include the public in the process, create an interactive web based Comprehensive Plan, and generate land use recommendations, policies,goals,and objectives. In order to achieve this end, proposing consulting teams shall include the following disciplines: Bluebonnets at Solana Campus 14 I Resolution 13-24A • Land Use Planning • Urban Design • Zoning,including emerging best practices �� t- • Sustainable practices �� • Transportation Planning and Engineering • Civil Engineering • Public Participation • Environmental Engineering and Planning • Economic Development • Fiscal Impact Analysis • Web Design B. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Public input is a vital part of the planning process. It instills a sense of pride and ownership in the plan with the community, thereby leading to a greater desire to implement its goals and objectives. The consultant shall design, implement, recommend, and guide a public participation process incorporating effective and innovative participation techniques.This process should include any formal committees,focus groups, or other mechanisms recommended by the consultant. Such mechanisms could include conducting public participation forums, developing and utilizing neighborhood citizen planning groups, or utilizing the Town's internet site to solicit public. The proposing consultant should explain their recommendations in this regard in their RFP submission. Additionally, the proposer should anticipate the creation of a Town Council appointed task force to work with the successful proposer's consulting team. This task force may(note: this has not been finalized at the writing of the RFP) be comprised of some members of the Town Council, some members of the P&Z, some Town Staff, as well as residents and stakeholder groups. The Town Staff will recommend to the Town Council,when the appropriate time arrives to appoint this task force,a group of 7-9 to work with the task force. C. IMPLEMENTATION The most common criticism of any plan is that it sits on a shelf and gathers dust. In order for this plan to avoid this fate, the Plan shall include a proactive and rational work program or strategy for implementation of the goals and objectives of the Plan. D. GENERAL PRODUCTS EXPECTED FROM THE PLANNING PROCESS • Completed Plan document with content as outlined in this RFP including recommended land uses, recommended zoning categories, transportation plan, open space plan, utility plans, development policies,fiscal sustainability analysis,associated data and supportive tables,graphics,charts and maps as well as any recommended design criteria for the transportation plan roadway types. • Reproducible plan document,including 20 original copies. • Electronic file of plan document: Microsoft Office 2007 compatible format. • Means to host the Plan on the Town's web site that will include interactive maps. • Land use map in Arcview compatible format with summary of major recommendations. 15 Resolution 13-24A E. STUDY SCHEDULE(GENERALLY) Although subject to change at the Town's discretion, Project participation by the selected consultant is anticipated to begin in late Spring 2013. Although the final completion of the plan is somewhat dependent upon the interaction with and decision making speed of the Town government, Proposers should target that the entire plan would be completed in draft form no later than December 2013 with final adoption no later than March-April 2014. The details of this schedule will be identified during contract negotiations with the consultant team selected to be recommended to be to be retained by the Town. 6. INFORMATION FOR CONSULTANTS A. SELECTION OF CONSULTANT A Town Staff RFP Evaluation Committee with review, analyze, and select the consultant to be recommended to the Town Council for this engagement. All proposals are considered public records unless determined otherwise by the Town. The Staff RPF Evaluation Committee (Committee) reserves the right to request additional information from consultants submitting proposals. The Committee may schedule interviews from a short list after a review of proposals. The Town of Westlake reserves the right to reject any or all proposals,and the right at its sole discretion to accept the proposal it considers most favorable to the Town's interest.The Town further reserves the right to reject all proposals and seek new proposals when such procedure is deemed reasonable and in its best interest. The Town also reserves the right,subject to negotiation — - with the identified recommended consultant, to modify the scope of this engagement to meet the Town's needs, budget, schedule, and financial ti resources. -L B. METHOD OF COMPENSATION Upon selection,the Town will propose a contract to 4, R `\ ` the consultant for review. The contract will be fora \ not-to-exceed amount, with reimbursement on a �I► monthly percentage-of-work performed minus a ten s (10) percent retainage that will be paid upon Solana Complex Aerial View completion and acceptance of the final work product. Final completion and acceptance shall be defined as when the Comprehensive Plan is adopted by the Westlake Town Council. C. WILLINGNESS TO WORK WITH OTHER TOWN DESIGNATED CONSULTANTS ON THIS ENGAGEMENT Selection of the successful proposer may include the requirement, at the Town's discretion, that the selected consultant collaborate with other Town consultants retained by the Town (or working as a subcontractor to the selected consultant) to analyze the consultant's recommendations from a.) a real estate development feasibility perspective and b.) an economic feasibility/financial sustainability perspective. 16 Resolution 13-24A D. RELATED APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS Prospective respondents shall review and familiarize themselves with the Town's current Comprehensive Plan and additional related documents. Most of the relevant documents are accessible on the Town's web site at www.westiake-tx.org with the exception of the Town's FM 1938 streetscape plan and utility master plans which will be furnished by the Town upon request. In addition to the information contained in this RFP and its Appendix, some of the documents that are recommended to become familiar with,if proposing to this RFP,include: • Town's current Comprehensive Plan,Zoning Maps,and Zoning Ordinances • Town's FM 1938(Davis Blvd)Corridor Streetscape Plan • Town's FY 12-13 Budget • Town's FY 12-13 Westlake Academy budget • Town's Five(5)Year Capital Improvement Program • August 2012 Report by School District Strategies Re: Potential Impact on Current Zoning Entitlements on Westlake Academy enrollment • Town Current Strategic Plan and Westlake Academy Strategic Plan E. STAKEHOLDERS The Town's Comprehensive Plan affects a long and diverse list of H rl1agogovernment, institutional, private, and neighborhood-based stakeholders. Many of these stakeholders have a significant interest in the Comprehensive Plan update, given that it will guide future decisions about zoning, infrastructure, public facilities,growth,and the environment. The following list of stakeholders, plus others not listed, may be involved in the revision process at some point, as agreed to by Terra Bella Estates Entryway the Town and the selected consultant: • Town Government Stakeholders: Includes,but is not limited to the Mayor,Town Council, Planning& Zoning Commission,Historical Preservation Committee,and the Public Arts Society as well as Westlake affiliate groups(WA Foundation, House of Commons,and Athletic Council). • Neighboring Municipal Governments: Trophy Club, Roanoke,Southlake,Fort Worth,and Keller • Independent School Districts: Keller ISD, Carroll ISD,and Northwest ISD • County Government:Tarrant County Elected Officials • Agency Stakeholders Including(but not limited to): North Central Texas Council of Governments, Metroport City Partnership(a public-private area transportation advocacy group),Tarrant County Transportation Council,1-35 Coalition,Trophy Club Municipal Utility District,City of Fort Worth,Trinity River Authority,and the Texas Department of Transportation(TxDOT) • Private/Business Stakeholders:Northwest Metroport Chamber of Commerce,Southlake Chamber of Commerce • Homebuilders • Businesses: Fidelity Investments,Deloitte University,etc(see Community profile section of this RFP for the specific listing of Westlake businesses) • Developers and Major Landowners: Hillwood Properties,Solana(represented by Cassidy Turley),Paul Spain(Terra Bella),Centurion America(Mehrdad Moayedi)and Roland Arthur • Community Stakeholders: Neighborhood groups and general citizenry(diversity of ages desired) The update process shall include these stake holders via some form of public participation, as agreed to by the selected consultant and the Town (see Section 5B of this RFP). This process could include visioning, consensus 17 Resolution 13-24A building, and conflict resolution around key issues with participation by selected, representative range of people such as neighborhoods,interest groups,businesses,developers,property owners,and others. F. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION In addition to the documents listed above in Section 6D above, • Attached is an area map that shows Westlake streets and its current corporate boundaries. • To further assist the consultant,copies of the 1992 Westlake Comprehensive Plan are available for review at the Town Municipal Offices, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or on-line at: http://www.westiake-tx.org/index.aspx?NID=140 • The Town's Zoning Ordinance and Subdivision regulations are contained in the Town's Municipal Code and can be viewed on the Town's website at www.westlake-tx.org.Zoning regulations are found in Chapter 102 of the Town's municipal code. • Utility master plans and the FM 1938 Streetscape Plan will be furnished upon request. 7. PROJECT APPROACH Proposing consultants will need to utilize the Town's existing Comprehensive Plan as a point of departure for this engagement,being mindful of the Town Council's direction to Staff outlined above in Section 5 of this RFP. In that context, the selected consultant is encouraged to propose an outline with new or updated elements intended to strengthen the plan as a policy document, make it more user- friendly, eliminate redundancies, and address emerging planning issues. Initially, the selected consultant team will work in close ` . collaboration with the Staff RFP Evaluation Committee `4 -- mentioned above in Section 6A of this RFP. Eventually, as described in Section 5B above, the selected consultant should anticipate working with a Town Council Task Force during formulation of the Town's new Comprehensive Plan. ati Additionally,the selected consultant should craft their proposal Vaquero Estates Entryway in a manner which provides the Town a deliverable that will allow for the Town to administer the Plan with limited staffing,yet allow for: • A Clear Plan Vision Statement:The Comprehensive Plan shall have a clear vision statement that meshes and integrates with the Town's Vision, Values, and Mission (VVM) found in its current Strategic Plan that states what Westlake can and will be in the future.This statement should serve as a framework for the revised Plan and should be articulated in the Plan as a statement in the Plan's introduction, through themes, or as a method of organizing the Comprehensive Plan elements. • Keeping the Policies Current: Changes in the marketplace, design standards, evolving land use trends, rapidly changing growth patterns,and the amount of land in the short and long range planning areas warrant examination on a regular basis. The Comprehensive Plan shall include methods of examining the Plan elements every year. 18 Resolution 13-24A • Coordinating Multiple Planning Efforts: As an overarching policy guide for the Town, the Comprehensive Plan update shall be coordinated with more specific plans created for its transportation, infrastructure, and parks systems. It shall also be easily integrated and coordinated with the implementation of the Town's Strategic Plan. • Relationship in the Northeast Tarrant County area and NCTCOG Region: Westlake is not alone. Westlake's neighboring cities (Keller, Trophy Club, Roanoke, Fort Worth, and Southlake) all have experienced robust growth as well. Westlake's future is inter-connected with the transportation, economy, housing, and quality of life issues in :g F' the communities that surround it. In addition to addressing local issues,the Comprehensive Plan shall acknowledge regional issues and incorporate a regional perspective. • Economic and Environmental Sustainability: Growth patterns and land uses within the Town and the region have resulted in what many consider to be a high quality of life,with excellent schools and housing opportunities, safe neighborhoods,and a wide range of shopping choices. However, Westlake Firefighter Paramedics these same development patterns raise sustainability issues. Within Corbin's broad definition of sustainability mentioned above in Section 6A, the Town is interested in pursuing policies that promote both economic and environmental sustainability,including mitigating environmental impacts and creating workable development patterns. Economic sustainability considers the cost of growth which includes determining growth's fiscal impacts,cost of extending infrastructure,and the provision of public services.An analysis of the fiscal impacts of current and recommended land uses is necessary to provide the Town with the information necessary to determine the revenue stream necessary to fund the Town's future growth. This analysis will need to consider both municipal services, as well as services provided by Westlake Academy. Environmental sustainability will need to consider the changing nature of transportation. The Comprehensive Plan update will need to address transportation issues such as multi-modal choices, public transportation, and transit friendly development and determine what, if any, applicability or impact they will have Westlake both now and in the future. This sustainability perspective is important as the Comprehensive Plan update process considers Westlake's long-term future. Should the Town retain other designated consultants set out in Section 6C of this RFP, it will be important that the successful proposer to this RFP include them in their analysis. The following scope is presented as a guide for proposers. Respondents are invited to craft and submit their own scope. However, the key elements included in this scope must be addressed. The Town of Westlake will provide the selected consultant with • any information it has for the consultant's initial data collection, • any on-going data and GIS resources, • information on existing land use and infrastructure master plans,and • any specific elements typically prepared in-house. The Town's Project Manager for this engagement will be Mr. Eddie Edwards, Director of Planning and Development. The Town's Staff Leadership Team (which includes the Town Manager) will work closely with Mr. Edwards as he interfaces with the selected consultant,any public involvement component,and the project task force. 19 Resolution 13-24A Regarding data gathering,the Town has access to the Tarrant County Appraisal District's databases regarding property information. As a member of the North Central Texas Council of Governments,the Town access to that data base as well. The Town maintains its own data base pertaining to its development applications and approvals, current boundary and zoning map, re-zonings,as well as development standards,all of which will be of use in doing analysis of existing conditions and recent trends. This data will be made available to the selected consultant in a useful format according to the Town's best efforts. As it pertains to GIS mapping, the Town has recently begun (through an out-sourcing arrangement with an area engineering firm) converting its plats, site plans, and other maps to a GIS system. The Town will make available or provide in GIS format to the selected consultant what has been converted by the Town to its new GIS system to date. Other materials not yet converted will be furnished by the Town to the selected consultant in a mutually agreed upon technology and format. As mentioned in Section 5B of this RFP, public participation will likely be undertaken as part of this planning process. As part of the response to the RFP, the consultant shall prepare a proposed public participation plan. The public participation could include open houses, task force meetings web based information distribution and feedback, presentations to neighborhood groups or resident groups, surveys, and charrettes. However, based on Westlake's unique attributes, the responder is strongly encouraged to provide their own thoughts and ideas on how to best involve the public in this process. 8. INSTRUCTIONS FOR PROPOSALS 1. All proposals must be addressed and submitted to: Mr. Eddie Edwards Director of Planning and Development Town of Westlake 3 Village Circle,Suite 202 Westlake,TX 76262 2. Ten (10) copies of the proposal must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, . April 22, 2013. The proposal package should be labeled "WESTLAKE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PROPOSAL". All proposals should clearly state their contact person's name, title, office address, fax number, and email address so that the Town IY may contact for them further information, t questions, and Addenda notifications during the Longhorns at Circle T Ranch RFP evaluation process. 3. Any and all questions concerning proposals should be directed to Mr. Eddie Edwards, Director of Planning and Development, Town of Westlake. All questions must be submitted either by fax (817-430-1812) or by email (eedwards@west ake-tx.org). All questions and answers will be made available to all interested parties and may result in Addenda to this RFP per Item 10 in this Section outlined below. 20 Resolution 13-24A 4. If the proposer considers any portion of your proposal to be confidential and/or proprietary and that disclosure of its contents to competitors would cause them substantial competitive harm,they must clearly identify those portions of their proposal by putting the term CONFIDENTIAL OR PROPRIETARY in bold letters on the applicable page(s).The Town will attempt(but cannot guarantee) to protect the identified portions from y disclosure to the extent possible under the law. The proposer will be given notice of any request for disclosure of the identified information and given the opportunity to support their claim of confidentiality before the Texas Attorney General. Butterfly Exhibit at Arbor Day 5. Interviews will be conducted, at the Town's sole discretion, with proposers submitting proposals determined by the Town Staff Evaluation Committee to be reasonably qualified and reasonably responsive to this RFP, for recommendation for selection for this engagement. Fair and equal treatment will be shown to all proposers with respect to any opportunity for discussion and possible revision of their proposals that may follow such discussions. Such revision may be permitted after submission and prior to recommendation for selection for the purpose of obtaining best and final offers, but only with the Town's prior permission. 6. The recommended proposer must furnish and place on file with the Town an insurance certificate in compliance with the Town Standard Certificate of Insurance Specification 2.04 including a waiver of subrogation. 7. Submission Details Re: Content of Proposals. Proposals submitted in response to this RFP should address the scope of services described above in this RFP. Proposers shall, as a minimum, address each of the specific topics listed below as a minimum portion of their proposal submission (i.e. proposers may include additional information as well). Failure to include any of the below requested information may be cause for proposal to be considered non-responsive and thus,rejected. ■ Written presentation of the qualifications of their firm and their understanding of the work to be performed. ■ List of services that will be provided ■ Cost of services: Provide a detailed maximum not-to exceed cost estimate for all work to be performed as proposed in response to this RFP. Further, the proposal shall include a breakdown which shall include, at minimum, tasks to be performed, phasing and sequencing of work with a timeline,estimated number of hours for completion,and the not-to-exceed cost for each task. ■ Availability, credentials and related experience of the firm and key staff with similar studies, preferably with municipal governments. ■ Identify who will be the project manager and key staff involved if awarded ■ Provide copies of resumes of the proposed project manager and key staff. Also, include specific information on the disciplines mentioned above for each staff member. Provide information on specific experience, including design experience, with successful outcomes in conducting comprehensive plans and making presentations to public bodies. ■ Explain in detail how the project manager and key staff will be assigned to this project?What priority will be assigned to this project? Will the project manager and key staff be readily available to address any questions or concerns as well as to attend meetings to present the findings to Town Staff,a Plan Update Task Force, P&Z,and/or Town Council? 21 Resolution 13-24A ■ All proposers shall include with their proposals a list of at least three (3) current references for whom comparable work has been performed in the past three (3) years, with preference given to work in communities similar to Westlake. This list shall include the municipality's name, person to contact,address,telephone number,e-mail address,and a brief, but adequately detailed description of work performed. ■ State your firm's ability to meet and exceed the requirements set forth this RFP, including project staging,timeline,and proposed completion date. ■ How will your firm keep the Town informed of the progress of the project? ■ List of anticipated sub-contractors and/or partners (other than those Town requires successful proposer to consult with as detailed in Section 6C). ■ Provide performance guarantees that relate to the deliverables and what your firm is willing to propose as a result of non-performance or late deliverables. 8. Pre-Proposal Conference - A pre-proposal conference will be held on March 18, 2013 at 9:00 AM for the purpose of discussing the terms, conditions and requirements of the RFP and to answer questions. This conference will be held at the Town of Westlake offices, 3 Village Circle, Suite 202, Westlake, Texas. Attendance at the pre-proposal conference is not mandatory, but is strongly encouraged and could factor into the decision as to which firm to recommend to the Town Council for this engagement. 9. Timeline �� ■ RFP Issued—Monday,March 11,2013 ■ Pre-Proposal Meeting—Monday, March 18,2013,9:OOAM .� ■ Deadline for Submitting Questions—Wednesday,April 3, 2013,5:00PM ■ Deadline for Proposals—Monday,April 22,2013,5:OOPM ,� ■ Selected Consultant Interviews(tentative)— May 20-31, 2013 ■ Recommendation to the City Council(tentative)—June 17, 2013 Note: dates shown as tentative are subject to change at Town's 911 Memorial Event discretion based on availability and schedules. 10. Addenda ■ If revisions to the RFP become necessary, the Town will provide written addenda to all known, potential Proposers. All addenda issued by the Town will include a receipt form which must be signed and included with any proposal submitted to the City. If multiple addenda are issued, a separate receipt for each addendum must be included with the proposal when it is submitted to the City. ■ All Proposers wishing to be notified of any addenda should provide to the Director of Planning and Development the Proposer's name, address, telephone number, and if available, facsimile number and/or e-mail address. All questions regarding this RFP must be submitted in writing no later than close of business, 5:00 PM, April 3, 2013 to the contact listed in Item #2 of this Section of the RFP. All answers will be sent to all known interested firms by means of an addendum to the RFP. 22 Resolution 13-24A 11. Proposal Submission and Withdrawal ■ The Town will receive proposals, no later than 5:00 PM on April 22,2013, at the following address: Town of Westlake 3 Village Circle,Suite 202 Westlake,TX 76262 ■ To facilitate processing, please mark the outside of the RFP envelope or package as follows: a. WESTLAKE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE. b. The envelope or package shall also include the PROPOSER'S RETURN ADDRESS. c. Proposers shall submit ten (10) copies of the proposal in a sealed envelope or package marked as noted above. d. A Proposer may submit their proposal by personal delivery or by mail,but not by facsimile. e. The Town cautions Proposers that, in order to insure actual delivery of their proposal to the Town's offices prior to the submission deadline, they be mailed or hand-delivered at the above address. f. A proposal received by the Town after the established deadline will be returned unopened to the Proposer. ■ Proposers may withdraw their proposals by notifying the Town in writing at any time prior to the submission deadline. After the deadline, proposals shall become a record of the Town and will not be returned to the Proposers. Proposers shall be aware that after opening and during the evaluation process, all proposals submitted remain confidential. Once a decision to award is made, all proposals are subject to public disclosure consistent with state law. Proposers must invoke the exemptions to disclosure provided by law and must clearly identify in the proposal the data or other materials to be protected and state both the reasons why such exemption from public disclosure is necessary and the legal basis for such exemption. All other contents of the submitted proposals become public record. However, as stated above, the Town cannot be guarantee that any or all portions of RFP's received will not be made available to the public under the Texas Open Records Act. Proposers are encouraged, as they work on the content of their proposals for submission, to assume that their entire proposal will ultimately be deemed a public record. 12. Selection Process - The initial proposals will be reviewed by the Town's Staff Evaluation Committee as described above in Section 6A. The reviewers will evaluate and rate each proposal utilizing a number of criteria, including,but not limited to: ■ Overall responsiveness and quality of the proposal in clearly stating an understanding of the project (maximum of 30 points) ■ The nature and quality of the expertise the Proposer possesses in a full range of required disciplines (maximum 25 points) ■ The proposed project scope,timeline,and completion date(maximum 15 points) ■ The experience and availability of support staff for the project(maximum 10 points) ■ The experience and reputation of the Proposer as represented in the response and the quality of the references.(maximum 15 points) ■ Cost(maximum 5 points) 23 Resolution 13-24A After evaluating the proposals, the Town may request additional information from proposers identified by the Town as most responsive to this RFP. At its discretion,the Town may require any Proposer to make an oral presentation of their proposal to the Town RFP Staff Evaluation Committee. These presentations provide an opportunity for the Proposer to clarify the proposal for the Town. The Town will schedule any such presentations. As indicated in #9 above in this Section, the time period of May 20-31, 2013 has tentatively been set aside for these interviews. All proposers should make sure of their availability during this time for such an oral presentation, if selected for one. The Town will evaluate the written proposals and will select the Proposer which meets the best interests of the Town. The Town shall be the sole judge of its own best interests, the proposals, and the resulting negotiated agreement. The Town's decisions will be final. The Town reserves the right to negotiate any and all elements of this proposal,including,but not limited to,the fee structure and terms of the contract,with the proposing firm selected. 24 Resolution 13-24A Appendix - A 25 Resolution 13-24A Westlake Comprehensive Plan Review - Policy Guidance Workshop SurveyMonkely 1. Westlake should offer a variety of high quality upper end housing choices to its residents including single family residential estate housing, villas on smaller lots, lofts, high rise condos, low rise condos, multi-family, age-restricted, duplexes, provided, however, that all such housing types reflect the high standards to which Westlake has become accustomed. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree —� 18.2% 2 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 45.5% 5 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 1 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 2. In order to limit residential uses that will impact school enrollment growth, commercial and retail land uses that produce new ad valorem tax base and sales taxes should be considered for some areas that are currently zoned residential, even it means negotiating for utilities and infrastructure assistance or other incentives to offset the currently entitled uses. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 1 27.3% 3 Agree 45.5% 5 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 2 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 3. Raising taxes to pay for school expansion is preferable to amending the Comprehensive Plan to allow regional commercial and retail centers not contemplated in the '92 Comp Plan. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 9.1% 1 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 36.4% 4 answered question 11 skipped question 0 3 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 4. The Comp Plan revision should be prepared in a way that will establish a system by which land uses are analyzed in light of their impact on Westlake Academy, population levels, tax tolerance and their impact on the cost effectiveness of Town services. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 81.8% 9 Agree 18.2% 2 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 4 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 5. The Comp Plan review should reflect the belief that the review and regulation of land uses should be a tool to not only convey high quality design and development standards, but also help create economic sustainability for the Town government and the services it offers its residents and businesses. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 63.6% 7 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 5 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 6. The Comp Plan Revision should analyze replacing some Office uses with high quality Retail uses. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 27.3% 3 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 6 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 7. The Comp Plan Revision should analyze replacing some Office uses with high quality Mixed uses (Retail and Commercial combined with higher density residential). Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 45.5% 5 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 7 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 8. The Comp Plan Revision should analyze replacing some Office uses with high-end Single Family Residential uses. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 8 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 9. The Comp Plan Revision should analyze replacing some Office uses with Retail in combination with adjacent high-end Single Family Residential uses. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 18.2% 2 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 9 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 10. The Comp Plan Revision should offer development and redevelopment options for Solana that maintain strict quality standards while allowing more densely spaced commercial. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 81.8% 9 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 10 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 11. The Comp Plan Revision should offer development and redevelopment options for Solana that maintain strict quality standards while allowing additional retail. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 45.5% 5 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 11 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 12. The Comp Plan Revision should offer development and redevelopment options for Solana that maintain strict quality standards while allowing mixed use (commercial/retail and residential). Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree �- 18.2% 2 Neutral, No Preference 45.5% 5 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 12 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 13. In an effort to increase revenue without raising taxes, certain areas should be studied that would allow office/warehouse distribution facilities. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 9.1% 1 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 13 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 14. In an effort to increase revenue without raising taxes, certain areas should be studied that would allow adjustments in landscape setbacks on major highways to create more developable space. (currently 150' in Comp Plan, 100' in Zoning Ords). Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 14 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 15. In an effort to increase revenue without raising taxes, certain areas should be studied that would allow regional/destination Retail. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 9.1% 1 Disagree 36.4% 4 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 15 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 16. In an effort to increase revenue without raising taxes, certain areas should be studied that would allow themed entertainment venues. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 63.6% 7 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 18.2% 2 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 16 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 17. The Comp Plan revision should include recommendations for additional zoning categories that provide additional development options and revenue opportunities that take advantage of current market trends and urban planning best practices. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 9.1% 1 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 17 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 18. The Comp Plan revision should consider additional residential uses that may cause the anticipated maximum enrollment at Westlake Academy to be exceeded. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 45.5% 5 Neutral, No Preference 9.1% 1 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 27.3% 3 answered question 11 skipped question 0 18 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 19. The Comp Plan revision should recommend that residential land uses and ultimate population build-out should not exceed student enrollment maximums identified by School District Strategies ("SDS") report presented in August of 2012. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 27.3% 3 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preferences 18.2% 2 Disagree 18.2% 2 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 19 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 20. The Comp Plan revision should illustrate inter-mobility (the ability to move through Westlake to reach other destinations)for: Strongly Agree Agree Neutral, No Disagree Strongly Disagree Response Preference Count Vehicles 63.6% (7) 18.2% (2) 0.0% (0) 18.2% (2) 0.0% (0) 11 Bicycles 45.5% (5) 36.4% (4) 0.0% (0) 18.2% (2) 0.0% (0) 11 Pedestrians 36.4% (4) 27.3% (3) 18.2% (2) 18.2% (2) 0.0% (0) 11 answered question 11 skipped question 0 21. The Comp Plan revision should illustrate intra-mobility (the ability to circulate within Westlake)for: Strongly Agree Agree Neutral, No Disagree Strongly Disagree Response Preference Count Vehicles 54.5% (6) 45.5% (5) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 11 Bicycles 54.5% (6) 45.5% (5) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 11 Pedestrians 54.5%(6) 27.3% (3) 18.2% (2) 0.0% (0) 0.0% (0) 11 answered question 11 skipped question 0 20 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 22. The Comp Plan Revision Transportation component should reflect the impact of future growth according to land use. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 45.5% 5 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 21 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 23. The Comp Plan Revision Transportation component should reflect designated bicycle lanes on future thoroughfares. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 1 27.3% 3 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 22 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 24. The Comp Plan Revision should attempt to improve access to and from SH 114 and SH 170 in order to create additional development opportunities for retail corners. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 45.5% 5 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 23 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 25. The Comp Plan Revision should amend the plan to recommend hike and bike trails along roadways rather than mostly in the floodplain. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 24 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 26. The Comp Plan Revision should amend the plan to recommend a blended system that recommends hike and bike trails along some roadways and some floodplains. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 27.3% 3 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 25 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 27. The Comp Plan Revision should leave the Comp Plan as is, limiting hike and bike trails only along floodplains. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 0 9.1% 1 Neutral, No Preferences 18.2% 2 Disagree 54.5% 6 Strongly Disagree 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 26 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 28. The Comp Plan Revision should continue to recommend floodplain be dedicated as public open space. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 45.5% 5 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 27 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 29. The Comp Plan Revision should continue to recommend floodplain be dedicated as public or private open space. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 45.5% 5 Neutral, No Preference 45.5% 5 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 28 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 30. The Comp Plan Revision should recommend public open space in areas that could include flood plain, but not necessarily limited solely to floodplain. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 27.3% 3 Agree 72.7% 8 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 29 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 31. The Comp Plan Revision should include a high degree of trail connectivity, including connecting trails to parks, whether the trail is along roadways or floodplain. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 45.5% 5 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 30 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 32. The Comp Plan Revision should continue to recommend parks to be a minimum of 10 acres in size. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 36.4% 4 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 31 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 33. The Comp Plan Revision should allow buildings to exceed this standard under certain circumstances, subject to Council and P&Z review. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 36.4% 4 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 32 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 34. The Comp Plan Revision should establish some provision whereby owners of land on higher elevations are not subject to an unfair density standard compared to developers in lower elevations. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 45.5% 5 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 33 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 35. The Comp Plan Revision should continue to recommend that all medians and streetscapes be designed to appear natural with native plants and vegetation and minimal maintenance. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 18.2% 2 Agree 0 9.1% 1 Neutral, No Preference 2 Disagree 45.5% 5 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 34 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 36. The Comp Plan Revision should allow streetscapes to be somewhat more manicured with treatments comparable to those recently completed on FM 1938 as per the Town's adopted FM1938 Streetscape Plan. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0 9.1% 1 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 35 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 37. The Comp Plan Revision should provide that all residential and collector streets be constructed with curb and gutter with drainage systems placed underground, as opposed to allowing streets that have rural bar ditches with higher maintenance costs and storm drainage utilities being located exclusively in the floodplain. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 45.5% 5 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 18.2% 2 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 36 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 38. The Comp Plan Revision should require all new streets to be curb and gutter construction. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 37 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 39. The Comp Plan Revision should limit the recommendation of allowing curb and gutter to residential subdivisions with lots less than 1 acre. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 0 9.1% 1 Neutral, No Preference 45.5% 5 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 38 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 40. The Comp Plan Revision should establish a policy framework to better articulate desired lighting standards. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 45.5% 5 Agree 54.5% 6 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 39 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 41. The Comp Plan Revision should allow consideration of modified lighting standards in order to accommodate commercial and retail users and mixed use developments located along the highway corridor facing away from single family residential areas. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 36.4% 4 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 40 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 42. The Comp Plan Revision should avoid integrating lighting recommendations into the Comp Plan. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 0 9.1% 1 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 36.4% 4 Strongly Disagree 45.5% 5 answered question 11 skipped question 0 41 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 43. The Comp Plan Revision should incorporate sustainability as a community objective to be reflected in all aspects of the Comp Plan revision. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 0 9.1% 1 Neutral, No Preference 45.5% 5 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 42 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 44. The Comp Plan Revision should take a softer approach to sustainability by establishing minimum standards that impact sustainability. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 27.3% 3 Neutral, No Preference 54.5% 6 Disagree 0 9.1% 1 Strongly Disagree 0 9.1% 1 answered question 11 skipped question 0 43 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 45. The Comp Plan Revision should avoid attempting to introduce sustainability language in the Comp Plan, instead leaving it up to the Town Council's discretion on a case by case basis. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutrai, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 44 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 46. The Comp Plan Revision should continue to recommend that development should always pay for utility extensions and necessary infrastructure regardless of the circumstances and benefits the development may offer. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0.0% 0 Agree 36.4% 4 Neutral, No Preference 18.2% 2 Disagree 27.3% 3 Strongly Disagree 18.2% 2 answered question 11 skipped question 0 45 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 47. The Comp Plan Revision should avoid language that limits the Town Council to incentivize development deemed worthy of support or assistance including the extension of infrastructure, special taxing districts, sales tax reimbursements, etc. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 72.7% 8 Neutral, No Preference 0.0% 0 Disagree 18.2% 2 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 46 of 47 Resolution 13-24A 48. The Comp Plan Revision should incorporate language that provides for build-out planning in order to avoid incremental funding of utilities that will require future widening or paralleling water and/or sewer utility lines. Response Response Percent Count Strongly Agree 0 9.1% 1 Agree 63.6% 7 Neutral, No Preference 27.3% 3 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 0.0% 0 answered question 11 skipped question 0 47 of 47 Resolution 13-24A Westlake A one-of-a-kind community with a rural atmosphere, vibrant culture and Metropolitan location Town of Westlake } } Planning & Development < Department 3 Village Circle, Suite #202 Westlake, Texas 76262 Westlake exas 41 Resolution 13-24A its- 3 r Mi s moi}�1 y%( 7R. _ �'• �4t:''q ��-- �'•�-�� , F Yll lei :i or MESA MESA P r roe- ��• oilk Role 3 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS Resolution 13-24A April 22, 2013 �/� Mr. Eddie Edwards MESA + PLANNING Director of Planning and Development Town of Westlake 3 Village Circle, Suite 202 Westlake,Texas 76202 Re: Proposal for the provision of Planning Services related to a Comprehensive Plan Update for Westlake,Texas Dear Mr. Edwards, MESA Planning welcomes this opportunity to present the enclosed proposal and statement of qualifications for preparation of a Comprehensive Plan Update for Westlake,Texas. Our Planning Team has particular interest in Westlake because of our long history of planning for cities and townships located within the sphere of an expanding metropolitan area (such as Dallas and Fort Worth,Texas).All the members of this planning team have been working together for many years addressing the issues related to the implementation of internal/ community objectives while the external/surrounding conditions are rapidly changing. In addition, Westlake is at a pivotal point in its own development. With such a strong sense of vision prevalent across many segments of the community, this seems to be the right moment to make sure the town is fully equipped to manage growth toward desired outcomes for neighborhoods and quality of life, promote orderly form,strengthen Westlake Academy, and appropriately harvest the economic benefits of the town's assets as well as locational advantages. Careful and creative planning is an important tool to facilitate all the above. Therefore, the planning team, described herein, has been assembled and this planning proposal has been formulated. The enclosed proposal is organized into sections as follows: • Statement of Understanding and project strategy • Scope of Work • Timeline • Cost of Services and staff allocations • Team Project Experience • Organizational Chart • Key Personnel Resumes • Team Availability • References All of our plans are built upon inclusive and transparent public participation which cultivates local leadership and a plan constituency. I believe that our Planning Team is the right team for Westlake and we look forward to working with you and the plan leadership.Together we can help you craft a vision for Westlake that will prove to be a valuable guide in managing growth. Sincerely, Robin H. McCaffrey AIA., AICP Senior Principal, MESA Planning Resolution 13-24A TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Statement of Understanding 2. Scope of Work 3. Representative Projects 4. Team Structure 5. Availability and Assignments 6. References MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING Robust growth associated with the Highway 114 corridor has had a dramatic impact on the form and character of cities and townships along its path. Only a few years ago much of the vicinity of Westlake was largely rural in visual character and built density. It was in the remoteness of this setting that Westlake grew into the unique town that exists today despite speculative pressures of the corridor itself. In towns, such as Westlake, growth management is needed to preserve and enhance both quality of life and quality of development, while maximizing economic opportunity associated with regional growth and the distinctions it bestows on Westlake. Projections indicate that development intensity along the 114 corridor is expected to continue, raising several challenges that the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update must address. 1. Conflict between regional and local movement systems: The form of development that is attracted to the interstate differs from the form of development attracted to local movement systems. The local system houses the community in which people live as well as the roadways that connect them to the goods and services accessed on a regular basis, such as the grocer, the dry cleaners, schools, etc. The regional system services a larger population, is typically defined on a larger scale, and has a tendency toward a uniformity of expression. The local system services the local community and tends to reflect the unique attributes of character and form associated with it. Westlake is comprised of both regional and local elements, yet distinction is needed to ensure that one does not restrict or over shadow the other. Therefore, plan elements should be developed that define and accommodate both the regional and local system. In this way, the tendency of regional movement through Westlake accessing 114 will not make the local system subservient to the regional corridor. This will prevent local streets from blending with the regional system and loosing identity of locally meaningful distinctions. 2. Highway 114 dominant influence over future development: Highway 114 has the potential to dominate the emerging city form. The nature of development attracted to such freeway corridors has a distinctly regional character. In such areas, large plate retailers and entertainment venues begin to displace local businesses, and the host city can assume an increasingly regional identity. As such development arrays itself along the freeway, it influences the value potential of the future and burdens the city with a "corridor-scope" that can negatively affect initiatives to express the local fabric. Therefore, Urban Design elements should be defined for Westlake that will promote expression of community culture and identity, while accommodating the potential value associated with freeway traffic. 3. The pressures of high velocity growth upon environmental systems that are not jurisdictionally defined: Factors such as storm water management, water quality and quantity, air quality, biodiversity, and open spaces all contribute to the overall quality of life. As development continues in Westlake, there will be increased pressure placed upon natural systems that maintain these factors. In addition, due to Westlake's relatively small MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A size, many of the natural systems within the town are part of larger systems outside of the Town. This makes Westlake vulnerable to the effects of poor system management by surrounding communities. Therefore, a Parks, Open Space, and Systems Management Plan element is needed that facilitates environmental quality, namely surface water management, water quality/ quantity, air quality, vehicular trip reduction, and preservation of natural corridors. This plan should include special environmental enhancements that protect system components within the Town and, at the same time, establish natural assets that promote desired development. 4. Reconciliation of the preferred Land Use vision, Planned Development entitlements, and institutionalized speculation: Along the trajectory from founding to the present, certain entitlements for use of land became protected by Planned Development Ordinances (PDs). These PDs are largely speculative instruments that look to the growth opportunities associated with the 114 corridor and regional population growth. Properties, such as those in the vicinity of the proposed Circle "T" Mall, have experienced a sequence of transactions by investment parties, such as Hunt, General growth, Howard Hughes Corporation, etc.; each setting an increased increment of value not necessarily reflected by agricultural tax valuation. These relatively hidden and imbedded values greatly influence land use capability and must be rationalized to the Town vision and, if need be, addressed in the implementation section of the plan. Therefore, the land use plan element must speak in a vernacular that expresses the Town's goals without making the legally conveyed entitlements non-conforming or imposing value deprecation. Only in this way will there be a sufficiently articulated public interest that informs the process of development review rather than negates development energy. 5. Community Sustainability: True sustainability is dynamic in the sense that it has attributes of a living organism. This means that systems are inherently diverse and, in that diversity, affording underpinnings needed to sustain the phenotype (form). Therefore, the community must be a living thing and have diversity within it. The same is true for natural systems. This broadness is reflected by the mosaic of natural and human interdependencies that animate vitality. Therefore, the overall plan must seek to promote, preserve, and enhance that particular mosaic that is Westlake. This is reflected in land use, economic development, natural open spaces, and design. 6. Community Design that reflects a unique (meaning Westlake distinct) relationship between land and development: Westlake is a particular vision, painted with three primary colors: the landscape, the built-scape, and the community-scape. Design is the way these come together and the recognizable place they define. Therefore, Design is an overarching concern of the future. Such design is more than an image; it is an internalization of design consciousness within the decision-making-process of local government. Therefore, all aspects of the plan must establish a relationship to design and the implementation component must make that design consciousness actionable. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A PROJECT APPROACH In light of the above described issues, this project approach for Westlake is built upon the following aspects of use and structure: 1. The formulation of a clear vision that ties together previous vision elements, stated goals, and mission: The vision must build the bridge between past, present, and future. 2. The creation of a true management tool that will give the decision making processes of local governance the analysis of impacts (financial and natural) needed to reconcile tensions that the above described issues identify (tensions between regional/ local, external/ internal, vision/ entitlement, narrow/ broad community, and unique/ generic urban form). This tool is to be employed regularly: The plan must be useful to the decision making process so that it has justification for its on-going use. 3. The creation of a planning framework that gives needed overall form to land use and urban design and internalizes current planning efforts as well as an expanding reliance on multiple modes of transportation: The Framework is the template upon which the individual plan elements are fashioned. Therefore, it is the guiding expression of goals and objectives in a physical form that reflects their application. 4. The employment of a transparent public participation process that nurtures project leadership, constituency support, brings together regional/ local concerns, and facilitates adoption: Participatory input is active throughout the planning process and through its course transfers plan ownership to the participants. S. The establishment of financial performance objectives that assure attainment and maintenance of economic capacity necessary to build the vision: Financial performance is only possible with the identification of financial thresholds that are derived from the relationship of the cost of governance, services, and obligations to development capture and the subsequent value it transfers to the rest of the city. 6. The creation of clear financial and environmental indicators that will track successful attainment of sustainability objectives reflected by land use, economic development, and environmental strategies: Necessary changes to the plan as time goes on are reflected by its performance relative to indicators of applicability. 7. The delivery of a useful product at each planning phase: The plan should be as useful during its development as it is when it is fully developed. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A SCOPE OF WORK 2 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A SCOPE OF WORK Giving consideration to the Town's Request for Proposal and the planning issues as identified in the Statement of Understanding, the Planning Team presents the following Scope of Work. This Scope reflects our view of work elements that serve the Town of Westlake. However, the Planning Team realizes that agreement regarding adjustments to this document and appropriate adjustments to fee may be the result of scope discussion between MESA Planning and the client group. The scope elements of this proposal have been organized in five parts: PART ONE: ASSESSMENTS A CONTEXT FOR COMMUNITY VISION PART TWO: VISIONING A FRAMEWORK FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PART THREE: PLAN ELEMENTS ARTICULATING THE VISION OF SUSTAINABILITY PART FOUR: IMPLEMENTATION REALIZING THE VISION PART FIVE: ENGAGEMENT/ COMMUNICATIONS GUIDING THE PLANNING PROCESS PART ONE: ASSESSMENTS A CONTEXT FOR COMMUNITY VISION To ensure informed public participation, plan recommendations are rooted in a true understanding of Westlake, and that significant change since the 1992 plan is evaluated, the Planning Team will prepare various investigations and analyses that serve as a basis for the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update. The Assessment findings will be a key feature of workshop 1 , described in the Engagement portion (Part Five) of this proposal. 1.1 Population and Demographic Profile. The Planning Team will utilize population data to establish a demographic profile for the Town of Westlake identifying trends for possible future growth within the defined planning horizon. These values will provide benchmarks for use in the various other assessments conducted for this project. Particular attention will be paid to Westlake's comparison with other population trends in the larger planning context. This comparison has particular importance as Westlake will continue to shoulder the impacts of population growth of surrounding communities. Population projections will use an analogue approach; the outcome of which will be compared to NCTCOG projections and differences analyzed. Of particular focus in this projection is the effect of population growth on Westlake Academy and its expansion plans. 1.2 Existing Conditions. The Planning Team will assess the contextual fabric of the Town of Westlake identifying those natural, built, and economic systems that will influence the form and future patterns of growth for the Town. Elements such as drainage patterns, natural corridors, activity centers, development patterns, cultural landmarks/ features, and economic indicators will be evaluated, as well as current plans, studies, and zoning designations/ instruments. This assessment will identify significant aspects of each that will influence future development physically, politically, and economically. Consideration will be given to the nature of emerging strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and liabilities. 1.3 Circulation Analysis. Prior to the first public workshop, the Planning Team will conduct MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A a circulation analysis of the Town of Westlake. Circulation is a critical element of the Comprehensive Plan for the Town. The relationship of community elements to Highway 114, the existing patterns of use and development, and the potential alignment of future transit in relation to vehicular traffic patterns establish a need to investigate the efficiency and physical influence of the circulation system. Consideration will be given to external traffic demand on roadways within Westlake and the extent to which increased volumes influence land use suitability (discussed below). Of particular interest in this analysis is the extent to which existing PD ordinances identify right of way dedications and/ or other roadway provisions that in turn influence the overall character and operation of the local system. 1.4 Infrastructure Capacity Analysis: Due to Westlake's small population, its potential for growth, and reliance upon private and neighboring public utilities to serve population expansion and commercial development, the Planning Team will identify limitations and chokepoints within the existing systems as well as project future demand. This Assessment will review and consider the individual plans of various private and neighboring public utility providers to the Town of Westlake. In this way, cooperative planning with private and neighboring public utilities can be initiated by this Comprehensive Plan Update. 1.5 Land Developability Analysis. Building upon the existing conditions and the circulation analysis (described above), the combined significance of built and natural systems as they coexist within the Town will be portrayed in a map based sequence which defines areas most and least suitable for development. This analysis includes such considerations as topography, drainage, protected resources, jurisdictional overlays, vegetative communities, existing/ on-coming land uses, and circulation patterns. Attention will be given to the relationship between land developability and the trajectory of land development trends (Task 1 .2). 1.6 Assessment Findings Report. The Planning Team will place each of the above described analyses into a combined document that portrays a diagnosis of the existing and emerging town fabric. This combined document will be presented in report form with all pertinent maps, charts, graphs, and illustrations, as well as a written summary of their significance to the Comprehensive Plan. Of particular emphasis in this summation is the extent to which conditions informing the 1992 Comprehensive Plan have significantly changed and, therefore, necessitate targeted updates of the existing document (a performance review of the existing plan). Recommendation of specific updates will be made in this report. At a minimum, updates will include those areas of concern identified in the RFP. Deliverable for Part One: • An Assessment Findings Report (sub-component 1 of the Comprehensive Plan Update) with text and graphics for each of the tasks described above. • Assessment Findings presentation power point for Workshop 1 Meetings: • Workshop #1 (see Engagement: Part Five) MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A • Steering Committee Meeting • Focus Group Meetings and Interviews (see Engagement: Part Five) • Milestone meeting with staff PART TWO: VISIONING A FRAMEWORK FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE The Vision Plan for the Town of Westlake must manifest the Goals and Objectives of the Community, while establishing a strategy for implementation that will effectively guide and direct future development within the Town. The Framework is the template of the Plan that assures its fulfillment of community aspirations and values. 2.1 Community Goals and Objectives. Input from public workshop 1 will be incorporated as Community Goals and Objectives for the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update; specifically as they pertain to land use, circulation, urban design, economic development, and the town relationship to Westlake Academy. Inputs from Workshop 1 will be analyzed and organized into strategic goals and objectives by comparing Assessment Findings (described above) to Community Inputs, thereby determining which goals potentially address the greatest range of issues. 2.2 The Framework Plan. Once Community Goals and Objectives are identified, they will be physically expressed in a Planning Framework for the Town of Westlake. This Framework will serve as a graphic representation of the goals and objectives (identified in 2.1 above), expressed in districts, edges, nodes, portals, linkages, zones, landmarks, and interfaces. In this way, true agreement as to the application of goals and objectives can be accomplished in Workshop 2 (see Engagement: Part Five). Deliverable for Part Two: • A summation of goals and objectives according to their strategic significance. • A graphic Framework Plan with associated text and support graphics. • A Goals and Objectives and Framework Power point for Workshop #2 (see Engagement: Part Five) Meetings: • Workshop #2 (see Engagement: Part Five) • Steering Committee Meeting • 2 Milestone Reviews; one with staff and one other as staff directs. • Remaining Focus Groups or Interviews not completed in Part One (see Engagement: Part Five) PART THREE: PLAN ELEMENTS ARTICULATING THE VISION OF SUSTAINABILITY The Plan Elements identified for the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update will serve to direct and facilitate desired development in the future while preserving a city form consistent with the vision manifested in the Planning Framework. 3.1 Land Use and Land Use Sustainability. The Town of Westlake has experienced MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A unprecedented growth over the past decade that has been largely residential and, thereby, garnished a shared interest in the quality of life that such growth has nurtured. At the some time, recognition of the economic importance of the Highway 1 14 Corridor and velocity of population growth along it has fostered the allocation of significant non- residential entitlements within Planned Development Ordinances. In order to establish a Land Use Plan expressive of the Town's Goals, Objectives, and Vision that avoids non-conformance with previously granted entitlements, the language of the Land Use Plan must be more form based and relate to the issues of form (density, square footage, value, and use ranges whose allocations are financially derived), thereby establishing an ad valorem base that gives the Town financial capacity to shoulder future cost burdens related to improved services and mitigation of impacts imposed by rapid growth in surrounding communities. The ability to translate use conveyed by entitlement to the fulfillment of use established by the Land Use Plan, determines the extent to which the Land Use Plan is a useful guide to manage of growth. As Land Use Plans and Zoning Ordinances serve two very distinct roles in the regulation of use and development, it is important that the Land Use Plan informs and guides zoning decisions and deliberations so that they are mutually exclusive, yet complimentary roles are preserved and protected. The Future Land Use Plan should also address proper land use hierarchies and transitions throughout the Town. This attention to the relationship between uses is critical to the coherency of the emerging form. The extent to which land use enhances or degrades community sustainability is largely determined by the overall mosaic and the organic unity achieved through transition, hierarchy, and other dimensions of proper adjacency. The Future Land Use Plan would consist of a plan graphic and associated designations of land use districts that apply land use performance standards. 3.2 Transportation and Community Fabric Sustainability. This is a critical component of comprehensive planning because of the strong relationship between traffic densities, economic value, and community development. It ultimately has greater influence on land use than entitlement. Many Comprehensive Plans fail due to a separation between land use and transportation. One (transportation) is viewed from a perspective of functionality, and the other (land use) is viewed from a perspective of vision. Value created by functionality alone will attract development that often conflicts with the community vision. Therefore, symmetry between creation of value (by traffic density) and community vision (expressed in land use) is an essential component of growth management. In creation of the Transportation Plan, the regional and local systems that transit the Town of Westlake will be reconciled. The Planning Team will review the existing thoroughfare system and its potential for change as a result of surrounding growth in conjunction with the Future Land Use Plan and will also consider the introduction of alternative transportation. A Transportation Plan will then be defined that both accommodates anticipated traffic levels and reinforces the intent of the Future Land MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A Use Plan. As a primary generator of value, transportation has the effect of stimulating the forces of transition even though physical transition has not occurred and can, therefore, precipitate instability, particularly in undeveloped areas where transportation often promotes speculation. Accordingly, attaining a balance between land use and transportation is a key component of community fabric sustainability and ultimately preserving value. The Transportation Plan will include both thematic and functional elements as well as recommended improvements to the existing system. The Transportation Plan will consist of a plan graphic with associated designations. 3.3 Town Design Structure. A Town Design Structure Plan is the creation of visual themes and hierarchies, as well as thematic identities within the Town of Westlake. Thematic elements, such as roadways, portals, districts/core areas, public spaces, key intersections, and connections, give a greater sense of legibility and identity to the Town and are essential to preserving a sense of place amid such rapid growth. The Town Design Structure Plan will focus upon enhancement of the public realm within the Town of Westlake. The Town Design Structure Plan will identify design initiatives that can be incorporated within the management and decision structure of the Town so that design consciousness becomes an ordinary part of Town decision making. 3.4 Parks, Open Space, and Trail Plan, and Environmental Sustainability. This Plan will serve as the green infrastructure of Westlake that defines and protects the natural assets of the community. Elements of the Parks and Open Space Plan includes both active and passive spaces creating a network of connectivity that would include parks, trails, recreational areas, and appropriate passive open spaces as well as protected natural assets. The Parks and Open Space Plan will promote the role that surface water management must play in sustaining biodiversity, habitat and visual identity. The connection of natural assets so that a matrix of natural features knits through the community fabric supports the tendency of natural elements to gather in lineated forms along distributions of water deposited soils, levels of hydration, and active water courses. Thereby, a key component of natural sustainability is addressed. 3.5 Housing. Housing responds to a contextually determined market. For this reason, it is seldom the case that mixtures of value exist in the same place, especially at higher price points. In fact, the higher the price point, the more singular the housing setting often is. Therefore, an expansion of housing options can only occur to the extent that such options do not depreciate the contextual elements supporting higher end price points. In the life cycle of housing tenancy, an existing yet aging population will seek higher price point housing options suitable for their changing spatial needs, while younger professionals and families will seek housing options closer to work and good schools. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A Therefore, the Housing Plan element will consider expansion of housing options to serve the changing needs of Westlake's traditional markets and to make housing more accessible to younger buyers and those who work within the community. Housing demand, in all its forms, confronts an available land supply, as well as varied housing entitlements already imbedded in previously approved Planned Development Ordinances. Therefore, the Housing Plan will investigate means by which existing housing trends (in price and community design) can co-exists with externally driven housing demand able to be accommodated by PD entitlements. The Housing Plan will identify housing availability (housing stock inventory) in light of developable land (within the context of the Land Use Plan) and identify where existing contextually dependent housing options will likely continue and where newer, more diverse housing options can emerge. These allocations will take into consideration emerging housing trends generally and the extent to which those trends are finding market success locally. In the end, the constellation of housing options should support a coherent and graded distribution supporting commercial viability where feasible. 3.6 Public Facilities. To ensure services are provided for future population projections, recommendations will be made regarding emergency and other city services based on industry standards for the designated planning horizon. The issue of public service and the cost of such services will be considered in the financial sustainability of land use so that quality of life, as measured by the cost of governance and services, is properly sustained in the future. A key component of this plan element is consideration of a new city hall in terms of size, location, and relationship to existing facilities, including Solana (described below). 3.7 Solana Revitalization and Town Center. As populations grow and greater residential and commercial differentiations emerge within the fabric of Westlake, it becomes critically important that the Town form is anchored by a viable center. At present, Solana offers potential to anchor and contribute to such a definition of place. A viable center includes public and private investment brought together around a shared public domain. Therefore, Solana is viewed as a component of a broader vision of center that possibly includes municipal facilities and an expanded public space. In addition, the center vision will consider the integration of housing and vertical mixed use. Other proposed projects for Westlake will be taken into consideration so Solana can find its particular markets. The Solana and Town Center Plan will be an illustrated plan showing possible development with public and private components identified. 3.8 Policy Recommendations and Plan Tabulations. Each of the aforementioned plan elements portrays the build out of Westlake. Therefore, summations of the Plan will be presented to identify population holding capacity and economic implications of build out in terms of employment and value added to the Town GDP. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A - The Westlake Comprehensive Plan will consist of a number of physical and programmatic plan elements that will help direct future growth and development for the Town. Once these plans are identified, a list of policy recommendations will be generated and organized by plan element to facilitate implementation. Therefore, the realization of the community vision will occur as follows: Inputs---Goals and Objectives---Planning Framework---Plan Elements---Policy Recommendations Deliverable for Part Three: • A Plan Elements Report (sub-component 2 of the Comprehensive Plan Update) that brings the work of Part Two and Part Three into a single document with text and graphics for each of the tasks described above. • Assessment, Framework, and Plan Elements power point for Workshop #3 Meetings: • Workshop #3 (Engagement: Part Five) • Steering Committee Meeting • 2 Milestone Reviews, one with staff and one other as staff directs. • 2 Follow-Up Meetings with critical land owners PART FOUR: IMPLEMENTATION REALIZING THE VISION To facilitate realization of the Community Vision, certain elements are needed for plan implementation. These speak to the regulatory instruments, agencies, and measures that collectively guide future growth and development. 4.1 Economic Development Strategy. As Westlake continues to grow, it will become even more important to define how development will occur within the Town. The processes, roles, and responsibilities of both public and private interest should be articulated so as to encourage the type of development desired and to provide the tax base necessary to support a quality of life preferred by the Westlake Community. The Planning Team will work in conjunction with Council, Staff, the Planning Steering Committee, and the Economic Development Committee to define an economic development strategy for the Town. This would include features such as Funding Mechanisms/ District Designations, Administration and Oversight, and Project Prioritization criteria. The key role of economic development strategy is to promote value while the growth management elements (described below) direct both capture of value and the transfer of value through good design. 4.2 Growth Management Strategy. The ultimate objective of the Comprehensive Plan is to provide a tool to assist in the direction and management of future growth and development. In the implementation strategy, the attainment of values as represented by the Land Use Plan will be facilitated by allocation of various plan recommendations MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A and actions to value related issues, such as capture of mature value and the transfer of value to promote orderly form and community viability. This will be presented as a growth management tool kit; elements of which are related to the above described value considerations. 4.3 Plan Benchmarks. Over time, it will become necessary to access the relevance and applicability of the Westlake Comprehensive Plan. Due to the potential for rapid change within the Highway 114 Corridor, it becomes important to be able to identify when the Comprehensive Plan requires recalibration and further updates. The Planning Team will work with the Town to develop an internal performance evaluation tool for the Comprehensive Plan to ensure the relevance of this plan in future years. This will allow for appropriate updates while preserving consistency and intent of the original document. 4.4 Code Performance Review. The institutionalization of entitlements within Planned Development ordinances, the changing conditions within Westlake, and the changing conditions outside of Westlake challenge the effectiveness of existing zoning and subdivision code. Therefore, the Planning Team will perform a Code Performance Review with recommendations regarding revision, reorganization, and rewriting. Deliverable for Part Four: • An Implementation Interim Report (sub-component 3 of the Comprehensive Plan Update) with text and graphics for each of the tasks described above. • Assessment, Framework, and Plan Elements power point for Workshop #3 Meetings: • Staff Work Session • Steering Committee Meeting • Milestone Review with staff. PART FIVE: ENGAGEMENT/ COMMUNICATIONS GUIDING THE PLANNING PROCESS The foundation of this Comprehensive Plan Update is the public participation in its formulation and public support of its adoption. Therefore, the Engagement/ Communications portion of this proposal is critically important. 5.1 Engagement. The engagement portion of this proposal will consist of workshops and focus groups engaged as follows: Workshop #1: Goals and Objectives Upon completion of the Assessments identified in Part One, the Planning Team will conduct Public Workshop #1 . At this workshop, the various assessments will be presented as informed participation creates more meaningful dialogue concerning community vision. After the assessments are presented, workshop participants will breakout into groups based upon character districts identified in the assessment analysis. Each of MESA + PLANNING _ Resolution 13-24A these breakout groups will have an appointed facilitator who will be a member of that particular region. Within that breakout group, workshop participants will be encouraged to explore the issues and attributes that the Comprehensive Plan should address. This will provide direction for elements of the plan that pertain to land use, circulation, urban design, and economic development. Workshop #2: Planning Framework A Planning Framework will be fashioned through the process of Workshop #2. This workshop starts with a presentation of the goals and objectives identified in Workshop #1 . These goals and objectives and their application to the Town fabric are once again discussed in breakout groups where their likely manifestation within smaller areas of consideration is deliberated. These applications are summarized by the Planning Team in a diagrammatic form called the Framework Plan. The workshop participants are asked to determine whether the Framework Plan effectively represents the goals and objectives established in Workshop #1 . This is the publically crafted vision element that will guide the formulation of plan elements. Workshop #3: Putting It All Together At Workshop #3, the Planning Elements will be presented to all workshop participants. Key to the success of this project is the transfer of the Plan from the Planning Team to community leaders. For this reason, the steering committee who, up to this point, serve as facilitators will assume a more significant role in the presentation of plan elements. This is important in the transition of the Plan from the Planning Team to the community. The success of this Plan will depend, to a large degree, on their continued leadership. This committee will ultimately advocate the Plan with regard to future planning activity. Workshop #3, therefore, becomes the point of transition and, ultimately, Plan ownership to the community it is intended to serve. Focus Groups and Interviews. During the Assessment Phase of the planning process, sessions will be held with particular community members who generally do not participate in public events. These include land owners, other jurisdictional interests, and the Academy. Therefore, individual focus group sessions will be conducted to solicit their input. Focus group parties include: • Land Owner/ Developer Stakeholders (Hillwood Properties, Solana, Terra Bella, Centurion American) • Educational Stakeholders (Westlake Academy, Deloitte University, overlying school districts) • Home Builders • Daytime population representatives • Business Stakeholders (Chamber, Fidelity, other major employers) Interviews will also be conducted. Parties to be interviewed include: • Agencies ( candidates include NCTCOG, Metroport City partnership, Tarrant County Transportation Council, 1-35 Coalition, Trophy Club Municipal Utility District, MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A City of Ft. Worth, Trinity River Authority, Local TxDOT) • Neighboring Municipal and County Governments (candidates include Trophy Club, Roanoke, Southlake, Ft. Worth, Keller, Tarrant County key officials) • Town Government (Mayor, Town Council, Planning and Zoning Commission, Historical Preservation Committee, Public Arts Society, Westlake Affiliate groups) 5.2 Communication. The communication portion of this proposal will consist of web portal and milestone touch points as follows: Interactive Web Portal The Planning Team will design and develop an interactive, user friendly website version for the Comprehensive Plan Update featuring maps, photos, commentary, presentation materials, and report summaries to inform the public about the plan process on an on-going basis. The website will enable citizens to post comments and to share the publications on social sites, such as Facebook and Twitter. The website will also feature a Content management System that will enable the administrator/ editor of the site to upload photos or maps and input text so that updating the site is easy and instantaneous. The content management feature will have blogging and sharing abilities. Features of the website include: • A homepage that identified the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update website (with link to it from the city website) • Links that correspond to the phases of the plan process. • Drop down menu or secondary navigation that has options such as maps, pictures, report summaries, workshops, citizen comments, etc. • A designated place for citizen comment • Content management system for managing web content Steering Committee Meetings The Planning Team will attend a pre-determined number of meetings with the Steering Committee (3 are recommended, one meeting before each workshop to review workshop material). The Steering Committee members will be appointed by the Client group. Milestone Updates As indicated in the meetings itemized in the above work description, there are points along the way for milestone updates with staff and, where indicated, others identified by staff. These occur during Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four. These meetings are in addition to steering committee meetings, public hearings, focus groups, and interviews. Joint Council Commission Staff Work Session This joint council/ commission/ staff work session is critical to the use of the Plan, by each body and the staff, as a growth management tool. During this work session, the planning team will walk through the Comprehensive Plan document explaining its use in matters of zoning consideration. In this way, the joint session becomes a tutorial intended to make all parties conversant in the Plan's use and content. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A Final Plan Report The final Comprehensive Plan Report will reflect comments gathered at the final workshop, staff review of the draft report and input from the joint work session. Upon completion of revisions, the planning team will provide 20 bound color copies and 2 digital pdf copies. The Client will have had opportunity to view the document through its component installments (described in the above deliverables) and will have had opportunity to comment on the Plan as it is developing. Public Hearings The Planning Team will present the Comprehensive Plan to both the Planning and Zoning Commission (public hearing to recommend approval) and Council (public hearing to consider approval). In accordance with the intent of the public process to promote community ownership of the Plan, these presentations will be shared with members of the Steering Committee. Deliverable for Part Five: • A Complete Plan Report (including sub-components 1 , 2, and 3 as well as the remaining project recommendations), which constitutes the Comprehensive Plan Update, with text and graphics for each of the tasks described above. • Comprehensive Plan power point for presentation to the joint work session and public hearings. Meetings: • Workshops 1 , 2, and 3 (as already indicated in meetings listed above) • 3 Steering Committee Meeting (as already indicated in meetings listed above) • Milestone Updates (as already indicated in meetings listed above) • Draft Plan Review with Staff • Joint Council/ Commission Work Session • Public hearings MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A PROPOSED JET TIMELINE Project Timeline July August SeptOct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Abril 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2014 Part One 1.1 Demographics 1.2 Existing Conditions 1.3 Circulation 1.41 nfrast ru ct u re 1.5 Developability 1.6 Assessment Summary Part Two 2.1 Goals and Objectives 2.2 Framework Part Three 3.1 Land Use 3.2 Transportation 3.3 Urban Design 3.4 Park,Open Space 3.5 Housing 3.6 Public Facilities 3.7 Solana Revitalization 3.8 Policy Rec/Tabulation Part Four 4.1 Economic Development 4.2 Plan Implementation 4.3 Plan Benchmarks 4.4 Code Performance Review Part Five 5.1 Engagement Workshop#I Workshop#2 Workshop #3 Focus Group/I nterviews 5.2 Communication Web Portal Steering Committee Joint Work Session Final Report Public Hearing MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A TASK HOURS ASSIGNMENTS BY CONSULTANT ALLOCATION OF HOURS BY CONSULTANT MESA P RCLCO GSP Mosaic Ashley Eli Brandora Part One 1.1 Demographics 16 16 18 1.2 Existing Conditions 16 6 22 16 8 1.3 Circulation 16 14 1 8 16 1.4 Infrastructure 8 18 8 16 1.5 Land Developability 16 100 8 8 1.6 Assessment Summary 16 20 10 38 24 Part Two 2.1 Goals and Objectives 8 6 9 12 2.2 Framework 8 14 20 18 16 Part Three 3.1 Land Use 44 20 28 16 3.2 Transportation 44 64 16 24 3.3 Urban Design 40 38 32 3.4 Park, Open Space,Trails, and Natural 24 12 80 30 Sustainability 3.5 Housing 24 87 30 3.6 Public Facilities and Utilities 16 21 30 16 3.7 Solana Revitalization 40 38 32 3.8 Policy Rec/Tabulation 16 15 20 80 Part Four 4.1 Economic Development 32 62 16 40 4.2 Growth Management 32 40 4.3 Plan Benchmarks 4 40 10 4.4 Code Performance Review 32 48 32 Part Five 5.1 Engagement Workshop#1 12 16 20 12 15 Workshop#2 12 16 15 Workshop#3 12 8 12 15 Focus group/interviews 24 8 33 16 5.2 Communication Web Portal 4 6 16 100 Steering Committee 12 8 15 Milestone Updates 12 20 20 Joint Work Session 8 16 20 Final Report 16 5 78 80 84 Public hearings 8 8 32 18 532 226 293 332 705 478 100 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A FEES BY TASK ALLOCATION OF FEES BY TASK FEES Part One $52,012 1.1 Demographics $4,220 1.2 Existing Conditions $8,533 1.3 Circulation $6,075 1.4 Infrastructure $4,915 1.5 Land Developability $17,380 1.6 Assessment Summary $10,889 Part Two $16,309 2.1 Goals and Objectives $6,440 2.2 Framework $9,869 Part Three $101,743 3.1 Land Use $9,780 3.2 Transportation $12,134 3.3 Urban Design $9,200 3.4 Park,Open Space,Trails,and Natural Sustainability $17,972 3.5 Housing $21,447 3.6 Public Facilities and Utilities $8,874 3.7 Solana Revitalization $11,200 3.8 Policy Rec/Tabulation $11,136 Part Four $43,702 4.1 Economic Development $21,982 4.2 Growth Management $6,640 4.3 Plan Benchmarks $6,840 4.4 Code Performance Review $8,240 Part Five 100,077 5.1 Engagement $37,715 Workshop#1 $13,432 Workshop#2 $5,871 Workshop#3 $8,186 Focus Group/Interviews $10,226 5.2 Communication $62,362 Web Portal $11,560 Steering Committee $4,645 Milestone Updates $8,462 Joint Work Session $5,080 Final Report $21,311 Public Hearings $11,304 BASIC FEE $313,843 8%of Basic Fee REI M BU RSABLES $25,027 TOTAL FEE $338,950 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A - MESA + PLANNING - Resolution 13-24A REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS 3 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Kyle Comprehensive Plan Project Overview: Kyle, Texas The recipient of the APA Com- prehensive Plan of the Year for Texas in 2010, the Kyle Com- prehensive Plan is a growth /- = A rapidly growing city south of management document that �� Austin,Texas in the Austin/San -`; was created to encourage sus- Antonio Corridor :' _ = Awards tainable development patterns. \. _-.: s 1 ; The implementation strategy ' i1 Texas APA Comprehensive Plan �; of the Year,2010 was performance oriented, as it -- tied land value to land use dis- tributions. A prioritization pro- gram was given for recom- mended actions based on the _ concept of return on public in- vestment in such projects. The Kyle Comprehensive Plan establishes Ad Valorem Tax ' >,. Base objectives necessary to - a r provide sufficient tax revenues to fund the community's stated quality of life goals. Such goals are monetized as General Fund thresholds supported by reve- nues from city growth in ac- i cordance to values reflected by the Future land Use Plan. r The Downtown Plan Compo- nent om o-nent establishes a strategy for ',— r- strengthening economic activity within the City's business core. i i M w 'r$AW Entertainment Gateway Market Value Monument value MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING — , Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Seguin Comprehensive Plan Project Overview: �. Seguin,Texas The Seguin Comprehensive Plan is a growth management APA Comprehensive Plan tool intended to give form to on- Award 2009 coming growth that threatens to change the fabric of this historic - ;•Y- city. Like many cities on the , Statistics { A rapidly growing city south of fringe of urbanizing areas, suc- Austin;Texas in the I-10 Houston/ cessive road bypasses have Y �j�l , '*.; San Antonio Corridor continually redefined the com- munity's overall growth pattern _ }� and economically affected the A viability of its city center. There- fore, this Comprehensive Plan _ establishes a coherent overall form for the city that once again restores value within the core, preserves the fundamental River/City relationship, provides for industrial/employment growth, and establishes financial performance thresholds for land ,cumin use. The Plan builds upon a rich nat- ural fabric, historic assets, stra- tegic locational advantages and I _- j...... the vision of community resi- dents and business people. RURAL L >� -■ SECTION �• Tf �• � RUM APPROACH K"PARKWAY TOWN APPROACH MAN PARKWAY CORE APPROACH O 6KN14EN r.. - �.- —R r -- • - ter �; .1-�r > Isla', Mi i 04 MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Brownsville Comprehensive Plan Project Overview: Brownsville Comp Plan MESA PLANNING and MESA were brought into the Brownsville Compre- hensive Planning process to formulate the City's Future Land Use Plan, cre- D Statistics ate an economic vision which the Land '� s� x -� _ A rapidly growing border city im- Use Plan could fulfill. In addition, ME- "-�h/ pacted by U.S.border conditions SA PLANNING formulated the Urban 4 and needing to re-establish role in Design Plan, Open Space Plan, and 4 the Rio Grande Valley. implementation strategies for economic development. The Comprehensive - Plan was the largest and most compre- hensive planning initiative conducted by 44 ft.the city and led by the citizenry , orga- nized as United Brownsville. United Brownsville and its executive director remain committed to, and active in, im- plementation of the plan vision. United Brownsville has fostered emergence of - F a sister organization in Matamoros (Imagine Matamoros) and together the _ two bodies have crafted a Bi-national l '� Economic Development Agreement. The Brownsville Comprehensive Plan has led subsequent more detailed plans for industrial development, down- town revitalization and citywide infra- structure. Civic festivals Culturul Hub Fines, Fees, Environmental Protr--lion Finances Vibrant Downtown Regional o Commercial N tourism -� D-finution 0 Excellent Schools v -� Strnntscnpc Local c% Enhancement Commercial F load i ny AhnMmrnt Strovo Repoir L, Police&fire Residential service Tax Base General Fund Genera and Requirements Sources MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Argyle Comprehensive Plan Project Overview: Argyle Texas The Argyle Comprehensive Plan and 0000 Open Space plan is formulated to ad- x dress the special concerns of a com- Statistics munity wanting to remain small in the r ` A rapidly growing city north of Fort face of on-coming growth flowing from Worth,Texas in the Ft.Worth/ the Dallas/ Ft. Worth Metroplex. The Denton Corridor Plan recognized the high cost of re- maining small when surrounded by more intense development and seeks to set aside areas of strategic develop- ment that can capture the economic I benefits growth brings without fundaI-M - mentally changing the way of life that citizens of Argyle enjoy. MESA PLAN- NING formulated a detailed growth management plan that would strength- en the City Council as they made deci- sions on complex development issues. The Plan is in essence a Form Based Comprehensive Plan Document which identified ad valorem value targets for its developable areas. L0 PRESERVATION OF OPEN SPACE HIGH� ones lit ACTIVEMKREATION MESA+ PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Brenham Downtown Plan Project Overview: !1 '� Brenham Texas N The City of Brenham, Texas has seen ' y • "'" APA Project Planning the economic underpinnings of its his- '; Award 2012 toric downtown challenged by retail de- -, velopment along the Highway 290 by- A �s.� : �:' �,. +., ,; Statistics pass. Therefore, a plan and strategy were needed that would attract invest- t =s'-✓ ' '' An historic town, located between Houston and Austin, in Washing- ment to the downtown area. The Plan ton County. first considers sources of likely spend- ing and then isolates the physical fea- tures and connections that such spend- �!!w'�-• ��"?'P' '' ing seeks. Building upon this under- standing of the potential market, the t ,` I -i J,g plan is a physical strategy aimed at cre- ating the place that the market desires. In addition to recommended physical improvements, within and leading to, +►=�• - l i- ? a downtown, the plan articulates sources of funding (both public and private) that can support key catalyst projects aimed at setting the foundational elements of the physical strategy in place. Investigations at the outset revealed that Brenham enjoys considerable im- ported spending within its city limits .� • making a physical strategy appropriate. - 3� -� •,,�� 111 - f j _ -a 1111 i �- ,t• - �J -;i iy.y,": `' .- c .! J �^ - ^_-..gin•. �. MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING - Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS M E SA + P LA N N I N G iron Horse Station TOD Plan Project Overview: North Richland Hills,Texas The City of North Richland Hills required a plan for areas around the proposed Iron Horse Transit the Statistics Station. This plan would create a A rapidly growing city on the north vision for development of the Iron edge of Ft.worth,along the Cot- Horse station area that could be ton Belt Rail line("T"Corridor) supported by the "T", the City, and the property owners within the pe- rimeter of the station zone. This plan works within the parameters of normative development require- ments yet creates a vision that , achieves integrated land uses, ver- tical use mix, pedestrian usability, and a balanced value gradient across the entire planning area. The essence of the plan is to gen- erate a value center within the Sta- tion Area that can balance the eco- nom ic co-noetic power of the adjacent free- way. �:. / @ o- •` R71`110'1`1 i� MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development _ MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A - MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Strategic Infrastructure Plan Project Overview; Brownsville,Texas Opening of the improved Pa- - nama Canal in 2015, oil from the �l Statistics Eagleford Shale and Alaminos _ = A border city with a vital sea port Canyon, and the resurgence of that serves Mexico,South Amer- manufacturing in Mexico's ma- 'c ica and regions of the U.S. Cur- 1 r F-» a► rently 170,000 people, Brownsville quiladoras will have profound � !'�' — and its sister city of Matamoros economic impact upon Browns- comprise an urban area of nearly R- - j , "�Tr "= =; ville. MESA PLANNING, � _ -�;=���-' - �. 1 million. Mosaic, and Cambridge Sys-15 tematics are formulating a stra- tegic tra te is infrastructure plan, aimed at attracting equity funding of nearly $1 billion for critical infra- structure that will position tt = Brownsville to capture the eco- nomic benefits of forthcoming � �•� -i-� - change and move Brownsville -I toward the formation of exter- nallony traded industrial clusters. ;"`" :; This will increase the city's ad valorem tax base and raise wages overall. ...................... FRAMEWORK W/ Zone of Convergence .Air Freight VOther Points of ��Convergence Transitional -; Trade Portals Residential Wet/Dry Bulk Low Impact Development Manufacturing ►Rail MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA 4. PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Montgomery Farm Project Overview: �_- _ - Allen, Texas The Emerson Partnership (developer of Montgomery Farm) required a unique / Statistics plan that recognizes the historic signifi- ` r An historic farm in Allen,Texas Cance of this property, sets a high f I (population 84,346). A 400 acre standard of environmental sustainabil- site with approximately 40%of its total area preserved as permanent ity, relies upon surface management of open space. storm water, promotes bio-diversity, en- hances air quality, allows preservation � of agricultural setting, nurtures pedestri- an and neighborhood activity, and of- i ''� fers a wide choice of housing options in � z r- -"�' an harmonious fabric of community. "R= '` The farm has long been host to the arts and artists and played a leadership role _in promotion of environmental steward- ship. This history became the founda- tion of the plan. The plan is imple- mented through the Montgomery Farm Pattern Book which sets design and environmental guidelines and stand- ards, administered by both the develop er and the City. Montgomery Farm is one of the nations first LEED communi- ties with many of it structures receiving LEED Platinum certifications. •- i j � MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MESA + PLANNING Brownsville Downtown Plan Project Overview: BrownsvilleTexas The downtown area of Brownsville, Texas seeks to revitalize an urban -- Statistics core that once enjoyed considerable An historic town, located between spending by Mexican nationals. How- on the Rio Grande River,at the ever, current border politics have re- -- Mexican border with Matamoros duced that spending to a fraction of its former volume. Therefore a downtown, once center of a city with nearly 1 mil- lion people, is today a center of a cyy much smaller population (178,000). The plan seeks to create new econom- ic energy by regaining former patron- age by Mexican nationals, establishing - � '• >! _ _ �_ ,z°- /• ;x':11:. a stronger public domain that will en- v -- - s ' l`t hance downtown as a destination, cre- t �J i _ I ating longer durations of stay through _ ? yr yam . residential uses and lodging, and creat- fir,gyp?: ing stronger connections with the uni- versity population. in addition, the plan seeks to find niche specialty markets .�.... .»= that can flourish in some of the unique downtown spaces , forged by its histo- ry. yx;_ 1� The plan is built upon catalyst projects , that can find private investment with s� 1 the right public partnerships. Partner- " ship opportunities are identified. j , '+�.� "+•• .t �r �v"4.� _ � -�� ,fir•- t'_ -.- 4L- 14 i S 4•I q _ Iwo Af MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS M ESA + PLAN N I NG Argyle Commercial Centers Plan Project Overview: �. _ :. '1 Argyle ,Texas The Commercial Centers Plan for Argyle is an implementation ' �« r -e guide for the earlier Comprehen- w ; { `' i Statistics sive Plan (also completed by �' � € "' Small township lying in the 1-35 W MESA). Based on economic growth corridor between Ft.Worth and Denton.Population approxi- performance thresholds r� �- mately 2,000 (depicted in the value map with " - r dark brown zones, right) the plan k - � sought to increase present value distribution (depicted by yellow � � FAO and brown zones, right) through the creation of hubbing and con- rab verging movement patterns thatAA, � will harvest the economic value of regional traffic volumes flowing I tt through the town. Through at- tainment of value potentials, - j / ", " Town Vision Goals (such as the town centers depicted below and above) are attainable, The Com- mercial Centers Plan also recom- " mended land based approaches to value capture because much - --- — " , of the early development will be land development. I 1, Av s l I - - I 11 yam. _ s lop- •+�,! MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A RCLCO REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS RCLCO ALEXANDRIA ECONOMIC DFVELOFW N I ANALYS Alexandria, VA Project Areas e q l/tf ff tf ii• .•1111!.11 t,r1�.. ,:.' ... a if un=•r .n„ ,,.,, , -- _ Economic Development :v.,. If it WIN ff ill un s cp s - fi ,�n,il :niau, IIIIIItIA IA 1�i EW i"l� null: OW Will The Challenge Alexandria Economic The D.C. Metropolitan region is growing and Alex- from locating in Alexandria and provides the city Development Partnership, andria is strongly positioned to capture new demand key data points that it can use to recruit and retain Inc for office space.Companies within the region are ex- target industries. The end product of the analysis panding,new companies are moving to DC,compa- is an opportunities matrix, which summarizes key Scope of Work nies already in Alexandria are growing,and together recommendations and tools for implementation. these forces will add to the regional demand for office Cluster Analysis space in the coming decade.The city is home to a growing cluster of high tech,business services,and Impact professional association headquarters. Alexandria The Alexandria Economic Development Strategic Economic Development Partnership (AEDP) hired Plan is in the process of being developed and this eco- RCLCO to quantify growth within business cluster nomic development strategy will help shape the goals, in the city and regionally,and identify location,busi- timeline,and implementation strategy of the strategic Implementation ness,and other advantages that the city provides that plan. RCLCO will present its findings to City Coun- could help retain and recruit businesses in the city. cil and work with AEDP to facilitate implementation. Solution RCLCO was commissioned by AEDP to evalu- ate the local economic drivers and to create an economic development strategy that would assist Regional Economics the city in its long-term decision making. The eco- nomic development study evaluates sources of city revenue, identifies established and emerging busi- ness clusters, analyzes the geographic distribution of business clusters, and evaluates the cost of do- ing business in Alexandria as compared to other competitive submarkets. The analysis identifies the types of businesses that would most benefit MESA + PLANNING www.rcico.com Resolution 13-24A RCLCO REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS RCLGO DOWNTOWN DENTON IMPS Denton, TX r . Project Areas au Downtown Revitalization Economic Development AMR y� Public-Private Partnerships Transit-Oriented Development Challenge Denton, Texas is in Denton County, one of the four the development community. Finally, we analyzed major counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro- available existing development incentives in down- Scope of Work politan area. It is home to the University of North town Denton and evaluated additional incentives Texas and Texas Woman's University and an in- and public financing tools for the City to consider. creasingly thriving music and arts scene. The Impact city recently created a downtown master plan, RCLCO's recommendations became part but did not have a plan to implement it. The pur- of the City's overall implementation plan pose of the implementation plan was to provide for the Downtown Master Plan. RCLCO: the city with a roadmap towards implementation -Recommended an organizational structure Implementation as well as the tools to help in decision-making. necessary to not only execute economic Solution development for the City of Denton,but also RCLCO was part of a multidisciplinary team, lead the implementation strategies for new City, Partnership Structuring by Jacobs,to craft a plan to help facilitate the imple- business,and residential investment in Down- mentation of the master plan. RCLCO specifically town Denton(i.e.the Downtown Implementa- Public Financing focused on tools and strategies the City could utilize tion Plan). to help catalyze development and educate the pri- -Recommended various public-private partner vate development community on the opportunities ship structures with which the new organiza- available in downtown Denton. We first analyzed tional structure could attract and incentivize how the City was organized in its pursuit of econom- development. is development initiatives and to what extent its or- -Identified various funding strategies to support ganization, or entities within the organization, were the infrastructure required to accommodate empowered to most effectively engage the private new development in support of jobs related development community. Next, we looked at spe- economic development,as well as incentives cific public-private partnership structures the City to encourage private investment downtown. could employ,once property organized,to help draw The Downtown Implementation Plan for the City of development downtown. These structures were in- Denton won a Development of Excellence Award tended to improve development economics,making from the North Central Texas Council of Govern- development in downtown Denton more attractive to ments(NCTCOG). www.rcico.com MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A RCLCO REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS RCLCO tI'VibIUN I U__ IHh Salt Lake City, UT Project Areas �- e✓ - Corridor Planning Economic Development i y Economic&Fiscal impact Metropolitan Growth Strategy Public-Private Partnerships Transit-Oriented Development The Challenge • Identified ways that each of the existing centers Envision Utah Utahns have prospered since pioneers entered the could be strengthened in order to better meet state in the 1800s. However by 2050,the population Envision Utah's definition of"sustainable cen- Scope of Work of Utah will nearly double to over five million people. ters"; As one of America's fastest-growing states, Utahns Created statistical models to determine the Cluster Analysis wanted to act proactively to grow in a way that pro- amount of housing, retail, office, civic, and in- tects and enhances quality of life for existing and dustrial space that would be required to turn the future citizens. In 1997, Envision Utah brought to- Northwest Quadrant into a balanced, sustain- gether residents, elected officials, developers, con- able center. servationists,business leaders,and other interested Impact Implementation parties to make informed decisions about how we Since facilitating the Quality Growth Strategy, Envi- should grow.They retained RCLCO to construct for sion Utah has partnered with more than 100 com- Market Analysis them a long-range growth model to forecast how re- curring trends in other cities might influence growth munities in Utah. The Envision Utah approach of Partnership Structuring civic engagement has been replicated by dozens in Salt Lake City. of regions around the country. RCLCO continues to Solution work with Envision Utah, most recently to provide Public Outreach In orderto help Envision Utah meet its goals,RCLCO: statistically-rigorous forecasts that support an initia- Regional Economics Interviewed local economists, significant em- tive to bring more fixed-rail transit to the Wasatch ployers, and large land holders to understand Front. the underlying drivers of regional growth; Strategy Planning Used interviews,GIS mapping,and proprietary research to identify key centers of economic activity • Developed a model to score those centers on a variety of factors and identify the proportion of future growth that each center might be able to attract; • Based on historic trends, case study research, and the results of the scoring exercise above, identified areas likely to emerge as new centers over the next 30 years; www.rcico.com MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A RCLCO REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS RCLCO GO CINCINNATI Cincinnati, OH Project Areas _.-. Economic Development _- Economic&Fiscal Impact Industrial City Turnaround Metropolitan Growth Strategy Public-Private Partnerships The Challenge Impact Cincinnati USA Regional Cincinnati urban and regional economy had been hit The Mayor evaluated the recommendations and an- Partnership especially hard by the nation's economic restructur- nounced those which he would like to move forward ing and especially the decline of traditional manu- during his State of the City address on February 4, Scope of Work facturing. This decline had negative impacts on the 2008. City Council unanimously adopted the strate- City's neighborhoods and downtown as well as its gy in February of 2010,and is working now to imple- Cluster Analysis budget and overall competitiveness for future growth. ment the recommendations. The plan has resulted Economic Impact City leaders and the regional chamber of commerce in hundreds of new jobs moving into the city,includ- realized that Cincinnati needed a new strategy,one ing those from companies such as Proctor&Gamble Financial Modeling that would be place-based in nature, enhance the and KAO Brands. City leadership is aggressively Fiscal Impact City's fiscal health, and re-position the City and acquiring and repositioning hundreds of acres of the region for economic growth in the 21st century. brownfields for new jobs-related activities, and pri- vate developers are now approaching the City to re- Market Analysis Solution develop these and other sites forjobs-related activity. RCLCO worked alongside the Brookings Institution to construct an economic analysis of the City,assess its potential competitive advantages in the regional Public Outreach and national economy, identify opportunity areas within the City suitable for development to accom- Regional Economics modate growth, and create place-based economic development strategies specific to each growth Strategy Planning area. RCLCO brought together business,communi- ty,and political leaders to be part of the process and ultimately embrace the recommended economic de- velopment strategy. We also quantified the impact that the strategy would have on jobs and revenues for the City. Finally,RCLCO delivered an implemen- tation plan tied to agencies,leaders,and resources, to carry the ideas set forth in the strategy into action. www.rcico.com MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A RCLCO REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS RCLCO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AT 'ATFGY Shaker Heights, OH Project Areas Downtown Revitalization Economic Development Economic&Fiscal Impact Challenge City of Shaker Heights The City of Shaker Heights,Ohio,had enjoyed a po- an economic development strategy to reposition the sition of regional prominence and fiscal strength for a City for economic growth over the next 100 years. Scope of Work century. Economic restructuring throughout the Mid- west through west through the latter part of the 20th century ex- Cluster Impact posed structural weaknesses in the Shaker Heights Economic Impact economy that threatened its near-term fiscal health Not only was the strategy unanimously accepted and as well as its "brand" —a residential destination of adopted by the City Council,but private sector actors Financial Modeling choice within the Cleveland metro area. It faced fis- embraced the plan and moved quickly to implement Fiscal Impact cal duress that threatened to deplete its reserve and its recommendations. Within months of the plan's general funds within five years. City leaders recog- adoption, the City had successfully moved forward Implementation nized this threat and called for a new vision and eco- on a transit-oriented neighborhood redevelopment Market Analysis nomic development agenda to solidify the City's eco- and negotiated a deal with a technology incubator nomic health and carry it through the next century. and numerous related commercial developments that promise to revitalize an aging commercial and Public Financing industrial corridor in the City. Moreover,the strategy Solution has been integrated into the overall Management Public Outreach RCLCO worked with the Mayor and City leaders to Plan for the City and has been used to create a sig- Regional Economics construct a forward-looking forecast of the City's nificant developer and business interest in the City. potential trajectories within the regional economy. We recast the City's economic development para- Strategy Planning digm to target commercial development niches and outlined strategies by which City leaders could capture this activity. We developed sophisticated fiscal and financial models that could quantify the impact of various incentives and subsidies upon the City's overall development activity and tax rev- enues. Finally,we engineered a public process by which we collaborated with City leaders to author www.rcico.com MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A GS&P REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS G R E S H A M 0y1___ City of Cleburne -'` S M I T H A N D COMPREHENSIVE PLAN P A R T N E R S CLEBURNE, TEXAS GS&P is part of a team, including MOSAIC and MESA Planning, responsible for the creation of a comprehensive plan for the City of Cleburne. The City is seeing a shift in development patterns, land values and market interest, altering patterns of development activity and impacting infrastructure systems. The team will provide careful planning to uphold the quality of life that residents enjoy while ensuring economic competiveness and growth management. GS&P is providing transportation and infrastructure systems planning. GS&P will participate in public meetings, making presentations to develop a vision for the plan. The public meetings will include a Town Hall Meeting, two Public Workshops and a Project Open House. As part of the contextual analysis, GS&P will perform a capacity analysis of the water/wastewater system and the thoroughfare system to determine their ultimate capacity for expansion. The Thoroughfare Plan will be developed to address both form and function, establishing capacity-based typologies that also carry design guidelines. An Infrastructure Plan we be dev.eloped that will focus on those systems that are operated and managed by the City: water, wastewater, solid waste and stormwater. Policies and recommendations for attracting desired franchises (such as telecommunications operators) will be developed as a way to promotes desirable growth patterns. Policies and best practices for natural gas production activity will also be crafted so that the impact of drilling and production activity is minimized. A list of prioritized public improvement projects will be created that could be included in the City's Capital Improvement Plan. Douglas County HIGHWAY 92 CORRIDOR LIVABLE CENTERS INITIATIVE DOUGLAS COUNTY, GEORGIA Douglas County created a vision and plan for the Highway 92 corridor through the Atlanta Regional Commission's awarding-winning Livable Centers Initiative (LCI). GS&P teamed with the County to help implement more than $100 million of proposed transportation infrastructure projects recommended for the corridor, including sidewalks, off-road trails, new street networks, streetscape enhancements and arterial BRT service. GS&P was tasked with measuring and evaluating the benefits of an interconnected, multi-modal network and integrating that network within new growth and development as it evolves along the corridor. The study took an innovative approach of balancing four factorsmobility, livability, market impact and physical constraints—in evaluating and prioritizing projects. The study also made recommendations for implementation, including federal grants, public-private partnerships and regulatory approaches. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A GS&P REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS G R. E S H A M City of Garland - S M I T H A N D MUNICIPAL SUSTAINABILITY PLAN P A R T N E R S GARLAND, TEXAS GS&P was chosen by the City of Garland to prepare an internally-focused sustainability plan designed to improve City operations while ensuring that those efforts will be compatible with future community-wide sustainability efforts. As part of the development of the plan, GS&P assisted with sustainability visioning, updated the City Manager, worked with an internal green team on plan development, conducted a benchmark analysis of eight other cities, and assisted with baselining. The GS&P process for developing the sustainability included: • Documentation of the City's expectations and needs for the plan through a sustainability mission and vision statement with management support. • Involvement by Garland staff to gain insight in cost-effective measures from front line employees. • Development of a range of sustainability ideas from innovative and out-of-the box to tried and true measures adopted by other local governments. • Collection of baseline information. • Cost/benefit analysis for each measure and documentation of the analyses. • Identification of metrics that are easy to collect and are effective and informative. • Goal setting of realistic and achievable objectives. • Use of implementation management systems to educate, build support and drive success of the program. • Engagement and active participation of Garland staff and stakeholders not only through the development of the plan but through implementation as well. • Assistance with scope development, data collection and report review of the greenhouse gas emission inventory. The resulting sustainability plan provides the means to achieve measurable and consistent benefits, facilitates active participation by staff and the community, and drives continual improvement. City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT PLAN ATLANTA, GEORGIA GS&P is responsible for the management and development of a comprehensive 50-year wastewater management plan for the City's wastewater facilities, including treatment and collection systems. Phase I included a comprehensive study of the City's four WRCs and eight CSO facilities. This work included condition and regulatory compliance assessments at each facility (including extensive headworks screening and grit removal system assessments at the four WRCs) as well as an investigation of historical operations and maintenance costs use to develop short-term and long-term cost saving strategies across the wastewater operations. Phase II includes a comprehensive system-wide assessment taking into account the immediate needs identified in Phase I and projecting requirements at each facility and across the wastewater enterprise for the next 50 years. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A GSBP REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS G R E S H A M City of McKinney S M ! T H A N D MUNICIPAL SUSTAINABILITY PLAN P A R T N E R 5 MCKINNEY, TEXAS The City of McKinney received a monetary grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program for the development of a municipal sustainability plan, including identifying essential elements of sustainability and providing analysis and guidelines for the operation of community activities. The plan was developed in close coordination with City staff and built upon existing sustainability objectives and associated programs to drive continual improvement for the City. The plan was developed in a way that builds ongoing support, shared ownership and community champions. GS&P provided the City with measurable indicators and planning principles for all key areas, including the natural environment, built environment, purchasing, energy, economic development, air quality, water quality and quantity, and transportation. To support the City's sustainable goals, GS&P's approach helped the City to: • Foster stakeholder engagement and leveraging strategies within the City, including existing organizational efforts to identify and support sustainability objectives. • Identify and prioritize activities for leveraging fiscal and non-fiscal resources in support of the City's objectives. • Identify and implement strategies to build the capacity of organizations, individuals and champions to participate in sustaining community-wide investment and participation. • Build and nurture a shared ownership of the City's sustainability vision through partnerships between individuals, governments, corporations, and foundations working to identify physical, natural, and fiscal resources and achieve similar results. • Develop clear and measurable sustainability goals with associated implementation tools. Metroplan IMAGINE CENTRAL ARKANSAS: 2040 LONG RANGE TRANSPORTATION PLAN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS GS&P is partnering with Metroplan, the MPO for the Little Rock, AR region, in the development of a 2040 Long Range Plan. In addition to meeting FHWA requirements, the plan will result in a shared regional vision for transportation and land use that is focused on sustainability and livability. GS&P will provide expertise in multi-modal transportation and land use planning, sustainability and community engagement. The project comprises five components: a Stakeholder Engagement Strategy that will use innovative web and mobile-based approaches to ensure the involvement of all interested local parties; analysis of alternative transportation and land use scenarios; technical support for the Metroplan staff and other involved organizations; development of a Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and finally, the development of a sustainable, multi- modal transportation plan. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A GS&P REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS G R E S H A M City of San Marcos S M I T H A N D SUSTAINABILITY PLAN SAN MARCOS, TEXAS P A R T N E R S GS&P is working with the City of San Marcos to create a sustainability plan to expand its green initiatives, reduce environmental impacts, protect the local waterways and achieve financial benefits by incorporating sustainability measures into everyday business operations. The sustainability plan will build on existing measures, include the means to continually improve the program over time and highlight San Marcos' past sustainability successes and recommended future activities. The plan will include sustainability efforts under the categories of Environment—air quality and greenhouse gases, energy, water quality and conservation, waste management, and land use and habitat conservation; Economy—green purchasing, and budget and finance; and Society—education and outreach, workplace safety and wellness, and culture and diversity. City of Fort Worth SUSTAINABILITY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION PROGRAM FORT WORTH, TEXAS GS&P was chosen by the City of Fort Worth to develop a Sustainability Education and Outreach Program using EECBG funding provided through the U.S. Department of Energy. GS&P is working closely with the City of Fort Worth staff and community to build upon existing programs to drive continual sustainability improvements for the City, its staff, residents, and businesses. The primary goals of the Sustainability Education and Outreach Program are to: • Build awareness of issues in terms of social, economic and environmental impacts. • Inform, encourage, and change behaviors that protect, preserve, and restore the environment, economy, and community- ultimately promoting sustainability. • Build a coalition of advocates comprised of staff, business and elected leaders, corporations, neighborhoods, and like-minded groups. • Identify, create, deploy and manage messaging in a variety of formats for varied audiences. • Develop a measurement and assessment tool that displays sustainability progress in a way that promotes continual improvement. • Assist with reporting and management of the EECBG grant funding. GS&P is developing tools, messaging campaigns, PR packets and other additional outreach materials for use in the education of the community as well as internally to City staff. Project elements have ranged from branding and website development, to a school curriculum for the Parks and Recreation summer camp, to facilitating a symposium for the business community, to developing a metric tracking tool to communicate progress toward the City's goals. This project is focused on the communication of sustainability and the differing information delivery techniques needed to reach the different audiences and stakeholders. -r MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A GS&P REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS G R E S H A M SMITH AND P A R T N E R S Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization KNOXVILLE REGIONAL COMPLETE STREETS STUDY KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE Due to the increased number of residents and traffic congestion in the urban areas of Knoxville, The Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization (RTPO) identified the need to transform corridors in the Knoxville region to make them friendlier to alternative modes of transportation for pedestrians, bicyclists and transit riders of all ages and abilities. The Knoxville RTPO received a grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) to conduct the study and it included looking at two corridors in the region and how they could transform into more complete streets. Specific problems identified included extra right-of-way on either side of one street, a two-way turning lane down the middle of both streets and a limited budget to pursue the project as well as time constraints to complete it. The Knoxville RTPO engaged GS&P to examine the two corridors and propose a complete streets concept that would make room for all user groups while balancing service to vehicles and managing overall congestion. GS&P first met with the community to personally discover what the immense needs were for the area and the people who commute within Knoxville daily. Incorporating the community's input as well as findings from a week-long study of the streets, GS&P identified innovative solutions that would immensely benefit the commuters of Knoxville. For the extra right-of-way on either side of one of the streets, GS&P made recommendations for bike lanes that would not impact traffic and would provide safety for bicyclists. For the two-way center turn lane running down the middle of both streets, GS&P recommended installing raised medians that could be used by pedestrians to cross mid-block. GS&P also developed a set of Complete Streets Design Guidelines for future complete streets transformations throughout the region. The Guidelines take advantage of flexibility within the AASHTO Green Book and other accepted design standards to suggest techniques and general guidance for accommodating all modes within. The study resulted in an elegant, innovative design that is simple, rejuvenating and accessible to bicyclists, pedestrians, transit riders and motor vehicle operators. Knoxville now has additional safe and efficient methods of alternative transportation, allowing the growing population to walk and ride bikes safely amongst motor vehicles. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MOSAIC REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS MOSAIC PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT NSERVICES Cleburne Comprehensive Plan. MOSAIC has recently begun work with Cleburne to develop a comprehensive plan for the City. The construction of the �I Chisholm Trail Parkway, an extension of SH 121 , will redefine Cleburne's position with the DFW Metroplex, opening the door for new development expressions, employment opportunities :,—a and patterns of circulation. The comprehensive plan will provide a clear vision of community preferences for growth patterns, as well as a strategy for harnessing emerging development opportunities to improve the city's economic competitiveness `r - within the region. Brownsville Infrastructure Development Plan. MOSAIC has teamed with Needham-McCaffrey Associates and " ►� Cambridge Systematics to create a large scale infrastructure development plan for the greater Brownsville area. This region along the U.S.-Mexico border is attracting significant development interest, related to power, energy, transportation •! and industry. Our team has been commissioned to identify core +► , , infrastructure projects with highest likelihood of success for a ;»� *•- multi-jurisdictional area of interest. The team will also be creating -` p land management plans that will impact growthwithin and W4 around the areas of the Port of Brownsville and the Brownsville International Airport. -- ----- , Hickory Creek Town Center Code Development. I i �� �■ � MOSAIC is currently working with the Town of Hickory Creek to establish define a commercial town center. With limited DR oxsn,a availability of commercial land and complex ownership i patterns, the project involves definition of uniform standards but employment of diverse tools for their application. -- MESA + PLANNING `�4 Resolution 13-24A TEAM STRUCTURE 4 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Mqw- ESA + PLANNIN- IWNG Principal in Charge And Project Manager Robin McCaffrey AIA, AICP Land Use, Urban Design, Growth Economics, Architecture =SUBCONSULTANTS Ashley Shook, LEED APO Urban Planning and Design Tia Primova Eli Pearson, AICP, LEED APO Web Design Urban Planning and Design G R E S H A M MOSATC. S M I T H A N EPLANNING DEVELC)PMENT Ila[ P A R T N E R SEIZVICES Todd LaRue, Principal Alex Martinez, PE Carissa Cox, AICP Land Use Economics Civil Engineering Environmental Real Estate Transportation Planning Sustainability MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A M E SA + P LA N N I N G Firm and Contact Information MESA PLANNING is a Dallas-based Planning and Architecture Firm active in MESA PLANNING the Dallas area for 35 years. Much of the firm's experience has focused on 11700 Preston Road revitalization, infill development, public planning, urban design, economic Ste 660-299 strategies., and citizen participation in the planning process. MESA PLAN- Dallas, Tx 75230 NING offers the following professional services: Contact: Robin H. McCaffrey, • Development Planning AIA,AICP •Architecture 214.535.7484 • Community and Regional Planning rmccaffrey@ • Urban Design mesa-planning.com • Site Design • Infrastructure Planning - ,> • Land Use Economics • Economic Development Consultation • Development Services In each of the above areas, we have successfully undertaken a diverse range of commissions. Our architectural and planning projects have received numer- ous awards and critical acclaim. Our planning commissions have generated in innovative development concepts and established new approaches towards zoning and public policy for growth management. - v 1 _. MESA PLANNING has developed numerous procedures and methods for as- 0 sessment and analysis of natural and built environments as well as economic impacts. The resulting plan, using these methods, have been more environ- mentally responsive, more sustainable, and more historically resonate. Entire vocabularies have been formulated to design, create, and evaluate environ- ment and economic trajectories from site to neighborhood to whole communi- ties. Natural environments such as parks, camps, and urban open spaces/ corridors are substantially integral with their context due to targeted analysis , methods developed by MESA Planning. Growth management is directed to- ward a future that strengthens financial capacity to accommodate such ;�:1 ,;. ------------ growth. MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA + PLANNING Firm continued MESA PLANNING has an outstanding record of favorable review by agencies, boards, commissions, and councils at varying levels of government. Our under- standing of public policy, current planning practices, jurisdictional procedures, and development dramatically reinforces the effectiveness of our planning ser- vices. The associates of MESA PLANNING hold distinctive academic and professional credentials with years of experience in their individual areas of expertise. Our registered architects have responsible experience in both commercial and resi- dential projects ranging from high-rise commercial buildings to homes. Our cer- tified planners have significant experience in both the public and private sector. �. AM - r l - .�A MESA+PLANNING Planning Architecture Economic Development MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A M E S A + P LA N N I N G Robin H. McCaffrey AIA, AICP AFFILIATIONS AND HONORS: Education ■ Texas Registered Architect Master of City Planning, Massa- ■ Certified Planner (AICP) chusetts Institute of Technology ■ Texas Licensed Nurseryman Bachelor of Architecture,Texas ■ Grant Panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts A&M University ■ Member of the Dallas Historic Landmark Commission (6 years) Agricultural Science; PennsylvaniaState University ■ Member of the Dallas Urban Design Advisory Committee (3 years) ■ Member of Texas Turf Growers Association and member of American Turf Grass Association Planning Experience ■ Chairman of the Fair Park Task Force (3years) 2011—Present, Senior Principal, ■ Recipient of American Institute of Architects Design Award MESA Planning ■ Recipient of American Planning Association Planning Award 1996-2011, Senior Principal; ■ Recipient of American Society of Architects Design Awards MESA Design Associates ■ Recipient of US Dept. of HUD Urban Design Award 1987-1996, Co-founder and ■ Recipient of NAHB Builder's Choice Award president of Needham-McCaffrey ■ Critical Acclaimed by University of Texas Architectural Journal "Center" Associates and The Dallas Morning News Architecture Critic Author of numerous articles in National Professional Journals 1 Inc.,a Dallas Vice President,m ■ c.;a Dallas Development firm ■ Member of US Delegation to People's Republic of China to advise on Preservation Planning 1980-1983; Principal Planner, City of San Antonio SELECTED PROJECTS: 1975-1978, Principal Planner, City of Dallas Comprehensive Plans. A selection of land use, thoroughfare, housing, urban design, open space/ natural systems, and infrastructure plans intended to ac- commodate projected growth. • Brownsville Port and Strategic Infrastructure Plan (current) • Brenham Downtown Plan (2012 Planning Award) Licenses and Certifications • Texas Lutheran University Campus Plan AICP • Kyle, Texas Comprehensive Plan (2010 Planning Award) AIA • Brownsville Comprehensive Plan (2009 Planning Award) • Seguin Comprehensive Plan (2009 Planning Award) • Argyle Comprehensive Plan • Prosper Comprehensive Plan • Corsicana Comprehensive Plan • De Soto Comprehensive Plan • Mesquite, 1-30 Corridor plan "y-! • Others prior to 2006 • Bi-National Economic Development Initiative(US/Mexico): Attainment of agreement between the Cities of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mex- ico to jointly pursue Bi-National Economic Development as a pilot initiative that demonstrates the use of economic development as a means of restor- ing border stability. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA + PLANNING Robin H. McCaffrey, continued • Advisor to the Trade Bank of Iraq: Working with and through the interna- tional law firm of Patton Boggs, providing input on matters related to infra- structure reconstruction and value creation in Iraq. • Expert Witness: Providing testimony on behalf of the City of North Rich- land Hills regarding matters where private development claims regulatory taking and misuse of regulatory authority. • Private Development Planning in Mexico, the reuse of industrial sites in the urban core of Monterrey (and other Mexican cities) as places for mixed use development and packing such development proposals in ways that foreign investment will find attractive. • Dallas Arts District Plan: An urban design and development management plan that promotes and guides the creation of an Arts and Culture District through design continuity and innovation. Development Plans: • Mantua Master Development Plan and PD Ordinance • Montgomery Farm Development Plan and PD Ordinance • (APA and ASLA Award) • Lakeside Ranch Development Plan, PD Ordinance, and Development Agreements • Spectrum Center Master Development Plan, PD Ordinance, and public Improvement strategy • Marble Falls Master Development Plan, Strategy business plan, public/ private partnership, and PD Ordinance • Fairview Town Center Plan, Implementation Strategy, Realignment of Public Infrastructure to create value, and Town Center Ordinance • Others prior to 2004 LECTURES National APA Conference • 2013: Creating an investment Environment for Downtown • 2012: Long Term Vision Short Term gain • 2011: Urbanism an Economic Condition • 2010: Land Use in Changing Financial Times • 2009: Spatial Economics of Land Use • 2008:NewUrbanism vs. True Urbanism • 2007:The Ungovernable City • 2006: Emphasizing the Pedestrian in TOD • 2004: Guidelines that Give Form • 2003: Public Participation Strategy • 1979: Neighborhood Planning/Planning by Neighborhoods • APA, Texas Chapter Conference • 2003: Guidelines that Give Form MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA + PLANNING Robin H. McCaffrey, continued • 2003: Pedestrians Interaction with Light Rail • 2003: The Developer Citizen and Public Investment • 2002: Public Private Partnerships in Commercial Development • 2002: New Towns, New Urbanism:Developments of Past and Future • 2001: Educating the Public About Planning Fort Worth Chapter AIA, Keynote Speaker for Annual Awards Meeting. 2004. Urban Design International Economics Conference (Brazil, The Catholic University of Brasil- ia). 2005 The Next Phase of Urban Development.- The Rise of Telophase Centers University of Texas at Arlington. 2002. Urban Design Overview University of Texas at Arlington. 2002. Panel Member. Foundation of Good Urban Design.- AIA esign:AIA Local Chapter. 2001. Urban Design and Planning COURT CASE INVOLVEMENT that has affected the Planning Profession • Crownrich vs. the City of Dallas: A Supreme Court decision resulting from early historic preservation work where the ability of the City of Dallas to deny a building permit in anticipation of pending historic designation was tested. Decision in favor of City of Dallas empowered historic preservation movements throughout the State of Texas. • Mayhew vs. the City of Sunnyvale: A Supreme Court decision resulting from development challenge of Sunnyvale's small lot prohibition. Su- preme Court decision in favor of Sunnyvale (despite lower court ruling in favor of the plaintiff citing discriminatory effect of such a restriction) estab- lished Sunnyvale's right to determine lot size as part of their zoning law. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A - RCLCO For over 40 years, RCLCO (Robert Charles Lesser& Co., Our extensive network of clients, colleagues, LLC) has been the "first call" for real estate developers, professionals, and public officials, in the United States and financial institutions, public sector entities, private abroad, provides us with a unique and comprehensive investors, anchor institutions, and Fortune 500 companies outlook on the industry—not to mention unmatched access seeking strategic and tactical advice regarding property to the best minds in real estate. investment, planning, and development. As the largest independent real estate advisory firm in the nation—with Since we opened our door in 1967, RCLCO has been experience in international markets—we provide end-to- governed by our core values. We believe that excellence, end advisory and implementation solutions at an entity, integrity, honesty, respect, exceeding expectations, and portfolio,or project level. quality are great goals that all firms must possess. These goals and values shape the culture and define the RCLCO has expertise in five major areas: Urban character of our firm. They guide how we behave and Development,Community and Resort Development, Public make decisions. Strategies, Institutional Advisory, and Management Consulting. Our multidisciplinary team combines real Year Opened: 1967 world experience with the analytical underpinnings of the firm's thousands of consulting engagements to develop Office Locations: Washington, DC(HQ) Los Angeles,CA and implement strategic plans that strengthen our client's Austin,TX position in a market or sector, add value to a property or Orlando, FL portfolio, mitigate price erosion, and strengthen a client's Staff: 45 position in the case of an acquisition or disposition. Practice Groups: Community Development Institutional Advisory Each day, our consultants apply the knowledge gained Management Consulting from our body of work along with the insights stemming Public Strategies Urban Development from our proprietary research—trends analysis, consumer research, project performance metrics, economic Affiliations: Urban Land Institute Pension Real Estate Association projections, etc.—to add value to our clients' real estate International Economic activities at every point in the market cycle. We constantly Development Council National Multifamily Housing refine our concepts and methods in order to identify the Council best means for helping our clients gain a competitive Society for College and University Planning advantage in the marketplace. AUSTIN I LOS ANGELE� 1 ORDANDO I 'AIAEHINGTON.D.C. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A i &A RCLCO Todd LaRue RELEVANT . - 512-215-3157 tlarue(d_)rcico.com Envision Waco 2050; RCLCO is currently a member of a larger team working with the City of Waco to assess . plan for the future development potential of Greater Downtown Waco. an Areas of Specialization: area encompassing approximately square miles. The goal of the study is to Master-planned Communities; Mixed-Use Development, maximize potential devel• Attached/Detached Residential (infill, suburban), 2nd opportunities to ensure the Citys long-term - Home/Resort Developments viability not only as an urban core, but also as a vibrant and sustainable mixed-use Mr. LaRue is a Principal and leads our Austin, Texas office. With community. Our role is to work with the key his project teams, he advises developers, investors and public stakeholders and planning team members to frame the strategic options sector clients on the application of market, financial and development consumer research to clients' particular needs. Downtown economic feasibility analysis and Since joining RCLCO, Mr. LaRue has managed and directed implementation engagements for a variety of land uses in Texas and the Southeast including Georgia. Florida, South Carolina, North Fourth Ward Livable Center;Houston Carolina, Alabama, Tennessee. Kentucky; and Mississippi. His RCLCO D` signWorkshop to develop a livable centers plan work has included consulting for numerous types of mixed-use for the 4"' Ward neighborhood in central developments, residential housing, retail, office, and industrialHouston. Texas. • role provide developments. For these engagements; he conducts highestthe market and economic context for the and best use analyses; opportunity analyses, market analyses; long-term implementation consumer research, economic development assessments, ensure that the final plan is grounded financial analyses; fiscal impact analyses and various other market realities while fulfilling the needs of analytical tasks to meet clients' particular objectives. the local community. b Denton,Texas Prior to joining RCLCO, Mr. LaRue's professional career r Downtown includes over seven years of experience in construction RCLCO conducted market feasibility and strategic planning services for the City of management with Beers Construction (now Skanska USA) in Denton, enhance Atlanta. GA and W. H. Bass, Inc. in Norcross. GA. Much of hisrevitalize its downtown. work was concentrated on managing construction projects inwere topreserve - downtown retail, banking, education, and telecommunication. In addition, while adding new residential, retail, office, he served as a construction manager for tenant improvement and entertainment uses to energize the projects at Peachtree Center in downtown Atlanta. area. In addition, there was a concerted downtowneffort to connect the historic Mr. LaRue brings strong analytical skills in quantitative and a new transit station wouldwhich with the qualitative analysis with his civil engineering degree from the • _ _ . University of Virginia and Master in Business Administration degree in real estate and finance from Emory University. He is Other an active member of the Urban Land Institute (member of theComers; Farmers Branch,TX Executive Committee of ULI Austin) and has been a guest & Downtown Northport, speaker/lecturer/panelist at numerous real estate industry events 0 Perimeter Community and graduate business schools including the Urban Land Improvement Institute, Congress for the New Urbanism, the University of Texas at Austin. and Emory University. 0 Downtown Transit-Oriented Development: Leander,Texas(Austin) MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A . RELEVANT PROJECT EXPERIENCE ' Alexandria Economic Development °~ Analysis—Alexandria,VA �. Project manager for the economic development strategy for Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. The analysis considered projected job growth by industry in Alexandria and throughout the region to identify the city's competitive antages and industry targets for growth. • • • omic Development Strategy for West Broad Street—Columbus,OH • -• • 1 i • • - • roject Manager for economic development trategy for the neighborhood surrounding . . •_• ••_ . Westland Mall and the new Hollywood .+ _ .•• • _ • _ ••_I_ •_ Casino. The analysis provided targeted strategies for redevelopment and identified specific implementation tools that can be used to fund and realize each strategy. •_ _ •• -• - • • • • ' Lake Travis Economic Impact Analysis— Travis County,TX •- - •• - - • •• ••. . • Project manager for the fiscal and economic -.. . • . -. - . . . analysis of Lake Travis, which quantifies the . . .. . . . . . . total impact of the lake on Travis County and - • + • �• _• • municipalities surrounding the lake, and the • _ • • effects of fluctuating water levels on state, county,and municipal revenues. •- - •• - -• • ' • • Union Station Master Planning Market Analysis—Los Angeles,CA RCLCO was retained by METRO LA to conduct an economic and market analysis for current conditions of the residential, office, retail and hospitality sectors. The analysis will forecast future demand each land use to help envision build-out of the site. Columbia Town Center Revitalization Strategy—Columbia,MD Project Manager for a strategy to revitalize Columbia Town Center, the mixed-use center of Columbia,MD,which is one of the first new town developments in the US. The analysis included market analysis for residential, retail, office,and commercial uses;highest and best use recommendations, consumer research to better understand local residential demand, case study analysis, and development recommendations. Other mixed-use: • Strategic Planning Analysis; Cincinnati,OH • Residential Market Analysis for a New Town Center Style Development:North Cincinnati.OH 12G R E S H A M S M I TH AND P A R T N E R S Gresham, Smith and Partners (GS&P) was founded in 1967 to plan and design built and natural environments for our clients. Today, we are made up of more than 600 talented men and women dedicated to the success of our clients' programs. For more than 45 years, GS&P has focused on enhancing quality of life and sustainability within communities. The firm consistently ranks among the top architecture and engineering firms in the United States. Each member of GS&P's staff is an expert in some facet of the design process, ranging from comprehensive planning, to architecture and engineering design, to environmental permitting and regulatory coordination, to sustainability planning, to water resources management, to public outreach and involvement. With our diversity of in-house expertise, we are able to offer a variety of tailored solutions to meet each of our clients' individual needs. GS&P understands comprehensive planning and recognizes its importance in guiding the future physical, social and economic health of communities. Our planning efforts reflect an understanding of the unique factors that define a community. Planning is a process of discovery that effectively involves all community stakeholders. Successful planning ensures that growth responds to the long-range vision of the community and considers all aspects of development including land use, mobility, urban design and economic development, while respecting natural resources and providing the flexibility necessary. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M S M IT H AND P A R T N E R S We offer comprehensive planning in the following areas: • Community revitalization plans • Comprehensive community plans • Site-specific master plans • District master plans • Design guidelines and development standards • Site assessments/due diligence/yield estimates • Zoning and regulatory compliance • Thoroughfare Plans • Stormwater Master Plans • Water and Wastewater Master Plans • Zoning and regulatory codes • Effective growth management tools • Greenway and public open space planning • Main Street and corridor revitalization • Streetscape/gateway planning and design • Smart growth techniques • Context-sensitive solutions • Transit-oriented development • Parking master plans GS&P has worked closely with a number of Texas municipalities, including the City of Dallas, Nueces County, City of Cleburne and the City of Fort Worth, among others. In addition, Alex Martinez, P.E., GS&P's task leader, has worked with most municipalities within north Texas over the last 30 years, providing a range of services—civil/site planning and design, transportation planning and design, environmental and master planning, water/waste water planning and design, stormwater management and design and infrastructure analysis. Our team's in-depth understanding of how municipalities operate gives us the ability to develop environmental programs that facilitate compliance, yet are tailored to the organizational needs of our clients. MESA + PLANNING 56 Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M S M IT H AND Alex Martinez, P.E. P A R T H E R S GS&P TASK LEAD/CIVIL With 30 years of experience in the management, design and construction of environmental and engineering projects, Alex has become a proven and diversified public works practice leader in the North Texas Region. His experience includes environmental and comprehensive planning, civil/site planning and design, transportation planning and design, water/waste water planning and design, stormwater management and design and infrastructure analysis. Alex has worked on comprehensive master plans for the City of Mesquite, Nevada; the City of Corsicana, Texas; the Restoration Master Plan for Reverchon Park in Dallas, Texas; and the Integrated Water/Wastewater Master Plan for the City of Laredo, Texas. Also, he led the team to develop the Southern Dallas County Infrastructure Analysis Project, assessing the demographics; existing transportation, water, wastewater, drainage and franchised utilities capacities; and future needs to meet 2035 demands. EDUCATION 1982/13achelor of Science, Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University REGISTRATIONS Professional Engineer: TX MEMBERSHIPS/AFFILIATIONS National Society of Professional Engineers Chamber of Commerce/Dallas Regional American Society of Civil Engineers/Dallas, Texas YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 31 RELEVANT PROJECTS City of Cleburne - Comprehensive Plan, Cleburne, TX—Principal. GS&P is part of a team, including MOSAIC and MESA Planning, responsible for the creation of a comprehensive plan for the City of Cleburne. The team will provide careful planning to uphold the quality of life that residents enjoy while ensuring economic competiveness and growth management. GS&P is providing transportation and infrastructure systems planning. City of Corsicana - Comprehensive Master Plan,* Corsicana, TX—Project Manager. Managed civil engineering on the planning team developing the comprehensive master plan. Conducted physical systems assessments that included paving, drainage, water and wastewater infrastructure. Participated in public meetings to develop stakeholders' goals and priorities that were incorporated in the plan. City of Mesquite - Comprehensive Master Plan,* Mesquite, NV—Project Manager. Managed civil engineering on the planning team. Performed physical systems assessments including, paving, drainage, water and wastewater infrastructure. Participated in briefings and public meetings to develop stakeholder goals and priorities. Gaylord Texan Roadways,* Grapevine, TX—Project Manager, Engineer-of-Record. Prepared plans, specifications and estimates for roadway improvements to 8,000 linear feet of Gaylord Trail and Ruth Wall Road. *Denotes individual experience MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M S M IT H AND Kevin W. Tilbury, AICP P A R T N E R S TRANSPORTATION Kevin's focus is of , community and regional planning with an emphasis on integrating land use, transportation and community design. His vast skill set and diverse project experience enable him to perform at a high level of competency on a wide range of applications, including community visioning, land-use master plans, comprehensive plans, corridor studies and multi-modal plans. Kevin excels working within the public process to balance diverse interests and build consensus. EDUCATION 1997/Master of Science, Urban Planning, Florida State University 1995/Bachelor of Science, Geography, Florida State University MEMBERSHIPS/AFFILIATIONS American Institute of Certified Planners American Planning Association, Transportation Planning Division, Information Technology Division Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Institute of Transportation Engineers/TN Section ACCREDITATIONS/CERTIFICATIONS American Institute of Certified Planners YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 17 RELEVANT PROJECTS Metroplan - Imagine Central Arkansas: 2040 Long-Range Transportation Plan, Little Rock, AR—Planner. Under contract to Metroplan, GS&P is leading the update of a new long- range transportation plan for the Central Arkansas region. The plan includes an exten- sive outreach effort using a comprehensive toolkit of both face-to-face and "virtual" engagement strategies. The plan will result in a regional vision linking transportation with land-use, housing, economic development and the environment as well as a list of trans- portation strategies and investment priorities for the next 40 years. Knoxville Knox County MPC - Plan East Tennessee (PlanET), Knox County, TN—Lead Plan- ner. GS&P is a major subconsultant partner on East Tennessee's first regional planning effort. Funded through the Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Sustainable Communities Initiative, the Knoxville Regional Plan for Livable Communities, more commonly known as Plan East Tennessee (PlanET), is a multi-year process to build capacity for regional collaboration and implementation. GS&P is playing a major role in the development and evaluation of alternative transportation and land use scenarios, community outreach and implementation plan. Douglas County Highway 92 Corridor Livable Centers Initiative, GA - Douglas County, GA—Project Professional. Douglas County created a vision and plan for the Highway 92 corridor through the Atlanta Regional Commission's award-winning Livable Centers Initiative. GS&P teamed with the County to help implement more that $100 million of proposed transportation infrastructure projects recommended for the corridor, including sidewalks, off-road trails, new street networks, streetscape enhancements and arterial BRT service. MESA + PLANNING 5o Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M S M I TH AN D Lauren J. Seydewitz, LEED AP BD+C PARTN E RS ENVIRONMENTAL Laurer) is an environmental professional experienced in environmental planning and program management, site assessment and compliance consulting, data collection and evaluation, stormwater and environmental permitting, sustainability planning and green infrastructure evaluation. Lauren's past work has included working with the U.S. EPA, U.S. Navy and the City of Dallas as an environmental manager and scientist addressing innovative water end infrastructure proiects. Lauren has much experience working with Texas municipalities and has gained valuable insight into typical operations, through both her role as a consultant and her previous role as a City of Dallas staff member. Her current projects include assisting the City of Dallas Water Utilities with evaluating procedures as part of the City-wide environmental management system as well as providing an energy consumption study for its Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant. EDUCATION 2008/Master of Science, Environmental Management, University of Maryland University College 2001/Bachelor of Science, Environmental Science, University of Delaware ACCREDITATIONS/CERTIFICATIONS LEED Accredited Professional YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 12 RELEVANT PROJECTS City of Cleburne - Comprehensive Plan, Cleburne, TX—Project Manager. GS&P is part of a team, including MOSAIC and MESA Planning, responsible for the creation of a comprehensive plan for the City of Cleburne. The team will provide careful planning to uphold the quality of life that residents enjoy while ensuring economic competiveness and growth management. GS&P is providing transportation and infrastructure systems planning. Metroplan - Imagine Central Arkansas: 2040 Long-Range Transportation Plan, Little Rock, AR—Project Professional. Under contract to Metroplan, GS&P is leading the update of a new long-range transportation plan for the Central Arkansas region. The plan includes an extensive outreach effort using a comprehensive toolkit of both face-to- face and "virtual" engagement strategies. The plan will result in a regional vision linking transportation with land-use, housing, economic development and the environment as well as a list of transportation strategies and investment priorities for the next 40 years. City of McKinney contracted with GS&P for the development of a city sustainability plan. GS&P worked collaboratively with the City on conducting public meetings, including a teen meeting on sustainability. GS&P provided the City with measurable indicators and planning principles for all key areas, including the natural environment, built environment, purchasing, energy, economic development, air quality, water quality and quantity, and transportation. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M ry SMITH AND Chris Kaakaty, P.E. WATER/WASTEWATER P A R T N E R S S—e 3 1111Y)wide resource in GS&P's Technical Leadership Program related to wet weather, SSO reduction and utility system management operations. He has worked in North Texas for 25 years, recently serving as the Director of Wastewater Operations for the City of Dallas Water Utilities. Because of this role, Chris brings great experience to the team regarding the operator perspective as well as how to effectively interface with the client on public works projects. Chris provides guidance and experience on regulatory matters based on his extensive permitting and regulatory compliance experience and Chris served on variety of complex, multidisciplinary wastewater projects for Dallas Water Utilities, specifically those involved with wastewater system evaluation and rehabilita- tion. The following are key Dallas Water Utilities projects that Chris has led from the start to finish: Wastewater Collection System Master Plan, Wastewater Strategic Master Plan, Wastewater System Odor Control Improvement and Wastewater Recycle Plan. EDUCATION 1983/Bachelor of Science, Chemical Engineering, University of Oklahoma REGISTRATIONS Professional Engineer: TX YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 25 RELEVANT PROJECTS City of Dallas, Dallas Water Utilities*—Director Wastewater Operations. Executive man- agement over the entire wastewater operation system for the City of Dallas, responsible for annual operating and capital budget exceeding $250 million. City of Dallas, Dallas Water Utilities*—Plant Engineer, Technical Services/Interim Assistant Manager, Maintenance & Operations for the Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant. Monitored wastewater regulations to identify possible impacts on utility operations; pro- vided input on proposed regulations; drafted discharge permit applications and annual sludge reports; and identified research needs. Used data to solve diverse problems such as mitigation of odor generated by the sludge handling facilities, investigating material quality, inspecting field conditions, and conducting environmental assessments. Per- formed quantitative analysis to identify and prioritize expenditures of funds for future proj- ects; calculated cost estimates; conducted feasibility studies; and forecasted day-to-day plan operation. City of Dallas, Dallas Water Utilities*—Senior Program Manager, Pretreatment & Labora- tory Services. Consultation with city, state, federal officials regarding facility needs, plant expansion and rehabilitation issues. Evaluation of short- and long-term capital improve- ment needs; due diligence for wastewater projects. 11400 N. Central at White Rock Creek,* Dallas, TX—Project Team Member, Executive Re- viewer and Approver. Replaced 300 feet of 30-inch sewer main under freeway. 3900 Buena Vista,* Dallas, TX—Project Team Member, Executive Reviewer and Approver. Bypass pumping of 18-inch for Pipeline for four months. *Denotes individual experience MESA + PLANNING _ Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M SMITH AND Therese Mehta, P.E. P ART N E R S CIVIL '041 1h nearly 10 years of engineering and planning experience, Therese brings a wide range of expertise in stormwater runoff management, water quality improvement meth- ods, permitting and sustainable design, including green infrastructure and low impact development. Therese excels at incorporating low impact development—porous pave- ment, rainwater harvesting including rain barrels, natural bioretention facilities, vegeta- tive rooftops and rain gardens—into design and construction of projects as feasible based on site limitations. Therese has designed residential, industrial, hospital, commercial, mixed-use land development and roadway drainage projects. She has worked for a variety of municipal and private clients providing solutions to complex project challenges. Her management skills, coupled with her technical abilities, make her a strong asset to any project team. EDUCATION 2006/Master of Science, Civil Engineering, Focus on Water Resources, San Diego State University 2002/Bachelor of Science, Engineering Science, Focus on Management of Technology, Vanderbilt University REGISTRATIONS Professional Engineer: TX MEMBERSHIPS/AFFILIATIONS American Society of Civil Engineers/Texas Section; North Texas Chapter YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 8 RELEVANT PROJECTS City of Cleburne - Comprehensive Plan, Cleburne, TX—Supervisor. GS&P is part of a team, including MOSAIC and MESA Planning, responsible for the creation of a comprehensive plan for the City of Cleburne. The team will provide careful planning to uphold the quality of life that residents enjoy while ensuring economic competiveness and growth management. GS&P is providing transportation and infrastructure systems planning. Bird Rock Traffic Slowing,* San Diego, CA—Engineer. Redesigned La Jolla Boulevard to reduce traffic lanes; add bike lanes; and reduce traffic speed with roundabouts, medians, turning pockets and bulb outs. Additional on-street parking and tree wells were also incorporated. Part of overall Walkable Community Plan. City of Dallas - Comprehensive Dredge Management Plan, Dallas, TX—Project Engineer. GS&P is assisting the City of Dallas with the development and implementation of a city- wide dredge management program. This includes the preparation of a plan for more than 100 city-managed retention/detention ponds, sumps, lakes and reservoirs. City of Dallas - Fuel Reconciliation and Perpetual Inventory Project, Dallas, TX—Project Engineer. GS&P is assisting the City to establish a perpetual fuel inventory to monitor and document fuel usage for its eight fuel islands. GS&P is reviewing collected data incorporating database spatial analysis and then recommending revised practices to address data discrepancies to assist the City with implementing a program that includes inventory processes that meet U.S. EPA standards for fuel inventory control. MESA + PLANNING --�� Resolution 13-24A G R E S H A M y� S M I TH AND Marshall Elizer, Jr., P.E., PTOE PART H E R S TRANSPORTATION ivlc ciG :_ -._:g iS1tered professional engineer, joined the firm in 1997 after a distinguished 22-year career providing transportation and engineering services to local governments in Tennessee, Colorado, Texas and California. Marshall has extensive experience in identifying and improving traffic flow and safety problems. As traffic engineer for the City of Lakewood, Colorado and later as the trans- portation director for the City of Arlington, Texas, Marshall was a lead member of the engineering study teams that used innovative approaches to reduce congestion, im- prove efficiency and enhance the safety at numerous urban/suburban intersections and streets. The success of these efforts was recognized nationally when the Institute of Trans- portation Engineers awarded two of the profession's highest traffic engineering awards to the Arlington Department of Transportation. EDUCATION 1989/Master of Science, Civil Engineering, University of Tennessee 1974/Bachelor of Science, Transportation Engineering, University of Tennessee REGISTRATIONS Professional Engineer: AL, AR, CO, GA, IN, KY, LA, MS, NC, OH, SC, TN, TX MEMBERSHIPS/AFFILIATIONS American Planning Association American Public Works Association American Road & Transportation Builders Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Highway Engineers/Middle TN Chapter Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Congress for New Urbanism Institute of Transportation Engineers Intelligent Transportation Society of America ACCREDITATIONS/CERTIFICATIONS Professional Traffic Operations Engineer YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 38 RELEVANT PROJECTS City of Arlington - Abram Traffic Analysis Study, Arlington, TX—Principal. The City of Arling- ton tasked GS&P with performing a traffic study as a part of the Abram Street Pilot Project (Cooper Street to Collins Street) which launched in October 2010. The Pilot Project report noted that the Downtown Arlington Master Plan, adopted in 2004, envisioned a "pedes- trian-friendly, safe, vibrant and active Downtown Arlington." GS&P's traffic study identifies and estimates the potential diversion of Abram Street traffic to other area roadways as travel lane capacity is removed from the corridor. Nashville Downtown Transportation Plan, Nashville, TN—Principal. Study to assess needs and coordinate all transportation plans and modes in the core downtown area. Central to this effort was the accommodation of traffic, transit, pedestrian and parking needs for an expanded convention center, a new multi-modal transportation transfer station, downtown arena and NFL stadium. MESA + PLANNING _ Resolution 13-24A IMOSAIC FIRM INFORMATION MOSAIC is a planning and development service firm that creates tools for managing community growth and land development. We are solutions-oriented, working with our clients to provide plans, policies and implementation strategies that are custom-fit to project needs and community preferences. We unite vision and value through exceptional design, addressing the physical as well as the programmatic needs associated with expanding urban systems. CORE VALUES ■ Help our clients resolve the complex issues related to growth and development in the context of local community. Pursue innovation in all areas of our practice to provide robust and meaningful planning solutions. Deliver integrated planning solutions that address the elements of community in a holistic manner. Foster organic urban forms that will stand the test of time and preserve community identity. On each of our projects we manifest these core values by: • Delivering planning products that are buildable, doable and fundable • Crafting concepts and plans that focus on performance outcomes • Preserving and promoting place-making distinctives by adding elements of destination • Intentionally integrating natural systems into physical design • Providing a solution-oriented roadmap for plan implementation MOSAIC is committed to an agile operational platform. We organize customized teams with expertise tailored to the needs of each specific project. Our network includes economists, architects, civil engineers, environmental engineers, ecologists, designers, artists and other professionals that enhance the production capabilities of our certified planners. This benefits our clients in several ways. Our clients receive expert consultation and product quality control without inflated fee schedules that are cornmon to larger operations. Our agile platform also affords us a higher level of flexibility with respect to product delivery. We are able to respond to scheduling adjustments and scope changes in an efficient manner, as we operate within a tighter team structure. It also ensures active participation of key project personnel, who are clearly identified at time services are retained. ,'FPROBLEM INNOVATI04LI SOLVING CONTACT INFORMATION: Carissa Cox,AICP ORGAMC 214.738.0015 INTEGRATION carissacox@mosaicplans.com FORMS MOSAIC Planning&Development Services,Inc. 18756 Stone Oak Parkway,Ste 200 San Antonio,Texas 78258 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A -- ■■MOS /� TRESUME ■ ILJl X11C Carissa Cox, AICP Planning Awards As president and principal planner of MOSAIC, Carissa creates customized plans that • Brenham Downtown Plan focus on growth management and environmental stewardship. Her unique project 2012 approach integrates innovative planning methods, economic development tools and • Kyle Comprehensive Plan 2010 sustainability principles to optimize land use performance in a contextually appropriate • Seguin Comprehensive Plan rnanner. 2009 Education Carissa believes that every community is unique, and therefore the processes for public MS,Applied Geography,2011 involvement and plan development should be adaptive and suited to client needs and University of North Texas preferences. Carissa works closely with her clients to provide a transparent yet BA, Biology, 1995 controlled process of public involvement that leads to successfully adopted and Texas A&M University implemented plans. Planning Experience President&Principal Planner, AREAS OF EXPERTISE MOSAIC Planning& Development Services Comprehensive Planning;Carissa has developed a unique approach to comprehensive (Present) planning, incorporating elements to ensure that the plans can truly function as a P/anningAssociate, roadmap for realizing community vision. Unique attributes of the plans Carissa MESA Design Associates produces are: quality of life benchmarks, customized suitability modeling and a tool to (2005-2012} P q g directly correlate the land use plan and zoning code. Carissa facilitates plan adoption Licenses and Certifications and implementation by providing work sessions with council, commissions and staff to AICP-No.197018 walk through plan applications. Infrastructure and Development Planning: Infrastructure systems are primary determinants of growth patterns in our communities. Carissa works with a range of jurisdictions and authorities to create infrastructure development plans. Her focus is on project prioritization,feasibility analyses, partnerships and funding strategies.. Economic Development Strategies: Carissa advises her public and private clients on opportunities for Public Private Partnership through implementation of special districts, development agreements and other recommended mechanisms. She recommends PPP participants and conducts site selection studies based on value mapping and development feasibility. Municipal Codes and Ordinances:Carissa draws from her extensive background in ordinance evaluation to provide code and ordinance reviews for municipalities, focusing on components of land development codes, such as zoning and subdivision codes. Development Suitability Analyses:Carissa devises customized GIS models to evaluate land use suitability, informing site selection, land use distribution and land preservation policies. Plan Implementation: By creating organizational structures, funding strategies and policies for project prioritization, Carissa helps her clients to realize community vision through customized strategies for plan implementation. In addition, Carissa establishes performance benchmarks to ensure fidelity to vision, advisement regarding adoption — - and navigation of public process, and policies for plan updates and amendments. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A 0 00MO (� /��11 TC RESUME ■ IJCalissa Cox, AICP Appointments and EXAMPLES OF PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS Affiliations Presentations and Speaker Sessions.- Rebuilding essionsRebuilding America, 2013 Creating an Investment Environment Downtown (NationalAPA Conference) Green Infrastructure 2013 Planning and Capacity Building for Local Governments (Eagle Ford Consortium Subcommittee,APA,2010 Annual Conference) 2013: Benchmarking Quality of Life(Focus North Texas Planning Symposium) Preservation Dallas,Issues Committee,2011 2012: Long Term Vision vs. Short Term Gain (National APA Conference) 2012: Value Capture (Focus North Texas Planning Symposium) NationalAPA Menbei; 2012: Downtown Master Planning: Communicating Vision and Capturing Value (Texas Current Main Street Conference) 2011: Border Stabilization via Economic Development: A Model and a Case Study (Tri- APA Texas Chapter Member, National Agricultural Accord Presentation) Current 2011: Development and Land Use in Changing Financial Times (Texas APA Conference) 2009: Spatial Economics of Land Use (NationalAPA Conference) Publications.- 2011 ublications2011 Spatial Patterns in Development Regulation: Tree Preservation Ordinances of the DFW Metropolitan Area CURRENT PROJECTS Cleburne Comprehensive Plan. MOSAIC has recently begun work with Cleburne to -develop a comprehensive plan for the City. The construction of the Chisholm Trail Parkway, an extension of SH121, will redefine Cleburne`s position with the DFW TEX S Metroplex, opening the door for new development expressions, employment opportunities and patterns of circulation. The comprehensive plan will provide a clear vision of community preferences for growth patterns, as well as a strategy for harnessing emerging development opportunities to improve the city's economic competitiveness within the region. Brownsville Infrastructure Development Plan. MOSAIC has teamed with Needham- McCaffrey Associates and Cambridge Systematics to create a large scale infrastructure development plan for the greater Brownsville area. This region along the U.S.-Mexico border is attracting significant development interest, related to power, energy, _ transportation and industry. Our team has been commissioned to identify core P infrastructure projects with highest likelihood of success for a multi-jurisdictional area of interest. The team will also be creating land management plans that will impact growth within and around the areas of the Port of Brownsville and the Brownsville International Airport. Hickory Creek Town Center Code Development. MOSAIC is currently working with the Town of Hickory Creek to establish define a commercial town center. With limited availability of commercial land and complex ownership patterns, the project involves definition of uniform standards but employment of diverse tools for their application. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A ■■MRESUME ■ VOS /� TrilC Carissa Cox; AICP EXAMPLES OF COMPLETED WORK Plans and codes are complex documents that encompass much more than physical design. To demonstrate the full breadth of planning capabilities and the signature approach that Carissa has developed over time, a series of links to completed products has been provided. Clicking on the underlined links below allows for the review of products in greater detail and also serves as a list of previous clients for which services were rendered. Kyle Comprehensive Plan, Kyle,Texas,2010 Seguin Comprehensive Plan,Seguin,Texas, 2009 F' . Brenham Downtown Master Plan, Brenham,Texas, 2012 I-30 Corridor Redevelopment Plan, Mesquite,Texas, 2008 Montgomery Farm Pattern Book,Allen,Texas, 2008 OTHER REPRESENTATIVE PROJECTS r/ `f ' s r __;;. Small Area Plans Brownsville Downtown Revitalization Plan, Brownsville,Texas 2012 R• Brownsville Integrated Logistics Hub, Brownsville,Texas, 2012 ,�.. Town Center Plan and Zoning Amendment, Hickory Creek,Texas, 2011 John Peter Smith Hospital Redevelopment Strategy, Fort Worth, Texas, 2011 Gus Thomasson Neighborhood Stabilization Plan, Mesquite,Texas, 2011 Pharr Integrated Small Area Plans, Pharr,Texas 2010 g t"■. Thomasson Square Redevelopment Plan, Mesquite,Texas, 2010 w�"� � �• Garland Road Corridor Redevelopment Initiative, Dallas,Texas,2008 . ' Codes and Ordinances TOD Forrn-Based Code Revisions, North Richland Hills,Texas, 2012 Development Code Review, Gallup, New Mexico, 2012 "'" ...... Zoning Code Review: SUP Requirements, North Richland Hills,Texas, 2010 Economic Impact of Categorical Zoning Change, North Richland Hills,Texas, 2010 ; I I � , �■ .' Development Code Review, Argyle, Texas, 2008 - - - Development Code Review, Corsicana,Texas, 2006 DEPOT DISTRICT Site Plans and Entitlements Falling Waters Master Plan and Zoning Amendment, Marble Falls,Texas, 2010 Iron Horse Crossing Concept Plan and Zoning Review, North Richland Hills,Texas, 2010 a EI Centro Mall Redevelopment Strategy, Pharr,Texas, 2010 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A Brandora is a Carrollton based design studio that specializes in creating meaningful experiences for businesses through interactive branding. Whether we are working on an identity, website or a video, we always strive to find meaning, innovate through design and media, seek human involvement and challenge tradition. In today's cluttered, saturated, and price-driven marketplace it is not enough to have excellent products/ services. This is to be expected. A company needs to bond emotionally with its desired customers in their daily life and create an emotional experience. Offering a meaningful experience is the defining element that separates success from indifference in the marketplace. At Brandora, our goals for every project are: • to Create A Visual Language that represents your true brand and speak on a personal level to your customers • to Differentiate Your Services from the competition through the strength of your culture and the uniqueness of your brand imagery • to Achieve Ubiquity and Visibility for your company by carefully assessing your marketing needs • to Connect With Your Audience in an emotional way by offering them a multisensorial brand experience • to Increase Profitability Our services include: BRANDING - Identity Design / Nomenclature / Brand Guidelines / Color Systems / Brand Strategy PRINT - Brochures / Books / Business Systems / Posters / Direct Mail / Marketing Collateral INTERACTIVE- Web Design and Development / Newsletters / E-Commerce Sites / Flash Presentations / Interactive CD ROMs / Motion Graphics / Intranets / Extranets VIDEO - Video Shoots / Post Production / Special Effects / On Location Interviews EXPERIENCE - Packaging / Product Development / Environmental Graphics / Signage SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT - Content Management Systems / UI design / Custom web tools MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A C= Tia Primova Principal, Creative Services Tia has over ten years of experience designing identity and branding systems, brand guidelines, marketing collateral, websites and presentations for a wide range of clients including top brands like Nokia, Nokia Siemens Networks, ATI, AMD, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, Ketchum.. Tia began her design education at the University of Texas in Ar- lington, where she received a BFA in Communication Arts and graduated summa cum laude. Born in Bulgaria, Tia provides a unique and global perspective to her design pro- cess. Drawing from fine art, design, fashion, literature, music and film, Tia creates images that speak to contemporary audiences with emotional impact and appeal. Her design philosophy is to stay away from trends and complication but rather focus on the idea. Tia's work has won numerous awards among which a Merit Award at the 2009 ReBrand 100® Global Awards, and her work has been featured on Adobe.com, published in Lo- goLounge 5: 2,000 International Identities by Leading Designers, Brand Identity Essentials and LogoLounge Master Library, Volume 3: 3,000 Shapes and Symbols Logos. Brandon Payton Principal, Interactive Services Brandon Payton has over fourteen years of interactive and video experience. He studied Computer Science and Architecture at Texas A&M University, and received a Bachelor of Arts at the University of Texas at Arlington. Before Brandora, Brandon was a part of Nokia's interactive media team, where he created numerous videos, flash presentations, websites, interactive CD-ROMs and printed collateral for different business groups within Nokia. His unique approach to design and knowledge of video, 3D, programming and post production software makes him a valuable asset to clients, both large and small. Brandon has won over thirty awards for his interactive and multimedia work. MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A ASHLEY SHOOK, LLC Ashley Shook, LEED APO Education Master of City and Regional Planning - University of Texas at Arlington - 2012 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture -Texas Tech University-2009 Current Work Experience Baldwin Associates -3904 Elm St. Suite B, Dallas, Texas 75216 Land Use and Zoning Consulting Firm As a consultant, Ashley's consistent involvement with Baldwin Associates includes zoning code and land use review and analysis for purposes of expediting land development opportunities for developers and private property owners. Additionally, she performs third party Green Ordinance review and inspection for the City of Dallas. As a Green Inspector, Ashley employs her knowledge of LEED building standards to promote the City's efforts towards more sustainable development. Highlighted Projects: • Balch Springs Town Center Masterplan - in progress • David Weekley Homes Site Design and Lot Layout- Watters Creek, Allen, Texas - in progress • Green Review and Inspection for Trammel Crow's Alexan Skyline (Mixed Use Development) - Dallas, Texas -in progress Team Better Block- 2139 Fort Worth Ave., Dallas, Texas 75211 Rapid Urban Revitalization As a consultant, Ashley's growing involvement with Team Better Block includes creation and quick implementation of small area plans for under-utilized areas in declining neighborhoods with the primary use of a neighborhood's strongest asset, its existing community network. Ashley facilitates community organization through local neighborhood outreach and creates a cohesive vision between the City and the existing community to perform a living charrette (Better Block) as a means to experiment with various urban design methods. In turn, she is able to review and recommend updates/ revisions to existing code, land use regulations and permitting processes that may otherwise hinder successful urban design methods proven to work during the Better Block. In an effort to make permanent change to such neighborhoods, she, with the Team, prepares follow-up reports with implementation recommendations based on observation from the Better Block. Highlighted Projects: • The Alamo Better Block - San Antonio, Texas-completed August 2012 • Brownsville Better Block- Brownsville, Texas - completed May 2012 • Saint Paul Better Block-Saint Paul, Minnesota - in progress MESA Design Group - 1807 Ross Ave., Dallas, Texas 75201 Landscape Architecture and Planning Firm As a former consultant, Ashley's involvement with MESA Design Group included analysis of best practices and design guidelines pertaining to downtown revitalization and parks and open space plans. She was also tasked with creating various graphics for community meeting exhibits and final reports. Highlighted Projects: • Kyle Comprehensive Plan - Kyle, Texas - completed 2010 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A RESUME Eli Pearson, AICP, LEED AP® An Urban Planner and Landscape Designer based in Texas and Argentina, Eli has collaborated on a number of projects that have won awards from the American Planning Association and the American Society of Landscape Architects. His experience has Comprehensive Planning centered on planning for institutional, industrial, and municipal clients in Texas and Awards Mexico, with a special emphasis on planning for downtown and specially designated • Kyle Comprehensive Plan areas. His specialties include Site Analysis and Assessment through GIS mapping and 2010 related tools, Economic Development planning via analysis of return on investment and • Brownsville Comprehensive Plan 2009 IMPLAN economic modeling, and presentations in charrettes and meeting facilitation. Education Eli holds Master's degrees in Community and Regional Planning and Landscape MS,Community and Regional Architecture from the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin, where Planning MLA, Landscape Architecture he was awarded the Excellence in Design Award in both disciplines. He is a member of University of Texas at Austin the American Planning Association, and has project experience in the U.S., Latin BS, Business Administration and America, Europe,and Asia. Spanish,Trinity University Planning Experience CURRENT PROJECTS Planning ConRlltant(Present) Brownsville Infrastructure Development Plan: The plan leverages industrial Planner,Landscape Designer infrastructure to propose catalyst projects related to energy, logistics, and commodities. MESA Design Group(2008-12) Landscape Designer Cleburne Comprehensive Plan: Focus on directing regional growth to allow economic Garcia Design,Inc.(2007-2008) development, increased employment,and improved transportation connections. Research Statistics Technician Texas Department of Information Resources(2006) AREAS OF EXPERTISE AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Y' Downtown,Small Area, and Historic District Planning: f � Brownsville Downtown Area Plan - Brownsville,Texas A '06Grapevine Downtown Historic District Revitalization Plan -Grapevine,Texas p\}1.''' Pharr Small Area Plans - Pharr,Texas °o Comprehensive Planning.• ^� Argyle Comprehensive Plan -Argyle, Texas Brownsville Comprehensive Plan - Brownsville,Texas Kyle Comprehensive Plan - Kyle,Texas h Seguin Comprehensive Plan - Seguin,Texas Economic Development and Analysis: Argyle Economic Development Plan -Argyle,Texas Brownsville Industrial Area Plan - Brownsville,Texas Thomasson Square Redevelopment Plan - Mesquite,Texas Environmental Planning and Design.- Galveston esign:Galveston Island State Park - Galveston, Texas San Antonio Botanical Garden Master Plan - San Antonio,Texas International Planning: Fundacion Montemayor Development Plan- Monterrey, Mexico Chersonesus Cultural Landscape Plan - Sebastopol, Ukraine MESA-+�PLLAN�1�1R�; Resolution 13-24A AVAILABILITY AND ASSIGNMENTS MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A STATEMENT OF AVAILABILITY MESA Planning endeavors to maintain a project load of two significant planning projects at a time. Therefore, MESA Planning does not pursue all RFP's that are available but those: • With start dates that roughly coincide with the completion dates of other on-going projects, and thereby contribute to maintenance of the 2 principal projects at a time project load goal. • With a scope of work consistent with our project experience, thereby fitting well with our project delivery system. • That present creative challenges, thereby enhancing our overall body of work MESA Planning maintains (to extent possible) 2-significant projects at time workload because it assures the robust participation of Robin McCaffrey AIA, AICP. In this case, a significant planning project for the Port of Brownsville will be concluding, making opportunity to start one new project such as the Westlake Comprehensive Plan Update. The Westlake Comprehensive plan Update will be personally managed by Robin McCaffrey. Mr. McCaffrey will be the continuing face of this plan process with his personal attendance at all meetings internally and as described in the MESA Planning Proposal. Mr. McCaffrey will be the primary point of contact. All the subcontractors have designated staff support and assure principal involvement. _ -1,7 . - i it ^"k'- • 1►�Rr . -� _�.tea. ,�,y- t8 - u, ;t�}t •._. _ 7 --- rte. - E• -. _�-� I � -�lllil I t MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A TASK ASSIGNMENTS BY DISCIPLINE Disciplines PlMES ng RCLCO GS&P MOSAIC Shoo Ashle Eli Pearson Brandora Land Use Planning Urban Design Zoning/ Emerging Best Practices Sustainable Practices Transportation Civil Engineering Public Participation Environmental Engineering Economic Development Fiscal Impact Analysis Web Design k Development 4- N- - �1���h 1� _� i' I,�- L i 1' •may, � MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A - MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A REFERENCES MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A MESA PLANNING CLIENT REFERENCES Brownsville: Jason Hilts President and CEO Brownsville Economic Development Council 301 Mexico Street, Suite F-1 Brownsville, Texas Phone: 956-541- 1 183 e-mail: jhilts@bedc.com (relationship: Client Team leader for the Brownsville Comprehensive, Strategic Infrastructure Plan, 2012, see project sheet in work examples) Brenham: Thomas Upchurch Upchurch Architects, Inc. 404 East Main Street Brenham, Texas 77833 Phone: 979-830-1723 e-mail: tupchurch@upchurcharchitects.com (relationship: Chairman of Brenham Downtown Plan Steering Committee, 2011, see project sheet in work examples). NRH: John Pitstick Director of Planning City of North Richland Hills 731 NE Loop 820 North Richland Hills, Texas 76180 Phone: 817-462-6303 e-mail: jpitstick@nrhtx.com (relationship: Client for Iron Horse Station Area Plan, 2012, see project sheet in work examples) _ MESA + PLANNING Resolution 13-24A