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Ord 645 Revising the Budget for Fiscal Year 09-10 and Adopting the Budget for Fiscal Year 10-11TOWN OF WESTLAKE ORDINANCE NO. 645 A ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, REVISING THE BUDGET FOR THE 2009-2010 FISCAL YEAR; ADOPTING THE BUDGET FOR THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2010 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2011; PROVIDING AUTHORIZATION TO THE TOWN MANGER TO APPROVE APPROPRIATED FUNDS UP TO $25,000; PROVIDING THAT THE BUDGET TO BE KEPT IN CITY SECRETARY'S OFFICE; PROVIDING FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, public notice of a public hearing on the proposed annual budget, stating the date, time, and place and subject matter of the public hearing, was given as required by the laws of the State of Texas and, and WHEREAS, a public hearing was duly held and all interested persons were given an opportunity to be heard for or against any item therein on September 29, 2010; and, WHEREAS, as required by Texas Local Government Code 102.002, the budget officer has prepared a municipal budget to cover the proposed expenditures of the municipal government for the succeeding year; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Ordinance is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS: SECTION 1: That, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety SECTION 2: That the Town Council hereby adopts the revised budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2009 and ending September 30, 2010 as shown in Exhibit "A." SECTION 3: That the Town Council does hereby approve the proposed Municipal Budget attached as Exhibit "B", adopting the budget for the Fiscal Year Beginning October 1, 2010, and for Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2011; and also adopting the capital projects as shown on attached Exhibit "C. " SECTION 4: That the Town Council hereby gives the Town Manager authorization to approve any appropriated holds up to the amount of $25,000. SECTION 5: That a copy of the official adopted 2010-2011 budget documents shall be kept on file in the office of the Town Secretary Ordinance 645 Page I of 2 SECTION 6: If any portion of this Ordinance shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Ordinance without the invalid provision. SECTION 7: That this Ordinance shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPRO ATTEST: 29TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 2010. . O WF �' �� s� * .m Town Secretary APPROV S T RM: I.. tanton wn Attorney - - z4a, Laura L. Wheat, Mayor Ordinance 645 Page 2 of 2 The Town of Westlake i4 2010-201.1 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org A GOVERNMENT FINANCE OF is t1' n u The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) has presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the Town of Westlake for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2009. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan, and as a communication device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. E L E (1, 1 F F F F I GALS Laura Wheat Mayor Tim Brittan Larry Corson Council Member Council Member Clifton Cox Rick Rennhack Council Member Council Member Carol Langdon Council Member ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS Tom Brymer Town Manager Ginger Awtry Kelly Edwards Assistant to the Town Manager Town Secretary Debbie Piper Finance Director ffeTe-i 0=0 J Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Troy Meyer Director of Facilities Maintenance and Parks & Recreation Jarrod Greenwood Public Works Amanda DeGan Municipal Court Administrator Richard Whitten Fire Chief Eddie Edwards Director of Planning and Development The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 BOARDS ,, [,r� CCfff1\<,1SS4(--) "S * WESTLAKE HISTORICAL PRESERVATION SOCIETY Stephen Thornton, Jack Wiesman, Sharon Sanden, Kristi Layton, Joyce Roach, Karen Stoltenberg, Bert Schultz * WESTLAKE ACADEMY FOUNDATION Robert Scott, Deborah Ziegler, Leah Rennhack, Kelly Cox, Casey Paulson, Bill Greenwood, Cathy Lee, George Ledak, Leigh Sander, Karen Osborne, Jac Risenhoover * PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION Bill Greenwood, Walter Copeland, Allen Heath, Sharon Sanden, Wayne Stoltenberg * TEXAS STUDENT HOUSING AUTHORITY Jim Carter, George Ledak, Jill McKean, Chuck Schultz, Gregg Malone * PUBLIC ARTS COMMITTEE Dave Rollins, Leah Rennhack, Kelly Cox, Shannon LaRue, Trish Biddle Vanessa Swarovski-Piedra, Mike Silliman, Debra Hale * 4B ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOARD Laura Wheat, Rick Rennhack, Tim Brittan, Carol Langdon, David Brown, Gregg Malone * ARBOR DAY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Cinda Knight, Troy Meyer, Amy Robichaux, Stephanie Erb The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION ➢ Transmittal Letter Introduction 2 FY09/10 Milestones and Strategic Achievement 3 Parameters for Preparing and Scrubbing the Budget 4 Governing and Managing for Outcomes 5 Westlake Community Vision 6 Budget Theme - Securing Our Vision 7 Asking the Right Questions 9 New Revenue Scenarios 14 Closing Comments 14 ➢ Budget Overview and Framework Basis of Accounting /q Budgeting 18 The Budget Process 21 Budget Amendment Process 22 Financial Policies 22 Revenue, Expenditures and Fund Balance Revenues, Expenditures, Fund Balance - All Sources 23 Fund Balances - All Source 24 Fund Balances - Budget Summary 25 Revenues and Other Financing Sources 30 Revenues and Other Financing Sources Budget Summary 31 Expenditures and Other Operating Uses 33 Expenditures and Other Operating Uses Budget Summary 34 Detail of Transfers in 35 Detail of Transfers Out 36 ➢ Personnel and Organization Organizational Chart 37 Position Summary 38 Personnel Summary 39 2. GENERAL FUND Program Summary 41 Revenues and Transfers In 42 Expenditures and Transfers Out 45 Fund Balance 47 Dept 10 -General Services Goals and Objectives 48 Department Staffing and Expenditures 49 Program Budget 50 Dept 1 1 -Administrative Goals and Objectives 51 Department Staffing and Expenditures 55 Proaram Budaet 56 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Table of Contents Dept 12 - Planning and Zoning Goals and Objectives 57 Department Staffing and Expenditures 60 Program Budget 61 Dept 13 - Town Secretary Goals and Objectives 62 Department Staffing and Expenditures 65 Program Budget 66 Dept 14 - Emergency Services Goals and Objectives 67 Department Staffing and Expenditures 70 Program Budget 71 Dept 15 - Municipal Court Goals and Objectives 72 Department Staffing and Expenditures 75 Program Budget 76 Dept 16 - Public Works Goals and Objectives 77 Department Staffing and Expenditures 81 Program Budget 82 Dept 17 - Facilities Maintenance Goals and Objectives 83 Department Staffing and Expenditures 86 Program Budget 87 Dept 18 - Finance Goals and Objectives 88 Department Staffing and Expenditures 92 Program Budget 93 Dept 19 - Parks and Recreation Goals and Objectives 95 Department Staffing and Expenditures 97 Program Budget 98 Dept 20 - Information Technology Goals and Objectives 99 Department Staffing and Expenditures 100 Program Budget 101 Dept 21 - HR/Admin Services Goals and Objectives 102 Department Staffing and Expenditures 104 Program Budget 105 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Table of Contents 3. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Westlake Academy Fund 199 Program Summary 107 Fund Overview 108 413 Economic Development Fund 200 Program Summary 109 Fund Overview 110 Inter -fund Repayment Schedule 1 1 1 ➢ Economic Development Fund 210 Program Summary 112 Fund Overview 113 Tax Reimbursement Schedule - Fidelity Phase 1 114 ➢ Visitors Association Fund 220 Program Summary 115 Program Budget 116 Fund Overview 117 ➢ Special Revenue Fund 250 Program Summary 118 Fund Overview 119 ➢ FM 1938 Fund 252 Program Summary 120 Fund Overview 121 ➢ Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax Fund 260 Program Summary 122 Fund Overview 123 ➢ Lone Star Public Facilities 418 mmary 124 Fund Overview 125 4. DEBT SERVICE FUND Program Summary 127 Fund Overview 128 Long Term Debt Summary 129 2008 Series - General Obligation Bonds 130 2007 Series - General Obligation Refunding Bonds 131 2003 Series - Certificates of Obligation 132 2002 Series - Certificates of Obligation 133 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Table of Contents 5. ENTERPRISE FUND ➢ Cemetery Fund 255 Proqram Summary 135 Fund Overview 136 ➢ Utility Fund 500 Program Summary 137 Program Budget 138 Expenses 142 Capital Project - N-1 Sewer Line/Inflow & Infiltration Repair 143 Capital Project - TRA Assumption of N-1 Sewer Line 144 Inter -fund Repayment Schedule 145 Debt Payable Schedule - Keller Overhead Storage 146 6. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS ➢ Utility Major Maintenance Fund 510 Program Summary 148 Fund Overview 149 ➢ General Major Maintenance Fund 600 Program Summary 150 Fund Overview 151 Capital 5 Year Projection 152 Vehicle & Equipment Replacement Fund 257 Program Summary 153 Fund Overview 157 Capital 5 Year Projection 155 7. CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS ➢ Capital Projects Fund 410 Program Summary 157 Fund Overview 158 Capital Project - Deloitte Trail Connection 159 Capital Project- FM1938 Streetscape/Wayfinding 160 Capital Project - Dove Road Reconstruction & Drainage 161 Capital Project - JT Ottinger & Dove Intersection 162 Capital Project - Mahotea Boone Reconstruction & Drainage 163 Capital Project - JT Ottinger Reconstruction & Drainage 164 Capital Project - Street Survey 165 Capital Project - Westlake Academy Dining Hall Improvements 166 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 Table of Contents ➢ Arts and Sciences Center Fund 411 Program Summary 167 Fund Overview 168 S. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS Capital Improvement Plan 170 Approved Capital Projects - 5 Year Projection 171 9. LONGTERM PLANNING Strategic Plan 173 Five Year Financial Forecast Narrative 180 Five Year Financial Forecast All Municipal Funds 183 10. PERFORMANCE MEASURES Performance Measures Memo 190 Performance Measures Detail 192 1 1 . WESTLAKE ACADEMY Excerpt from Westlake Academy Budget 240 12. COMMUNITY PROFILE General Information 275 History of Westlake 276 Local Government 277 Community Events 278 Westlake Academy 279 Facts, Figures, Statistics 280 Area Employers 281 13. APPENDIX Glossary of Terms 283 Fiscal and Budgetary Policies 287 Investment Policy 298 FY 10 - 1 1 Budget Calendar 303 1mo the Vision The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 SECTION 01 ntroducti*on The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org October 1, 2010 Honorable Mayor and Town Council: INTRODUCTION On behalf of the Town Staff Leadership Team, I am presenting to the Council the Town of Westlake's Approved FY 2010-2011 budget totaling $20,511,927 (includes $3,457,593 transfers from fund balance for operating, debt service, capital projects, major maintenance and equipment replacement needs) for all funds. This budget also includes Westlake Academy's FY 2010-2011 expenditures and transfers out totaling $4,749,094. This is the first municipal budget that includes Westlake Academy's revenues and expenditures for the purposes of a complete presentation of the Town's financial position. The FY 2010-2011 proposed budget document previously presented was based on no implementation of property tax and the use of fund balance to balance the General Fund. During the Council meeting held on September 30, 2010, the decision was made to implement a property tax for FY 2010-2011. This is Westlake's first municipal budget that includes revenues from a municipal property tax levy. This document contains the Approved FY 2010-2011 municipal budget, which was prepared with the base assumption that the Town's first priority is to have a balanced budget that delivers basic, but high quality municipal services to our residents and businesses. Service levels are in alignment with resident feedback regarding priorities from our 2010 Direction Finders (citizens') survey results and with the Town's Strategic Plan. Additionally, preparation of this FY 2010-2011 Budget utilizes these approaches and premises: A program approach for budgeting is proposed to be implemented with the 2010- 2011 Budget. Due to a continued decline in on-going sales tax receipts and other revenue sources, utilization of a portion of the fund balance in the General Fund was originally proposed to continue in FY 2010-2011; however, a property tax was implemented which eliminated the need to continue to reduce fund balance to provide for our residential service levels. Below is a summary of the Fund Balance for the "Adopted" FY 2010-11 budget: General Fund $ 3,400,015 $ 4,308,690 $ 6,483,952 $ (2,175,263) $ 1,224,752 -64% Westlake Academy 584,909 4,779,213 4,749,094 30,119 615,028 5% Special Revenue 2,797,969 2,547,508 3,693,381 (1,145,873) 1,652,096 -41% Debt Service Fund - 1,528,258 1,528,258 - - 0% Capital 230,391 5,640,000 1,452,744 4,187,256 4,417,647 1817% Utility Fund 1,289,732 2,426,766 2,513,173 (86,407) 1,203,326 -7% Internal Services 115,100 41,274 91,324 (50,050) 65,050 -43% 2 The Town will utilize the property tax to balance operating expenditures and on-going revenues. Prior to the ad valorem tax adoption, the Town of Westlake faced a budgetary shortfall of 14%. This was despite having reduced base expenditures (without service level adjustments) to approximate the same levels as the FY 2009-2010 expenditures. The operating portion of the FY 2010-2011 Budget is approximately I% less than the Estimated FY 2009-2010 Budget. The Utility Fund incurred a 30% rate increase from our sewage treatment provider, the Trinity River Authority during this fiscal year. Additionally, water costs increased by approximately 1 1% in the new wholesale water contract with the City of Fort Worth. The Town will need to increase water and sewer rates a minimum of 10% to offset these increases. Staff will propose a rate increase in the fall that will take effect on January 1, 2011. FY 2009-2010 MILESTONES AND STRATEGIC ACHIEVEMENTS While the focus of this budget is the upcoming 2010-2011 fiscal year, it is important to recognize the strategic priorities and milestones achieved by the Town of Westlake organization during FY 2009-2010. This budget continues to build upon the Council's strategic planning framework begun in FY 2008-2009 that culminated with the adoption of the Town's first five (5) year strategic plan in July 2009. More detailed expenditure explanations by department and operating fund are provided in the Budget Overview and Budget Framework section of this budget. In addition, further detail can be found in each departmental budget which also provides fund -level detail. During FY 2009-2010 the following milestones and strategic priorities were achieved: Construction on the $15 Million Phase 1 FM 1938 (Precinct Line Rd) Improvements Project commenced. This will be a major north/south arterial which will greatly enhance mobility for this region, our residents, and employees of Westlake businesses. It will have a major impact on future business attraction and economic development in Westlake. ® Occupancy of Fidelity Regional Headquarters Phase II began. ® The Town's Five (5) Year Strategic Plan was reviewed for progress with the Town Council during the fiscal year with significant time spent by the Council and staff on addressing the Town's long term financial sustainability, a key part of this Strategic Plan. • The Town received a Scenic Cities designation as a Gold level Scenic City, a marked distinction given only to cities with codes, ordinances, and plans that encourage, create, and maintain a high standard of pleasing community appearance, aesthetics, and community livability. ® The Stagecoach Hills Subdivision Drainage Improvements Project was completed and water distribution system improvements for the Stagecoach Hills Subdivision were begun. • A Five (5) Year Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan was adopted by the Town Council. ® The Town continued to receive recognition for the transparency and high quality of its financial reporting, receiving the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting as well as the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from the Governmental Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for both its FY 2009-2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), also known as the annual audit and its FY 2009-2010 Budget. • The new $5.1 Million Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center at Westlake Academy was opened and operated for the 2009-2010 school year. ® Ground was broken and construction begun on the $300 million Deloitte University project which is on schedule and set to open in September of 2011. • The Terra Bella and Solana trail systems were linked with a connection on Sam School Road. ® Westlake's first gas well was successfully drilled in Solana under the standards and requirements of the Town's Oil and Gas Drilling/Production Ordinance adopted in 2009. ® The Town's second Direction Finders (Citizens') Survey was conducted and the results were compared to the 2009 results as well as used to help guide this proposed budget preparation process. • New Westlake e -Tube Videos were launched on the Town web site. • New home construction began in the Town's newest residential neighborhood, Terra Bella. • For the second consecutive year, the Town continued its "Westlake Windows" initiative for transparent government with citizen outreach meetings held in every Westlake Neighborhood. ® Westlake was the recipient of a Municipal Excellence Award for Management Innovation from the Texas Municipal League for the cities of 25,000 populations or less, recognizing the Town's multi -faceted, low cost citizen engagement program entitled Westlake Windows: TGIF (transparent government in focus). PARAMETERS FOR PREPARING AND "SCRUBBING" THE BUDGET Certain assumptions, parameters, and approaches were utilized as this FY 2010-2011 proposed Budget was prepared in order to: a.) easily track cost increases as they relate to maintaining or increasing service levels, b.) identify use of fund balances and inter -fund transfers, c.) delineate the amount for employee compensation increases, and d.) understand the approach used for revenue estimating. These approaches and parameters were: Maintain minimum fund balances to exceed policy requirements (90 day fund balance). Conservative revenue estimating that identified one-time and on-going revenues. Increased focus on more intense "drill down" analysis to better determine our actual on-going sales tax revenue stream has been made for this upcoming fiscal year. ® Estimated expenditures for current levels of service in FY 2010-2011 were made by: a) adjusting for actual spending in FY 2009-2010 b) deducting one-time FY 2009-2010 expenditures to create the FY 2010-2011 proposed base budget. Increases in the current level of service anticipated, due to inflation and other cost increases, were identified and kept separate from the current level of service base budget in the form of "current service level adjustments" (SLA's). ® Resources to provide average market pay adjustments of 2% of total salary cost. The majority of the Town positions continue to have associated pay levels that are well below the market average for similar municipal positions in our immediate area. Some positions are as much as 60% below the market average. Due to economic conditions and revenue limitations, no "expanded or new levels of service" are included in this Approved FY 2010-2011 Budget. ® The original "Proposed" budget had postponed all capital spending for all general government capital improvement projects (i.e. street, drainage, parks, trails, public buildings) unless those projects had an identified project specific funding source 4 already in place. This was not a recommended approach but one taken out of necessity due to current funding limitations. The inability of the Town to have the financial capacity to adequately maintain its infrastructure had huge implications for the Town's residents and businesses' quality of life in the future and was a major consideration when the Council made the decision to implement a property tax for the current fiscal year. It was noted that once a community falls behind with its infrastructure maintenance, it is virtually impossible to catch up and keep the price of the Town services at a reasonable level. The Town's five (5) year capital improvement plan has been adjusted per Town Council direction to include certain street projects that have been funded by the newly approved ad valorem tax levy for FY 2010-11. This will require debt issuance at a subsequent point in the fiscal year. ® Per Council feedback, all direct expenditures related to operating Westlake Academy have been moved from the municipal budget to the Westlake Academy budget (totaling $243,213). (Note: In FY 2011-2012 indirect expenditures related to operating Westlake Academy borne by the municipal budget will be moved to the Academy's operating budget). • All costs for base budgets as well as service level adjustments due to cost increases/inflation were "scrubbed" through extensive review and analysis by the Town Manager and Finance Director. Programs of service were extensively analyzed and discussed in budget review sessions with the Town Manager and Director of Finance. This ensures maximum efficiency, effectiveness, and utilization of both additional and requested financial resources. The sustainability of the request as well as the economic realities we currently face were a primary concern during this review process. Additionally, separate from this proposed budget and based on Council direction at its May 24, 2010 planning retreat, staff prepared 3 budget reduction scenarios (two scenarios using 10 and 20 percent across-the-board spending reductions and one scenario balancing the budget using a program approach based on the Council's guiding principles survey results of October 2009); these cost reduction scenarios resulted in significant negative impacts to all areas of Town services. Despite these drastic cost -reduction measures, the revenue shortfall was not remedied. GOVERNING AND MANAGING FOR OUTCOMES Two years ago, beginning in FY 2008-2009, the Town began moving its leadership and management systems to a framework utilizing a more program based budget designed to link desired outcomes with budgeted resources and accountability for results. The FY 2010-2011 Budget represents the next step in this continuous improvement process. This budget document utilizes a systemic framework designed to link together critical governance and management decision making tools. This system is called "Governing and Managing for Outcomes" and is designed to integrate: • Strategic planning ® Five (5) year financial forecasting, budgeting, and performance measurement linked to priorities, objectives, and outcomes • Reporting to monitor progress in outcome achievement and accountability for results ® Aligning resources to prioritized outcomes ® Citizen surveys to gauge service satisfaction levels with Town services and resident willingness to pay for those services ® Long term approach to ensure financial sustainability ® Maintaining core services • Five (5) year capital improvement planning This budget focuses on the next twelve months of the Town's future. However, the Council's initiative to pursue a strategic planning approach to the Town's governance is critical to providing the Council, and the community, with a multi-year focus that couples strategic priority setting with good financial stewardship decisions that achieve the long-term vision set by the Council for Westlake. The Council has articulated an exciting vision for Westlake with a strategic plan to move us towards that vision: Westlake's Community Vision Westlake is a one of a kind community - an oasis with rolling hills, grazing longhorns, and soaring red-tailed hawks, located in the heart of the Fort Worth -Dallas metropolitan area. Inviting neighborhoods and architecturally vibrant corporate campuses find harmony among our meandering roads and trails, lined with native oaks and stone walls. We are leaders. In education we are known for our innovative partnerships between the Town -Owned Charter School and its corporate neighbors. We are environmental stewards - exemplifying the highest standards. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake. As a community, we are fully involved and invested in our rich heritage, vibrant present and exciting, sustainable future. One of the outcome strategies set out in the Town's Strategic Plan is to "Establish a strategy for achieving long-term financial sustainability for the Town government, including Westlake Academy." As a part of the systemic framework of governing and managing for outcomes, we know from the regularly updated and Town Council reviewed Five (5) year Financial Forecast that if nothing had changed, beginning in FY 2012-2013, the Town's present revenue sources and fund balances would not be able to keep pace with projected expenditures; the projected fund balance in the General Fund would fall below the 90 day minimum requirement. The original "Proposed" Five (5) Year Financial Forecast is set out below in an excerpt from this Forecast that illustrated the seriousness of the Town's financial challenges: General Fund Beginning Fund Balance $ 2,675,310 $ 3,400,014 $ 2,309,322 $ 1,217,730 $ 952,660 $ (669,162) Total Revenues 4,869,244 2,887,997 2,937,137 2,987,751 3,039,884 3,093,580 Total Transfers In 90,000 18,000 208,540 1,229,096 19,669 20,259 Total Expenditures (4,113,749) (3,960,931) (4,079,759) (4,202,152) (4,328,216) (4,458,063) Total Transfers Out (120,790) (35,758) (157,510) (279,765) (353,158) (81,258) Net Total 3,400,014 2,309,322 1,217,730 952,660 (669,162) (2,094,644) Total Restricted Funds 194,540 197,800 197,800 197,800 197,800 197,800 Ending Balance (projected) $ 3,205,474 $ 2,111,522 $ 1,019,930 $ 754,860 $ (866,962) $(2,292,444) Operating Days 284 195 91 66 (73) (188) Excerpt from "Original" Five Year Forecast (General Fund only) Financial forecasts are used to identify important warning "sign posts" that should not be ignored. The FY 2009-2010 and 2010-1011 forecasts indicated that we are heading into severe financial distress. Our Strategic Plan established financial sustainability as a priority for the Town 6 and Westlake Academy. However, as the Town's financial condition worsened the need to make hard decisions regarding key services and potential revenue sources including an ad valorem tax became more apparent. The decision to "wait out the storm" in FY 2009-2010 meant we had even less time to make strategic decisions to deal with this issue. Deciding to wait again, would have prolonged the continued decline by spending our reserves and not being able to meet our short or long-term financial obligations. The FY 2010-2011 budget establishes an additional revenue source with the imposition of a property tax and in so doing, secures our future. D DESCRIPTION ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 1 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-1S General Fund Total Revenues $ 4,004,923 $ 4,869,244 $ 3,888,427 $ 4,114,065 $ 4,340,007 $ 4,436,319 $ 4,554,976 Total Transfers In 311,321 90,000 420,263 432,871 445,857 459,233 473,010 Total Expenditures (4,134,254) (4,113,750) (4,363,194) (4,494,090) (4,628,913) (4,767,780) (4,910,814) Total Transfers Out (278,417) (120,791) (2,120,758) (75,758) (119,865) (100,158) (81,258) Net Total (96,427) 724,703 (2,175,263) (22,912) 37,086 27,613 35,914 Beginning Fund Balance 2,771,739 2,675,312 3,400,015 1,224,752 1,201,840 1,238,926 1,266,539 Ending Fund Balance 2,675,312 3,400,015 1,224,752 1,201,840 1,238,926 1,266,539 1,302,454 Restricted Funds 193,104 194,540 197,800 197,800 197,8001 197,8001 197,800 Unrestricted Ending Balancel $ 2,482,2081 $ 3,205,4751 $ 1,026,9521 $ 1,004,0401 $ 1,041,126 $ 1,068,739 $ 1,104,654 Operating Days 219 284 95 90 90 90 90 Excerpt from "Adopted" Five Year Forecast (General Fund only) "SECURING OUR VISION": THE FY 2010-2011 BUDGET THEME In the FY 2009-2010 Budget we began to use a thematic approach to help focus and capture the essence of what we are addressing as we prepare and consider a budget. The Town FY 2009-2010 budget theme was, "Critical challenges, Critical choices". This theme emphasized the need for the Town as a community to come to terms with its financial future by understanding that funding of Town services is not only a critical financial decision, it is a critical long-term quality of life decision as well. In FY 2009-2010, the budget theme of "Critical challenges, Critical choices" emphasized Good to Great author Jim Collins' assessment that great organizations are introspective. They ask the hard questions to "confront the brutal facts, yet never lose faith" in the midst of their "current reality." As a leadership team we asked what those "brutal facts" were as they pertain to the Town of Westlake's critical reality of pending financial distress. As a result, we identified a number of factors that remain in place as we enter FY 2010-2011. They include: • The Town's reliance primarily on sales tax and one-time permits/fees to fund its operation and debt service costs. • During this current recession, Texas, and especially the Fort Worth -Dallas metroplex, has fared better than many other parts of the country. Nevertheless, this economic downturn has negatively impacted local governments' revenue streams throughout this area and Westlake is no exception. Westlake's primary means of funding its services has been hard hit by this economic downturn with a reduction in on-going sales tax of approximately 5%. Sales tax used to fund General Fund services is declining due to reduced business purchasing activity and the closure of at least one significant business which had generated significant sale tax revenue. While sales tax is a desired 7 revenue source for municipalities, it is a volitional tax (i.e. - paid when someone decides to buy a service or product), during economic down turns it often decreases. As a result, Westlake, under its current financial structure must spend fund balance, something that is not sustainable over the long-term. ® Retail development that could help increase sales tax revenue has not occurred to date and based on retail industry conditions, is unlikely to occur at any significant level in the near to medium term. ® A significant source of sales tax is "situs agreements" that generate sales tax revenue from construction materials purchased for major economic development projects such as Deloitte and Fidelity. Again, these sales tax revenues are one-time revenues. • Hotel/motel occupancy tax revenue has not grown at an appreciable rate due primarily to decreased business travel, even though the Marriott Solana expanded their room count two years ago. ® Residential building permits have decreased due to the current economic climate ® Large building permits from major economic development projects such as Fidelity and Deloitte have helped fund Town services; however, these economic development projects take years to develop. Currently, there are no such projects even in the preliminary planning stages. Again, these are one-time revenue sources. • In FY 2005-2006 Westlake voters approved dissolving the Town's 4A half cent economic development sales tax and replacing it with a half cent sales tax for "property tax reduction". This provided $2.2 million that was transferred to the General Fund and significantly increased the fund balance in that fund. This funding infusion, while increasing the General Fund's fund balance, has perhaps masked the volatility and lack of diversity of the Town's on-going revenue structure. • Fixed debt service costs are a significant part of the Town's costs and were increased in FY 2007-2008 with the issuance of $2.5 million of general obligation bonds for the new Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center at Westlake Academy. ® Operating costs have increased to fund Town services, including Westlake Academy. As the Town's population has grown, the Academy's campus and enrollment growth has increased correspondingly. Another influencing factor related to operating cost adjustments is due to natural inflationary increases. ® Funding for capital projects identified in the Town's Five (5) year Capital Improvement Plan was inadequate to meet basic general government infrastructure needs for streets, drainage, parks, trails, and public buildings. ® The Town's land use plan, and the zoning that implements it, features corporate office campuses and large lot single family residential as the primary land use pattern that is desired for Westlake. Both of these land uses, particularly the office land use, lend themselves more to creating a strong ad valorem tax base, not necessarily a strong sales tax base. The "brutal facts" as Collins terms them indicate that the Town's business model, while having worked previously, will no longer work based upon these current and projected economic realities and assumptions. Under the Town's present revenue stream, this business model was not sustainable beyond the next two (2) fiscal years; beginning in FY 2012-2013, the projected fund balance in the General Fund would fall below the 90 day minimum requirement. Simply put, we needed to stabilize our financial foundation to secure our future. Thus, in FY 2010-2011, we found ourselves at a juncture where we could still continue to face critical challenges and critical choices financially. However, we had an opportunity to deal with them in a proactive, thoughtful manner that places Westlake's future as a premier knowledge based community on a firm financial foundation. Hence, this budget's theme for FY 2010-2011 of "Securing Our Vision". ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS Collins maintains that "leadership does not begin just with vision. It begins with getting people to confront the brutal facts and to act on the implications". Over the last two years, the Town's Westlake Windows citizen engagement efforts have targeted creating dialogue and conversation with our residents and businesses to make sure they understand the critical nature of Westlake's financial situation and the choices we face. This has been accomplished through neighborhood meetings, focus groups, Town Council meetings, email blasts, and our Town newsletter, The Westlake Wire. In the FY 2009-2010 Budget transmittal letter, The Price of Government authors David Osborne and Peter Hutchinson were quoted to offer some valuable insights into answering this question as it relates to Westlake as follows: "Native Americans have many sayings, and one of the wisest is this: When you're riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount. You don't change riders. You don't reorganize the herd. You don't put together a blue-ribbon commission of veterinarians. And you don't spend more money on feed. You get off and find yourself a new horse." If Westlake were to obtain a "new horse" financially speaking to ride into and secure its future, what questions need to be asked first? Osborne and Hutchinson offer "five critical decisions" that must be made by government dealing with fundamental financial issues that can help us create a new paradigm to achieve financial sustainability: The Town Council spent much time at its May 24, 2010 budget retreat examining this issue of financial sustainability. In addition to the direction given at the retreat, using our Financial Forecast and Direction Finders (citizens') survey, we can begin to address some of these questions and issues. 1. Getting a Grip on the Problem: Is it short or long term? Is it driven by revenues or expenses, or both? Status: As illustrated in the previous discussion, our Financial Forecast shows us this was primarily a revenue problem, although expenditures can and have been addressed as well. Our revenue sources were not diverse and were declining. This is both a short term and long term problem. 2. Setting the Price of Government: Determining how much citizens are willing to pay. Status: Since the Town's government has been funded primarily with sales taxes and building permits/fees, in one sense, Westlake residents have not had to directly pay for the services provided by the Town (with the exception of water, sewer, and solid waste. Yet, DirectionFinders provides us a good road map to deal with this critical issue as illustrated in the following charts: 010- Willingness of Westlake Residents to Pay a Property Tax to Avoid Reductions in Town Services by percentage Of respondents who rated the item as a 1 to Son a 5 -point scale {excluding don't kno%v-,} Maintenance of stiroGft and drainage Public safety services Streetscaping Storm water management Parks., trails and recreation programs WGstlakL-Academy Public art Historic preservation 0% 20% 40% 500% 80% 100% MVery Willing (5) MWilli" (4) Monwrwhat W illing (3) M Not W Ming (112) gaure- ETC 1=uKA- D%renianFinder (Joriy 2010 - Wesr&Tke. TX) 011. Projects and Services Residents Felt Should be the Highest Priority for Improvement If the Funding Were Available by percentage of respondents who selected the i4am as one Gf their top two choices Public saleryFnaN fire stalion Improvements to Westlake Academy Enhanced stre4scaping for Precincl Line Road --:=.i.:_. bike pwn�.and park improvements Street and dramage improvements Z7N 26'/9 24% 33% 0% 1 01Y. 20% 30% 409/6 I M 1 st ClhoicG =i2ad Choice Sme. ETC InaimAe Lr4rea1onFznder(Jwly 2010 - WevXake. TXJ 10 7--a3% 2 2 1/ :3 59/- 2 22% 2 291 37% 0 2 20% 280/. 44T. 18% 30% 16% 6% 2&% 11% 12% 473/6 5613/. 6% 191% 71% 17% 17% 73% 0% 20% 40% 500% 80% 100% MVery Willing (5) MWilli" (4) Monwrwhat W illing (3) M Not W Ming (112) gaure- ETC 1=uKA- D%renianFinder (Joriy 2010 - Wesr&Tke. TX) 011. Projects and Services Residents Felt Should be the Highest Priority for Improvement If the Funding Were Available by percentage of respondents who selected the i4am as one Gf their top two choices Public saleryFnaN fire stalion Improvements to Westlake Academy Enhanced stre4scaping for Precincl Line Road --:=.i.:_. bike pwn�.and park improvements Street and dramage improvements Z7N 26'/9 24% 33% 0% 1 01Y. 20% 30% 409/6 I M 1 st ClhoicG =i2ad Choice Sme. ETC InaimAe Lr4rea1onFznder(Jwly 2010 - WevXake. TXJ 10 3. Setting the Priorities of Government: Deciding which results citizens value most. Status: Again, Dire ctionFin ders is a good tool for the Council to help set these priorities: 01. Overall Satisfaction With Town Services by Major Category by percentage of respondents who rated the item as a 1 to 5 on a 5 -point scale (excluding don't knows) Quality of public safety services Effectiveness of Town communication W astlak4s emergency prepared ness efforts Quality of customer service provided by the Town Quality of wastewater utility services Quality of water utility services Mai ntenance of Town streets Town efforts to manage storm water run-off Parks., trails, and recreation programs-'facilides Westlake Academy 0°1:: 20% 40 0 60% 80% 1Oo% t•4'ery Satisfied (5) EDSatisfted (41 ONeutral (3) Dissatisfied (112) Source- ETC1nmirure Direalo"Finder(Jaly 2WO - Wesriuike, TX} 02_ Major Categories of Town Services That Residents Felt Were Most Important by percentage of respondents who selected the item as one of their top thrae choices Quality of public safety services W estlaka Academe• Maintenance of Trnm streets Quality or water utility services Parks, trails, and recreation programsffadlities W estlak4s emergerrry preparedness efforts Town efforts to manage storm water nin-off Quality of wastawatar utility services QLLality or customer service provided by the Town Effc4:i� aness of Town communication 74 8 4 moi` —,i 4[1 i 20% 1S o i i 1221a 10% 9�l 0°% 20% 40% 60% 11111111111stGhoice 1=12ndGhoire 1111111113ndGhoice Source= ETC {"irprde Ed--iiooeF'inder (Jody 2010 - Wr.=4.,te, TX) 11 80% 43% 12% 32©l 44% 15% 110- 026 26% % 47% 24 29% 43% 17% 11% 2894 31 24°% 44'§` -:: 46°l :' 1 lJ 17'11, 159fl 17% 50-% 19% 37% 24% 27% 2:7% C 21% 25% 0°1:: 20% 40 0 60% 80% 1Oo% t•4'ery Satisfied (5) EDSatisfted (41 ONeutral (3) Dissatisfied (112) Source- ETC1nmirure Direalo"Finder(Jaly 2WO - Wesriuike, TX} 02_ Major Categories of Town Services That Residents Felt Were Most Important by percentage of respondents who selected the item as one of their top thrae choices Quality of public safety services W estlaka Academe• Maintenance of Trnm streets Quality or water utility services Parks, trails, and recreation programsffadlities W estlak4s emergerrry preparedness efforts Town efforts to manage storm water nin-off Quality of wastawatar utility services QLLality or customer service provided by the Town Effc4:i� aness of Town communication 74 8 4 moi` —,i 4[1 i 20% 1S o i i 1221a 10% 9�l 0°% 20% 40% 60% 11111111111stGhoice 1=12ndGhoire 1111111113ndGhoice Source= ETC {"irprde Ed--iiooeF'inder (Jody 2010 - Wr.=4.,te, TX) 11 80% Importance -Satisfaction Rating 2010 Town of Westlake Resident Survey Maior Categories of Town Services Category of Service Most Most Important Important Satisfaction Satisfaction % Rank % Rank Importance - Satisfaction Rating I -S Rating Rank Hirsh PriprO1is.10~20) Safety Westlake Academy 40% 2 64% 14 4.1844 _1F_ Quality of public safety services 740% 1 83% 1 4.1258 2 Parks, trails, and recreation programs4acilities 26% 5 66% 9 4.1144 3 Maintenance of Town streets 380/0 3 70% 7 4.1144 4 Quality of water utility services ifs% 4 71 % 6 4.1044 5 uedium Prforiiv as <I— 175,061 Westlake"s emergency preparedness efforts 20'% 6 73% 3 4.0544 6 Town efforts to manage storm water run-off 18% 7 66% 8 4.0442 7 Quality of wastewater utility services 12% 8 72% 5 4.0336 8 Quality of customer service provided by the Town 100/0 9 72% 4 4.0284 9 Effectiveness of Town communication 90/0 10 76% 2 4.0216 10 4. Setting the Price of Each Priority: Deciding how much the government will spend to produce each of these outcomes. Status: Converting our budget to a program format has made it easier to see where we spend our resources and thus what our priorities are and what we have been spending on them. This program format reveals we allocate our resources as follows: TOWN OF WESTLAKE EXPENDITi TRFS BASED ON GUIDING PRINCIPLES (BY COUNCIL RANKING) GENERALFUND FY 2010 2011 BUDGET 12 2,290,78 Safety 153,108 Financial Stewardship &Sustainability 572,138 f3 Education ,076 35,604 139,954 75,704 I nfrastru cture 175,061 Community Development Economic Sustainability 95,874 Active Lifestyles Environmental SustaMability Service Excellence & Effectiveness Transportation Citizen Engagement Arts & Culture $0.00 $Soo, 000.00 $1,000,000.00 $1,500,000.00 ,0000 $2,000,000.00 $2,500,000.00 12 f3 43 ,076 35,604 75,704 12 5. Purchasing the Priorities: Deciding how best to produce the desired results at the price citizens are willing to pay. Status: We must continually examine what we are paying for service delivery. However, this must be done in the context of understanding that Westlake has a unique service delivery configuration. Many of our programs are designed to cross -utilize our employees to provide for an economy of scale to either stretch our municipal dollar and/or offer a broad range of services which are not specific to one department. In addition, our services often span from the municipal to the academic side of the organization as well. Our leadership and organizational philosophy is to facilitate this type of cross -departmental cooperation so that we can reduce the need to hire additional staff and increase our capacity to handle multiple projects with limited funds. Not only do we have a unique service delivery configuration (cross utilization of staff for greater efficiencies), we also have a unique blend of service delivery mechanisms. A service delivery mechanism is what is used to deliver the actual service. The Town uses two types: • direct service delivery, and • outsourcing (sometimes called privatization, although privatization is only an accurate term if the party providing the outsourced service is a non- governmental entity (i.e. private business). Examples of some of the Town services provided by direct service delivery include: o Development review, building inspection, zoning administration, and planning o Fire suppression/prevention o Emergency Medical Service o Disaster Preparedness o Operation of Westlake Academy o Information Technology o Human Resources o Finance/Accounting (except for WA accounts payable) o City management o Westlake Academy administration/management o Water distribution system management and billing o Sewer collection system management and billing o Duct bank system management and billing o Capital project management and administration o Oversight and management of Town outsourced service contracts Examples of some of the Town services provided by outsourcing delivery include: o Solid waste collection, recycling, and solid waste disposal o Water production and treatment o Engineering services o Some services related to development review and large commercial building project inspections o Legal services o Information Technology o Waste water (sewage) treatment o Road repair and maintenance o Police services (police patrol, traffic enforcement, CID, dispatch, jail, and animal control) o Water and sewer line maintenance and repair o Drainage improvement and maintenance work o Elevated water storage (shared with Keller) o Landscaping and parks maintenance o Academy maintenance work 13 NEW REVENUE SCENARIO While this budget was submitted utilizing existing revenue sources, information on revenue options was presented at the Council's budget workshops and other public meetings that placed the Town's finances on solid ground, securing our vision for the future. These scenarios focused on stabilizing the General Fund's on-going revenues (i.e. ceasing the use of fund balance for daily operations and reliance on one-time, non -reoccurring revenues) as well as re- investing in Westlake's infrastructure. These revenue options utilized a municipal ad valorem (property) tax, something that the Town has never had before. Westlake's estimated 2010 taxable assessed valuation is approximately $654M net of abatements, a large ad valorem tax base for a community 6.2 square miles in land area and a permanent residential population of approximately 800 with an estimated daytime population of between 10,000 and 12,000 (Monday -Friday). The tax rate for Westlake for FY 2010-11 is among the lowest in the area and breaks down as follows: Maintenance &Operations $.1562 Interest & Sinking .0039 Total $.1601 per $100 of Assessed Valuation IN CLOSING In the FY 2009-2010 Budget transmittal letter I stated that in over thirty years of public service, I have never written a budget transmittal letter like this one. This continues to be the case for FY 2010-2011. Why? I believe it is because Westlake is a very unique community. Yes, we are small; however, our small size allows us to do many things larger communities cannot do. This gives us a huge advantage and opportunity to set the standard for a premier community quality of life in both education and municipal services. As I said in FY 2009-2010, setting a standard for an excellent quality of life comes at a price; we will have to determine what that price is, as well as what Westlake residents are willing to pay to achieve it. We have to come to terms with what we want to be as a community, where we want to go (i.e. the vision), what quality of life we wish to have, and finally, what cost is determined to be reasonable to achieve those things. While dealing with the financial challenges of the current economic climate, this proposed budget was prepared based on a conservative fiscal philosophy. It maintains existing levels of service and does so in concert with the Council's strategic priorities. The FY 2010-2011 Budget gives us an exciting opportunity to move Westlake further toward its vision of being a one -of -a - kind, premier, knowledge-based community. As stated in last year's budget transmittal letter and as I continually emphasize to Town staff, the Town of Westlake does not create wealth, but instead only spends public dollars collected on behalf of our citizens. We are stewards. We exist as a municipal corporation for one reason alone: to prioritize and deliver the best services possible with the resources provided to achieve an exceptional quality of life. With the Council, Staff, and Community working in tandem as a team, we can achieve much as a municipal government on behalf of our citizens. Osborne and Hutchinson noted this about citizens and their view of funding government: "...they (citizens) want government to provide what only the public sector can provide ... But they want their money's worth. They want value for dollars. When they can't get it, they often opt for tax cuts and private services. When they do get value from public institutions, however, they are often willing to invest in them." We have accepted, and in my view, met this challenge to offer value for the Town services we deliver as borne out by the results of our DirectionFinders (citizens' survey). But, it is a continuous 14 challenge, one that we must meet every day so that Westlake citizens continue to have that confidence in us and feel they are getting value from their Town government so they are willing to invest in the services we provide. The staff Leadership Team is to be highly commended for their concerted efforts in putting this FY 2010-2011 Budget together for Council consideration. Having a Council -staff team is essential for effective governance as well as deal with the issues Westlake faces. The Leadership Team recognized the challenges we face financially and accordingly, have submitted conservative budget requests given our situation. Over the last several months this team has put enormous effort into converting their line item budgets to a program format. The Leadership Team has also analyzed the impact of cost reductions scenarios on the Town's ability to provide quality services. Finally, special recognition and thanks are due to Director of Finance Debbie Piper, Administrative Intern Scott Dixon, and Finance Assistant Jaymi Ford, for their efforts in putting together this budget document. It has required long hours to make this not only a financial document, but a policy document that is easy for our citizens to read and understand. I appreciate their dedication and the effort they have invested in this process. Finally, my thanks and appreciation also go to the Town Council for the countless volunteer hours you invest in governing Westlake for the betterment of all. Sincerely yours, Thomas E. Brymer Town Manager/Superintendent Westlake Academy Resources Cited Collins, Jim, "Good to Great," Why some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't, First Edition, 2001. Osborne, David, and Hutchinson, Peter, The Price of Government," Getting the Results We Need in an Age of Permanent Fiscal Crisis, 2004. 15 FY 2010/2011 BUDGET OVERVIEW AND FRAMEWORK The Town of Westlake's 2011 fiscal year begins on October 1, 2010 and ends September 30, 2011. It provides the framework to implement the Town's vision, mission and value statements as set out by the Town Council. The Town's annual budget is prepared in the context of a five (5) year financial forecast. The adopted budget is submitted to the Council approximately thirty to forty- five days before the beginning of the fiscal year for their consideration. The Town's budget is allocated by fund. It is designed to provide a clear picture of adopted Town spending, allocation of financial resources, and priorities as well as how they are set to carry out the policy direction of the Council. In addition to a fund format, the budget is the beginning of efforts to show the allocation of the Town's resources in concert with the Town's strategic planning efforts. A "bottom-up" approach is used to solicit input from the staff Leadership Team as to their operations' needs with an emphasis on: • Identifying costs to provide the current level of services. • Identifies additional cost increases needed to maintain the current level of service. • Additional resources necessary to provide new or increased levels of service. • Delineating changes in fund balance levels for each fund. It is important to note that the original "Proposed" budget" had a portion of the General Fund's fund balance being utilized in FY 10-11 to balance the budget. This was due in direct response to the current economic climate that has resulted in declining revenues. Also, revenue had fallen from one-time sources such as sales tax situs agreements, building permits from one-time major economic development construction projects, as well as decreased building permits from a slowdown in new residential construction. As stated previously in the "Transmittal Letter", the Council voted to impose a property tax for the FY 2010-2011. The Town of Westlake staff is pleased to present the 2010/2011 annual operating budget, which is the product of many hours of preparation as well as a response to ever-changing internal and external influences. As in previous years, efforts have been made to control expenditures while continuing to deliver an excellent level of service to our citizens. Concentrated efforts have been made to produce a document that clearly illustrates the uses of Town resources in a format that may be utilized as a resource tool by the Town Council, Town staff, and the citizens of Westlake. Our budget preparation process continues to be refined on an annual basis, operating within clearly defined budget preparation guidelines. The following procedures, which are guided by generally accepted budgeting practices, has been established: 1. The annual operating budget presents appropriations of expenditures and estimates of revenues for all local government funds. These revenues include sales and use 16 taxes, ad valorem property tax, citation revenue, franchise taxes, mixed beverage taxes, license and permit fees, development fees, sales of printed material, interest income, water and sewer utility revenue, duct bank leases, and miscellaneous revenues. 2. The annual operating budget illustrates expenditures, anticipated revenues, and the estimated impact on reserves. 3. Budgets for each department are broken down into specific cost components, including payroll/salaries, payroll related & benefits, supplies, services, insurance, repair & maintenance, rent & utilities, economic development incentives, and capital outlay. 4. Revenue projections are prepared for each revenue source based on an analysis of historical revenue trends and current fiscal conditions. 5. The budget process includes a multi-year projection of required capital improvements. 6. Goals and objectives have been developed for each department and are incorporated into the evaluation of employees and performance of the organization. 7. A budget message summarizing local financial conditions and principal budget issues is presented to the governing council along with the annual budget. The layout and organization of the budget is designed to help the reader locate both financial and non-financial information in a timely fashion. The General Fund is divided into twelve departments. Each department has the following information included: • Description of the fund and it's program's trends, goals, highlights, measures and Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts • Summary of Employee Staffing and Expenditures • Program budgeting for the Department The Fund Sections are broken down between Special Revenue Funds, Debt Service Fund, Enterprise Funds, Internal Service Funds, and Capital Projects Funds. Each Fund contains the following information: • "Fund Overview" describing the function of the fund and explaining the variances between the revenues and expenditures of FY 09/10 and FY 10/11 • "Program Summary" of revenues and expenditures. Also included are sections detailing the Capital Improvement Plan and Long -Term Planning. The final four components include a Performance Measures, Community Profile, excerpts from Westlake Academy FY 2010-2011 adopted budget and an Appendices section. The Community Profile contains historical and current information regarding the Town of Westlake. The Performance Measures section includes a summary of what the Town is trying to achieve along with detailed program costs, goals and objectives of each program identified by the Town's leadership team. The appendices section consists of a Glossary of Budget Terms, the Town's Fiscal and Budgetary Policy, Investment Policy, and the Town ordinance related to the adoption of the budget. 17 The budget contains financial data spanning two fiscal years. The current budget year ending September 30, 2010 is presented in its original adopted form, as well as an amended estimate. Actual totals for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2009 are also presented for comparison. BASIS OF ACCOUNTING/BUDGETING The accounts of the Town are organized on the basis of funds, each of which is considered to be a separate accounting entity. All governmental fund types are budgeted and accounted for on a Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (GAAP) basis for financial statement presentations. The Governmental Fund types use a financial resources measurement focus and utilize the modified accrual basis for accounting and budgeting. Under the modified accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recorded when susceptible to accrual, meaning that it is measurable and available. Available revenues are defined as those funds that are collectable within the current period, or collectable within a timeframe to pay liabilities of the current period. Expenditures generally represent a decrease in net financial resources and are recorded when a measurable fund liability is incurred. In some instances, such as the incurrence of long-term debt, expenditures related to interest on the debt is recorded in the period that it is due. The Proprietary Fund types are accounted and budgeted for on a cost of services, or "Capital Maintenance" measurement focus using the accrual basis of accounting. Under the accrual basis of accounting, revenues are recognized when earned and expenses are recognized when incurred. For purposes of this budget presentation, depreciation is not displayed and capital expenditures and bond principal payments are shown as uses of funds. Governmental Fund Types Governmental fund types are those through which most governmental functions of the Town are financed. The acquisition, use, and balances of the Town's expendable financial resources and the related liabilities (except those accounted for in the Proprietary and Fiduciary Fund types) are accounted for through Governmental Fund types. Descriptions of each fund contained in the Town's budget are as follows: The General Fund is the general operating fund of the Town. It is used to account for all Town revenues and expenditures except those required to be accounted for in other funds. Major functions financed by the General Fund include Administration, Building & Code Compliance, Fire/EMS, Public Works, Facilities/Grounds Maintenance, Finance and Human Resources, Parks and Recreation, Information Technology, and Engineering. Sources of revenue include sales and use taxes, development fees and permits, court revenue, and franchise taxes. 2. Westlake's Visitors Association Fund receives its primary funding from a 7% hotel occupancy tax adopted by the Town of Westlake in FY 1999-2000. Proceeds from the hotel occupancy tax are required to be used in accordance with statutory parameters including the promotion of travel and tourism in the Town of Westlake. 18 3. The Economic Development Fund was set up to maintain all receipts and disbursements of agreements between the Town and various corporations for economic development. There was confusion regarding the additional revenues being recorded in the General Fund and offset by expenditures. These balances offset to zero but skewed the analysis of each. The Town is hoping this fund will create more transparency to the public regarding these receipts and payments. 4. The 4B Economic Development Corporation Fund is a local option established under the Texas local government code. 4B funds are generated from a '/2 cent sales tax levy and proceeds are used for debt service. 5. The Westlake Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax Fund will receive its funding from a '/2 cent sales tax levy that was formerly earmarked for the 4A Economic Development Corporation. The purpose of this fund is to reduce local property tax rates throughout Texas by providing cities with an additional unrestricted revenue source. These funds may be used for general Town expenditures, capital projects, or debt service. 6. The Lone Star Public Facilities Corporation was founded in 1996 and was designed "to provide for the acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, repair, equipping, furnishing and placement in service of public facilities in an orderly, planned manner and at the lowest possible borrowing costs." The ideas was to "acquire, through the issuance of installment sale obligations, office buildings located within the State of Texas but outside the boundaries of Westlake, whose tenants will be limited to those entities which are qualifying tenants under applicable federal income tax law so that the interest payable with respect to the installment sale obligations will be exempt from federal income taxation." There has been no activity in the fund for several years. 7. The FM 1938 Fund is a Texas Department of Transportation project for several surrounding cities. The Town is responsible for the books for this project. 8. The Debt Service Fund is established to account for, and the payment of, general long-term debt principal and interest. This fund provides a clearer accounting of ongoing debt obligations compared to operating budgets. The Debt Service Fund is used to make scheduled payments for all bond issues associated with the building of the Civic Campus as well as a partial refunding of the 2002 series. 9. The Capital Projects Fund tracks the infrastructure and building projects (other than those financed by proprietary fund types), funded with general operating transfers, intergovernmental revenue, bond funds and other special funding methods. Capital expenditures are clearly identified by their respective funding sources, and projects are shown in a clear, concise format. 10. The Arts & Sciences Center Fund tracks the monies related to the new building to be located on the Westlake Academy Civic Campus. Construction of the building was completed in FY 09/10. 19 Proprietary Fund Types Proprietary fund types operate in a manner similar to private business utilizing an accrual basis of accounting. Enterprise Funds Account for operations of governmental facilities operated in a manner similar to commercial enterprises where the intent is to recover, in whole or in part, the costs and expenses of providing goods and services to the public. Revenues are typically generated through usage fees based on individual demands of each customer. Enterprise funds may be used when the governing body has determined that periodic determination of revenue earned, expenses incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, management control, accountability, or other purposes. 1. The Cemetery Fund includes all operations associated with the 5.5 acre cemetery located on J.T. Ottinger Road which was acquired during the year ended September 2008. 2. The Utility Fund accounts for water, wastewater and telecommunications conveyance (duct bank) services for the residents of the Town. All activities necessary to provide such services are accounted for in the Fund, including administration, operations, maintenance, financing and related debt service, and billing and collection. Additionally, the Town collects monthly solid collection fees in this fund which are paid to the Town's solid waste franchisee. Internal Service Funds Accounts for services and/or commodities furnished by a designated program to other programs within the Town. Funds include the following: 1. The Vehicle & Equipment Replacement Fund (V&E) provides a mechanism for long-term repair and replacement of vehicles and equipment. The V&E Fund receives planned portions of revenue from the General Fund to set aside for future vehicle and equipment repairs and replacement. 2. The General Major Maintenance Fund (GMM) is an account to offset the future costs of repair and/or replacement of large capital assets due to age and use. Contributions from the Town's General Fund and Property Tax Reduction Fund are transferred on an annual basis; resulting in a cash balance which mitigates the cash flow impact of large maintenance and capital replacement costs. 3. The Utility Major Maintenance Fund (UMM) is an account to offset the future costs of repair and/or replacement of large capital assets due to age and use. Contributions from the Town's Utility Fund are transferred on an annual basis; resulting in a cash balance which mitigates the cash flow impact of large maintenance and capital replacement costs. 20 Relationship Between Funds and Departments Funds Departments c O Q) Y v •i QJ E: C f0 V U 2- i O O W o u N •f0 O O bD 0 O > 3 v o ~ ? E n u_ - E o c N m o v N 0 E = 66 General Fund ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ 46 Economic Development ✓ Visitors Association ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Special Revenue Grant ✓ FM 1938 ✓ Cemetery ✓ Vehicle & Equipment ✓ ✓ ✓ Property Tax Reduction ✓ Lone Star Public Facilities ✓ Debt Service ✓ Utility ✓ ✓ Utility Major Maintenance ✓ Gen Major Maintenance ✓ ✓ Capital Projects ✓ ✓ Arts & Sciences Center ✓ THE BUDGET PROCESS The Town Manager submits the budget to the Town Council. The Town's fiscal year begins each year on October l st and ends on September 30th of the following calendar year. Prior to the beginning of the fiscal year, the Town Manager must submit a proposed budget, which includes: • A budget message • A consolidation statement of anticipated revenues and proposed expenditures for all funds • General fund resources in detail • Special fund resources in detail • A summary of proposed expenditures by department and activity • Detailed estimates of expenditures shown separately to support the proposed expenditure • A description of all bond issues outstanding • A schedule of the principal and interest payments of each bond issue The proposed revenues and expenditures must be compared to prior year revenues and expenditures. The budget preparation process begins early in the calendar year with the establishment of overall town goals, objectives, and analysis of current year operations compared to expenditures. Budget policies and procedures are reviewed at the same time to reduce errors and omissions. In May, the Finance Department prepares such items as budget forms and instructions for estimating revenues and expenditures. Department heads submit proposed baseline expenditures for current service levels and any additional one-time or on-going request they may have for their department. Meetings are subsequently held with the Town Manager, `A the Finance Director and each department head. After all funding levels are established and agreed upon; the proposed budget is presented by the Town Manager to the Town Council. A public hearing on the budget is conducted in accordance with state and local law. This meeting is held after the Council has reviewed the budget during a workshop. The Town Council approves a level of expenditure (or appropriation) for each fund to go into effect on October 1 st, prior to the expenditure of any Town funds for that budget year. BUDGET AMENDMENT PROCESS The Town Manager may request that the current year budget be amended. In this process, the Town Manager will review the documentation and draft an ordinance to formally amend the current budget. This ordinance is presented to the Town Council for consideration. Following the consideration of the proposed amendment, the Town Council will vote on the amendment ordinance. If the amendment is approved, the necessary budget changes are then made. All budget amendments will be approved by the Town Council prior to the expenditure of funds in excess of the previously authorized budgeted amounts within each department. FINANCIAL POLICIES The Town of Westlake is committed to financial management through integrity, prudent stewardship, planning, accountability, full disclosure and communication. The broad purpose of the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy is to enable the Town to achieve and maintain a long-term stable financial position and provide guidelines for the day-to-day planning and operations of the Town's financial affairs. The Town Council annually reviews and approves these policies as part of the budget preparation process. A copy of these Policies can be found in the "Appendix" section of this budget. REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, FUND BALANCE ALL SOURCES FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 Increase/(Decrease) FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 FY 10/11 vs FY 09/10 Description Actual Estimated Adopted Amount Percent REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property tax Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeits Investment Earnings Misc Income Charge for Services Hotel Tax Revenues Contributions Academy Total Revenues Transfers In Other Sources WA -Other Sources Total Other Sources 3,664,410 3,648,000 3,250,000 (398,000) -11% 0 0 1,025,410 1,025,410 100% 17,869 17,750 17,750 0 0% 624,400 609,500 609,500 0 0% 860,698 1,877,165 367,455 (1,509,710) -80% 523,515 578,860 550,960 (27,900) -5% 64,465 28,757 17,740 (11,017) -38% 216,290 168,864 122,142 (46,722) -28% 2,345,724 2,372,966 2,430,966 58,000 2% 497,769 450,000 450,000 0 0% 1,264,261 468,730 450,000 (18,730) -4% 3,758,255 4,543,285 4,692,781 149,496 3% 13,837,655 14,763,878 13,984,704 (779,174) -5% 2,450,487 2,040,183 5,300,573 3,260,390 160% 0 0 1,900,000 1,900,000 100% 117,640 0 86,432 86,432 100% 2,568,127 2,040,183 7,287,005 5,246,822 257% Total Revenues and $ 16,405,782 $ 16,804,061 $ 21,271,709 $ 4,467,649 277. Other Sources EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll/Salaries 1,821,974 1,837,411 1,886,448 49,037 3% Payroll Related 521,292 547,332 600,976 53,644 10% Supplies 196,741 218,020 183,562 (34,458) -16% Service 3,102,318 3,203,074 3,033,551 (169,522) -5% Insurance 32,857 31,736 32,544 808 3% Maintenance 263,133 325,804 203,479 (122,325) -38% Rent & Utilities 369,063 396,622 396,622 0 0% ED Incentives 229,907 285,759 410,758 124,999 44% Capital Outlay 92,494 163,587 140,788 (22,799) -14% Capital Projects 4,353,657 1,128,258 1,792,986 664,728 59% Debt 1,651,102 1,694,034 1,780,542 86,508 5% Academy 3,805,696 4,363,028 4,649,824 286,796 7% Total Expenditures 16,440,233 14,194,666 15,112,081 917,415 6% Transfers Out 2,250,487 2,040,183 5,380,005 3,339,822 164% WA -Other Uses 200,000 100,000 19,840 (80,160) -80% Total Other Uses 2,450,487 2,140,183 5,399,845 3,259,662 152% Total Expenditures $ 18,890,720 $ 16,334,849 $ 20,511,927 $ 4,177,078 26% and Other Uses Excess Revenues Over $ (2,484,938) $ 469,212 $ 759,783 $ 290,571 62% (Under) Expenditures BEGINNING FUND BALANCE $ 10,433,841 $ 7,948,903 $ 8,418,115 $ 469,212 6% ENDING FUND BALANCE $ 7,948,903 $ 8,418,115 $ 9,177,897 $ 759,783 9% 23 FUND BALANCES ALL SOURCES FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 Fund Name Projected Beginning Fund Balance 10/1/2010 Adopted Revenues and Other Funding Sources Adopted Expenditures and Other Funding Uses Net Change Projected Ending Fund Balance 9/30/2011 Percent of all Funds General Fund 3,400,015 4,308,690 6,483,952 (2,175,263) 1,224,752 13% Westlke Academy 584,909 4,779,213 4,749,094 30,119 615,028 7% 4B Economic Development 267,577 812,500 842,231 (29,731) 237,846 3% Economic Development - 410,758 410,758 - - 0% Visitors Association 938,309 478,975 597,877 (118,902) 819,407 9% FM 1938 (0) - - - (0) 0% Cemetery 155,881 16,875 24,350 (7,475) 148,406 2% Vehicle/Equipment 72,210 10,000 81,788 (71,788) 422 0% Property Tax Reduction 1,350,323 818,300 1,736,377 (918,077) 432,246 5% Debt Service - 1,528,258 1,528,258 - - 0% Capital Projects 230,391 5,640,000 1,452,744 4,187,256 4,417,647 48% Arts & Sciences - - - - - 0% Lone Star 13,669 100 0 100 13,769 0% Utility Fund 1,289,732 2,426,766 2,513,173 (86,407) 1,203,326 13% Utility Major Maint 65,050 - - - 65,050 1% General Major Maint 50,050 41,274 91,324 (50,050) - 0% TOTAL $ 8,418,116 $ 21,271,709 $ 20,511,927 $ 759,783 $ 9,177,897 100% Projected Ending Fund Balances FY10/11 W Utility Major Maint W Utility Fund 1% 13% I O Capital Projects 48% 24 ■ General Fund 13% ■ Westlake Academy 7% ■ 4B Economic evelopment 2% ■ Visitors Association 9% ■ Cemetery 2% IJ Property Tax Reduction S% FY 2010/2011 BUDGET SUMMARY FUND BALANCES • FY 08/09 actual vs. FY 09/10 estimated o The September 30, 2010 estimated ending fund balance totals $8,418,116; ■ a 6% increase of $469,836 from the September 30, 2009 actual ending fund balance of $7,948,820 Fund Name General Fund Westlake Academy 4B Economic Development Economic Development Visitors Association FM1938 Cemetery Vehicle/Equipment Property Tax Reduction Debt Service Capital Projects Arts & Sciences Lone Star Utility Fund Utility Major Maintenance General Major Maintenance TOTAL FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Adopted %of total Actual Estimated change percent 2,675,312 3,400,015 724,703 27% 504,653 584,909 80,256 16% 297,308 267,577 (29,731) -10% 0 0 0 0% 1,244,945 938,309 (306,636) -2S% 8 (0) (8) -100% 163,356 155,881 (7,475) -5% 62,000 72,210 10,210 16% 1,068,034 1,350,323 282,289 26% 0 0 0 0% 230,391 230,391 0 0% 92,618 0 (92,618) -100% 13,569 13,669 100 1% 1,496,086 1,289,732 (206,354) -14% 50,000 65,050 15,050 30% 50,000 50,050 50 0% $ 7,948,280 $ 8,418,116 $ 469,836 6% FY 09/10 estimated vs. FY 10/11 Adopted o The September 30, 2011 Adopted ending fund balance totals $9,177,898; ■ a 9% decrease of $759,783 from the September 30, 2010 estimated ending fund balance of $8,418,116 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent General Fund 3,400,015 1,224,752 13% (2,175,263) -64% Westlake Academy 584,909 615,028 7% 30,119 5% 4B Economic Development 267,577 237,846 3% (29,731) -11% Economic Development 0 0 0% 0 0% Visitors Association 938,309 819,407 9% (118,902) -13% FM1938 (0) (0) 0% 0 0% Cemetery 155,881 148,406 2% (7,475) -5% Vehicle/Equipment 72,210 422 0% (71,788) -99% Property Tax Reduction 1,350,323 432,246 5% (918,077) -68% Debt Service 0 0 0% 0 0% Capital Projects 230,391 4,417,647 48% 4,187,256 1817% Arts & Sciences 0 0 0% 0 0% Lone Star 13,669 13,769 0% 100 1% Utility Fund 1,289,732 1,203,326 13% (86,407) -7% Utility Major Maintenance 65,050 65,050 1% 0 0% General Major Maintenance 50,050 0 0% (50,050) -100% TOTAL $ 8,418,116 $ 9,177,898 $ 759,783 9% 25 Explanations of both year-end fund estimated balances are presented below: 1. General Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 Estimated to have a 27% increase of $724,703 One time building permit of $1.2 M provided a means to balance this budget in FY 09/10 Fund Name General Fund FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change percent 2,675,312 3,400,015 724,703 27% • Estimated to have a 64% decrease of $2,175,263 • Transfers out to Capital Projects Fund of $2,085,000 • No one-time fees are anticipated to be received during FY 10/11; therefore, the Town will have to use a portion of fund balance to balance the budget FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted % of total change percent General Fund 3,400,015 1,224,752 13% (2,175,263) -64% 2. Visitors Association Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a 25% decrease of $(306,636) • Debt service payment for the $2.5M issue for the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center were paid from this fund -$179,275 • Additional funds were paid to the Marriott for transportation/marketing efforts • Funds of $100K are anticipated to be transferred out to the Capital Project Fund for FM 1938 Town project expenditures Fund Name Visitors Association FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change percent 1,244,945 938,309 (306,636) -25% • Estimated to have a 13% decrease of ($118,902) • Debt service payment for the $2.5M issue for the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center will be paid from this fund - $180,944 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted % of total change percent Visitors Association 938,309 819,407 9% (118,902) -13% 26 3. Vehicle/Equipment Replacement Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 . Estimated to have a 16% increase of $10,210 • Transfers in from Property Tax Reduction and General Fund to future equipment replacement Fund Name Vehicle/Equipment FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change percent 62,000 72,210 10,210 16% FY 09/10 vs. 10/1 1 • Estimated to have a 99% decrease of $71,788 • Anticipated to transfer in $10,000 from Property Tax Reduction Fund • Majority of funds will be used for anticipated equipment replacement • Ending Fund balance Adopted to be $422 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent Vehicle/Equipment 72,210 422 0% (71,788) -99% 4. 4B Economic Development Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a 10% decrease ($29,731) • Fund balance represents the total of an inter -fund payable from the Utility Fund for funds used in previous years for capital projects • All sales tax revenues and the $29,731 inter -fund payment are transferred to the Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service Fund Name 4B Economic Development FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change percent 297,308 267,577 (29,731) -10% FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 • Estimated to have an 11% decrease of ($29,731) • Fund balance represents the total of inter -fund payable from the Utility Fund for funds used in previous years for capital projects • All sales tax revenues and the $29,731 inter -fund payment are transferred to the Debt Service Fund for payment of debt service FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent 4B Economic Development 267,577 237,846 3% (29,731) -11% 27 5. Property Tax Reduction Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a 26% increase of $282,289 • Even with the on-going sales tax decreasing by 12%; the Town was fortunate to receive additional one-time economic development agreement funds as well as a large audit payment during FY 09/10 adding approximately $350K to this fund • 4B Economic Development Fund contributes 100% of it's revenue to debt service with this fund contributing $420,369 and the Visitor's Association Fund paying $179,275 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Fund Name Actual Estimated change percent Property Tax Reduction 1,068,034 1,350,323 282,289 26% FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 • Estimated to have a 68% decrease of ($918,077) • Transfers Out to Capital Projects fund of $1,205,000 • Anticipating on-going sales tax to remain flat but estimate approximately $187,500 in one-time economic development agreement revenues • 4B Economic Development Fund contributes 100% of it's revenue to debt service with this fund contributing $480,103 and the Visitor's Association Fund paying $180,944 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %oftotal change percent Property Tax Reduction 1,350,323 432,246 5% (918,077) -68% 6. Capital Projects Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have 0% change • Typically we transfer funds from other funds to cover any capital projects needed for the current year leaving only restricted fund balance amounts to be used in future years FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Fund Name Actual Estimated change percent Capital Projects 230,391 230,391 0 0% FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 • Estimated to have 1817% increase of $4,187,256 • Council voted to impose an I&S property tax to accommodate the interest payment on an approximate $2.9M bond issue for capital projects • Transfers in from the General Fund of $2,085,000 and from the Property Tax Reduction Fund of $1,205,000 will be used for future approved capital projects FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted Capital Projects 230,391 4,417,647 28 % of total change percent 48% 4,187,256 1817% 7. Arts & Sciences Center FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a -100% decrease of $(92,618) • Project was completed in FY 09/10 and this amount represents the final costs FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Fund Name Actual Estimated change percent Arts & Sciences 92,618 0 (92,618) -100% 8. Utility Fund FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a -14% decrease of $(206,354) • Stagecoach Hills Waterline Connection project completed during FY 09/10 Fund Name Utility Fund FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change percent 1,496,086 1,289,732 (206,354) -14% FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 • Estimated to have a 7% decrease of $(86,407) • Increase in anticipated debt service payments to Hillwood for the service areas • N-1 Sewer Line Transfer and Inflow & Infiltration repairs are anticipated for FY 10/11 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent Utility Fund 1,289,732 1,203,326 13% (86,407) -7% 9. Utility Major Maintenance FY 08/09 vs. FY 09/10 • Estimated to have a 30% increase of $15,050 • Transfer in from Utility Fund for future projects Fund Name Utility Major Maintenance FY 09/10 vs. FY 10/ 11 • No transfers proposed for FY 10/1 1 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Actual Estimated change 50,000 65,050 15,050 29 30% ADOPTED REVENUES AND OTHER FINANCING SOURCES ALL SOURCES FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 Revenues GF 100 WA 199 4B 200 ED 210 VA 220 CF 255 VE 257 PTR 260 DS 300 CP 410 LS 418 OF 500 GM 600 TOTAL Sales Tax 1,250,000 812,500 375,000 - - 812,500 - 3,250,000 23% Property Tax 1,000,430 - - - - - - 24,980 - - - - 1,025,410 717 Beverage Tax 17,750 - 17,750 0% Franchise Fees 609,500 - - - - - - - - - - - 609,500 4% Permits/Fees 367,455 - - - - - - - - - - - 367,455 317 Fines/Forfeits 550,960 550,960 4% Interest 8,465 1,700 75 5,800 - 100 1,600 17,740 07. Contributions - - - - - - - - 450,000 - - - 450,000 3% Misc Income 83,867 - - 27,275 3,000 - - - - - 8,000 - 122,142 1% Chg for Services - - - - 13,800 - - - - - 2,417,166 - 2,430,966 17% Hotel Tax 450,000 - - - - 450,000 317 Academy - 4,692,781 4,692,781 347. Total Revenues 3,888,427 4,692,781 812,500 375,000 478,975 16,875 818,300 24,980 450,000 100 2,426,766 13,984,704 1007. Transfers In 420,263 79,432 - 35,758 - - 10,000 - 1,503,278 3,290,000 - - 41,274 5,380,005 Other Sources - 7,000 - - - - - - - 1,900,000 - - - 1,907,000 Total All Funds 4,308,690 4,779,213 812,500 410,758 478,975 16,875 10,000 818,300 1,528,258 5,640,000 100 2,426,766 41,274 21,271,709 Revenues by Type ■ PTI` 69// ■ VA 3% ■ GF 1k 28% ■ WA 34% ■ Charge for Services ■ Misc Income 18% ■ Hotel Tax 1% 3% ■ Contributions 3% ■ Fines and Forfeits 4% ■ Academy 34% IN Permits and Fees - 3% ■ Franchise Fees 4% ■ Property Tax 7% ■ Sales Taxi 23% Revenues by Fund 30 FY 2010/2011 BUDGET SUMMARY REVENUES AND OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Comparing the FY 09/10 estimated revenues to FY 10/1 1 adopted revenues; • total Town revenues (all funding sources) are budgeted at $21,271,709 • a 27% increase of $4,467,649 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent General Fund 4,959,244 4,308,690 20% (650,554) -13% Westlake Academy 4,543,285 4,779,213 22% 235,928 5% 4B Economic Development 912,375 812,500 4% (99,875) -11% Economic Development 285,758 410,758 2% 125,000 44% Visitors Association 479,975 478,975 2% (1,000) 0% FM1938 1,256 0 0% (1,256) -100% Cemetery 16,875 16,875 0% 0 0% Vehicle/Equipment 94,386 10,000 0% (84,386) -89% Property Tax Reduction 917,800 818,300 4% (99,500) -11% Debt Service 1,499,750 1,528,258 7% 28,508 2% Capital Projects 215,500 5,640,000 27% 5,424,500 2517% Arts & Sciences 429,640 0 0% (429,640) -100% Lone Star 100 100 0% 0 0% Utility Fund 2,402,516 2,426,766 11% 24,250 1% Utility Major Maintenance 22,550 0 0% (22,550) -100% General Major Maintenance 23,050 41,274 0% 18,224 79% TOTAL $ 16,804,061 $ 21,271,709 $ 4,467,649 27% The primary source is: • an increase of $3,524,500 ($3,290,000 in transfers in from GF and PTR fund balances) in the Capital Projects Fund • an increase of $1,900,000 in bond proceeds in the Capital Projects Fund • an increase of $1,000,430 in ad valorem property tax in the General Fund • a decrease of $429,640 in the Arts & Sciences Center Fund • a decrease of $650,554 in the General Fund General Fund Revenues • Ad Valorem Property tax increased by $1,000,430 o First year of property tax implementation for the Town of Westlake • Sales Tax decreased $324,000; o sales tax revenue used to fund General Fund services is declining due to reduced business purchasing activity; business' which had generated significant sale tax revenue in the past have been sold and closed. o retail development that could help increase sales tax revenue has not occurred to date and based on retail industry conditions, is unlikely to occur at any significant level in the near to medium term. o significant source of sales tax is "situs agreements" that generate sales tax revenue from construction materials purchased for major economic development projects such as Deloitte and Fidelity. Again, these sales tax revenues are one-time revenues. 31 • Permits and Fees decreased by $1,509,710; o related to the Deloitte development building permit and inspection fees that were received in FY09/10. o one-time revenues; no commercial projects proposed for FYI 0/1 1. Capital Projects Revenues • Adopted to increase by $3,524,500 o Contribution revenues are $450,000 o Bond Proceeds are $1,900,000 o Transfers in from General Fund $2,135,000 o Transfers in from PTR Fund $1,155,000 Arts & Sciences Center Revenues • Adopted to decrease by $429,640 o Project is complete and no funding is necessary in FYI 0/1 1 Largest Revenue Streams 1. General Fund 0 6% - Sales Tax - $1,250,000 0 5% - Property Tax - $1,000,430 0 3%- Franchise Fees - $609,500 2. Capital Projects Fund 0 9% - Bond Proceeds - $1,900,000 0 10% - Transfer in from GF fund balance - $2,085,000 0 6% - Transfer in From PTR fund balance - $1,205,000 3. The Utility Fund 0 11 % - Charges for Services - $2,417,166 4. Property Tax Reduction Fund 0 4% - Sales Tax - $812,500 5. 4B Economic Development Corporation 0 4% - Sales Tax - $812,500 6. Westlake Academy 0 19% - State Funds - $3,964,371 32 ADOPTED EXPENDITURES AND OTHER OPERATING USES ALL SOURCES FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 Expenditures GF WA 4B 100 199 200 ED VA 210 220 CF VE 255 257 PTR DS 260 300 CP 410 OF 500 GM 600 TOTAL % Payroll Salaries 1,886,448 - - - - - - - - - - - 1,886,448 127. Payroll Related 600,976 - - 600,976 4% Supplies 136,346 33,350 6,200 - 7,667 183,562 1% Services 1,358,178 173,975 13,150 1,500 1,486,749 3,033,551 20% Insurance 26,658 - - - 5,886 32,544 0% Repair & Maint 102,979 - 5,000 95,500 203,479 17. Rent/Utilities 251,610 - 34,637 - 110,375 396,622 3% ED Incentives - 410,758 - - 410,758 3% Capital Outlay - 81,788 59,000 140,788 1% Capital Projects - - 1,452,744 248,920 91,324 1,792,988 12% Debt - - - 1,526,758 - 253,784 - 1,780,542 12% Academy - 4,649,822 4,649,822 31% Total Expenditures 4,363,194 4,649,822 410,758 241,962 24,350 81,788 1,528,258 1,452,744 2,267,881 91,324 15,112,081 100% Transfers Out 2,120,758 79,432 842,231 - 355,915 - - 1,736,377 - - 245,292 - 5,380,005 Other Uses - 19,840 - - - - - - - - - - 19,840 Total All Funds 6,483,952 4,749,094 842,231 410,758 597,877 24,350 81,788 1,736,377 1,528,258 1,452,744 2,513,173 91,324 20,511,927 Expenditures ■ Cap6 by Type ■ Capital 1 0 E In ■ Rent & 3' ■ Repaii ■ CP ■ OF 10% is% ■ GM 1% W DS 10% f ® VA 1% ■ Debt i7/ ■ ED 3% 31% 33 ■ GF 29% emy ■ Payroll Salaries 12% (roll ated y Expenditures by Fund FY 2010/2011 BUDGET SUMMARY EXPENDITURES AND OTHER OPERATING USES Comparing the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures to FY 10/1 1 adopted expenditures • total Town expenses (all funding uses) are budgeted at $20,511,929 • a 26% increase of $4,177,079 • General Fund increase $2,249,412 o Transfer out to Capital Project Fund $2,085,000 • Property Tax Reduction Fund increased $1,100,866 o Transfer out to Capital Project Fund $1,205,000 Capital Projects Fund increased $1,237,244 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 ■ $374,200 Deloitte Trail Connection ■ $645,160 Fund Name Estimated Adopted %of total change percent General Fund 4,234,541 6,483,952 32% 2,249,412 53% Westlake Academy 4,463,029 4,749,096 23% 286,067 6% 46 Economic Development 942,106 842,231 4% (99,875) -11% Economic Development 285,758 410,758 2% 125,000 44% Visitors Association 786,611 597,877 3% (188,734) -24% FM1938 1,264 0 0% (1,264) -100% Cemetery 24,350 24,350 0% 0 0% Vehicle/Equipment 84,176 81,788 0% (2,388) -3% Property Tax Reduction 635,511 1,736,377 8% 1,100,866 173% Debt Service 1,499,750 1,528,258 7% 28,508 2% Capital Projects 215,500 1,452,744 7% 1,237,244 574% Arts & Sciences 522,258 0 0% (522,258) -100% Lone Star 0 0 0% 0 0% Utility Fund 2,609,495 2,513,173 12% (96,322) -4% Utility Major Maintenance 7,500 0 0% (7,500) -100% General Major Maintenance 23,000 91,324 0% 68,324 297% TOTAL $ 16,334,850 $ 20,511,929 $ 4,177,079 26% • General Fund increase $2,249,412 o Transfer out to Capital Project Fund $2,085,000 • Property Tax Reduction Fund increased $1,100,866 o Transfer out to Capital Project Fund $1,205,000 Capital Projects Fund increased $1,237,244 o Total Projects for FY2010/201 1 are $1,452,744) ■ $374,200 Deloitte Trail Connection ■ $645,160 FM 1938 Town Improvements ■ $ 50,800 Dove Road Reconstruction & Drainage ■ $ 25,000 Dove & Ottinger Road Intersection ■ $ 67,056 Mahotea Boone Reconstruction & Drainage ■ $ 50,800 Ottinger Road Reconstruction & Drainage ■ $100,000 Streets Survey ■ $139,728 Academy Dining Hall Improvements Largest expenditure types include: • Westlake Academy o 23% - Payroll and related - $3,410,634 • Town of Westlake 0 16% - Payroll and related - $2,487,424 o 20% - Services - $3,033,551 0 12% - Debt Service - $1,780,542 0 12% - Capital Projects - $1,792,988 34 FY2010/2011 Transfers In Detail by Account Account Object Description Amount 7949 Transfer in from Town GF $ 79,432 52510 Transfer in from GF 2,120,758 52550 Transfer in from VA 180,944 52551 Payroll Transfer in from VA 174,971 52560 Transfer in from 4B 842,231 52560 Transfer in from OF 18,000 52561 Payroll Transfer in from OF 227,292 52600 Transfer in from PTR 1,736,377 Totals $ 5,380,005 600 GMM Fund 600 41,274 Totals $ 5,380,005 ■ ED Fund 210 1% ■ WA Fund 199 1% ■ General Fund 8% ■ GMM Fur 1% ■ V&E Fund 257 not ■ DS Fund 300 35 ind 410 61% Detail by Fund Fund No Description Amount 100 General Fund 100 $ 420,263 199 WA Fund 199 79,432 210 ED Fund 210 35,758 257 V&E Fund 257 10,000 300 DS Fund 300 1,503,278 410 CP Fund 410 3,290,000 600 GMM Fund 600 41,274 Totals $ 5,380,005 ■ ED Fund 210 1% ■ WA Fund 199 1% ■ General Fund 8% ■ GMM Fur 1% ■ V&E Fund 257 not ■ DS Fund 300 35 ind 410 61% FY2O1O/2011 Transfers Out Detail by Account Account Object Description Amount 8911 Transfer Out to A&S $ 79,432 62510 Transfer Out to GF 18,000 62511 Payroll Transfer Out to GF 402,263 62535 Transfer Out to ED 35,758 62580 Transfer Out to DS 1,503,278 62590 Transfer Out to CP 3,290,000 62600 Transfer Out to GMM 41,274 62601 Transfer Out to V&E 10,000 Totals $ 5,380,005 Detail by Fund Fund No Description Amount 100 General Fund 100 $ 2,120,758 199 WA Fund 199 79,432 200 4B Fund 200 842,231 220 VA Fund 220 355,915 260 PTR Fund 260 1,736,377 500 OF Fund 500 245,292 Totals $ 5,380,005 ■ VA Fund 7% ■ 4B Fund 200 16% ■ PTR Fund 260 36 Fund 500 5% !neral Fund 100 39% Kecoras ano Marshal Part Time Clerk Revenue Clerk 37 Position Summary FY 2010/2011 1.00 1.00 1.00 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 0.00 0.25 Actual Actual Actual Actual Actual Estimated Adopted 0.50 0.25 0.50 Part -Time Intern (2) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Position Town Manager Assistant to Town Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.00 0.00 Town Manager Assistant to Town Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.00 0.00 Part -Time Intern (1) 0.50 0.50 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.25 0.50 Part -Time Intern (2) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.00 Planning & Development Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.33 0.00 0.00 Administrative Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.33 0.33 Town Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Fire/EMS Coordinator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Fire Chief 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Lt. Firemen/Paramedics 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Firemen/Paramedics 7.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 6.00 Court Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Clerk (1) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Clerk (2) 0.75 0.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Judge 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Marshal 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Warrant Officer 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.50 Public Works Superintendent 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Utility & Building Technician 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Facilities/Grounds Maintenance 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Utility & Building Technician 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.33 0.00 0.00 Administrative Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.17 0.17 Finance Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Finance Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Records & Revenue Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Parks & Recreation 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Utility & Building Technician 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Administrative Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.17 0.17 Human Resources 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.33 0.00 0.00 Administrative Clerk 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.33 0.33 Marketing & Public Affairs 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Acdemy Employees 25.15 32.40 36.40 43.00 48.10 55.62 59.45 Total 50.40 58.65 61.40 70.00 76.10 82.62 86.45 38 FY 2010/2011 BUDGET SUMMARY PERSONNEL SUMMARY Overall staffing for the Town in FY 10/1 1 is proposed to remain the same. Dept # Department Name Total Percent 11 Administrative 2.50 3% 12 Planning & Development 1.33 2% 13 Town Secretary 1.00 1 14 Emergency Services 9.00 10% 15 Municipal Court 5.50 6% 16 Public Works 1.50 2% 17 Facilities Maintenance 0.92 1 18 Finance Dept 3.00 3% 19 Park & Recreation 0.92 1% 21 Human Resources 1.33 2% Westlake Academy 59.45 69% Total Employees 86.45 10070 ■ Westlake Academy 59.45 69% ■ Administrative ■ Planning & ■ Town Secretary 2.50 Development 1.00 'Aoi 1.33 poi 39 rvices lunicipal Court 5.50 6% ■ Public Works 1.50 2% icilities Maintenance 0.92 1% Finance Dept 3.00 3% -k & Recreation 0.92 1% asources 1.33 2% SECTION 02 eneral Fund The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org General Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted EstimatedAdopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 2,771,739 2,675,312 2,675,312 3,400,015 General Sales Tax 1,832,205 1,452,600 1,574,000 1,250,000 Property Tax - - - 1,000,430 Hotel Tax - - - - Charges for Services - - - - Contributions 38,840 100,000 100,000 0 Beverage Tax 17,869 17,750 17,750 17,750 Franchise Fees 624,400 646,675 609,500 609,500 Permits & Fees 848,698 505,220 1,877,165 367,455 Fines & Forfeitures 523,515 547,460 578,860 550,960 Investment Earnings 21,155 11,200 14,375 8,465 Misc Income 98,241 106,936 97,594 83,867 Total Revenues 4,004,923 3,387,841 4,869,244 3,888,427 Transfers In - Other 311,321 418,000 90,000 18,000 Transfers In - VA Payroll - - - 174,971 Transfers In - OF Payroll Total Other Sources TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCESMM161 311,321 4,316,244 - 418,000 3,805,84 - 90,000 227,292 420,263 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 2,771,739 2,675,312 2,675,312 3,400,015 Payroll / Salaries 1,568,563 1,522,512 1,526,151 1,886,448 Payroll Related & Benefits 443,532 441,219 448,673 600,976 Supplies 121,776 177,403 177,004 136,346 Services 1,301,981 1,431,648 1,449,324 1,358,178 Insurance 26,725 28,052 26,023 26,658 Repair & Maintenance 181,505 236,342 226,554 102,979 Rent & Utilities 239,096 248,261 251,610 251,610 Capital Outlay 21,169 8,581 8,411 - Economic Development Incentives 229,907 488,327 - - Total Expenditures 4,134,254 4,582,344 4,113,749 4,363,194 Transfers Out 278,417 8,050 120,791 2,120,758 Total Other Uses 278,417 8,050 120,791 2,120,758 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 4,412,671 4,SIMMWlIMW 4,234,540 6,483,952 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 (96,427) (784,553) dh 724,704 (2,175,262) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 2,771,739 2,675,312 2,675,312 3,400,015 FUND BALANCE, ENDINGAM 2,675,312 1,890,758 11111102,400,015 64,136 1,224,753 Restricted/Designated Funds 193,104 194,540 194,540 197,800 UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 2,482,207 1,696,218 3,205,475 1,026,953 # Days Operating 230 150 284 95 Restricted/Designated Funds Court Technology 10136 64,136 65,000 65,000 66,000 Court Security 10137 87,451 88,000 88,000 89,000 Court Efficiency 10138 2,678 2,700 2,700 2,800 Reforestation Tree Escrow 101 10139 15,540 15,540 15,540 16,000 Street Escrow 102 10139 23,300 23,300 23,300 24,000 TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS 193,104 94,540 194,540 197,800 Cy FUND OVERVIEW GENERAL FUND Revenues and Transfers In REVENUES FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Proposed % of to change percent Sales Tax 1,574,000 1,250,000 29.0% (324,000) -21% Property Tax - 1,000,430 23.2% 1,000,430 100% Contributions 100,000 - 0.0% (100,000) -100% Beverage Tax 17,750 17,750 0.4% 0% Franchise Fees 609,500 609,500 14.1% 0% Permits & Fees 1,877,165 367,455 8.5% (1,509,710) -80% Fines & Forfeits 578,860 550,960 12.8% (27,900) -5% Interest 14,375 8,465 0.2% (5,910) -41% Misc Income 97,594 83,867 1.9% (13,727) -14% Transfers In 90,000 420,263 9.8% 330,263 367% TOTAL 4,959,244 4,308,690 (650,554) -13% ■ ■ Property Tax, 23.2% ■ Franchise Fees, 14.10 29.0% EN s & Fees, 8.5% ■ Fines & Forfeits, 12.8% ■ Interest, 0.2% 0 Misc Income, 1.9% 'ansfers In, 9.8% i Total General Fund revenues and Transfers In for FY 10/11 are projected to be $4,308,690 • A 13% decrease of $650,554 from the FY 09/10 estimated revenues of $4,959,244 • Decrease is due in large part to the one-time building/permit fees from Deloitte Property Tax • Property tax receipts comprise 23% of General Fund revenues. • FY 2010/2011 will be the first year the Town of Westlake has i mposed an ad valorem property tax. General Sales Tax • Sales taxes are collected on the sale of goods and services within the Town as authorized by the State of Texas. • The maximum sales tax allowed in the State of Texas is 8.25% per dollar on all taxable goods and services. Funds are collected by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and remitted to the Town on a monthly basis. • An amount e qual to 1 % of th e taxable sales (50% of local c ollections) is ap propriated t o th e Town's General Fund. • The To wn also receives an addi tional 1 % sa les to x th at is e qually divided b etween th e 4 B Economic Development Corporation Fund and the Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax Fund. Sales Tax Analysis $3.75 $3.50 $3.25 $3.00 $2.75 $2.50 m $2.25 o $2.00 $1.75 — $1.50 $1.25 $1.00 $0.75 $0.50 $0.25 $0.00 to n 00 0) O c -I N M V Ln W n 00 0) O ci 0) 0) 0) 0) O O O O O O O O O O 01 Oi of o) O O O O O O O O O O O O rl c -I c -I .ti N N N N N N N N N N N N > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL ■ Base Sales Tax Economic Development Agreements ■ Audit Payments ■ Presumed One-time Payments • Sales tax receipts comprise 21% of General Fund revenues. • Sales taxes are budgeted to decrease by $324,000. (Approximately $800K of presumed one- time sales tax was received in FY 09/10) • On-going sales tax is anticipated to be flat. • A one-time economic development agreement sales tax revenue in the amount of $750,000 is projected to be received during FY 10/11. 50% of this will be returned per the agreement. Beverage Tax • The Town collects a 14% gross receipt tax on mixed beverages. • Of this percentage, 10.7% of gross liquor receipts are remitted to the Town, and the remaining 3.3% is retained by the State of Texas. 43 FUND OVERVIEW • No increase of Alcoholic beverage tax revenue is anticipated. Franchise Taxes • Franchise taxes represent revenues collected from utilities operating within the Town that use the Town rights-of-way to conduct their business. • A flat rate is charged to both telephone operators (adjusted annually) and Tri -County Electric based on the number of access lines and services rendered, respectively. • These fees are anticipated to remain flat for FY 10/11. Court Revenue • The revenue generated from the Municipal Court is based on citations and warrants issued. • The Keller Police Department will continue to perform its contractual patrol of Westlake roads in FY 10/11. • Adopted court revenues for FY 10/1 1 are $550,960. • These revenues show a decrease of 5% for a total of $27,900 Licenses & Permits • License an d pe rmit revenues incl ude fees charged by the Town for cert ain types of operator licenses, as well as permits for construction and other items regulated by Town ordinances. • Total licenses & permits are anticipated to decrease by 80% for a total of $1,509,710 • The major portion of this change is due to the receipt of the Deloitte building permits/fees in FY 09/10. No major permits/fees are anticipated for FY 10/11. Miscellaneous Revenue • Miscellaneous rev enue i ncludes the sale of pr inted materials, i nterest earned, and par ks & recreation fees. • Revenues will decrease by 14% for a total of $13,727 Transfers In • Transfers In represents those funds transferred from one fund to another. These transfers may be utilized as a means to fund projects or debt service from multiple sources. Transfers In may also be used to transfer funds collected by one fund and should be properly recorded in a different fund. • Adopted transfers in for FY 10/1 1 are $420,263 o This is an increase of $330,263 over the FY 09/10 estimated $90,000 Transfer in from the Utility fund are $18,000 o This is for co Ilection of Fo rt Worth Impact Fees, w hich a re collected w ith in itial water deposits and tap fees on new water meters. o These funds are collected by the Utility Fund and transferred to the General Fund as a result of an agreement with the City of Fort Worth. o When the transferred total reaches $2,000,000 (remaining balance is $1.6M) these funds will be paid to the City of Fort Worth in compliance with the wholesale water customer agreement. All payroll and relat ed expenditures f or the Town are p aid v is t he Gene ral Fu nd. Portions of these expenditures are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitor Fund. o Transfers in from the Utility Fund are $227,292. ■ Administration ■ Public Works ■ Finance ■ Human Resources 44 FIND OVERVIEW o Transfers in from the Visitor Fund are $174,971 ■ Administration ■ Facilities Maintenance ■ Finance ■ Parks & Recreation ■ Human Resources Expenditures and Transfers Outs TOTAL 4,234,540 6,483,952 2,249,412 53% IN Rent & ■ Repair & Utilities, Maintenanc3.9% 1.6% P r ■ Insurance, 0.4%/ 0 Transfers Out, 32.7% ■ Services, 20.8% ■ Supplies, 2.1% ■ Payroll Taxes & Benefits, 9% ■ Payroll/ Salaries, 29.1% 45 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Expenditures Estimated Proposed %ofttl change percent Payroll/Salaries 1,526,151 1,886,448 29.1% 360,297 24% Payroll Taxes & Benefits 448,673 600,976 9.3% 152,303 34% Supplies 177,004 136,346 2.1% (40,658) -23% Services 1,449,324 1,358,178 20.9% (91,147) -6% Insurance 26,023 26,658 0.4% 635 2% Repair & Maintenance 226,554 102,979 1.6% (123,575) -55% Rent & Utilities 251,610 251,610 3.9% - 0% Capital Outlay 8,411 - 0.0% (8,411) -100% Transfers Out 120,791 2,120,758 32.7% 1,999,968 1656% TOTAL 4,234,540 6,483,952 2,249,412 53% IN Rent & ■ Repair & Utilities, Maintenanc3.9% 1.6% P r ■ Insurance, 0.4%/ 0 Transfers Out, 32.7% ■ Services, 20.8% ■ Supplies, 2.1% ■ Payroll Taxes & Benefits, 9% ■ Payroll/ Salaries, 29.1% 45 FUND OVERVIEW • Total General Fund expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $6,483,952 o A 53% increase of $2,249,412 from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures of $4,234,540 o The above increase is d ue to all payroll expenditures being paid out of the General Fund with a transfer in from the Utility Fund and the Visitors Association fund of $402,263. o When taking the transfers into consideration, the expenditures have decreased by 3.7% As in rece nt ye ars, Town st aff co ntinues to op erate co nservatively by controlling costs w hile maintaining the highest possible levels of service. o These goals are only possible through continued strategic planning and the innovative use of available resources. o Our overall bu dget phi losophy continues to focu s on meeting stated goals and objectives and maintaining a 90 day fund balance. Payroll/Salaries and Related Taxes/Benefits • Comprise 38% of expenditures with a total of $2,487,424 • This is a 26% increase of $512,600 from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures $1,974,824 • All payroll and related expenditures for the Town are paid via the General Fund. • Portions of these expenditures ($402,263) are subsidized by the Utility Fund and the Visitor Fund. o Transfers in from the Utility Fund are $227,292. ■ Administration ■ Public Works • Finance • Human Resources o Transfers in from the Visitor Fund are $174,971 ■ Administration ■ Facilities Maintenance ■ Finance ■ Parks & Recreation ■ Human Resources Supplies/Services/Repair and Maintenance/Insurance/Rent & Utilities • Comprise 28% of expenditures with a total of $1,875,770 • This is a 12% decrease of $(254,744) from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures o A total of $243,213 was transferred from the Town's Facility Maintenance department to the Academy's budget related to maintenance on the Academy's facilities. Capital Outlay • Capital Outlay has no adopted expenditures for FYI 0/11. FY 09/10 estimated expenditures were $ 8,411 In the past this account has reflected auto payments for the marshal vehicle. • The final payment was made in FY09/10. Transfers Out • Comprise 33% of expenditures with a total of $2,120,758 • Transfer out $35,758 to Economic Development Fund • Transfer out $2,085,000 to Capital Projects Fund. 46 FUND OVERVIEW Fund Balance The audited fund balance of the General Fund as of October 1, 2009 was $2,675,312. FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 FUND BALANCE Adooted Estimated chanee Mooted Total Receipts 3,387,841 4,869,244 1,481,403 3,888,427 Total Transfers In 418,000 90,000 (328,000) 420,263 Total Deductions 4,582,344 4,113,749 (468,595) 4,363,194 Total Transfers Out 8,050 120,791 112,741 2,120,758 Net (784,553) 724,704 1,509,257 (2,175,262) Beginning Fund Balance 2,675,312 2,675,312 - 3,400,015 Ending Fund Balance 1,890,758 3,400,015 1,224,753 Designated funds 194,540 194,540 - 197,800 Undesignated Fund Balance 1,696,218 3,205,475 1,509,257 1,026,953 Operating Days 150 284 95 FY 09/10 Adopted Budget o Projected an excess of expenditures and other financing uses over revenues and other financing sources by $(784,553). o This would have resulted in a budgeted ending fund balance of $1,890,758. FY 09/10 Estimated Budget o Projects an excess of revenue and other financing sources over expenditures and other financing uses of $724,704 o This represents an increase of $1,509,257 from the adopted budget o This increase is primarily due to the receipt of permits/fees for the Deloitte project in FY 09/10 that were originally budgeted to be received in FY08/09. o The fund balance as of September 30, 2010 is estimated at $3,400,015 o The undesignated balance of $3,205,475 represents coverage for 284 operating days FY 10/11 Adopted Budget o Projects a n excess of expenditures a nd other financing uses over rev enues an d of her financing sources of $(2,175,262). o This would result in a budgeted ending fund balance of $1,224,753 o The undesignated balance of $1,026,953 represents coverage for 95 operating days 47 Key Result Areas Affected ® High Quality Standards Coupled with Financial Stewardship Program Description ® The General Service Program is comprised of costs in the budget that may not be specifically identifiable to any operational budget. The activity is administered by the Finance Department and funds various charges that are not defined or directly related to any specific department or activity of the Town. • Examples of cost include, electricity, insurance, professional services, contingencies, etc. These types of expenditures affect all budgets and are generally not prorated. Trends ® Newly created Department. 48 General Fund FY 2010/2011 10 General Services Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Total - - penditures Payroll Payroll Related Supplies - 17,390 Services - 160,179 Insurance - 21,765 Maintenance - - Rent & Utilities - 154,518 E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - - - - 353,852 49 General Services Department 10 PROGRAM BUDGET Department Director: 1 Thomas Brymer Department Phone: 817-490-5720 Program Activity Budget Percent Municioal Governance 1 Legislative Affairs 15,6341 4.42% 2 Policy Development, Council Meetings and Workshops 17,246 4.87% 3 Council Governance Training and Education 15,634 4.42% $ 48,514 13.71% Academic Governance Com prenensive manning 1 I Legislative & Authorizing Agency Affairs 5,6161 1.59% 1 2 Policy Development, Board Meetings and Workshops 7,228 2.04% 15,846 3 Board Governance Training and Education 5,616 1.59% $ 18,460 5.22% Com prenensive manning ana tconomic ueveio mens 5,841 1 1 Development Recruiting and Assistance 15,846 4.48% 2 Comprehensive Planning 25,184 7.12% 3 Development Oversight and Regulation 13,134 3.71% 4 Development Agreement Oversight 13,134 3.71% Professional Development $ 67,297 19.02% Financial Mur 1 Managing and Budgeting for Outcomes 5,6161 1.59% 2 Oversight of Five -Year Financial Forecast 5,616 1.59% 3 Review and Planning for Financial Sustainability 5,616 1.59% $ 16,8481 4.76% icipal Administration Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 5,841 1 Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 40,069 11.32% 2 Contract Management 17,834 5.04% 3 Agenda Preparation and Calendar Maintenance 15,634 4.42% 4 Strategic Plan Development and Implementation 15,634 4.42% 5 Professional Development 17,384 4.91% 6 Direction of Leadership Teaml 15,6341 4.42% 7 Affiliate Board Liaison and Support 15,634 4.42% 11.17% $ 37,8211 38.95% Academic Administration 1 Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 5,841 1.65% 2 Financial Management and Budget Preparation 5,616 1.59% 3 Agenda Preparation and Calendar Maintenance 5,616 1.59% 4 Strategic Plan Development and Implementation 5,616 1.59% 5 Organizational Development 5,616 1.59% 6 Parent and Student Communication 5,6161 1.59% 7 Affiliate Board Liaison and Supportl 5,6161 1.59% $ 39,536 11.17% Citizen Engaeement and Communication 1 Communication 5,691 1.61% 2 Neighborhood Gatherings and Outreach 8,453 2.39% 3 Community Activities 5,616 1.59% 4 Direction Finders and Other Surveys 5,616 1.59% $ 25,376 7.17% $ 353,852 1 100% 50 Department I I - Administration Key Result Areas Affected ® Comprehensive Planning ® Quality Development ® Aesthetic Standards ® High Quality Standards Coupled with Financial Stewardship ® Infrastructure Maintenance and Planning • Citizen Engagement ® Premier Education Facilities and Programs Program Description The Administration Department coordinates and manages all facets of the Town's operations. ® The Town Manager, reporting to the Town Council, serves as the chief executive officer for all Town operations including serving as Superintendent for Westlake Academy. His duties include implementation of the goals and objectives established by the Town Council, preparation and submission of an annual municipal budget for Board review and adoption, as well as the implementation and oversight of the adopted budget throughout its effective fiscal year. ® The Town Manager guides, coordinates, and facilitates recommendations to the Council on strategic planning initiatives and policies as well as their implementation. ® Responsible for attracting, retaining, and developing a municipal/educational work force for delivering top quality municipal and Academy services. Trends ® Residential growth remains slow. ® Commercial growth has continued with occupancy of the 600,000 sq. ft. Fidelity Phase II project and construction progressing on the $300 million plus Deloitte University project. However, other commercial development, including retail, has not occurred. ® The Town's on-going sales tax sources remain in decline and are continued to be projected based on this trend for both the near and long term. ® Proportionate spending on Town operations and maintenance remains consistent. However, financial resources necessary to properly maintain the Town's basic infrastructure as it ages and receives usage remains inadequate. ® Adequate funding for increasing capital project needs continues to present challenges. ® Based upon current forecasts, within two (2) fiscal years the Town's on-going revenue streams will not sustain provisions for current levels of service in their present delivery configuration. Program Broad Goals ® Assure all growth is compliant with Westlake development standards. Maintain and develop a competent and competitive municipal/Academy work force. ® Analyze and report new revenue generating ventures as well as analyze and report new ways to partner with public and private sector service providers to control cost and improve services. • Monitor the municipal and Academy budget and oversee all finances of the Town so as to apprise Town Council of the Town's financial condition and future needs in a timely manner. • Assist the Board of Trustees/Town Council with the growth and development of Westlake Academy. 51 Department I I - Administration ® Provide support for Council appointed advisory committees and commissions. • The Town Manager's Office participates in the following specific programs of service: o Municipal governance o Academic governance o Comprehensive Planning and Economic Development o Financial Development o Municipal Administration o Academic Administration o Citizen Engagement and Communication 2010 Highlights ® Ground breaking ceremony officially began the construction of the $300 million Deloitte University campus and work is progressing on -schedule. ® Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center- This $5.1 million facility was completed on time, within budget and opened for its first year of operation for the 2009-10 school year. This facility has provided much needed science laboratory/class room space for Westlake Academy students. ® FM 1938 (Precinct Line Rd) Phase I- Construction of this $15.2 million dollar TxDOT project finally began after many years of planning. • The Town Council, in partnership with Town Staff, has implemented a holistic approach for governing the Town called "Governing for Outcomes" which integrates strategic planning, budgeting, financial forecasting, a five (5) year capital improvements plan, outcome based performance measures and performance evaluations, as well as the Town's second DirectionFinder (citizens') Survey, initially conducted in FY 09-10. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Continue oversight and progress of the update process for all components of the Town's comprehensive plan. ® Continue intergration of the Municipal and Academy operations into a cohesive, unified organization. ® Strengthen Academy management and internal support systems. ® Monitor and facilitate the Town's approved strategic plan while implementing the complementary Academy strategic plan linked to outcome measures. ® Continue striving for constant improvement of citizen outreach and communication. ® Advancement of the development process of a programmatic budget tied to strategic plan, vision, mission, values and key result areas, as well as improve the capital improvement budgeting process. ® Revamp the organization's compensation and performance evaluation system. 52 Depa nt I I - ,Administration Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods • On-going comprehensive planning o Update master plans to guide development and provide a framework for future projects; promote the Master Plan as a community focal point o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Eddie Edwards • Highest quality development and aesthetic standards o Support our newest corporate partners, Deloitte and Fidelity, with Deloitte University and the completion of Fidelity Phase II o Team Leader: Ginger Awtry o Work to attract nationwide, well known anchor and retail businesses o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Eddie Edwards 53 Objective Actual Actual Projected Adopted Provide same day response to all FY07/08 FY08/09 90% FY9/10 90% FYI 0/11 1 100% 90� citizens' calls for services 100% 2 Produce monthly update for 100% 100% 100% Town Council 3' Complete program of services within 100 100% 100% 100% adopted or amended budget 4 Maintain annual 90 day balance in 328 days 230 days 284 days 177 days General Fund 6 % of Performance Evaluations 100% 100% 75% 75% administered on time Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods • On-going comprehensive planning o Update master plans to guide development and provide a framework for future projects; promote the Master Plan as a community focal point o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Eddie Edwards • Highest quality development and aesthetic standards o Support our newest corporate partners, Deloitte and Fidelity, with Deloitte University and the completion of Fidelity Phase II o Team Leader: Ginger Awtry o Work to attract nationwide, well known anchor and retail businesses o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Eddie Edwards 53 Department I I - Administration Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders High quality services coupled with financial stewardship o Establish a strategy for achieving long-term financial sustainability for the Town government, including Westlake Academy o Team Leader: Tom Brymer o Review and discuss growth related policies o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Todd Wood / Debbie Piper o Explore public safety service delivery options and funding o Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / DPS Lieutenants o Enhance the effectiveness of service delivery via intergovernmental partnerships o Team Leader: Tom Brymer Vision Point Three — Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Historic preservation o Integrate the mission of the Westlake Historical Preservation Society (WHPS) into community events o Team Leader: Ginger Awtry Tourism development o Host regional events to attract individuals to our restaurants, hotel and businesses o Team Leader: Ginger Awtry ® Arts and culture o Implement a Westlake speaker series featuring community leaders o Team Leader: Ginger Awtry 54 General Fund FY 2010/2011 11 Administrative Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Town Manager 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part Time Clerk - - 0.25 0.25 Part Time Intern 1 0.25 0.25 0.25 Part Time Intern 2 Total - 0.25 2.00 1 .50 penditures Payroll 170,944 169,912 173,602 246,344 Payroll Related 44,082 45,786 48,265 80,425 Supplies 23,806 24,640 23,930 4,225 Services 180,455 198,272 201,488 37,143 Insurance 21,441 22,513 21,131 - Maintenance - - - Rent & Utilities 156,282 152,264 154,548 E/D Incentives 229,907 488,327 - Capital Outlay - - ayroll Related 22% i 55 Administrative Department 11 PROGRAM BUDGET Department Director: 1 Thomas Brymer Department Phone: 817-490-5720 Program Activity Budget Percent Munici al Governance 1 Legislative Affairs 3,711 1.01% 2 Policy Development, Council Meetings and Workshops 6,979 1.90% 3 Council Governance Training and Education 6,979 1.90% $ 17,668 4.80% Academic Governance Com prenensive manning 1 I Legislative & Authorizing Agency Affairs 3,7111 1.01% 1 2 Policy Development, Board Meetings and Workshops 6,979 1.90% 3,711 3 Board Governance Training and Education 6,979 1.90% $ 17,668 4.80% Com prenensive manning ana tconomic ueveio mens 16,782 1 1 Development Recruiting and Assistance 3,711 1.01% 2 Comprehensive Planning 6,979 1.90% 3 Development Oversight and Regulation 6,979 1.90% 4 Development Agreement Oversight 443 0.12% Professional Development $ 18,112 4.92% Financial Mur 1 Managing and Budgeting for Outcomes 22,2281 6.04% 2 Oversight of Five -Year Financial Forecast 22,228 6.04% 3 Review and Planning for Financial Sustainability 22,228 6.04% $ 66,6841 18.11% icipal Administration Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 16,782 1 Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 6,979 1.90% 2 Contract Management 6,979 1.90% 3 Agenda Preparation and Calendar Maintenance 16,782 4.56% 4 Strategic Plan Development and Implementation 16,782 4.56% 5 Professional Development 34,604 9.40% 6 Direction of Leadership Teaml 6,9791 1.90% 7 Affiliate Board Liaison and Support 6,9791 1.90% 36.35% $ 96,082 26.10% Academic Administration 1 Departmental Coordination and Employee Management 16,782 4.56% 2 Financial Management and Budget Preparation 33,120 9.00% 3 Agenda Preparation and Calendar Maintenance 16,782 4.56% 4 Strategic Plan Development and Implementation 33,120 9.00% 5 Organizational Development 16,782 4.56% 6 Parent and Student Communication 13,5141 3.67% 7 Affiliate Board Liaison and Support 3,7111 1.01% $ 133,811 36.35% Citizen Engaeement and Communication 1 Communication 6,979 1.90% 2 Neighborhood Gatherings and Outreach 3,711 1.01% 3 Community Activities 3,711 1.01% 4 Direction Finders and Other Surveys 3,711 1.01% $ 18,112 4.92% $ 368,137 100% 56 Department 12 - Planning and Zoning Key Result Areas Affected ® Comprehensive Planning ® Neighborhood Integrity • Community Appearance • Quality Development • Aesthetic Standards Program Description *The Planning and Development Department is responsible for processing platting and zoning requests and insuring that proposed development will conform to the Town of Westlake's comprehensive plans. • This also requires the continuous updating and amending of ordinances to address ever-changing development concerns. • The Building and Code Compliance Division is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Town's adopted building codes and ordinances to assure that development is executed and maintained in compliance with ordinances and approved development plans. Trends ® Percentage of expenditures in comparison to revenues generated Actual Actual Actual Estimated Adopted FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Revenue $ 637,640 $ 987,392 $2,435,705 $1,667697 $250,355 Expenditure $ 161,655 $ 108,213 $222,102 $156150 $159,385 % Comparison 25% 11% 9% 9% 64% New Home Permits by Year FY 10/11 Projected 10 FY 09/10 Estimated 10 FY 08/09 actual 6 FY 07/08 actual 15 FY 06/07 actual 1 22 FY 05/06 actual 37 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 57 Department 12 - Planning and Zoning Program Broad Goals ® Prepare ordinances to amend existing ordinances as necessary to efficiently and logically guide development within the Town of Westlake. * Provide the administrative, technical, and clerical services necessary to professionally regulate the codes and ordinances related to the construction and use of Commercial and Residential structures and properties within the community. ® Insure code and ordinance compliance through effective communication, accurate records management, and by taking appropriate action when necessary to obtain compliance. 2010 Highlights • Provided Maximum 10 day turn -around time for SFR plans review submittal to permit issued. • Completed the master filing system within the Building Department records system. • Processed all applications for platting, zoning, and site plans within prescribed deadlines. 2011 Goals and Objectives Prepare ordinances for adoption by the Town Council that will : • Update the comprehensive plans o Land Use o Master Thoroughfare o Open space / Trails Master plan o Water and Sewer Master plan o Streetscape / Landscape Master plan ® Update all departmental information on the town web site. ® Continue to update and revise the forms used for processing permits and tracking inspections. Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures 58 Actual Budget Projected Projected ' Adopted Objective % SFR plans reviewed and FY07/08 FY08/09 FY08/09 FY09/10 FYI 0/11 1. completed within 10 days of 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% submittal 100% 100% 95% 95% 90% 95% 95% 95% 95% 2 % Commercial plans reviewed within 30 days and log updated 3 % Building inspections responded 95% to same day 80% 85% 79% 36% 4 % Revenue generated over 80% department cost to operate 58 11111111111111k Milt 111 111 111 11�1111 Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods On-going comprehensive planning o Update master plans to guide development and provide a framework for future projects; promote the Master Plan as a community focal point Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Eddie Edwards ® Highest quality development and aesthetic standards o Finalize oil and gas drilling related ordinances Team Leader: Eddie Edwards o Work to attract nationwide, well known anchor and retail businesses Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer/Eddie Edwards 59 General Fund FY 2010/2011 12 Planning and Development Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part Time Clerk - 0.33 - - Administrative Clerk - - 0.33 0.33 Total 1.00 1.33 penditures Payroll 80,015 94,018 94,503 99,387 Payroll Related 26,155 30,528 30,663 33,600 Supplies 1,737 7,300 7,300 7,300 Services 28,901 45,995 47,145 47,145 Insurance 486 486 486 475 Maintenance - 500 500 500 Rent & Utilities - - - - E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - - 80 60 Planning and Development PROGRAM BUDGET Department 12 Department Director Eddie Edwards Department Phone 817-430-5726 Program Activity Budget Percent Buildine Inspections 1 Code Research, Interpretation, & Technical Clarification 8,099 4.30% 2 Code/Fee Schedule Update 8,099 4.30% 3 Permitting / Plan Review Coordination and Fee Calculation 8,099 4.30% 4 Coordinate Addressing with other Depts & Agencies 8,099 4.30% $ 32,396 17.19% Plan Review & Inspections 1 Building Code - Plan Review 11,199 5.94% 2 Building Code - Inspections 10,413 5.53% 3 Zoning/Code - Plan Review 8,199 4.35% 4 Zoning/Code- Inspections 8,399 4.46% $ 38,210 20.28% Gas Well Permit Administration 1 Administration of the Gas Well Provisionsl 8,1491 4.33% $ 8,1491 4.33% Code Enforcement 1 Notices and Citations 8,710 4.62% $ 8,7101 4.62% Fire Prevention 1 Coordinate Fire/Building Code Inspections & Plan Review 8,099 4.30% 2 Code Research, Interpretation & Technical Clarification 8,099 4.30% 3 Assist Fire Dept access to Buildings & Subdivisions 8,099 4.30% $ 24,297 12.90% Planning and Zoning [::=Process Zoning, SUP, Site Plan, ZBA & Platting Cases, etc. 9,249 4.91% 2 Comprehensive Plan Update 33,099 17.57% $ 42,348 22.48% Municipal Governance Town Council Meetings/Workshops Municipal Administration 1 I Contract Management 8,0991 4.30% 2 Support Services 18,099 9.61% $ 26,1981 13.91% $ 188,407 100% 61 ;► I Key Result Areas Affected ® High Quality Services ® Citizen Engagement ® Citizen Communication Program Description • Perform tasks outlined in the Texas TOWN OF WESTlL, A�� Municipal Law and Procedure for TO WN SECRETA,Ry General Law Type A Cities as well as TEXAS ST[Ij,� tasks related to the support of the Town ENT HOUSINC Council, Board of Trustees, Planning and Zoning Commission, the Zoning Board of Adjustments, and the Texas Student Housing Authority, and oversight of the Town's records management program. • The Town Secretary is also responsible for the coordination of the design and distribution of the Town's quarterly newsletter as well as communicating announcements and other topics of interest to the Community. Trends ® The trends of the duties and responsibilities of the Town Secretary indicate an increase in the number of activities/functions that impact the workload of this office. Town of Westlake ® The number of meetings has decreased this year due to the reduction of Council meetings to one per month and with less development, the Planning and Zoning Commission has not met as frequently. Time required on the following pre and post meeting activities are impacted by the number of meetings. The amount of time will fluctuate year to year based on the total number of meetings. ■ Agenda preparation, • paper packet preparation, • posting requirements, ■ distribution of meeting notifications, ■ preparation of minutes, ■ legal advertisements, ■ maintaining records associated with each meeting ■ facility preparation for meeting Total Number of Meetings and Postings 130 120 1 110 06 100 90 85 85 8i 8i 80 70 58 64 60 50 38 40 30 20 10 0 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual estimated proposed 0 Total Number of Meetings U Total Number of Postings 62 Texas Student Housing ® Number of scholarship applications has leveled off in the past two years. However, In order to effectively manage the duties associated with the scholarship issuance process, TSHA must Identify processes and tools for accurate data entry and tracking of scholarship offers, rejections, and acceptances. ® This office will continue to fine- tune the process by adding additional fields for data collection as directed by the Board of Directors during the next annual award cycle. • TSHA utilizes temporary clerical assistance to assist with the labor- intensive data entry process. ® TSHA has brought in temporary personnel to conduct a records inventory of records dating back to the inception of the program - 1995. Program Broad Goals ® A commitment to leadership that ensures quality public service based on honesty, dependability, integrity, consistency, respectfulness, and fairness. ® Maintain accurate records that are available to the public, Boards, and staff through a user-friendly records management program in compliance with state law and our own ordinances. ® Conduct elections accurately, efficiently, and in accordance with state law. ® Accept and process Texas Student Housing applications in a timely and effective manner. ® Prepare notifications of scholarship awards and record responses in a timely and effective manner. • Update/enhance the Records Management section of the Code of Ordinances. ® Maintain all permanent Town records in digital form. 2010 Highlights ® Concentrated on and enhanced communication efforts with residents through distribution of quarterly newsletter and e-mail notifications. ® Prepared agendas, agenda packets and minutes for approval in a timely manner. ® Completed Election Law Training. • Advertising Booth at the Best of Northwest Chamber event for both the Town and Academy ® Completed the publication for the NW Metroport Chamber's annual Membership & Community Directory. ® Negotiated Chamber benefits package to best fit the Town's needs. • Scanned all of the WA Resolutions (permanent documents). Those documents are stored on the shared drive for staff use. ® Scanning Ordinances and Resolutions (permanent documents). Those documents are stored on the shared drive for staff use. 63 Texas Student Housing Scholarship Applications 825 750 695 725 US 649 649 648 675 600 525 450 1192211 1187187 375 300 225 187187 195 150 11 75 0 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual estimated proposed ILII New Applications ■ Renewals V Awarded ® A commitment to leadership that ensures quality public service based on honesty, dependability, integrity, consistency, respectfulness, and fairness. ® Maintain accurate records that are available to the public, Boards, and staff through a user-friendly records management program in compliance with state law and our own ordinances. ® Conduct elections accurately, efficiently, and in accordance with state law. ® Accept and process Texas Student Housing applications in a timely and effective manner. ® Prepare notifications of scholarship awards and record responses in a timely and effective manner. • Update/enhance the Records Management section of the Code of Ordinances. ® Maintain all permanent Town records in digital form. 2010 Highlights ® Concentrated on and enhanced communication efforts with residents through distribution of quarterly newsletter and e-mail notifications. ® Prepared agendas, agenda packets and minutes for approval in a timely manner. ® Completed Election Law Training. • Advertising Booth at the Best of Northwest Chamber event for both the Town and Academy ® Completed the publication for the NW Metroport Chamber's annual Membership & Community Directory. ® Negotiated Chamber benefits package to best fit the Town's needs. • Scanned all of the WA Resolutions (permanent documents). Those documents are stored on the shared drive for staff use. ® Scanning Ordinances and Resolutions (permanent documents). Those documents are stored on the shared drive for staff use. 63 Department 13 - Town Secretary 2011 Goals and Objectives *Conduct Records Inventory for the Town's Secretary's Office and establish a records controls schedule for said records. ® Continue Records Inventory of Texas Student Housing Authority Records and identify records for destruction. ® Continue the scanning process and file reorganization of Ordinances and Resolution. • Continue to maintain the success of an effective communications program. • Continue to serve as the public relations liaison to the Town's public relations firm, serve as the Town's Chamber advisor and work effectively with the Town's employees and Westlake Academy liaison to continue to communicate vital information to all interested parties. ® Complete a THSA and Town record destruction. • Attend TMCA Election Law Update - January 2011 (required for State recertification). ® Attend TMCA Graduate Institute - October 2010 (required for State recertification). Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders ® Infrastructure maintenance and planning o Work with transportation representatives to include Westlake in regional rail system Team Leader: Kelly Edwards Vision Point Three — Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake ® Citizen engagement and communication o Develop overall communication plan for the residents and businesses Team Leader: Kelly Edwards • Tourism development o Develop and assist the PR/marketing team, working with the Town's PR consultant group to promote Westlake as a business and tourist destination Team Leader: Kelly Edwards 64 Objective Actual Actual Estimated Adopted Post all Board meeting agendas to FY 07/08 New FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FYI 0/11 1. website at least 72 -hours prior to the 100% 100% 100% meeting date and time. Complete Minutes of regularly measure New 2. scheduled meetings and workshops 100% 100% 100% within five (5) business days. measure 3 Respond to all open records request New 100% 100% 100% with 10 business days. measure Assemble and distribute Board New 4. Packets for regular meetings five (5) 90% 95% 95% days prior to meeting date. measure Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders ® Infrastructure maintenance and planning o Work with transportation representatives to include Westlake in regional rail system Team Leader: Kelly Edwards Vision Point Three — Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake ® Citizen engagement and communication o Develop overall communication plan for the residents and businesses Team Leader: Kelly Edwards • Tourism development o Develop and assist the PR/marketing team, working with the Town's PR consultant group to promote Westlake as a business and tourist destination Team Leader: Kelly Edwards 64 General Fund FY 2010/2011 13 Town Secretary Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Town Secretary 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Total M1.00 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 penditures Payroll 81,932 74,445 73,495 76,864 Payroll Related 17,994 17,231 17,840 20,092 Supplies 2,987 3,418 2,643 2,643 Services 20,013 22,552 22,863 23,302 Insurance - - - - Maintenance - Rent & Utilities - - E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - 122: - 65 Town Secretary Department 13 PROGRAM BUDGET Department Director: Kelly Edwards Department Phone: 817-490-5710 Program Activity Budget Percent Municipal Governance 1 Agenda and Packet Preparation 16,901 13.75% 2 Minute Preparation 5,089 4.14% 3 Board Appointments 2,758 2.24% $ 24,748 20.14% Academic Governance 1 I Agenda and Packet Preparation 14,797 12.04% 2 Minutes Preparation 4,607 3.75% $ 19,404 15.79% Election Administration 1 Elections 16,312 13.27% $ 16,3121 13.27% Records Management 1 Town Records Management 9,5241 7.75% 2 Codification 10,735 1 8.73% 3 Public Information Request 6,268 5.10% $ 26,5261 21.58% Municipal Administration 66 1 Support Services 5,9571 4.85% 2 Marketing/Communications/Public Relations 1,962 1.60% Texas Student Housing $ 7,9191 6.44% 1 Support Services 27,990 22.77% $ $ 27,990 122,901 22.77% 100% 66 Department 14 - Emergency Services Key Result Areas Affected • Citizen and Corporate Communication ® High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship * Quality Development Program Description ® The Fire/EMS Department provides the public safety needs of the Town via a variety of programs and services. lullilm *The majority of these services are Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) related but also includes fire LWESTLAKE prevention and public education. ® Many civic organizations also benefit from these types TEXAS of services. Business organizations have benefited through the training activities and inspection/prevention programs that the Department provides. • The Department will continue to provide the most efficient method of delivering the traditional services - Fire Protection, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Inspections and Public Education while continuing to seek further avenues of outreach into the community. Trends *The level of activity can be categorized into four main areas: Emergency Operations, Training, Routine Activities and Public Orientated Activities. Emergency Operation trends showed a slight decrease in total calls. This is attributed to the decrease in employees at some of the local corporate office complexes, since most medical calls are generated from these locations. False alarm calls have been reduced due to cooperative efforts between the fire department and businesses. • Personnel continue to take advantage of joint training exercises and contracts which reduces cost and increases familiarity with personnel and equipment of our mutual aid agencies. ® Specialized training targets firefighter development that enhances our current services through state certification levels. • Ongoing efforts to increase public involvement through public education, relations and services. ® Daily activities and work details are the most time consuming activities due to their nature. These activities are necessary to maintain the proper condition and operation of the equipment. 67 1 at i ,74 a*� t 11 The illustration below demonstrates man hours for the previous year for activity trends. Emergency Operations Fire Training EMS Training Haz-Mat Training Public Relations Public Education Public Service Work Details Daily Activities Career Development Man Hours for Activity Trends 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 i36 Program Broad Goals • Provide safe, efficient, and professional emergency services to the Town. • Broaden the foundation of the department to initiate superior programs to interact with the citizens. • Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) accreditation through the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE). ® Organize the Department using the CFAI model. ® Continue efforts in professional development for personnel. • Improve prevention and public education programs by providing a variety of all hazard safety and prevention classes for residents and corporate offices. • Continue the advancement of prevention and inspection programs. • Increase efforts to build networks with the corporate businesses. 2010 Highlights * Department personnel completed the following state certification programs: Fire Inspector, Hazardous Materials Technician. ® Conducted numerous CPR classes and trained individuals in the use of automatic external defibrillators (AED). * Implemented a Home Hazard Awareness Program 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Continue monitoring the revenue enhancement streams to fund public safety needs and activities. ® Continue training the public in the use of CPR and AEDs (Automatic External Defibrillators). ® Conduct a CFAI Self -Assessment of the organization. ® Conduct a Community Risk Analysis. • Develop a Standard's of Cover (SOC). • Develop a Strategic Plan. ® Continue NIMS (National Incident Management System) training for public officials and staff. ® Continue performing emergency drills for local business as they relate to fire and severe weather. ® Continue training for all personnel in all disciplines of certification and career development. 68 Department 14 - Emergency Services • Enhance our public education and prevention programs within Westlake Academy. Target subjects include home safety principles, health and medical awareness programs such as the use of alcohol and tobacco by school age children, weather related safety programs, CPR and AED training, baby sitting safety tips, and general operational and maintenance of home sprinkler systems. ® Place in service a grass/fire attack apparatus that will utilize the CAFS unit received from a FEMA grant and will be capable of fighting grass/brush fires, as well as fires in parking garages. ® Replace the two current out -dated heart monitors with two new heart monitors with the latest technology and program functions. Performance Measures _F Objective Actual FY Actual Actual Projected Adopted Average response time 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 5:30 1. 5:29 5:41 6:07 6:00 2. Percent of incidents with a 37% 37% 27% 30% 35% response time of 4 minutes or less 3. Percent of incidents with a 75% 68% 60% 65% 70% response time of 6 minutes or less 4. Public education classes N/A N/A 19 25 30 5. Individual contacts through Public N/A N/A N/A 200 225 Education 6. Conduct residential inspections within three (3) days of called for 100% 100% 90% 90% 100% inspection 7. Conduct business/commercial 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% inspections utilizing Town staff only Vision Point Strategic Plan Impact Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders High quality services coupled with financial stewardship o Explore public safety service delivery options and funding Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer / Richard Whitten 69 General Fund FY 2010/2011 14 Emergency Services Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Payroll 766,591 728,349 722,549 719,073 Payroll Related 209,429 206,969 209,759 229,261 Supplies 44,358 64,985 63,641 63,966 Services 817,485 828,182 829,207 815,204 Insurance 4,011 4,212 3,611 3,710 Maintenance 26,221 26,942 25,642 26,942 Rent & Utilities 9,786 9,790 10,955 10,955 E/D Incentives - CapitalOutlay 12,588 - - - 70 Emergency Services PROGRAM BUDGET Department 14 Department Director Richard Whitten Department Phone 1 817-337-4722 Program Activity Budget Percent urgency Operations 1 Fire/Emergency Services 1,083,0071 57.94% 2 Emergency Medical Services 339,293 18.15% 3 Part Time Employees 173,845 9.30% $ 1,596,1451 85.40% Operations Support 1 Medical Director Services 3,0001 0.16% 2 Hydrant Maintenance/Testing 13,219 0.71% 3 Recruiting 6,068 0.32% $ 22,287 1.19% urgency Prevention 1 1 Inspection Services 18,3121 0.98% 2 Plan Review 3,768 0.20% 3 Public Education 11,044 0.59% $ 33,123 1.77% Billing Services 1 Billing Services 12,000 0.64% $ 12,0001 0.64% Municipal Administration 1 1 Administration and Management 165,7671 8.87% 2 Staff Training and Development 39,789 2.13% $ 205,5551 11.00% $ 1,869,110 1 100% 71 Department 15 - Municipal Court Key Result Areas Affected • High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship • Citizen Engagement • Citizen Communication Program Description The Municipal Court performs the duties necessary to support municipal judicial functions, assist the public and manage court operations. The program will uphold the integrity of the Court and build public trust by providing unbiased quality service and accurate information delivered in an efficient and professional manner. Trends �����c,1�,AL ��� • Processes consistent workload of approximately 6,500 new case filings annually. However, recent trend lines indicate an increase to approximately 7,800 new police initiated cases this fiscal year. • Marked increase in the number of defendant's taking advantage of the extended payment plans instituted by the Judge and Staff. We have received positive feedback from individuals facing economic challenges who are very glad to take advantage of this option. • Had positive results with the State-wide Warrant Round -up this year. Issued approximately 1,100 delinquent warrants of arrest and increased our closure rate. • Town Marshal is spending additional time in the field contacting delinquent defendants, which will continue throughout the year. Police Initiated Case Filings 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 ttt— t FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected Expired Dismissable Violations 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected 72 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 Speeding Violations FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected Overall Number of Filed Violations FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected Department 15 - Municipal Court Trends (continued) Number of Cleared Arrest Warrants 1,750 1,500 1,250 1,000 750 500 250 0 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected Program Broad Goals 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 Collected Fine & Warrant Revenue FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual estimated projected • Court staff will provide prompt assistance in a courteous manner. This includes telephone service, mail service and customers who appear in person. • Court staff will work to enter tickets in a timely manner and complete daily court deposits. • The Court will conduct hearings and trials in a professional and dignified manner in order to provide an impartial setting for cases to be adjudicated by the Municipal Court Judge. • Court staff will continue to work in conjunction with the collection agency and other involved agencies to reduce the number of outstanding arrest warrants. The collection efforts will be monitored and monthly updates reported to Town Management. • Court staff will work in partnership with the Texas Department of Public Safety to implement the driver's license suspension program for defendants who have outstanding or delinquent fines in the Court. 2010 Highlights • Fully instituted the extended payment plan option to allow defendant's to manage the fines associated with their offense judgments. • Successful State-wide Warrant Round -up participation; 1,200 warrants issued; 850 cleared = 70% clearance rate • Have had slight increase in the number of citations filed from the police department. • Sharon Wilson passed her Level I Court Clerks certification exam. 2011 Goals and Objectives Institute additional "Rules of the Court" to guide staff in routine issues per the Judges direction and utilize as basis for policy and procedures manual for front office. • Pursue document destruction for aged case files according to the retention schedule. • Develop and implement standard operating procedures (SOP) for the Marshal position with attention on the use of force and warrant service to ensure safety and compliance with state laws. 73 Department 15 - Municipal Court Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Vision Point Strategic Plan Impact Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders ® Infrastructure maintenance and planning o Draft facility master plan with Council Team Leader: Amanda DeGan 74 Objective Actual Budget Projected Adopted Violations entered within 3 business days FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 100% 1 95% 95% 95% of Receipt. Collections of warrant division in both 4 % under 100% 22% above 100% 2. cash and non-cash clearances. benchmark compliance benchmark compliance Benchmark is equal to $35,000 per month 3. Process Court deposits daily 87% 85% 90% 100% 4' Issue arrest warrants at 45 day 75% 100% 85% 100% delinquency Vision Point Strategic Plan Impact Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders ® Infrastructure maintenance and planning o Draft facility master plan with Council Team Leader: Amanda DeGan 74 General Fund FY 2010/2011 15 Municipal Court LFYAdopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Court Administrator 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Deputy Clerks 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Judge 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Marshal 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk Total - 0.25 0.50 0.50 5.50 penditures Payroll 204,710 215,127 217,627 232,530 Payroll Related 65,652 67,181 68,415 72,707 Supplies 7,994 9,601 10,251 10,351 Services 97,678 104,655 106,927 107,505 Insurance 510 564 564 471 Maintenance 271 2,900 2,825 2,900 Rent & Utilities 3,307 3,357 3,357 3,357 E/D Incentives - - - - Capital Outlay 8,331 8,331 411,71 8,331 - 418,296 429,821 �mktilities Maintenance 1% II Services 1. 25% Supplies Payroll Related 17% 75 Municipal Court PROGRAM BUDGET Department 15 Department Director Amanda DeGan Department Phone 1 817-430-0861 Program Activity Budget Percent Case Processing 1 Citation Management 33,226 7.73% 2 Customer Service 32,942 7.66% 3 Financial Processing 20,434 4.75% $ 86,602 20.15% 1 I Plea Docket 35,2141 8.19% 2 Pre -Trial Docket 33,518 1 7.80% 3 Trial Docket 21,5121 5.00% $ 90,2451 21.00% Warrant and Jail Services Collection Services 1 Case Submission 4,012 0.93% 2 Financial Processing 15,026 3.50% 3 Contract Management 7,090 1.65% $ 26,128 6.08% Jud iciary & Administration 1 Issuance Function 14,0631 3.270 2 Field & Office Arrests 67,4491 15.69% 19,597 3 Jail Processing 29,6481 6.90% $ 111,1601 25.86% Collection Services 1 Case Submission 4,012 0.93% 2 Financial Processing 15,026 3.50% 3 Contract Management 7,090 1.65% $ 26,128 6.08% Jud iciary & Administration 1 Case Review & Archival 19,597 4.56% 2 Staff Management 23,240 5.41% 3 Legislative & Legal Compliance 17,399 4.05% 4 Monthly Reporting, Financial Oversight and Budgeting 8,434 1.96% $ 68,670 15.98% Academic Governance Westlake Academy 33,189 1 7.72% $ 33,1891 7.72% Municipal Governance 1 Town of Westlake 13,829 3.22% $ 13,8291 3.22% $ 429,821 1 100.00% 76 Department 16 - Public Works Key Results Areas Affected ® Aesthetic Standards ® Quality Development ® Environmental Stewardship ® High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship • Infrastructure Maintenance and Planning Program Description ® The Public Works Department is responsible for: the operation, maintenance, repair, and installation of 65,000 LF of water lines, 39,000 LF of waste water lines, and 38,000 LF of duct bank lines; maintaining public records and regulatory requirements; inspecting and maintaining the Town's traffic signs, signals, roadway markings, and 10.8 miles of street pavement and storm drainage. Public Works also assist other departments, the Academy, and volunteer groups as needed: • Setting up for community events • Providing traffic control devices for DPS use • Supervision of community service workers • Provide back-up coordinating/inspecting work for facility maintenance Trends • The Town's population has continued to increase over the last several years. • This rise has also generated a significant increase in the demand for Public Works staff's time. ® The increasing population is accustomed to receiving basic public services that we are minimally equipped to handle. • The Town's water revenue fund continues to grow as the number of users and consumption increases. ® As the amount of water purchased from Fort Worth increases in correlation with the population, we have managed to mitigate some of the Peak Charges by continuously monitoring water storage capacities. ® FM 1938 construction will demand an increasingly amount of staff time as the project progresses. $2,000,000 $1,750,000 $1,500,000 $1,250,000 $1,000,000 $750,000 $500,000 $250,000 $0 Water & Sewer Revenues FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual Estimated Adopted 77 0 Water B Sewer Department 16 - Public Works Trends (continued) $800,000 $700,000 $600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0 Water and Peak Payments to City of Fort Worth FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual Estimated Adopted FY 10/11 Projected FY09/10 Estimated FY 08/09 actual FY 07/08 actual FY 06/07 actual FY 05/06 actual After Hour Emergencies o Water Payments O Peak Payments 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 30 Program Broad Goals ® To efficiently and effectively provide a safe and reliable solid waste collection, potable water distribution, wastewater collection, and duct bank system for the Town's customers. ® Maintain Water and Wastewater system in a fiscal and responsible manner in order to maintain a 90 day fund balance. • Continue preventive maintenance schedules for water, wastewater and streets facilities, to minimize emergency service disruptions and repair costs. ® To promote water conservation efforts through better irrigation management practices; thereby, saving water customers money. ® Maintain streets and shoulders in safe travelable condition. 78 Department 16 - Public Works ® Maintain accurate inventory of streets and their current condition. ® Manage all Public Works capital projects to be on schedule and within budget 2010 Accomplishments ® Started construction on FM 1938. ® Completed inflow and infiltration study of sewer lines within Vaquero TRA required as a result of issues discovered in the initial engineering analysis conducted previously. • Inspected and cleaned Ground Storage Tank. ® Implemented new water rates and sewer rate structure. ® Replaced aging waterlines in Stagecoach Hills. ® Automated school flashers by integrating them into the Town's SCADA system allowing staff to remotely operate and monitor. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Continue to work with StreetScape consultant for FM 1938 project ® Update Town's Master Plans • Complete N-1 sewer line transfer to TRA ® Secure an Inter -Local Agreement for a public works maintenance agreement for day to day operations. ® Continue "Green" initiatives that focus on improved efficiencies of service delivery, reduce, reuse, and recycling. ® Pursue pavement maintenance inventory classification system ® Identify system replacement standards to be outlined in the budget Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures 79 Objective Actual Budget Projected Adopted FY 07/08 FY08/09 1% FY08/09 FY09/10 1' of Preventive Maintenance Sewer 0% 2% 2� Line Cleaning of total LF 2' Number of Dead End Waterlines 0 4 4 4 flushed (17 total) 3 % of Manholes Inspected 0% 50% 30% 30% 250 total 4 Number of Pumps and Motors 2 0 2 2 Maintained 5 Number of Water Valves Exercised 0 10 20 20 (270 total) 6 LF of Drainage Ditch and Culvert 0 LF 0 LF 200 200 LF Repair/Maintenance 7. Tons of Asphalt Repairs New New New 5 tons Measure Measure Measure 79 Sittig' a Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One - Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods ® On-going comprehensive planning o Precinct Line Road construction Team Leader: Jarrod Greenwood ® Outstanding community appearance o Streetscape projects to enhance community appearance Team Leader: Jarrod Greenwood Vision Point Two - We Are Leaders ® Environmental stewardship initiatives Develop a comprehensive automated recycling and composting program to identify new technology which may be utilized in our environmental stewardship Team Co -Leaders: Jarrod Greenwood /Troy Meyer ® Infrastructure maintenance and planning • Review the drainage and storm water plans needed to minimize the impact of severe weather on our neighborhoods Team Leader: Jarrod Greenwood o Storm Water Utility review Team Leader: Jarrod Greenwood 80 General Fund FY 2010/2011 16 Public Works Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Superintendent 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Technician 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 AL1.56 1.50 1 1.50 Payroll 26,235 27,761 27,411 93,894 Payroll Related 9,559 10,197 10,547 36,370 Supplies 3,893 2,791 2,791 2,791 Services 19,571 52,050 52,065 52,065 Insurance - - - - Maintenance 16,659 17,000 16,685 16,685 Rent & Utilities 58,624 73,600 73,600 73,600 E/D Incentives - - - Capital Outlay - - F- General Fund Public Works PROGRAM BUDGET Department 16 Department Director: Jarrod Greenwood Department Phone: 817-490-5717 Program I Activity I Budget IPercent ROW Management 1 Drainage 74,211 26.95% 2 Line Locates 8,013 2.91% 3 Duct Bank Management 16,027 5.82% 4 Open Space Services 78,271 28.42% $ 176,5221 64.10% Transportation Services 1 2 3 Municipal Governance Sign and Signal Maintenance Pavement & Shoulder Maintenance Street Reconstruction 9,349 3.39% 41,429 15.04% 21,395 7.77% $ 72,172 26.21% l l Town Council Meetings/Workshops 24,0401 8.73% $ 24.040 8.73% Citizen Engagement and Communication 1 Neiehborhood Gathe 82 and Outreach 6711 0.97% 6711 0.97% $ 275,405 1 100% Department 17 - Facilities Maintenance Key Result Areas Affected ® Premier Education Facilities and Programs • High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship • Infrastructure Maintenance and Planning Program Description ® The Town of Westlake will plan for and provide facilities to enhance present and future community and educational programs and endeavors. ® Long-range plans should include: maintenance, renovation, construction of facilities as related to civic use and educational programs - efficient facilities meeting program needs. • Westlake Civic Campus facilities should be available to the community. The Town should develop cooperative projects with the community and agencies. Trends ® As the civic campus ages, maintenance costs of exterior, landscaping and interior systems will continue to increase. ® For the FY05/06 school year 700 sq. ft. was remodeled to accommodate the addition of the 8th grade. The court office, Town secretary and Texas Student Housing departments were relocated to the Solana Business Park and 4,000 sq. ft. were remodeled into classrooms. ® A 45 space, temporary parking lot was constructed on the west side of the gym as a pick up area for the 7th, 8th and 9th grades in FY 05/06 ® For the FY06/07 school year 3,500 sq. ft. was remodeled to accommodate the addition of the 10th -12th grades. ® A proposed performing Arts and Sciences Center to accommodate a black box, art and science centers has been suggested and is being designed. • The increase in academy sport programs has resulted in additional multi use field construction. ® All town employees relocated to the Solana business park in April 07 • The temporary fire station 12' X 52' mobile home was replaced with a new 14' X 60" in December 06. ® The facility director is working to complete 40 hours of basic water training in order for the town to have two certified water operators as required by the state to receive a Class D licenses. ® The student and staff population of the academy grows each year with the addition of one grade level until the 12th grade. This increases the demand for maintenance on the civic campus. ® $2.5 million bond passed in November 2007 to construct a 13,700 sf. ft. Arts & Sciences Center located on the civic campus. The bid packages for the project went out in August 2008. September 2008 Council approved the 8,400 sf. ft. Sam & Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center ,which would include two science rooms and one art room, six offices, conference room and breakout space. Due to the partnership between the Westlake Academy Foundation and the town, the funds needed for the project where raised. 83 Department 17 - Facilities Maintenance Program Broad Goals ® The Town has an effective long-range plan for facilities development and maintenance. • The facilities planning process will be communicated in a clear and concise format, including input from residents, academy and Town staff. ® Town facilities will be operated in a cost efficient and energy efficient manner. 2010 Highlights ® The Sam & Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center opened on the first day of class in the fall of 2009. The project came in $276,000 under budget which was used to extend the Sam & Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center parking area. • A $12,000 grant was awarded to the town by The M.R. & Evelyn Hudson Foundation to complete a master facilities plan for the Westlake Academy. ® Installed water well at the Westlake Academy to provide water for the irrigation system. ® Relocated seven staff members and remodeled an office space into a fire rated file room. ® Installed one additional serving line in the dining hall. ® Added 128 additional parking spaces on Westlake Academy campus ® Added lighting to the west parking area. ® Received a $23,000 energy efficiency & conservation block grant ® Completed traffic study to improve drop-off and pick-up flow on and off the Westlake Academy campus. • FY 10/11 Municipal budget will be decreased by $243,213. This represents direct costs related to the facility operations of the Westlake Academy. These expenditures have been transferred to the Westlake Academy operating budget. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Facilities Plan will be developed, including an annual maintenance, periodic maintenance, and facilities development plan. ® A long-range plan will be developed for future facilities needs that is based on census data and local and regional community development plans. ® Facility and Recreation Advisory Group will be created to provide input and to critique the long- range plan. ® Develop and implement a Facilities Information Communication Plan. • An energy efficiency plan will be developed and implemented. ® Town will increase its awareness and improve its actions regarding energy and resource conservation and recycling. ® Ensured the Christmas Lighting, Arbor Day and Decoration Day have a quality setting ® Maintain a quarterly and monthly maintenance agreement for the Academy, Solana, Fire Station and Municipal Campus for the following systems: ■ Cleaning service - Daily and semi-annual, window, carpet and tile floors ■ HVAC and heating - Quarterly ■ Electrical systems - Quarterly ■ Security systems - Semi-annual ■ Fire sprinkler and alarm systems - Annual ■ Maintain the campus landscaping: ■ 36 mowings, fertilizations, weed control 84 Department 17 - Facilities Maintenance ® Athletic Field Maintenance: ■ Athletic Field - 2 field mowings around athletic field ■ Athletic Field - 36 mowings by staff • Parchman house Maintenance • Cemetery Maintenance ® Fire station Maintenance ® Serve as back-up for the public works department Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Objective 1 100% compliant with fire sprinkler inspection schedule 2 100% compliant with alarm system inspection schedule 3 50% reduction in cleaning complaints Capital projects completed on 4. time, A & S, Water Well, Camera update 5 Maintain the campus and park contract services Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Actual FY 07/08 Yes Actual FY 08/09 Projected Adopted FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders ® Premier educational facilities and programs • Complete the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts and Sciences Center ■ Team Leader: Troy Meyer ® Environmental stewardship initiatives ■ Develop a comprehensive automated recycling and composting program to identify new technology which may be utilized in our environmental stewardship ■ Team Co -Leaders: Jarrod Greenwood /Troy Meyer 41! 85 General Fund FY 2010/2011 17 Facilities Maintenance Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Director 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Technician 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Part -Time Clerk 0.25 - - - Administrative Clerk - 0.17 0.17 0.17 Total 1 1.00 1 ,92 penditures Payroll 37,436 39,245 40,945 62,878 Payroll Related 13,435 13,994 14,094 22,551 Supplies 25,185 42,688 43,568 4,800 Services 63,911 90,031 91,551 17,681 Insurance 277 277 230 237 Maintenance 103,596 149,500 141,777 16,702 Rent & Utilities 120 500 400 400 E/D Incentives - - - Capital Outlay - - Maintenance 13% Services 14% dJ Supp ` lies 4% 86 Facilities Maintenance PROGRAM BUDGET Department 17 Department Director Troy J. Meyer Department Phone 817-490-5735 Program Activity Budget Percent Academic Administration 1 Support Services $ 19,9091 15.90% 2 Life Safety 5,167 4.13% 3 Facilities Maintenance 49,317 39.38% $ 74,394 59.40% Municipal Administration 1 2 3 4 Life Safety $ Facilities Maintenance Open Space Services Support Services Academic Governance 1 I Board of Trustee Meetings/Wo Municipal Governance 2,919 2.33% 6,797 5.43% 7,482 5.97% 18,266 14.58% 35,465 28.32% 6,5111 5.20% 6,5111 5.20% $ 125,249 1 100.00% 87 Department 18 - Finance Key Result Areas Affected ® Premier Education Facilities and Programs ® Well Educated Future Leaders and Thinkers ® High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship ® Infrastructure Maintenance and Planning Program Description ' ® The Finance Department is responsible for collecting, recording, summarizing, and reporting the results of all financial transactions of the following entities in a timely manner and in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, ensuring compliance with applicable ; state and federal statutes, bond covenants and grant = — contracts by reviewing financial data and reporting such in a timely manner. • Town of Westlake • Westlake Academy • Westlake Academy Foundation • The Department works with the Education Service Center (Region XI) to maintain the Westlake Academy Charter School financial system and fiscal controls, i.e. general ledger, payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable and cash management. ® In conjunction with maintaining financial records, the Department is responsible for the preparation for and coordination of the annual external financial audits for the Town of Westlake, Westlake Academy and Westlake Academy Foundation. ® The Utility Billing section of the Finance Department provides for the accurate and timely billing of the Town's water and sewer services, assists customers in applying for service, transferring service or discontinuing utility service, and responds to customer inquiries and disputes regarding their utility account. Trends ® Finance and accounting are core functions that often expand in direct correlation with the organization that continues to expand Increases in number of Academy employees, the number of utility customers, and the number of necessary fiduciary processes over past five years * Plans for continued expansion at Westlake Academy combined with residential population increases and economic development will continue to challenge the Finance Department's ability to maintain the highest levels of service and quality with existing staffing. ® The expansion of the Westlake Academy facility (Arts & Sciences Center) will require additional accounting processes during its construction period, i.e. monthly distributions to multiple contracting firms as well as accounting for retainage payments 88 Department 18 - Finance Program Broad Goals ® Provide Board of Aldermen, management, departments and citizens with accurate and timely financial records and reports in the most efficient manner. ® Maintain the accounting and financial reporting systems in conformance with all state and federal laws, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), standards of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) and the Government Finance 19 GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award Officers Association (GFOA). Town or Westlake ® Provide sound and conservative fiscal management in compliance with rexN� 4..,i M1c 1-i.�a9 5'ru I:kPnnrnp all state and federal regulations. {,s top`s, 2009 Adhere to policies established by the Public Funds Investment Act, ice_ applicable bond covenants, and the Town's adopted investment policy and ensure proper collaterallzatlon of bank deposits. 11111! �:K: ® Achieve efficient and effective collection of delinquent accounts regarding Utility billing. Accounts Payable Invoices Processed per Year Includes Town, Westlake Academy, Westlake Academy Foundation 5,000 4,500 17 4,000" Q;I 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 P 1,500 1,000 , 500 0 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual actual actual Estimated Projected ■ Town ■ Westlake Academy Foundation ff Westlake Academy 2010 Highlights ® Prepared, submitted and received the Town's third Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from Government Finance Officers Association for the FY 2009/2010. ® Prepared, submitted and received the Town's second Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for Government Finance Officers Association recognition for FY 2007/2008. • Received an unqualified audit opinion on the 2009 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. ® Prepared, submitted and received Westlake Academy's first FY 2009-2010 Operating Budget with the Government Finance Officers Association for the "Distinguished Budget Presentation Award" and the Association of School Business Officials International for the "International Award for Budget Excellence". 89 Department 18 - Finance 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Prepare and submit FY 2010/2011 budget for a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from Government Finance Officers Association. ® Prepare and submit the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for Government Finance Officers Association recognition for FY 2009/2010. ® Receive an unqualified audit opinion on the 2010 CAFR. • Investigate the feasibility of scanning all finance documents to eliminate storage problems and help with efficiency of the department. 90 Utility Billing Customers per Year 500 Average Number Processed per Year 450 6,000 400 350 a� 300 5,000 a� 0 L 250 • • • . °' 200 \ \ c 150 Qi \ E 100 3,500 a 50 •; • ,�, FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 �� ® • actual actual actual actual actual actual Estimated Projected 90 Utility Billing Payments Average Number Processed per Year 6,000 5,500 5,000 4,500 4,000 3,500 a 3,000 •; • ,�, 2,500 �� ® • v 2,000 • �� \ >, 1,500 a 1,000 \ 500 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual actual actual Estimated Projected 90 Department 18 - Finance Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders Premier educational facilities and programs o Create partnerships between municipal and Academy staff to utilize local government resources to enhance student learning and achievement Team Leader: Debbie Piper High quality services coupled with financial stewardship o Review and discuss growth related policies. Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer/Todd Wood/ Debbie Piper 91 Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting Fres—ted to Town Of -Westlake Texas Far lb Conrprehensirre Annuat Frnan W Report far the Fhcal Year Ended September 30, 2009 A Ar oJ.gcnRvernenr rn. E..ceOerre rn Fina W �t>orr^+H¢GR.enred rhe C�vrrnm.nr F-,--cw.— 'a"n'slenan of the Unrred Srarey and c -d.. 90 ernmmr uni¢ a,d Puhlk a ,kM nrrrremenr fysJe'' Why' c°'nryerKn'srve annum rina,K,ar repuny lCAFt¢I xhrva. rhe h'V" r+ardards ,n 9nr,ernmenf a.:twrnnny _.�_ and hnenrrar spun,ng lhr.�uM.i.r Objective Actual Actual Budget Estimated Adopted FY 07/08 FY08/09 FY09/10 FY 09/10 FYI 0/11 Quarterly Financial Reports to the 1. Council by the 2nd Council 100% 100% 100% 75% 100% meeting after eachquarter-end 2 Auditor prepared audit 5 5 5 5 5 ad'ustments not to exceed Prepare five year budget New 3. forecast Measure June June June June 4. Annual CIP update New June June September June Measure 5. Annual budget workshop New July/Aug July/Aug July/Aug July/Aug Measure 6. Annual budget approval New Measure Sept Sept Sept Sept Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders Premier educational facilities and programs o Create partnerships between municipal and Academy staff to utilize local government resources to enhance student learning and achievement Team Leader: Debbie Piper High quality services coupled with financial stewardship o Review and discuss growth related policies. Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer/Todd Wood/ Debbie Piper 91 Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting Fres—ted to Town Of -Westlake Texas Far lb Conrprehensirre Annuat Frnan W Report far the Fhcal Year Ended September 30, 2009 A Ar oJ.gcnRvernenr rn. E..ceOerre rn Fina W �t>orr^+H¢GR.enred rhe C�vrrnm.nr F-,--cw.— 'a"n'slenan of the Unrred Srarey and c -d.. 90 ernmmr uni¢ a,d Puhlk a ,kM nrrrremenr fysJe'' Why' c°'nryerKn'srve annum rina,K,ar repuny lCAFt¢I xhrva. rhe h'V" r+ardards ,n 9nr,ernmenf a.:twrnnny _.�_ and hnenrrar spun,ng lhr.�uM.i.r General Fund FY 2010/2011 18 Finance Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Assistant 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Clerk 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 114,511 86,462 88,337 207,078 Total 3.00 penditures Payroll 114,511 86,462 88,337 207,078 Payroll Related 32,437 23,588 23,853 61,786 Supplies 3,226 4,000 3,500 3,500 Services 25,865 29,386 27,746 27,746 Insurance - - - - Maintenance - Rent & Utilities - - E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - 176,039 - 92 Finance PROGRAM BUDGET Department 18 Department Director Debbie Piper Department Phone 817-490-5712 Program Activity Budget Percent Financial Management - Municipal 1 Municipal Annual Budget 36,702 12.23% z Capital Improvement Plan (CIP)i 6,491 2.16% $ 43,1931 14.39% Utility Billing 1 Utility Billing and Processingi 1,5351 0.51% 2 $ 1,5351 0.51% Accounting Services - Municipal 4,477 1.49% 4 1 Accounts Payable 17,420 5.80% Cash & Investment Management 2 Accounts Receivable 9,829 3.28% 47,914 3 Payroll 14,114 4.70% 4 Financial Reporting 40,037 13.34% 5 Cash & Investment Management 6,282 2.09% $ 87,6821 29.22% Accounting Services - Academic 1 Accounts Payable 12,845 4.28% 2 Accounts Receivable 11,206 3.73% 3 Payroll 4,477 1.49% 4 Financial Reporting 46,114 15.37% 5 Cash & Investment Management 2,501 0.83% 6 Academic Annual Budgeti 47,914 15.97% $ 25,0581 41.67% Accounting Services - Foundation 1 Accounts Payable 4,885 1.63% 2 Accounts Receivable 4,885 1.63% 3 Payroll 1,520 0.51% 4 Financial Reporting 11,986 3.99% $ 23,277 7.76% Municipal Governance 1 I Town Council 13,7631 4.59% $ 13,7631 4.59% Academic Governance 1 Board of Trustees Meetings/Workshops 5,602 1.87% $ 5,602 1.87% $ 300,110 100% 93 Department 19 - Parks & Recreation Key Result Areas Affected • Comprehensive Planning • Community Appearance • Quality Development • Open Space Presentation • Environmental Stewardship • High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship • Citizen Engagement Program Description • The Park and Recreation Department will maintain a 13.5 acre park located in the Glenwyck farms sub- division. The park has 3 ponds with water features, stage and a paved trail. • In 2009 Terra Bella development add 20 more acres of open space and will connect the Solana trails in late 2009 to the Glenwyck trail system. • The trees along roadways and cemetery will be maintained to ensure the safety of the drivers and pedestrians. • Additional trails will be added with the development of FM 1938 and the Deloitte project located on Dove road. • Westlake Academy and the park, located in Glenwyck Farms, will provide the facilities and space for recreation use to the public. The park at Glenwyck Farms and the Academy campus will host Arbor Days, Bandana Bonanza, Christmas Lighting and Decoration Day. Trends • The completion of the center and the population growth of The Town of Westlake have increased the need for a park and trail system and services to be offered to citizens of Westlake for the first time. • With the build out of Glenwyck Farms sub -division there is an increase in use of the park open space and road ways. • Conditions of landscaping on town owned properties have been impacted as a result of the drought in 05-06 and flooding in 06-07. This will place more pressure on budgets for replacement trees, sod, removal of dead trees, etc. ® There has been a decline in interest in the Tree City USA committee for the past two years. In an attempt to generate more involvement from the community, new goals and responsibilities were created to include the cemetery, Arbor Days event planning and open space and trails recommendations. On September 26, 2009 the Town received its tenth ;ity USE award and is three growth awards away from the itional Arbor Day Foundation. * The Terra Bella development located on the east end of Kirkwood Creek and Sam School Rd. will include 20 acres of open space. Walking trails will be completed in 2009. ® In spring 2009, there were several severe storms which uprooted 8 large trees in the park with additional damage to other trees within the park. The budget was - 94 Department 19 - Parks & Recreation impacted due to clean up and planting replacement trees to begin in the fall of 2009. Program Broad Goals • Provide park and common open spaces adequate in size and condition to serve citizens. • Use the park system to preserve and protect environmentally significant areas for public enjoyment and education. ® Maintain, secure and manage parks in a manner which encourages their appropriate use. • Maximize public/private partnerships to assist in all aspects of parks and recreation planning and development. 2010 Highlights • Town Council adopted the cemetery rules & regulations. ® Replaced the chain link fence on the south side of the cemetery. • Received the tenth annual Tree City USA award and our third Growth award. • Town was awarded the gold level Scenic City Certification. • Hosted first trail planning meeting with Southlake, Keller, Roanoke, Trophy Club ® $7,390 was raise for the 10 annual Arbor Day event ® Town Council passed the rules & Regulation and Sale policy for the Cemetery. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Continue to update the Town's Master Plan to include connecting the entire park system with a combination of pocket parks, neighborhood and community parks and Veloweb regional trail system. • Work with Planning and Development to coordinate park land acquisition with long range growth and development planning. ® Enhance and expand the linear park system along creeks and roadway. • Limit usage within environmentally sensitive areas to passive recreation. • Continue updating existing parks & facilities standards and guidelines. • Recognize that parks and recreation needs evolve over time with changes in the population. • Design parks and open spaces that are durable, easily maintained and are not detrimental to surrounding uses. • Utilize partnerships, wherever appropriate, to help develop, manage and maintain parks and recreation facilities. ® Seek new ways to involve communities and organizations in public finance strategies to accelerate park system improvements. 95 Department 19 - Parks & Recreation Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods Sensitivity to neighborhood integrity ■ Promote and develop landscaped entrances to neighborhoods ■ Team Leader: Troy Meyer Review and update the current trail system plan and develop interconnectivity options with surrounding municipalities Team Leader: Troy Meyer ® Open space preservation ■ Open space land management and park system expansion ■ Team Leader: Troy Meyer M. Objective Actual Actual Projected Adopted Dove road median - mowing, FY07/08 Completed FY08/09 FY 09/10 Completed FY 10/11 100% 1 Completed fertilizations, weed control 2 Park - 5 field mows and 36 mows Completed Completed Completed 100% around walkways and opens space 3 Provide tree trimming for road way Completed Completed Completed 100% and park once a year or as needed 4 Adopted rules and regulations for the N/A N/A N/A Completed Cemetery Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods Sensitivity to neighborhood integrity ■ Promote and develop landscaped entrances to neighborhoods ■ Team Leader: Troy Meyer Review and update the current trail system plan and develop interconnectivity options with surrounding municipalities Team Leader: Troy Meyer ® Open space preservation ■ Open space land management and park system expansion ■ Team Leader: Troy Meyer M. General Fund FY 2010/2011 19 Parks & Recreation Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Director 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 Technician 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Administrative Clerk 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.17 7,080 7,105 7,105 Services 19,039 21,225 33,433 33,308 Q 9-.00 1.00 1,00 Payroll 35,050 31,545 32,445 47,130 Payroll Related 13,214 11,670 11,780 18,026 Supplies 2,481 7,080 7,105 7,105 Services 19,039 21,225 33,433 33,308 Insurance - - - - Maintenance 34,758 39,500 39,125 39,250 Rent & Utilities 10,977 8,750 8,750 8,780 E/D Incentives - - - Capital Outlay 250 250 120,02 jjjjjjjjjjjjjjj� I - 4 E25% nan 97 Payroll 31% r Payroll Related 12% upplie3, 4% Parks and Recreation PROGRAM BUDGET Department 19 Department Director Troy J. Meyer Department Phone 817-490-5735 Program Activity Budget Percent Parks and Recreation Maintenance i Open Space Services $ 61,147 39.81% i Trail Development and Maintenance $ 44,460 28.95% $ 105,606 68.75% Citizen Communication & Engagement i Community Services $ 7,628 4.97% $ 7,6281 4.97% Academic Administration Academy Partnerships 20,918 13.62% $ 20,9181 13.62% Municipal Administration 1 I Purchasing 4,768 3.10% 2 Support Services 8,051 5.24% $ 12,820 8.35% Academic Governance 1 Board of Trustee Municipal Governance i I Town Council 98 $ 3,3141 2.16% $ 3,3141 2.16% $ 3,3141 2.16% $ 3,3141 2.16% $ 153,599 1 100% Department 20 - Information le chnr-)- Io�Jy Key Result Areas Affected High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship Program Description Information Technology works with the Town Manager to establish IT policy, evaluate and recommend technology solutions for specific departmental needs and provide administrative support to established servers, systems, and staff. Trends ® Information Technology is in a state of perpetual change, and policies, strategies, and system implementation must accommodate these realities. • Network and systems security require ongoing analysis and adjustments to meet emerging threats. ® Aging equipment must be updated to remain reliable and secure. ® Data communication links between locations require evaluation of alternate information storage and backup process to insure acceptable performance. Program Broad Goals ® Provide support to all Town departments through the design, deployment, and maintenance of systems to support departmental objectives. • Provide systems administration by maintaining IT systems with prudent provisions for security, data archiving, and disaster recovery. 2010 Highlights ® Deployed improved data backup measures for server data and workstation disaster recovery. • Upgraded workstations with new hardware and operating systems. • Deployed additional network security measures. ® Reduced costs by keeping outsourced technical services to a minimum. ® Replaced vital network equipment as it reached its technical end of life. • Initiated the redesign of the Town's website and the process for offsite hosting. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Perform on-going security assessments to validate the efficacy of existing measures and to evaluate and deploy solutions for new threats. • Identify and implement additional information technologies to improve the efficiency and/or security of business processes. ® Continue to reduce costs through the use of internal staff and third -party vendors. ® Replace aging network hardware to maintain security, reliability, and maximum functionality for system users. 99 General Fund FY 2010/2011 20 Information Technology AdoptedEstimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 1FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Payroll 841 - Payroll Related 133 - - Supplies 5,487 10,000 10,025 10,025 Services 23,839 31,500 31,475 31,475 Insurance - - - - Maintenance - Rent & Utilities - - E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - - 41,500 41,5 111 Information Technology Department 20 PROGRAM BUDGET Department Director Todd Wood Department Phone 817-490-5711 Program Activity Budget Percent IT Operations 1 Information Technology Support 4,000 9.64% 2 PC Support 4,525 10.90% 3 Enterprise Support Systems 7,000 16.87% 4 Data Center 1,000 2.41% 5 Website Services 2,278 5.49% $ 18,803 45.31% Network Operations 1 1 WAN Operations 1,5001 3.61% 2 Physical & Electronic Network Security 1,700 4.10% $ 3,2001 7.71% Westlake Academy 1 Information Technology Support 2,500 6.02% 2 PC Support 250 0.60% 3 Enterprise Support Systems 12,500 30.12% 4 Data Center 750 1.81% 5 Website Services 197 0.47% 6 WAN Operations 1,000 2.41% 7 Physical & Electronic Network Security 2,300 5.54% $ 19,497 46.98% $ 41,500 1 100% 101 Key Result Areas Affected ® Premier Education Facilities and Programs • Well Educated Future Leaders and Thinkers ® High Quality Services Coupled with Financial Stewardship Program Description • The HR/Administrative Services Department provides a diverse array of services to internal and external customers, as well as providing support to the organization's general operations. • These services include all HR functions, Payroll, Benefit Administration, Risk Management, and Information Technology. Support is offered in partnership with other departments for bidding & purchasing, strategic planning, policy development, general administration, and finance. ® The department continues to successfully provide services for Westlake Academy in addition to the Town of Westlake. ® The Department also provides support services as needed to all other Town Departments, in addition to the Westlake Academy Foundation, Westlake Historical Preservation Society, and the Westlake Public Art Committee. Trends ® Continued growth of Town and Academy staff, and corresponding administrative service demands. ® Exposure to dramatic benefit cost increases. ® Expanded responsibilities in the areas of IT, risk management, and benefit administration. ® New federal and state laws affecting HR practices create ongoing compliance challenges. Program Broad Goals ® Continually monitor the external business environment for trends and issues related to compensation and benefits and make recommendations to maintain competitive and motivated work force. ® Administer guidance and support for policy compliance to all Departments. ® Research, recommend and implement strategic organizational improvements to the Town Manager. ® Develop and implement effective policies, procedures, and guidelines in support of the organization's stated mission, vision, values, goals, and objectives. • Insure compliance with pertinent laws and best practices through continual and proactive monitoring. 2010 Highlights ® Updated Westlake Academy job descriptions to reflect changes in assigned job duties. ® Developed Board of Trustees policies pertaining to personnel, transportation, and technology. ® Facilitated all tasks and procedures pertaining to risk management, in response to the organization's required service demands. 102 Department 21 - Human Resources ® Completed updates the Town and Academy's personnel manuals with additional and amended policies. ® Processed all payroll, benefit transactions, and regulatory filings in a timely manner. 2011 Goals and Objectives ® Complete a comprehensive compensation plan based on the organization's stated values and objectives. ® Research opportunities to automate existing systems and processes that are performed manually. ® Review and modify Town job descriptions for each position where appropriate, based on the actual unique work processes that exist in the Town of Westlake. ® Implement a comprehensive software -based Human Resources Management system. • Develop and implement a five-year technology plan. Efficiency/Effectiveness Measures Performance Measure Actual Budget Projected Adopted FY08/09 FY08/09 FY09/10 FYI 0/11 1 Review need for policy amendments, Quarterly Quarterly Semi- Semi -Annually additions, and deletions Annually Development, and implementation of Town: 1 1 2. a comprehensive compensation plan N/A N/A N/A WA: 6//201201 1 for the organization All positions analyzed by actual job Academy Town 3. duty and development of N/A N/A Aug -2010 Feb -201 1 descriptions Approved changes, additions, and E4.comprehensive deletions made live within 24 hours for 95% 95% 95% 95% Town website Vision Point Strategic Plan Impacts Vision Point Two — We Are Leaders High quality services coupled with financial stewardship o Review and discuss growth related policies. Team Co -Leaders: Tom Brymer/ Todd Wood / Debbie Piper Vision Point Three — Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake ® Citizen engagement and communication o Use of technology to enhance service delivery and citizen engagement. Team Leader: Todd Wood 103 General Fund FY 2010/2011 21 Human Resources Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Employee Staffing Director 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Part -Time Clerk - 0.33 - - Administrative Clerk - - 0.33 0.33 1.00 Payroll 50,298 55,649 55,238 101,270 Payroll Related 11,442 14,072 13,455 26,158 Supplies 623 900 2,250 2,250 Services 5,224 7,800 5,425 5,425 Insurance - - - - Maintenance - Rent & Utilities - - E/D Incentives - - Capital Outlay - - 104 Human Resources & Administrative Services PROGRAM BUDGET Department 21 Department Director Todd Wood Department Phone 817-490-5711 Program Activity Budget Percent Human Resources Administration 1 Administrative Support Services 6,542 4.84% 2 Employee Records 1,869 1.38% 3 Payroll 3 738 2.77% Total Compensation Administrative Support Services $ 12,148 8.99% 2 1 12,450 Compensation and Classification 1,869 1.38% 12,450 2 4 Benefits Management 1,869 1.38% Risk Management 12,450 $ 3,737 2.77% Property & Casulty Insurance Management 1 Property & Casulty Insurance Management 6,233 4.61% Worker's Compensation 2 Worker's Compensation 934 0.69% 3,112 3 Loss Prevention 700 0.52% Employment Services Recruitment and Placement $ 7,868 5.82% 11 1 Employment Application Services 3,112 2.30% $ 2 Recruitment and Placement 1,402 1.04% Westlake 3 Employee Skills Development Academy Foundation 1,402 $ 5,916 1.04% 4.38% 1 Fundaising Support 468 0.35% 2 Employment services 233 0.17% 3 General Administrative Support 468 0.35% Westlake Academv $ 1,169 0.87% $ 135,105 1 100.00% 105 Administrative Support Services 24,899 18.43% 2 Employee Records 12,450 9.22% 3 Payroll 12,450 9.22% 4 Compensation and Classification 9,337 6.91% 5 Benefits Management 12,450 9.22% 6 Property & Casulty Insurance Management 4,669 3.46% 7 Worker's Compensation 1,556 1.15% 8 Loss Prevention 3,112 2.30% 9 Employment Application Services 9,337 6.91% 10 Recruitment and Placement 10,894 8.06% 11 Employee Skills Development 3,112 2.30% $ 104,268 77.18% $ 135,105 1 100.00% 105 SECTION 03 al Revenue Funds The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Westlake Academy Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES Adopted Estimated Proposed Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 57 Local Revenues 538,992 555,464 678,919 585,381 58 State Revenues 3,163,129 3,637,109 3,665,938 3,964,371 59 Federal Revenues 56,134 119,976 198,427 143,029 64 Other Operating Costs 126,878 184,643 237,731 346,146 65 Debt Service 82,991 42,000 41,496 - Total Revenues 3,758,255 4,312,549 4,543,284 4,692,781 7900 Other Sources 117,640 - - 7,000 7949 Transfer in from Town (GF) - 4,057,713 4,363,028 79,432 Total Other Sources 117,640 - 100,000 86,432 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES mmM75,895j,4,312,549 - - 79,432 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 61 Payroll Related & Benefits 2,790,289 3,090,775 3,347,488 3,410,634 62 Professional & Contracted Services 553,162 488,190 444,608 629,745 63 Supplies and Materials 252,376 252,105 291,705 263,297 64 Other Operating Costs 126,878 184,643 237,731 346,146 65 Debt Service 82,991 42,000 41,496 - Total Expenditures 3,805,696 4,057,713 4,363,028 4,649,822 8900 Other Uses 200,000 100,000 100,000 19,840 8911 Transfer out to Town (A&S) - - - 79,432 Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 200,000 4,005,696 100,000 4,157,713 100,000 4,463,028 99,272 4,749,094 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES (129,801)1 154,836 1 80,256 1 30,119 FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 634,454 504,653 504,653584,909 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 504653I' Restricted/Designated Funds 100,000 69,884 114,838 UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 504,653 559,489 515,025 500,190 Restricted/Designated Funds Uniform/Equipment Replacement - 7,884 14,838 Technology/FF&E Replacement 100,000 - 100,000 Hudson Foundation Grants 62,000 TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS 107 FUND OVERVIEW WESTLAKE ACADEMY This fund has been incorporated into the Town's budget for FY 10/11. Westlake Academy opened its doors in September 2003 when the Town of Westlake officials took advantage of the State of Texas' acceptance of chartered schools and thus, became the first and only municipality in the state to receive a chartered school designation. As a chartered school, Westlake Academy is an open enrollment public school. In 2008 the Texas Education Agency (TEA) renewed the Academy's charter until 2016. The officials who pioneered the school also decided to follow another brave path in offering the globally recognized International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum which is not being provided in over 900 schools nationwide and over 2,300 in 128 countries worldwide. Westlake Academy is owned and operated by the Town of Westlake and is the largest operating department of the Town. The TEA requires a separate budget be submitted to the state. A portion of that budget is now incorporated into the Town's annual budget. The Academy's fiscal year begins on September 1 st and ends of August 31 st. Revenues and Other Resources • FY 10/1 1 is budgeted at $4,779,213 • An increase of $235,929 over the ending estimated FY 09/10 budget of $4,543,284. • Enrollment is anticipated to increase by 39 students; therefore, bringing in more State and Local funds. Expenditures and Other Uses • FY 10/1 1 is budgeted at $,4,749,094 • An increase of $286,066 over the ending estimated FY 09/10 budget of $4,463,028 • A portion of this additional expense was the transfer of direct expenditures that were being paid by the Town for maintenance and upkeep of the Academy to the appropriate budget. Fund Balance • FY 09/10 estimated $584,909 • FY 10/11 proposed $615,028 • Increase of $30,119 See the excerpt from the Academy's budget in the appendix for additional information. 108 4B Economic Development Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 AdoptedEstimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax 916,102 726,300 912,000 812,500 Property Tax - - - - Hotel Tax - Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees - Fines & Forfeitures - - - Investment Earnings 1,138 1,100 375 Misc Income - - - - Total Revenues 917,241 727,400 912,375 812,500 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 917,241 727,400 912,375 812,500 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Capital Projects Total Expenditures Transfers Out 1,132,726 757,131 942,106 842,231 Total Other Uses 1,132,726 757,131 942,106 842,231 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1,132,726 757,131 942,106 842,231 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 (215,485) (29,731) (29,731) 4.7 < ' FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 512,793 297,308 297,308 267,577 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 297,308 Restricted/Designated Funds - - - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 297,308 267,577 267,577 237,846 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 109 1 4B ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND The 4B Economic Development Fund collects a '/2 cent sales tax to be allocated to qualified development projects. The 4B Fund has been committed to the repayment of the debt incurred for the Town's Civic Campus project. Revenues • Anticipated FY 09/10 revenues are $912,375 o Includes a one-time payment of $125,000 based on a development "Situs" agreement entered into with Deloitte o The above payment is based on a total of one-time "Situs" agreement revenue received from Deloitte which is estimated to be $500,000 of which (50%) will be returned to Deloitte and the remaining $250,000 being distributed to both the 4B Economic Development Fund and Property Tax Reduction Fund. FY 10/ 11 revenues are projected to be $812,500, a decrease of $97,875 (11%) from the FY 09/10 estimated budget. o FY 10/11 budgeted Deloitte project funds are $187,500. o The above payment is based on a total of one-time "Situs" agreement revenue received from Deloitte which is estimated to be $750,000. Again 50% of these funds will be returned to Deloitte with $375,000 being distributed to both the 4B Economic Development Fund and the Property Tax Reduction Fund. • An inter -fund repayment from the Utility Fund in the amount of $29,731 will also be used for debt payment. Expenditures and Other Uses • Transfers out to the Debt Service Fund for FY 10/1 1 are projected at $842,231 • This represents the total of the anticipated revenues as well as an inter -fund repayment from the Utility Fund in the amount of $29,731. Mul 413 Economic Development Fund Interfund Repayment Schedule Due from Utility Fund Pymt # Due Date Beginnig Balance $119,622 Glenwyck Farms Waterline $293,842 Knox Road Connection 2003 $119,688 Knox Road Connection 2004 $533,152 TOTAL Ending Balance 0 Nov -03 533,152 - 87,189 - 87,189 445,962 1 Aug -05 445,962 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 416,232 2 Aug -06 416,232 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 386,501 3 Aug -07 386,501 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 356,770 4 Aug -08 356,770 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 327,039 5 Aug -09 327,039 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 297,308 6 Aug -10 297,308 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 267,577 7 Aug -11 267,577 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 237,846 8 Aug -12 237,846 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 208,116 9 Aug -13 208,116 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 178,385 10 Aug -14 178,385 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 148,654 11 Aug -15 148,654 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 118,923 12 Aug -16 118,923 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 89,192 13 Aug -17 89,192 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 59,461 14 Aug -18 59,461 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 29,731 15 Aug -19 29,731 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 (0) TOTAL $ 119,622 $ 293,8421 $ 119,688 $ 533,152 Economic Development Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax 250,000 - 375,000 - Hotel Tax Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures Investment Earnings Misc Income - - Total Revenues 250,000 375,000 Transfers In 35,758 35,758 Total Other Sources 35,758 35,758 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES - 285,758 410,758 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay - - Economic Development Incentives 285,758 410,758 Capital Projects - - Total Expenditures 285,758 410,758 Transfers Out - - Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 285,758 410,758 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES - - - 'UND BALANCE, BEGINNING 'UND BALANCE, ENDING - Restricted/Designated Funds 1NDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS - IMM FUND OVERVIEW ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND The Economic Development Fund was set up to maintain all receipts and disbursements of agreements between the Town and various corporations for economic development. There was confusion regarding the additional revenues being recorded in the General Fund and offset by expenditures. These balances offset to zero but skewed the analysis of each. The Town is hoping this fund will create more transparency to the public regarding these receipts and payments. • Fidelity (Phase 1) - A schedule has been set up to repay $35,758 regarding this agreement thru FY 15/16. • Deloitte's agreement includes a 50% reimbursement of "Situs" agreement sales tax receipts. Revenues and Transfers In • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $750,000 for the "Situs" agreement with Deloitte of which $375,000 will be recorded in the Economic Development Fund. • A percent change of 50% from the FY 09/10 estimated revenues of $250,000 • This increase is due to the major portion of Deloitte University construction being performed in FY 10/11. A transfer of $35,758 will be made from the General Fund for the agreement with Fidelity for Phase I. Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $410,758. • A percent change of 43% from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures of $285,758 • Again, this increase is due to the major portion of the construction on Deloitte performed in FY 10/1 1. 113 University being ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND Tax Reimbursement Schedule Fidelity (Phase 1) Pymt FY End Beginning 100.46520.11 100.46522.11 Total Ending # Date Balance Principal Interest Pymt Due Balance 1 2 09/30/02 09/30/03 536,373.60 536,373.60 0.00 21,460.78 0.00 85,813.94 0.00 107,274.72 536,373.60 429,098.88 ** 3 4 09/30/04 09/30/05 429,098.88 429,098.88 0.00 17,476.75 0.00 18,281.49 0.00 35,758.24 429,098.88 393,340.64 5 6 09/30/06 09/30/07 393,340.64 357,582.40 16,425.56 15,313.93 19,332.68 20,444.31 35,758.24 35,758.24 357,582.40 321,824.16 7 09/30/08 321,824.16 14,138.39 21,619.85 35,758.24 286,065.92 8 09/30/09 286,065.92 12,895.24 22,863.00 35,758.24 250,307.68 9 09/30/10 250,307.68 11,580.62 24,177.62 35,758.24 214,549.44 10 09/30/11 214,549.44 10,190.41 25,567.83 35,758.24 178,791.20 11 09/30/12 178,791.20 8,720.26 27,037.98 35,758.24 143,032.96 12 09/30/13 143,032.96 7,165.58 28,592.66 35,758.24 107,274.72 13 09/30/14 107,274.72 5,521.50 30,236.74 35,758.24 71,516.48 14 09/30/15 71,516.48 3,782.88 31,975.36 35,758.24 35,758.24 15 09/30/16 35,758.24 1,944.30 33,813.94 35,758.24 0.00 TOTAL $ 146,616 $ 389,757 $ 536,374 $ ** FY 02/03 Payment of $107,274.72 included FY 01 /02, FY 02/03, and FY 03/04 ($35,758.24 x 3) See Transfers Out in Economic Development Fund - 114 Visitor Association Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted EstimatedAdopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax 1,244,945 938,309 FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds t1,4t51,1531,244,945 Property Tax - - - - Hotel Tax 497,769 450,000 450,000 450,000 Charges for Services - - - - Contributions - 174,475 255,493 173,975 Beverage Tax - - - - Franchise Fees - - - - Permits & Fees - 34,137 34,637 34,637 Fines & Forfeitures - - - - Investment Earnings 7,835 3,700 1,700 1,700 Misc Income 34,019 23,275 28,275 27,275 Total Revenues 539,623 476,975 479,975 478,975 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources 341,270 424,696 507,336 241,962 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 9,623 476,975 479,97 478,975 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1,244,945 938,309 FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds t1,4t51,1531,244,945 Payroll / Salaries 103,766 140,629 141,139 # of Days Operating Payroll Related & Benefits 30,719 42,105 42,717 - Supplies 70,017 33,350 33,350 33,350 Services 101,928 174,475 255,493 173,975 Insurance - - - - Repair & Maintenance - - - - Rent & Utilities 34,440 34,137 34,637 34,637 Interfund Advances - - - - Debt - Capital Outlay 400 Economic Development Incentives - Capital Projects - - - - Total Expenditures 341,270 424,696 507,336 241,962 Transfers Out Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 404,561 404,561 745,831 282,275 282,275 706,971 279,275 279,275 786,611 355,915 355,915 597,877 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 (206,207) (229,996) (306,636) (118,902) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 1,244,945 938,309 FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds t1,4t51,1531,244,945 938,309 - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING ,014,949 938,309 819,407 # of Days Operating 872 675 717 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 115 Visitors Association Fund Department Director Tom Brymer Department Phone 1817.490,5720 Program Activity Budget Percent Mun icipal Administration Communication 77,775 18.65% 1 Support Services - Administrative 60,240 14.45% 2 Support Services - Facilities Maintenance 22,886 5.49% 3 Support Services - Human Resources 16,302 3.91% 4 Contract Management 70,136 16.82% 5 Affiliate Board Liaison & Supporti 20,1001 4.82% $ 189,6641 45.49% Citizen Communication & Engagement 1 Communication 77,775 18.65% 2 Neighborhood Gatherings & Outreach 5,800 1.39% 3 Community Activities 45,849 11.00% 4 Direction Finders and Other Surveys 9,750 2.34% 5 $ 139,174 33.38% Accounting Services - Municipal 1 Accounts Payable 12,878 3.09% 2 Accounts Receivable 10,935 2.62% 3 Payroll 9,698 2.33% 4 Financial Reporting 20,855 5.00% 5 Cash & Investment Management 4,438 1.06 0 6 Budget Program $ 29,291 88,094 7.03% 21.13% $ 416,933 1 100.00% ** Includes $174,971 in transfers out to General Fund for Payroll related items 1w. FUND OVERVIEW VISITORS ASSOCIATION FUND The Visitor's Association Fund was established in late FY 1999/2000 and collects a 7% hotel occupancy tax from the Marriott Solana and any future Westlake hotels. FY 2004/2005 saw the launch of a new program in partnership with the Marriott to operate a shuttle service which delivers and returns Marriott visitors to DFW Airport. Hotel Occupancy Taxes are allocated to this fund and obtained through the assessment of a 7% hotel occupancy tax. Authority granted by the State of Texas allows cities to levy a tax not to exceed 7% of the rental rate for a hotel/motel room. Funds generated by the occupancy tax may be used in a manner that directly enhances and promotes tourism and the convention and hotel industry. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/11 are projected to be $478,975 • This remains flat compared to the FY 09/10 estimated revenues. Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $241,962. • This represents a 52% decrease of $265,374 from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures of $507,336. • The majority of the decrease is due to the decision to book all payroll and related benefits and costs in the General Fund and make operating transfers from each appropriate fund to the General Fund. This amount totals $174,971 with the remaining portion being due to the payment to the Marriott of the budgeted $56,000 from FY 08/09 in the FY 09/10. Transfers Out • A transfer out to the Debt Service fund in the amount of $180,944. • This payment represents a portion of the debt service payment for bonds issued to construct the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Building. • Additional transfer out to General Fund for the payroll and related benefits and costs totaling $174,971 Fund Balance • Fund balance will decrease by $118,902 based on the above revenues, expenditures and transfers out "n Special Revenue Grant Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax Charges for Services - - Contributions 65,000 Beverage Tax - Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures Investment Earnings - Misc Income 152,950 Total Revenues 152,950 Transfers In 8,050 Total Other Sources 8,050 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES - 161,000 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits - - Supplies 65,000 Services - Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt - Capital Outlay 96,000 Economic Development Incentives - Capital Projects - Total Expenditures 161,000 Transfers Out Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES - 161,000 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES - - - 'UND BALANCE, BEGINNING 'UND BALANCE, ENDING - Restricted/Designated Funds 1NDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS - 118 SPECIAL REVENUE GRANT FUND This Grant Fund was created to maintain all local, state and federally financed programs or expenditures legally restricted for specific purposes. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/11 are projected to be $0. • FY 09/10 adopted budget anticipated the funding of a federal grant that the Town did not receive. • No grants are projected to be received in FY 10/1 1 Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $0. fife] FM1938 Engineering Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax - Charges for Services - Contributions 360,938 Beverage Tax - Franchise Fees - Permits & Fees - Fines & Forfeitures - Investment Earnings - Misc Income - Total Revenues 360,938 Transfers In 25,814 1,256 Total Other Sources 25,814 1,256 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 386,752 1,256 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies - - Services 463,313 1,264 Insurance - - Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Capital Projects - - Total Expenditures 463,313 1,264 Transfers Out - - Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 463,313 1,264 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 (76,561) 'UND BALANCE, BEGINNING 76,569 8tti(0011 'UND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds JNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 8 8 Restricted/Designated Funds TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS - 120 FUND IUVFF\ff F\r\r FM 1938 FUND This is a Texas Department of Transportation project which staff felt justified setting up a separate fund to track pass-through expenditures and contributions from other cities associated with this project. This long-term project has received contributions from several surrounding cities with the Town keeping the books for the "Engineering" portion of the project. This is essentially a "pass-through" account used to track local expenditures from the cities participating in this project. Construction of the $15 Million Phase I, FM 1938 (Precinct Line Road) Improvements Project began during FY 09/10; therefore the Town's involvement in the "Engineering" portion of the project has been completed. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $0 • Town's bookkeeping portion of the project was completed in FY 09/10. Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $0 • Town's bookkeeping portion of the project was completed in FY 09/10. 121 Property Tax Reduction Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax 916,102 726,300 912,000 812,500 Property Tax - - - - Hotel Tax Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures - - - - Investment Earnings 4,728 1,000 5,800 5,800 Misc Income - - - - Total Revenues 920,830 727,300 917,800 818,300 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources - - TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 920,830 727,300 917,800 818,300 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Capital Projects Total Expenditures - Transfers Out 358,461 1,035,680 635,511 1,736,377 Total Other Uses 358,461 1,035,680 635,511 1,736,377 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 358,461 1,035,680 635,511 1,736,377 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 562,369 (308,380) 282,289 1(918,077) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 505,665 1,068,034 1,068,034 1,350,323 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 1,068,034 IW 1,350,323 Restricted/Designated Funds - - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 1,068,034 759,654 1,350,323 432,246 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - FEND OVERVIEW PROPERTY TAX REDUCTION SALES TAX FUND The Westlake Property Tax Reduction (PTR) Fund receives its funding from a '/2 cent sales tax levy that was formerly earmarked for the 4A Economic Development Corporation. The purpose of this fund is to reduce local property tax rates throughout Texas by providing cities with an additional unrestricted revenue source. Until FY 10/11, in Westlake's case, the revenue mitigated economic pressures to adopt a local property tax. In 2006 the voters of Westlake approved the dissolution of the 4A '/2 cent tax and the implantation of the '/2 cent tax to reduce property taxes in order to secure a less restrictive funding source for the Town. A portion of these funds are used to pay remaining debt service over and above that provided by the 4B Economic Development Corporation. These monies may be utilized for general Town expenditures and to fund a portion of debt service and the Vehicle and Equipment Replacement Fund in FY 10/1 1. Revenues • Anticipated FY 09/10 revenues are $917,800 o Includes a one-time payment of $125,000 based on a development "Situs" agreement entered into with Deloitte o The above payment is based on a total one-time "Situs" agreement revenue received from Deloitte estimated to be $500,000 ■ (50%) $250,000 will be returned to Deloitte. ■ (25%) $125,000 will be distributed to 4B Economic Development Fund. ■ (25%) $125,000 will be distributed to Property Tax Reduction Fund. • FY 10/1 1 revenues are anticipated to be $818,300 o a decrease of $99,500 (11%) from the FY 09/10 estimated budget of $917,800 o FY 10/11 budgeted Deloitte project funds are $187,500. o The above payment is based on a total one-time "Situs" agreement revenue received from Deloitte projected to be $750,000 • (50%) $375,000 will be returned to Deloitte. ■ (25%) $187,500 will be distributed to 4B Economic Development Fund. ■ (25%) $187,500 will be distributed to Property Tax Reduction Fund. Expenditures and Transfers Out • A Transfer OF $480,103 TO THE Debt Service Fund • A transfer of $10,000 to the Vehicle and Equipment Replacement fund • A transfer of $41,274 to the General Major Maintenance Fund • A transfer of $1,205,000 to the Capital Projects Fund. Fund Balance • Fund Balance will decrease by $918,077 bringing the anticipated FY 10/11 ending balance to $432,246. 123 Lone Star Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures - - - - Investment Earnings 110 100 100 100 Misc Income - - - - Total Revenues 110 100 100 100 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 110 100 100 100 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives Capital Projects Total Expenditures Transfers Out Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 110 1 100 1 100 100 FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING t13,_569569 459 13,569 13,569 13,669 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 13,6b9 13,669 Restricted/Designated Funds- - - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 13,669 13,669 13,769 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 124 FUND OVERVIEW LONE STAR FUND This fund was set up initially with donations from several involved corporations that were going to benefit from tax-exempt bonds. The Lone Star Public Facilities Corporation was founded in 1996 and was designed "to provide for the acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, repair, equipping, furnishing and placement in service of public facilities in an orderly, planned manner and at the lowest possible borrowing costs." The ideas was to "acquire, through the issuance of installment sale obligations, office buildings, located within the State of Texas but outside the boundaries of Westlake, whose tenants will be limited to those entities which are qualifying tenants under applicable federal income tax law so the interest payable with respect to the installment sale obligations will be exempt from federal income taxation." No bonds were ever issued. The fund is earning interest annually. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $100 in interest earnings. Expenditures • There have been no expenditures from this fund since inception 125 SECTION 04 Debt Service Fund The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Debt Service Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax - 24,980 Hotel Tax Supplies - - Charges for Services - Services 1,130 Contributions 1,500 1,500 Insurance Beverage Tax - - - Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Rent & Utilities Fines & Forfeitures Interfund Advances - Investment Earnings - - Debt Misc Income 1,498,250 1,498,250 - Total Revenues - - 24,980 Transfer in from VA 368,861 179,275 179,275 180,944 Transfer in from 4B Transfer in from PTR Total Other Sources 1,132,726 757,131 - 563,344 1,501,587 1,499,750 942,106 378,369 1,499,750 842,231 480,103 1,503,278 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1,501,587 1,499;750 1,499,750 1,528,258 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies - - - - Services 1,130 1,500 1,500 1,500 Insurance - - - - Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances - - - - Debt 1,500,457 1,498,250 1,498,250 1,526,758 Capital Outlay - - - - Economic Development Incentives Capital Projects - - - - Total Expenditures 1,501,587 1,499,750 1,499,750 1,528,258 Transfers Out - - - - Total Other Uses - - - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1,501,587 1,499,750 1,499,750 1,528,258 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES - UND BALANCE, BEGINNING LIND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds INDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS - - - 127 FUND OVERVIEW DEBT SERVICE FUND The Debt Service Fund was created to clearly illustrate the Town's debt service picture. The Town's debt obligations are consolidated into one fund with payments being transferred from 4B Economic Development Fund, Property Tax Reduction Fund and the Visitors Association Fund for the payment of our original two issues of certificates of obligation, the bond refunding in relation to the construction of the Civic Campus, as well as the $2.5 million in G.O. Bonds issued in FY 07-08. The Council approved $1.9M in anticipated CO's for various capital projects during the current fiscal year. Future CO's and General Obligation debt issuances would also be paid from this fund. The Debt Service Fund is used for the payment of general long-term debt principal, interest and related costs of Town issued debt. The Town of Westlake implemented an ad valorem property tax for the first time during the current year. There is no direct limit on debt for the Town. The Constitution of the State of Texas provides that the ad valorem tax levied by the Issuer for general purposes and for the purpose of paying debt service requirements of the Issuer's general obligation debt shall not exceed $1.50 for each $100 of assessed valuation of taxable property. The Town issued no debt during the 2010 fiscal year. Shown below is the Town's debt position as of the beginning of FY 2011. Outstanding General Obligation Bonds and Certificates of Obligation Principal $ 20,185,000 Interest 12,081,379 Total $ 32.266.379 Debt service payments are made for the following issues made for the construction of the Westlake Academy facilities: $12,400,000 Certificates of Obligation -Series 2002 $ 6,410,000 Certificates of Obligation - Series 2003 $ 7,465,000 General Obligation Refunding Bonds - Series 2007 (partial refund of $12.4 CO issue) $ 2,500,000 General Obligation Bonds - Series 2002 Revenues and Transfers In • Current debt service on the Westlake Civic Campus is paid by o Transfers in from 4B Economic Development Fund o Transfers in from Property Tax Reduction Fund o Transfers in from Visitors Association Fund for FY 10/1 1 o Ad Valorem Property Tax of $24,980 Expenditures • Expenditures for the Debt Service Fund are budgeted o at $1,528,528 o an increase of $28,508 in interest from FY 09/10 based on the intended issue of $1.9M bond issue for various capital projects 128 Debt Service Fund Long -Term Debt Summary All Bonds Pymt # Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 1 2011 $ 555,000 $ 946,778 $ 1,501,778 2 2012 580,000 918,450 1,498,450 3 2013 610,000 888,528 1,498,528 4 2014 640,000 856,906 1,496,906 5 2015 675,000 823,442 1,498,442 6 2016 710,000 787,864 1,497,864 7 2017 740,000 760,197 1,500,197 8 2018 775,000 730,089 1,505,089 9 2019 810,000 691,257 1,501,257 10 2020 850,000 649,870 1,499,870 11 2021 895,000 606,461 1,501,461 12 2022 940,000 560,744 1,500,744 13 2023 985,000 512,719 1,497,719 14 2024 1,040,000 462,385 1,502,385 15 2025 1,090,000 408,530 1,498,530 16 2026 1,130,000 362,154 1,492,154 17 2027 1,185,000 314,082 1,499,082 18 2028 1,240,000 263,668 1,503,668 19 2029 1,1 10,000 209,945 1,319,945 20 2030 1,155,000 161,095 1,316,095 21 2031 1,210,000 110,060 1,320,060 22 2032 1,260,000 56,160 1,316,160 TOTAL $ 20,185,000 $ 12,081,379 $ 32,266,379 Annual Funding Requirements 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% -1 M U) n 01 -1 M V1 n 01 `-I rl r1 .-i c -i 1-1 N N N N N M O O O O O O O O O O O N N N N N N N N N N N ■ Interest o Principal 129 Debt Service Fund Schedule of Requirements General Obligation Bonds - Series 2008 Pymt # Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 1 2011 $ 90,000 $ 90,944 $ 180,944 2 2012 95,000 87,416 182,416 3 2013 100,000 83,692 183,692 4 2014 100,000 79,772 179,772 5 2015 105,000 75,852 180,852 6 2016 110,000 71,736 181,736 7 2017 115,000 67,424 182,424 8 2018 120,000 62,916 182,916 9 2019 125,000 58,212 183,212 10 2020 130,000 53,312 183,312 11 2021 135,000 48,216 183,216 12 2022 140,000 42,924 182,924 13 2023 145,000 37,436 182,436 14 2024 150,000 31,752 181,752 15 2025 155,000 25,872 180,872 16 2026 160,000 19,796 179,796 17 2027 170,000 13,524 183,524 18 2028 175,000 6,860 181,860 TOTAL $ 2,320,000 $ 957,656 $ 3,277,656 Original Issue: $2,500,000 Issue Date: June 18, 2008 Use: Construction of the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center (Partial) 130 Debt Service Fund Schedule of Requirements GO Refunding Bonds - Series 2007 Pymt # Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 1 2011 $ 25,000 $ 297,545 $ 322,545 2 2012 25,000 296,545 321,545 3 2013 25,000 295,545 320,545 4 2014 35,000 294,608 329,608 5 2015 35,000 293,295 328,295 6 2016 410,000 291,983 701,983 7 2017 425,000 276,608 701,608 8 2018 40,000 259,608 299,608 9 2019 40,000 258,008 298,008 10 2020 45,000 256,408 301,408 11 2021 50,000 254,608 304,608 12 2022 55,000 252,608 307,608 13 2023 60,000 250,408 310,408 14 2024 65,000 248,008 313,008 15 2025 645,000 245,408 890,408 16 2026 670,000 219,608 889,608 17 2027 700,000 192,808 892,808 18 2028 730,000 164,808 894,808 19 2029 760,000 134,695 894,695 20 2030 790,000 103,345 893,345 21 2031 825,000 70,560 895,560 22 2032 855,000 35,910 890,910 TOTAL $ 7,310,000 $ 4,992,920 $ 12,302,920 Original Issue: $ 7,465,000 Issue Date: March 15, 2007 Use: Partial refunding of Series 2002 Used for the construction of the Civic Campus Westlake Academy 131 Debt Service Fund Schedule of Requirements Certificates of Obligation - Series 2003 Pymt # Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 1 2011 $ 160,000 $ 265,914 $ 425,914 2 2012 165,000 260,314 425,314 3 2013 170,000 254,291 424,291 4 2014 175,000 248,001 423,001 5 2015 185,000 241,220 426,220 6 2016 190,000 233,820 423,820 7 2017 200,000 225,840 425,840 8 2018 210,000 217,240 427,240 9 2019 220,000 208,000 428,000 10 2020 230,000 197,550 427,550 11 2021 240,000 186,625 426,625 12 2022 250,000 175,225 425,225 13 2023 260,000 163,350 423,350 14 2024 275,000 151,000 426,000 15 2025 290,000 137,250 427,250 16 2026 300,000 122,750 422,750 17 2027 315,000 107,750 422,750 18 2028 335,000 92,000 427,000 19 2029 350,000 75,250 425,250 20 2030 365,000 57,750 422,750 21 2031 385,000 39,500 424,500 22 2032 405,000 20,250 425,250 TOTAL $ 5,675,000 $ 3,680,890 $ 9,355,890 Original Issue: $6,410,000 Issue Date: June 23, 2003 Use: Second phase construction of Civic Campus (Westlake Academy) 132 Debt Service Fund Schedule of Requirements Certificates of Obligation - Series 2002 Pymt # Fiscal Year Principal Interest Total 1 2011 $ 280,000 $ 292,375 $ 572,375 2 2012 295,000 274,175 569,175 3 2013 315,000 255,000 570,000 4 2014 330,000 234,525 564,525 5 2015 350,000 213,075 563,075 6 2016 - 190,325 190,325 7 2017 0 190,325 190,325 8 2018 405,000 190,325 595,325 9 2019 425,000 167,038 592,038 10 2020 445,000 142,600 587,600 11 2021 470,000 117,013 587,013 12 2022 495,000 89,988 584,988 13 2023 520,000 61,525 581,525 14 2024 550,000 31,625 581,625 TOTAL $ 4,880,000 $ 2,449,913 $ 7,329,913 Original Issue: $12,400,000 Issue Date: January 15, 2002 Use: First phase construction of Civic Campus (Westlake Academy) 133 SECTION 05 Enterprise Funds The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Cemetery Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax Charges for Services - 13,550 - 13,800 - 13,800 Contributions - - - Beverage Tax Payroll Related & Benefits Franchise Fees - - Supplies Permits & Fees 9,000 - 6,200 Fines & Forfeitures 124 - - Investment Earnings - - 75 75 Misc Income 2,400 3,000 3,000 3,000 Total Revenues 2,400 16,550 16,875 16,875 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 2,400 16,550 16,875 16,875 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits - - - Supplies - 9,000 - 6,200 Services 124 9,000 8,600 13,150 Insurance - - - - Repair & Maintenance 350 6,000 3,750 5,000 Rent & Utilities - - - - Interfund Advances Debt - Capital Outlay 12,000 Economic Development Incentives - Capital Projects - - - - Total Expenditures 474 24,000 24,350 24,350 Transfers Out Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES - - 474 - 24,000 - 24,350 - 24,350 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1,926 (7,450) (7,475) (7,475) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 161,430 163,356 163,356 155,881 FUND BALANCE, ENDING MEN 1163,356 155,881 148,466 Restricted/Designated Funds - - - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 163,356 155,906 155,881 148,406 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 135 CEMETERY FUND The Cemetery program includes all operations associated with the 5.5 acre cemetery located on J.T. Ottinger Road. This includes interment, lot sales, record keeping, and all maintenance associated with the grounds, fence tree and flower beds. The cemetery was donated and conveyed by deed to the Town during FY 08/09. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $16,875 • This remains flat compared to FY 09/10 estimated revenues. Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $24,350. • This remains flat compared to FY 09/10 estimated expenditures. 136 Utility Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 i� Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES Charges for Services 2,345,724 2,520,166 2,359,166 2,417,166 Contributions - - - - Franchise Fees - - - - Permits & Fees - - - - Intergovermental - - - - Fines & Forfeitures - - - - Investment Earnings 7,858 3,600 5,350 1,600 Misc Income 74,866 8,000 38,000 8,000 Total Revenues 2,428,448 2,531,766 2,402,516 2,426,766 Transfers In - - - - Total Other Sources - 605,000 - - TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 2,428,448 2,531,766 2,402,516 2,267,881 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1 781,998 1 1,496,710 1,496,710 1 1,289,731 Payroll / Salaries 149,644 169,119 170,121 - Payroll Related & Benefits 47,041 55,165 55,942 - Supplies 4,948 7,717 7,667 7,667 Services 1,233,842 1,415,544 1,486,892 1,486,749 Insurance 6,132 6,439 5,714 5,886 Repair & Maintenance 81,278 83,400 95,500 95,500 Rent & Utilities 95,527 111,805 110,375 110,375 Debt 150,645 274,904 195,784 253,784 Capital Outlay 68,971 59,000 59,000 59,000 Capital Projects 20,497 605,000 360,000 248,920 Total Expenditures 1,858,526 2,788,093 2,546,995 2,267,881 Transfers Out - Payroll - - - 227,292 Transfers Out - Impact 76,321 142,500 62,500 18,000 Total Other Uses 76,321 1 142,500 62,500 245,292 TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1,934,847 2,930,593 2,609,495 2,513,173 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 493,601 1 (398,827) (206,979),I&_(86,407) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 1 781,998 1 1,496,710 1,496,710 1 1,289,731 FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds 1,275,599 125,540 1,097,883 125,540 1,289,731 135,000 1 1,203,325 135,000 UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 1,150,059 972,343 1,154,731 1,068,325 # Days Operating 248 185 211 195 Restricted/ Designated Funds Water/Sewer Deposits Texpool 10131 116,600 116,600 - - Water/Sewer Deposits Cash 101121 8,940 1 8,940 1 135,000 135,000 TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUND 7-125,000 137 Utility Fund Public Works Department Director Jarrod Greenwood Department Phone 817-490-5717 Program I Activity Budget Percent Water Services 1 Maintenance & Repairs 232,704 10.36% 2 Regulatory Monitoring & Reporting 39,432 1.76% 3 Water Conservation 18,516 0.82% 4 Customer Service 55,548 2.47% 5 Meter Testing & Replacement 67,782 3.02% 6 Wholesale Water Purchases 1,051,600 46.82% 7 Contract Management 168,152 7.49% 2.50% $ 1,633,733 72.73% Sewer Services 1 Maintenance & Repairs 17,788 0.79% 2 Regulatory Monitoring & Reporting 4,020 0.18% 3 Wastewater Treatment 377,000 16.78% 4 Contract Management 17,098 0.76% $ $ 415,9061 18.52% Solid Waste & Recycling Citizen Engagement and Communication 1 Neighborhood Gatherings & Outreachi 3,8391 0.17% $ 3,8391 0.17% Accounting Services - Municipal 1 1 5,608 Solid Waste 2 14,397 0.640 0.29% 2 Payroll Recycling 0.28% 14,397 0.64% Utility Billing Services 0.86% $ 28,794 1.28% 1 Utility Billing Annual Budget 56,219 2.50% Municipal Governance $ $ 56,2191 2.50% 1 Town Council Meetings/Workshops 34,553 1.54% S 34.5531 1.54% Citizen Engagement and Communication 1 Neighborhood Gatherings & Outreachi 3,8391 0.17% $ 3,8391 0.17% Accounting Services - Municipal 1 Accounts Payable 5,608 0.25% 2 Accounts Receivable 6,604 0.29% 3 Payroll 6,298 0.28% 4 Financial Reporting 19,370 0.86% 5 Cash & Investment Management 2,083 0.09% 6 Annual Budget 26,936 1.20% $ 66,900 2.98% Municipal Administration 1 Support Services - Human Resourcesl 6,3081 0.28% $ 6,3081 0.28% $ 2,246,253 100% ** Includes $227,292 in transfers out to General Fund forjP$yroll related items FUND IUVFF\ff F\r\r UTILITY FUN® The Utility Fund accounts for water and wastewater services for the residents of the Town. All activities necessary to provide such services are accounted for in the fund, including administration, operations, maintenance, financing and related debt service, and billing and collection. In addition, this fund contains the planning and implementation of the "Westlake Duct Bank". The duct bank is a series of underground conduits designed to house underground telecommunications services in Westlake. The duct bank is a public/private partnership that utilizes private sector capital, town planning and engineering and town operation. Phase I was completed in FY 00/01 and became ready for occupancy in FY 01 /02. The first leases were entered into in FY 02/03 with payments totaling $281,293. In FY 03/04, the Town received payment from Verizon in the amount of $183,452. FY 2004/2005 saw the completion of the duct bank extension from Vaquero to Pearson Road and generated $107,831 in revenue to the Town in FY 04/05. The Utility Fund is responsible for all water, sewer, and telecommunications duct bank service in the Town. The water and sewer services have become more efficient with the inclusion of the Town's Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system and pressure release valves. The Town continues to use these new technologies to control inflows into our storage facilities and minimize the annual peak payment charges to the City of Fort Worth. In FY 08/09 a solid waste cost center was created in this fund to charge the solid waste collection fees the Town began collecting recently for its residential solid waste collection franchisee. The fund is burdened with three outstanding long-term obligations. 1. The first is the proportionate buyout of infrastructure owned by the Hunt Trust that sold the Circle T Ranch to Hillwood. The Town's agreement with Hillwood is that in exchange for dissolution of the Municipal Utility Districts (MUDS), the Utility Fund will reimburse Hillwood the share of purchased MUDS infrastructure for each development based upon the acres removed from the MUDs. Hillwood, in turn, must deposit these funds into an escrow account owned by the Hunt Trust. 2. The second long term liability is the loan from Hillwood to the Town to construct the Dove Road water line and the SH 377 Pump and Meter Station. The Town is contractually obligated to pay for this infrastructure through a surcharge on water rates. The Town is divided into two service areas, one being the Circle T Ranch, and the remaining areas within the Town's limits constitute the "Town" service area. The Town pays Hillwood $.25 cents per 1,000 gallons of water distributed to consumers in these two service areas. Each service area pays its respective portion of the overall debt based on the volume of water used from its customers. The contract clearly stipulates that this is not a general obligation of the Town. It is, however, required to be paid back through this assessment being attached to the water rate. The rate would have to be doubled to pay this debt off in the twenty years contemplated under the agreement. Hillwood has stated that once the Town and Hillwood agree on proportionate future infrastructure funding, this liability will be erased. Nevertheless, the obligation does exist and water rates should always be reviewed with this obligation in mind. 3. The third long term liability is the joint Westlake/Keller water tower that was constructed to provide the necessary water storage and pressures within Westlake. Staff is committed to maintaining an up to date cost/benefit analysis of water and sewer revenue to ensure profitability and to maintain the integrity of the fund. The budget is based on a proposed adjustment in water and sewer rates and/or rate structures based on a study performed in FY 09/10. The fund revenues were estimated based upon a water and sewer rate increase approved by the Town Council and put into effect in January, 2009. The purpose of the rate increase was to fully recover all system costs as well as provide for capital improvements and maintenance of our water and sewer utility. Capital projects funded by the Utility Fund are described in the capital improvements portion of this overview. 139 FUND OVERVIEW RPVPni iPS • Utility Fund revenue is primarily comprised of fees for water and wastewater service. • The fund also receives a small portion of its revenue through tap fees and interest income, and currently serves as a mechanism for collecting and distributing debt service and impact fees. • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $2,426,766 • A 1 % increase of $24,250 from the FY 09/10 estimated revenues of $2,402,516 Water Revenue The Utility Fund is the recipient of all revenue generated from water sales in the Town. With the opening of Westlake's master -planned residential developments, the Town placed new water infrastructure into service in 2000. As Westlake's customer base expands, additional demands have been placed on the utility system, requiring incremental expansion of infrastructure. The health of the Utility Fund has continued to improve during the last several years as numbers of residential and commercial customers have increased; however, a study performed during the FY 08/09 indicated that a rate increase and rate structure was needed to recover actual cost of services. FY 09/10 revenues are based on the rate structure that was approved by the Town Council and effective January 1, 2009. Duct Bank The duct bank is the conduit that houses underground telecommunication infrastructure in Westlake. Revenues from the duct bank are contingent upon utility companies leasing out portions of the conduit. The Town successfully executed new duct bank leases since from 2001-2005. Wastewater Revenues Another major component for Utility Fund revenues is for wastewater. Wastewater will continue to grow proportionate to future non -irrigation water demands. These future increases can be attributed to both residential and commercial growth. Effective December 1, 2010 TRA rates will be decreased by 13% ($3.919/1000 gal to $3.499/1000 gal) due to decreased treated sewage volumes, delayed capital project funding needs and associated operating costs. Waste Management During the FY 08/09 the Town took over the billing and collection of residential solid waste user fees for its franchised hauler. The Town receives a 12% fee from its franchisee for providing this service. 500 400 300 200 100 0 8 Year Analysis - Utility Billing Accounts A 7 rZ 500 FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual actual actual estimated adopted 140 2,500,000 2,250,000 2,000,000 1,750,000 1,500,000 1,250,000 1,000,000 750,000 500,000 250,000 0 FUND OVERVIEW REVENUES FY 09/10 Estimated FY 10/11 Adopted % of Total Dollar ($) Change Percent (%) Change Water Revenue 1,850,000 1,908,000 78.52% 58,000 3% Waste/Sewer Revenue 448,166 448,166 18.47% - 0% Tap/Impact Fees 56,000 56,000 2.31% 0% Interest/Misclncome 48,350 14,600 0.60% (33,750) -70% TOTAL 2,402,516 2,426,766 100% 24,250 1% ■ Water Revenue 78.62% ■ Interest & rees Misc Income 2.31% .60% ■ Waste/Sewer Revenue 18.47% 8 Year Analysis - Revenue Trend C') A) Q AAR t-. .-- <-) A7C 7GG FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual actual actual actual Estimated Adopted 141 FUND IUVFF\ff F\r\r Expenses • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $2,267,881 (reduced water and TRA cost) • A 1 1% decrease of $278,489 from the FY 09/10 estimated expenses of $2,546,370 o A portion of this decrease is due to the salaries and benefits being recorded in the General Fund with a transfer from the Utility Fund for FY 10/11 - $227,292 o Westlake's proportionate share of the TRA system costs will also be reduced Debt 10.10% ■ Rent & Utilities 4.39% Repair & Mainte 3.80% ■ Capital Projects 0 Transfers Out a onv- 9.76% 142 arvices 59.16% FY 09/10 FY 10/11 % of Dollar Percent EXPENSES Estimated Adopted Total ($) Change (%) Change Payroll/Salaries 170,121 0.00% (170,121) -100% Payroll Related & Benefits 55,942 0.00% (55,942) -100% Supplies 7,667 7,667 0.31% - 0% Services 1,486,867 1,486,749 59.16% (118) 0% Insurance 5,714 5,886 0.23% 172 3% Repair & Maintenance 95,500 95,500 3.80% - 0% Rent & Utilities 109,775 110,375 4.39% 600 1% Debt 195,784 253,784 10.10% 58,000 30% Capital Outlay 59,000 59,000 2.35% - 0% Capital Projects 360,000 248,920 9.90% (111,080) -31% Transfers Out 62,500 245,292 9.76% 182,792 292% TOTAL 2,608,870 2,513,173 100% (95,697) -4% Debt 10.10% ■ Rent & Utilities 4.39% Repair & Mainte 3.80% ■ Capital Projects 0 Transfers Out a onv- 9.76% 142 arvices 59.16% Project Number: U 10 - Project Description: As a condition of the N-1 sewer line transfer Westlake was required to conduct an extensive inflow and infiltration study. The study will identify repairs that need to be made. -• 1 PROJECT GL CODE: 500-166600-00-31 Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Construction - 101,600 - - - - - - - 101,600 Engineering 19,802 20,320 - 40,122 EXPENDITURES TOTAL 1 19,802 1 121,920 1 - - - 141,722 -• 1 Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Utility Fund 19,802 121,920 - - - - 141,722 - - - FUNDING TOTAL 19,802 121,920 - - - - 141,722 143 Thru Budget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Supplies - - Maintenance - - Services - - Equipment - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - - - - 143 Project Number: U 10-0 Project Description: S 4, "k �+ , This project is intended to transfer ownership of a section , of sewer line from Westlake and Southlake to TRA. ItLl,d Dr includes the design and construction of a metering station with SCADA equipment at the proposed Town of Westlake "Point of Entry." Westlake will be required to '� .'•: '' conduct an extensive inflow and infiltration study and perform repairs (separate capital improvement). PROJECT GL CODE: 500-16600-00-30 ThruBudget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Construction - 101,600 7,959 1 25,400 - - - - - 101,600 Engineering Technical (I&I Study) - - - 33,359 I - I - - I - - - I - EXPENDITURES TOTAL 1 7,959 1 127,000 - I - - - 1 134,959 PROJECT Planned Project 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Total ThruBudget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Utility Fund 7,959 127,000 - - - - 134,959 FUNDING TOTAL 7,959 1 127,000 1 - - - - 1 134,959 IMPACThhL ON OPERATING ThruBudget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Total Supplies - - - - - - - Maintenance - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Equipment - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - - - - UTILITY FUND Interfund Repayment Schedule Due to 413 Economic Development Fund $119,622 $293,842 $119,688 $533,152 Glenwyck Knox Road Knox Road Pymt Beginnig Farms Connection Connection Ending # Due Date Balance Waterline 2003 2004 TOTAL Balance 0 Nov -03 $ 533,152 $ - $ 87,189 $ - $ 87,189 $ 445,962 1 Aug -05 445,962 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 416,232 2 Aug -06 416,232 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 386,501 3 Aug -07 386,501 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 356,770 4 Aug -08 356,770 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 327,039 5 6 Aug -09 Aug -10 327,039 297,308 7,975 7,975 13,777 13,777 7,979 7,979 29,731 29,731 297,308 267,577 7 Aug -11 267,577 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 237,846 8 Aug -12 237,846 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 208,116 9 Aug -13 208,116 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 178,385 10 Aug -14 178,385 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 148,654 11 Aug -15 148,654 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 118,923 12 Aug -16 118,923 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 89,192 13 Aug -17 89,192 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 59,461 14 Aug -18 59,461 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 29,731 15 Aug -19 29,731 7,975 13,777 7,979 29,731 (0) TOTAL $ 119,622 $ 293,842 $ 119,688 $ 533,152 145 UTILITY FUND Debt Payable Schedule Keller Overhead Storage Pymt Pymt TOTAL PAYABLE WESTLAKE'S PORTION OF PAYABLE 32% # Date Principal Interest Total Payable Principal Interest Total Balance 1 Sep -06 $ 190,000 $ 173,730 $ 363,730 $ 116,554 $ 60,884 $ 55,670 $ 116,554 $ 1,257,727 2 Sep -07 200,000 163,344 363,344 116,429.87 64,088.00 52,341.87 116,430 1,193,639 3 Sep -08 210,000 151,575 361,575 115,863.10 67,292.40 48,570.70 115,863 1,126,347 4 Sep -09 225,000 138,219 363,219 116,389.82 72,099.00 44,290.82 116,390 1,054,248 5 Sep -10 235,000 127,169 362,169 116,053.36 75,303.40 40,749.96 116,053 978,944 6 Sep 11 245,000 118,463 363,463 116,467.93 78,507.80 37,960.13 116,468 900,436 7 Sep -12 255,000 109,088 364,088 116,668.20 81,712.20 34,956.00 116,668 818,724 8 Sep -13 270,000 98,906 368,906 118,212.32 86,518.80 31,693.52 118,212 732,205 9 Sep -14 285,000 87,806 372,806 119,462.04 91,325.40 28,136.64 119,462 640,880 10 Sep -15 295,000 76,206 371,206 118,949.33 94,529.80 24,419.53 118,949 546,350 11 Sep -16 310,000 64,106 374,106 119,878.61 99,336.40 20,542.21 119,879 447,014 12 Sep -17 325,000 51,163 376,163 120,537.51 104,143.00 16,394.51 120,538 342,871 13 Sep -18 340,000 37,406 377,406 120,936.06 108,949.60 11,986.46 120,936 233,921 14 Sep -19 355,000 23,072 378,072 121,149.35 113,756.20 7,393.15 121,149 120,165 15 Sep -20 375,000 7,875 382,875 122,688.47 120,165.00 2,523.47 122,688 - TOTAL $4,115,000 $1,428,127 $5,543,127 $ 1,776,240 $ 1,318,611 $ 457,629 $1,776,240 146 SECTION 06 7nf,lrarrial Service Funds The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Utility Major Maintenance Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures Investment Earnings 50 Misc Income - Total Revenues - - 50 Transfers In 15,000 22,500 22,500 Total Other Sources 15,000 22,500 22,500 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 15,000 22,500 22,550 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives - - Capital Projects 22,500 7,500 Total Expenditures 22,500 7,500 Transfers Out - - Total Other Uses TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 22,500 7,500 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 15,000 15,050 FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 35,000 50,000 50,000 65,050 FUND BALANCE, ENDING MEN 150,000 65,050 Restricted/Designated Funds - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 50,000 50,000 65,050 65,050 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 148 r UTILITY MAJOR MAINTENANCE FUND The Utility Major Maintenance Fund (Utility MMF) was created to provide a mechanism for repair and replacement of capital assets such as pump stations, lift stations, elevated and ground storage facilities, etc. The Utility MMF receives planned portions of revenues from the Utility Fund allocated to future capital repair and replacement. As in the General Major Maintenance Fund, this was anticipated to help avoid future bond programs and force a more conservative pattern of spending in light of uncertain future revenues. Due to the Town's financial situation, no funds are to be transferred into this account in FY 10/11. There are no anticipated repairs for FY 10/11. The Utility MMF consists of systematic water and sewer line repairs and major maintenance projects funded by an operating transfer from the Utility Fund. Projects are included each year from a long- range maintenance schedule which incorporates routine scheduled maintenance and recommended replacement and upgrading of lines and permanent capital assets. Revenues and Transfers In • Total revenues for FY 10/1 1 are $0 • A 100% decrease from the FY 09/10 estimated transfer in of $22,500 Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are $0 • A 100% decrease from the FY 09/10 estimated expenses of $7,500 Fund Balance • Anticipated fund balance at FY 10/1 1 year-end is $65,050. 149 General Major Maintenance Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax Charges for Services Contributions Beverage Tax Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures Investment Earnings 50 Misc Income - Total Revenues - - 50 - Transfers In 77,278 23,000 23,000 41,274 Total Other Sources 77,278 23,000 23,000 41,274 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 77,278 23,000 23,050 41,274 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives - - - - Capital Projects 62,278 23,000 23,000 91,324 Total Expenditures 62,278 23,000 23,000 91,324 Transfers Out - - - - Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 62,278 23,000 23,000 91,324 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 15,000 50 1(50,050) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 35,000 50,000 50,000 50,050 FUND BALANCE, ENDING MEN 150,000 50,050 Restricted/Designated Funds - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 50,000 50,000 50,050 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 150 FUND OVERVIEW GENERAL MAJOR MAINTENANCE FUND The General Major Maintenance Fund (General MMF) was created to provide a mechanism for the long term repair and replacement of large capital assets such as HVAC, walls, floors and ceilings, plumbing, electric, roadways, etc. The General MMF receives planned portions of revenues from each operating fund that owns and maintains capital assets to set aside for future capital repair and replacement. This helps to avoid future bond programs and encourages a more conservative pattern of spending in light of uncertain future revenues. Currently, because of our financial situation, the fund is not being able to be used as we had anticipated. This fund supports systematic facility repairs and major maintenance projects funded by operating transfers from other Town funds. Project lists are developed annually from a long-range facility maintenance schedule, and incorporated into a routine schedule for maintenance and replacement of major facility equipment and infrastructure and permanent capital assets. Revenues and Transfers In • Total transfers in for FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $41,274 • A 79% increase from the FY 09/10 estimated transfers in of $23,050 • This increase is due to the needed funds for the FY 10/11 projects. Expenditures/Proiects • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $91,324 • A 297% increase from the FY 09/10 estimated expenses of $23,000 • The increase is due to Westlake Academy Projects totaling $91,324 o $30,480 - Relocate pumps for campus irrigation system o $19,304 - Carpet/VCT flooring o $10,160 - Environmental building upgrades - lighting -water o $10,160 - Seal roof and overhangs o $10,160 - Exterior paint - wood treatment & replacement o $11,060 - Exterior environmental improvements - irrigation Fund Balance • Fund balance at FY 10/1 1 year-end is anticipated to be $0. 151 General Major Maintenance & Repair 5 Year Projection FUND 600 Wyck Hill resurface ADOPTED I Projected Projected Proiected Proiected 35,560 DESCRIPTION FY 10-11 FY11-11 FY 11-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 TOTALS Wyck Hill resurface 35,560.00 35,560 Main Street (170 to Westlake/Roanoke limits) 12,192.00 12,192 Dept 16 - Total GF Public Works $ - $ $ - $ $ 47,752 47,752 WA - Relocation pumps for campus irrigation system 30,480 2,750 3,000 36,230 WA - Carpet/VCT flooring 19,304 20,254 - 39,558 WA -Parking - 17,600 17,600 WA- Environmental building upgrades- lighting -water 10,160 5,195 5,330 5,500 26,185 WA- Painting/cloth wall coverings repairs - 12,468 10,660 - - 23,128 WA- Seal roof and overhangs 10,160 10,390 8,000 28,550 WA - Exterior paint - Wood treatment & replacement 10,160 5,000 5,000 11,000 11,000 42,160 WA - Exterior environmental improvements - irrigation 11,060 5,195 - 5,000 5,000 26,255 Dept 17 - Total Facilities & Grounds Maintenance $ 91,324 $ 38,248 $ 69,594 $ 21,500 $ 19,000 • 0r $ 66,752 287,418 152 Vehicle & Equipment Replacement Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted EstimatedAdopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax - - Charges for Services - - Contributions - 0 Beverage Tax - Franchise Fees - Permits & Fees 12,000 Fines & Forfeitures - Investment Earnings 50 Misc Income - - - Total Revenues 12,000 50 0 Transfers In 51,954 94,336 94,336 10,000 Total Other Sources 51,954 94,336 94,336 10,000 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 63,954 94,336 94,386 10,000 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt - - - - Capital Outlay 1,954 94,336 84,176 81,788 Economic Development Incentives - - - - Capital Projects - - - - Total Expenditures 1,954 94,336 84,176 81,788 Transfers Out - - - - Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 1,954 94,336 84,176 81,788 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 62,000 1 - 1 10,210 1(71,788) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING - 62,000 62,000 72,210 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 62,000 62,000 72,210422 Restricted/Designated Funds - - - - UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 62,000 62,000 72,210 422 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 153 FUND IUVFF\fIF\r\f VEHICLE AND EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT FUND The Vehicle and Equipment Fund (V&E) was created to provide a mechanism for long term repair and replacement of vehicles and large equipment. The V&E Fund receives planned portions of revenues from other funds to set aside for future vehicle and equipment repairs and replacement. This helps to avoid future funding shortfalls and forces a more conservative pattern of spending in light of uncertain future revenues. Currently, because of our financial situation, the fund is not being able to be used as we had anticipated. Revenues and Transfers In • Total transfers in FY 10/1 1 are projected to be $10,000 from the Property Tax Reduction Fund • This represents an 89% decrease of $84,386 from the FY 09/10 estimated transfers in of $94,336. • FY 09/10 included transfers in for projects that will be completed in FY 10/11. • The $10,000 represents the amount that the Town feels can be transferred for the current year based on our economic condition. Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $81,788 o Westlake Academy Facilities & Grounds ■ $ 5,080 - Update security cameras ■ $ 5,080 - HVAC system replacement ■ $ 8,128 - 15 ton split system ■ $21,844 - 2 ton roof top units ■ $10,160 - A/C 2 ton & 7.5 ton (server room) o Information Technology ■ $15,240 - Cisco call manager upgrade ■ $ 3,048 - Telephones/peripheral devices ■ $ 5,080 - Replacement of routers/switches ■ $ 5,080 - Server replacements ■ $ 3,048 - Network printer • Represents a 3% decrease of $2,388 from the FY 09/10 estimated expenditures of $84,176 Fund Balance • Fund balance will decrease by 99% bringing the FY 10/11 ending balance to $422 154 Vehicle & Equipment Replacement 5 Year Projection FUND 257 WA - Update Security System ADOPTED Projecte Projected Proiected Proiected 10,000 DESCRIPTION FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 I FY 13-14 FY 14-15 TOTALS WA - Update Security System 15,240 - - - 10,000 10,000 WA - Update Security Cameras 5,080 5,000 5,000 5,500 - 20,580 WA - HVAC System replacement 5,080 5,195 5,330 5,500 5,000 15,580 WA - 15 ton split systems 8,128 19,741 20,254 20,900 - 69,023 WA - 2 ton rooftop units 21,844 22,858 23,452 68,154 WA - A/C 2 ton & 7.5 ton (server room) 10,160 17,663 $ 30,401 $ 27,500 $ 15,500 $ 10,160 WA -Heater boilers 20,320 10,000 30,320 Dept 17 - Total Facilities & Grounds Mainte $ 50,292 1 $ 67,919 1 $ 48,706 1 $ 31,900 1 $ 25,000 $ 223,817 Cisco Call Manager Upgrade 15,240 - - - - 15,240 Telephones/Peripheral Devices 3,048 7,273 15,990 16,500 4,000 46,811 Replacement of Routers/Switches 5,080 5,195 5,330 5,500 6,000 27,105 Server Replacements 5,080 5,195 5,330 5,500 5,500 26,605 Network Printers 3,048 3,751 6,799 Dept 20 - Information Technology $ 31,496 $ 17,663 $ 30,401 $ 27,500 $ 15,500 $ "122,560 Pump/Motor Repairs/Replacement 31,170 31,170 Pump Station Equipment - 159,900 165,000 324,900 SCADA Replacement - 88,000 88,000 Dept 16 - Total OF Public Works $ • a& $ 31,170 $ 159,900 $ 253,000 $ A yiJ16�O -- All i'1' - $ 444,070 . Me 155 SECTION 07 �'ZpRtal Projects Fund The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Capital Projects Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Proposed Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax 121,510 230,391 230,391 230,391 Hotel Tax 230,391 230,391 230,391 4,417,647 Charges for Services - - - - Contributions 16,924 430,500 20,950 450,000 Beverage Tax - - - - Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures - - Investment Earnings 446 400 - Other Sources - - - 1,900,000 Total Revenues 17,370 430,500 21,350 2,350,000 Transfers In 267,532 160,000 194,150 3,290,000 Total Other Sources 267,532 160,000 194,150 3,290,000 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 284,902 590,500 215,500 5,640,000 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives - - - - Capital Projects 176,021 590,500 215,500 1,452,744 Total Expenditures 176,021 590,500 215,500 1,452,744 Transfers Out - - - - Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 176,021 590,500 215,500 1,452,744 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 108,881 - 4,187,256 FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 121,510 230,391 230,391 230,391 FUND BALANCE, ENDING 230,391 230,391 230,391 4,417,647 Restricted/Designated Funds 229,945 229,945 229,945 229,945 UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 446 446 446 4,187,702 Restricted/Designated Funds Proj Campus Water Well 000014 - - - - FM1938 Underpass Improvements 000015 60,760 60,760 60,760 60,760 GW Farms Reed Trail Extenstion 000019 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 FM 1938 Town Improvemen 000020 - - - - Glenwyck Farms 000021 149,185 149,185 149,185 149,185 Stagecoach Hills Drainaige TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS 000022 - - 157 FUND OVERVIEW CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND This fund tracks the infrastructure and building projects funded with general fund operating transfers, intergovernmental revenue, bond funds and other special fund sources. Capital projects are those projects over $25,000 that may extend over one fiscal year to complete and reflect multiple expense categories such as engineering, design and construction. All capital projects illustrate not only the expenditure and revenue sources, but ongoing operational impact. Completion of CIP projects may have a fiscal impact to the Town's operating funds as routine maintenance and operational expenditures are necessary to utilize the completed project. When an operating impact has been identified, it is included on the project description sheet, and costs are projected for the next three years. Upon approval of the project for an annual expenditure, the fiscal impact is integrated into the operating budget. Revenues • Contribution revenues are projected to be $450,000 • Transfers in from General Fund $2,085,000 • Transfers in from PTR Fund $1,205,000 • Bond Proceeds of $1,900,000 Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 projected to be $1,452,744 o Project Number 17 ■ Deloitte Trail Connection ■ Projected cost $374,200 o Project Number 20 • FM 1938 Town Improvements ■ Projected cost $645,160 o Project Number 24 ■ Dove Road Reconstruction & Drainage ■ Projected cost $50,800 o Project Number 25 ■ Dove Road and Ottinger Road Intersection Reallignment ■ Projected cost $25,000 o Project Number 26 • Mahotea Boone Reconstruction & Drainage ■ Projected cost $67,056 o Project Number 27 • Ottinger Road Reconstruction & Drainage ■ Projected cost $50,800 o Project Number 28 ■ Streets Survey ■ Projected cost $100,000 o Project Number 29 • Westlake Academy Dining Hall Improvements ■ Projected cost $139,728 158 Project Description: Connect the trail from the Deloitte project to Vaquero current trails. Hillwood Development can fund up to $1.5 M for Dove Road improvements. •-• PROJECT GL CODE: 410-73000-00-17 Thru 09/30/10 Planned Project Total 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 10 Design - 25,400 - - - - 25,400 15 Construction 25 Engineering - 325,120 - - - - 325,120 - 23,680 - - - - 23,680 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 374,200 - - - - 374,200 •-• Thru 09/30/10 Planned Project Total 10/11 11/12 1 12/13 13/14 14/15 Dove Rd Imp (Hillwood contrib) - 374,200 - - - - 374,200 FUNDING TOTAL - 374,200 Services (Irrigation) Water usage - - 1,023 2,568 IMPACT ON OPERATING Thru Planned 09/30/10 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Maintenance (Electrical) - - - 1,023 6,138 1,027 9,757 1,551 9,823 1,562 9,890 5,163 35,607 Services (Landscaping) - Services (Irrigation) Water usage - - 1,023 2,568 2,585 2,603 8,778 - - 12,276 10,270 11,374 11,451 45,371 OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - 20,460 23,621 25,333 14,054 94,919 159 Project Description: Thru 09/30/10 11 Project consist of the design and construction of landscape Maintenance - - - - 5,170 5,205 10,375 and hardscape improvements to the FM 1938 corridor from Thru 09/30/10 SH 114 south to Randol Mill Road, including sidewalks, 11/12 trailheads, signage, rest areas, plantings, entry Project Total monuments. Per developer's agreements: Fidelity is to 74,922 provide funding for landscape enhancements to the - median and ROW (est. $322K) and Vaquero (Discovery 74,922 30,000 Land) was to provide landscape enhancements to the - median (est. $217K). We anticipate the Fidelity and - Discovery Land amounts will need to be negotiated as the 322,000 developer's agreements don't provide a cap nor scope of - work to be designed to. The Town is required to install 914,320 sidewalk on the west side of FM 1938 from Dove to SH 3,290,000 114 per the Fidelity developer's agreement at our cost. Utility relocations will be necessary to accomodate construction, including adjusting manholes, fire hydrants, 856,900 valves and meters as necessary. Maintenance is for 74,922 irrigation only. 914,320 PROJECT 4,573,822 GL CODE: 410-74400.00.20 Thru IBudget Planned Project 09/30/10 FY 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Total Construction - 254,000 893,540 1,972,100 935,000 - 4,054,640 Engineering 74,922 381,000 20,780 21,320 11,000 - 509,022 - 10,160 - - - - 10,160 Utility Relocation EXPENDITURES TOTAL 74,922 645,160 914,320 1,993,420 1 946,000 - 4,573,822 160 Thru 09/30/10 Budget Planned FY 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Maintenance - - - - 5,170 5,205 10,375 OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - 5,170 5,205 10,375 Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 11/12 Planned 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Visitors Association Fund Vaquero 74,922 - - - - - 30,000 - - 74,922 30,000 Fidelity - - - 150,000 172,000 - 322,000 Capital Projects Fund - Cash - 645,160 914,320 1,730,520 - - 3,290,000 Capital Projects Fund - Bond 1 82,900 774,000 856,900 FUNDING TOTAL 74,922 645,160 914,320 1,993,420 1 946,000 - 4,573,822 160 Thru 09/30/10 Budget Planned FY 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Maintenance - - - - 5,170 5,205 10,375 OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - 5,170 5,205 10,375 160 Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6" of asphalt to approximately 5,000 LF of Dove Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches. Project improvements are from JT Ottinger to Vaquero. Foresee crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. The cost below reflects construction by private contractor without Tarrant County participation. This work will also include construction of a pedestrian trail from the Deloitte development to the proposed realigned Dove/Ottinger intersection.This includes 3rd party construction inspection services. 161 IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET Planned 09/30/10 FY 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 PROJECT Supplies GL CODE: 410-73000-00-24 Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Engineering - 50,800 17,144 - - - 67,944 Construction - - 311,700 - - - 311,700 Trail construction (w. of creek) - - 100,000 - - - 100,000 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 50,800 1 428,844 - - - 479,644 161 IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET Planned 09/30/10 FY 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Supplies - - - - - - - Maintenance - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Equipment - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - - 161 Project Description: Re -alignment of Dove/JT Ottinger intersection to improve traffic and pedestrian safety. The realignment of this intersection will also include construction of a pedestrian trail. This includes 3rd party construction inspection services. IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET M110SEELMMMMMW PROJECT GL CODE: 410-73000-00-25 Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Engineering - 25,000 18,702 20,254 - - - 63,956 631,500 Construction - - - 311,700 - 319,800 53,300 - - Trail construction - 53,300 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 25,000 1 330,402 393,354 - - IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET M110SEELMMMMMW PROJECT Planned Thru 09/30/10 Budget FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Dove Rd Imp (Contribution) - 25,000 330,402 393,354 - - 748,756 FUNDING TOTAL - 1 25,000 1 330,402 393,354 1 - - 1 748,756 IMPACT ON OPERATING BUDGET M110SEELMMMMMW 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Supplies Maintenance - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Services - - - - - - - Equipment - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL I - - - - - - 162 Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade F and 2" of asphalt to approximately 1,100 LF of Mahotea Boone and replace/improve culverts and ditches. Anticipate crack sealing during the 2nd year after completion. This project is not a candidate for Tarrant County participation. This includes 3rd party construction inspection services. PROJECT EXPENSE GL CODE: 410-73000-00-26 Thru Budget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Engineering - 11,176 - - - - 11,176 Construction - 55,880 - - - - 1 55,880 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 67,056 - - - - 1 67,056 - • Thru Budget 09/30/10 FY 10/11 Planned Project Total 11112 12/13 13/14 14/15 Capital Projects Fund - Bond 1 - 67,056 - - - - 67,056 FUNDING TOTAL - 1 67,056 1 - I - I - I - 1 67,056 163 Project Description: The project will provide stabilization of road subgrade and 6" of asphalt to approximately 5,000 LF of Dove Road and replace/improve culverts and ditches. Foresee crack sealing 2nd year after completion. The cost below reflects construction by private contractor without Tarrant County participation. This includes 3rd party construction inspection services. This work will also include construction of a pedestrian trail to the Westlake Academy to the proposed realigned Dove/Ottinger intersection. -• PROJECT GL CODE: 410-73000-00-27 Thru 09/30/10 Budget 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Engineering - 50,800 - 17,589 - - 68,389 Construction - - - 319,800 - - 319,800 Trail construction - - - - 160,000 - - - 45,000 - - - 160,000 45,000 Landscaping EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 50,800 1 - 542,389 - - 593,189 -• Thru 09/30/10 Budget 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Capital Projects Fund - Bond 1 - 50,800 - 542,389 - - 593,189 FUNDING TOTAL - 1 50,800 1 - 542,389 - - 1 593,189 Imul- WeIgIVIN Thru 09/30/10 Budget Planned 10/11 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Project Total Maintenance (Electrical) - - - 514 1,137 1,145 2,796 Services (Landscaping) - - - - 1,034 1,041 2,075 Services (Irrigation) - - - - 1,551 1,562 3,113 Water usages - - - 10,230 9,243 9,306 28,779 OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - 10,744 12,965 1 13,054 1 36,763 164 Project Description: The Street Survey will evaluate the current status of streets and thouroughfares within Westlake's Town limits. This information will be used to establish a POO prioritization for repairs and replacements as well as `- further definition of future standards of construction and ti repair. PROJECT GL CODE: 410-73000-00-28 Thru Budget 09/30/10 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Engineering - 100,000 - - - - 100,000 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 100,000 - - - - 100,000 • •- Thru Budget 09/30/10 10/1111/12 Planned Project Total Project Total 12/13 13/14 14/15 Capital Projects Fund - Bond 1 - 100,000 - - - - 100,000 Maintenance - - - Services Equipment - - - FUNDING TOTAL - 100,000 - I - I - I - 1 100,000 • •- Thru 09/30/10 Budget 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Supplies - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Maintenance - - - Services Equipment - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL I - - I - I - I - - - 165 Project Description: This project would expand the dining hall to the west of the current facility. Using the existing roof structure and slab. The fire alarm, sprinkler and HVAC systems would have to be modified for this project to accommodate 20 — additional seat. • IMPACT ON OPERATING Thru Budget 09/30/10 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Design Engineering - 10,000 - - - - 8,128 - - - - 101,600 - - - - 10,000 8,128 - Construction FF & E - 101,600 - 139,728 - - - 20,000 - - - - 20,000 EXPENDITURES TOTAL - 139,728 - - - - 119,728 :19111 IMPACT ON OPERATING Thru 09/30/10 Budget 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Capital Projects Fund - 139,728 _ _ = - - 139,728 - - = FUNDING TOTAL - 139,728 - - - - 139,728 166 IMPACT ON OPERATING Thru Budget 09/30/10 10/11 Planned Project Total 11/12 12/13 13/14 14/15 Supplies - - - - - - - - - Maintenance - - - - - Services Equipment - - - - - - - - - - - - - - OPERATING IMPACT TOTAL - - - - - 166 Arts & Sciences Center Fund Program Summary Fiscal Year 2010/2011 Adopted Estimated Adopted Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES General Sales Tax Property Tax Hotel Tax - - - Charges for Services - - Contributions 847,560 347,780 Beverage Tax - - Franchise Fees Permits & Fees Fines & Forfeitures - - Investment Earnings 21,194 432 Misc Income 6,764 1,996 Total Revenues 875,517 350,208 Transfers In 200,000 79,432 Total Other Sources 200,000 79,432 TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER SOURCES 1,075,517 429,640 EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES Payroll / Salaries Payroll Related & Benefits Supplies Services Insurance Repair & Maintenance Rent & Utilities Interfund Advances Debt Capital Outlay Economic Development Incentives - - Capital Projects 4,094,860 522,258 Total Expenditures 4,094,860 522,258 Transfers Out - - Total Other Uses - TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER USES 4,094,860 522,258 EXCESS REVENUES OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES 1 (3,019,343) (92,618) FUND BALANCE, BEGINNING 3,111,961 92,618 92,618 FUND BALANCE, ENDING Restricted/Designated Funds UNDESIGNATED FUND BALANCE, ENDING 92,618 92,618 Restricted/Designated Funds (TOTAL RESTRICTED/DESIGNATED FUNDS I - I I - I - 167 r ARTS AND SCIENCES CENTER CAPITAL PROJECT FUND This capital project was set up in its own fund due to the number and complexity of the funding sources. The project will be completed by the end of FY 08/09. This is a capital project fund created specifically for this project due to the complexity of its funding sources. The Arts and Sciences Center Phase I includes science labs, art room, main lobby, offices, restrooms, a conference room, and half of the parking lot. A portion of Phase I was funded by the $2.5M General Obligation bonds that were issued during FY 08/09 as well as contributions and grants. Students started class in the building in August of 2009. Revenues • Total revenues for FY 10/11 are projected to be $0 • Project is complete Expenditures • Total expenditures for FY 10/11 are projected to be $0 • Project is complete 168 SECTION 08 1 Improvements The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org CAPrrAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN The purpose of a Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is to more formally structure the process for pricing, prioritizing, and determining the scope of all Town capital projects. The CIP helps both the elected officials and the staff to see the most accurate picture possible of the Town's infrastructure and public building needs over the next five (5) years. A Town capital project should be defined as construction or reconstruction of any public building or infrastructure identified as a community need, whether funding is currently available or not. If funding is not currently available, but the project is determined by the Council to be important, the project is still included in the Council's approved five (5) year CIP and shown as unfunded. If funding is later made available, the project is already on the "radar screen", although it may be scheduled in the out years of the 5 year planning period. The Council approved the Town's first formal Five (5) Year CIP in the prior fiscal year. By going through the effort of a formally prepared CIP in the prior year, subsequent years' CIP should be more of an annual update to make sure of the following: • The staff has identified all the capital projects the Council sees on the horizon. • The Council can remove the projects that no longer are seen as a priority in terms of not meeting the community's strategic needs (assuming that no funding has been spent on design thus far). • Annual Council review allows project timing to be adjusted in terms of which year in the 5 year time span the project is assigned. • Annual review of the Council approved 5 year CIP allows this review to be performed at the same time as the review of the 5 year financial forecast (this is completed to see the impact of a capital project not only on the capital side, but also on the operations/maintenance side). • With Council's adoption of this 5 year CIP, along with the adopted financial policies, no capital project, regardless of funding source, is put into the CIP until it first comes through the annual update "call for projects" prepared each Spring by the staff and is included in the CIP approved by the Council. 170 APPROVED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS 5 Year Projection by Funding Source UTILITY FUND PROJECTS FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 TOTAL TRA Assumption of N1 Sewer Line Transfer 127,000 - - - - 127,000 N-1 Sewer Line Transfer I & I Study/Repairs 121,920 - - 121,920 Stagecoach Hills Waterline Connection - 311,700 - - - 311,700 Ground Storage Tank TOTAL UTILITY FUND PROJECTS - 77,925 169,572 168,277 171,636 587,410 FUNDED BY CONTRIBUTION/GRANT $ 450,000 $ 759,246 $ 760,354 $ 172,000 $ $ 2,141,600 CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 TOTAL Deloitte Trail Connection Project 374,200 - - - - 374,200 Dove Road Reconstruction & Drainage 50,800 428,844 - 479,644 Ottinger/Dove Intersection improvements 25,000 330,402 393,354 - 748,756 FM 1938 Town Improvements - - 367,000 172,000 539,000 FUNDED BY CONTRIBUTION/GRANT $ 450,000 $ 759,246 $ 760,354 $ 172,000 $ $ 2,141,600 Mahotea Boone Reconstruction & Drainage 67,056 - - - 67,056 Ottinger Road Recon & Drainage (WA -Limits) * 50,800 542,389 - 593,189 Streets Survey 100,000 - - - - 100,000 FM 1938 Town Improvements 645,160 914,320 1,626,420 774,000 3,959,900 WA -Dining Hall Improvements 139,728 - - - 139,728 Stagecoach Hills Street Recon & Drainage - 338,714 338,714 Roanoke Road Recon & Drainage (N of 170) 243,048 243,048 Aspen Lane Reconstruction & Drainage 187,020 - 187,020 Roanoke Road Recon & Drainage (170 -DC) - 307,008 - 307,008 Dove Road Recon & Drainage (Vaq - TB) ** - - - 627,000 627,000 Sam School Road Reconstruction & Drainage - - - 208,910 208,910 PROJECTS FUNDED BY GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS $ 1,002,744 $ 1,683,102 $ 2,475,817 $ 1,609,910 $ $ 6,771,573 171 # SECTION 09 Term Plannin 9 The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Town of Westlake " rlestlake, a premier knowledge based community" 3 Village Circle, Suite 202, Westlake, Texas 76262 www.westlake-tx.org (817) 430-0941 Vision Statement Key Result Area Summary and 3 Timelines Community Strengths and 4 Challenges Mission Statement Vision Point One 5 Vision Point Two 6 "On behalf of the citizens, the mission of the Town of Westlake is to Vision Point Three 7 be a one -of -a -kind community that blends our rural atmosphere with our rich culture and urban location." 173 Westlake is a one -of -a -kind community—an Community Values oasis with rolling hills, grazing longhorns, and soaring red-tailed hawks, located in the heart • Innovation of the Fort Worth -Dallas metropolitan area. • A strong knowledge/education Inviting neighborhoods and architecturally base vibrant corporate campuses find harmony • Being friendly and welcoming among our meandering roads and trails, lined • Family focus with native oaks and stone walls. • Engaged citizens • A unique rural setting We are leaders. In education, we are known emphasizing preservation of for our innovative partnerships between the our natural beauty Town -owned Charter school and its corporate • Aesthetic appeal and high neighbors. We are environmental stewards — development standards exemplifying the highest standards. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake. As a Table of Contents community, we are fully involved and invested in our rich heritage, vibrant present and History and Demographics 2 exciting, sustainable future. Key Result Area Summary and 3 Timelines Community Strengths and 4 Challenges Mission Statement Vision Point One 5 Vision Point Two 6 "On behalf of the citizens, the mission of the Town of Westlake is to Vision Point Three 7 be a one -of -a -kind community that blends our rural atmosphere with our rich culture and urban location." 173 History and Demographics Approximately 700 residents currently occupy the Town of Westlake's 6.6 square miles, which is situated in the northern triangle of the Fort Worth—Dallas area. Originally settled in 1847, Westlake was incorporated in 1956. Today, the Town of Westlake is home to several neighborhoods, all of which share a commitment to excellence, but possess unique character and charm. All residents live in single-family homes and there is an award winning private golf course in Town. The median age in Westlake is 47, and 51 % of the residents are female. Some of the community's top employers are: Fidelity Investments, Chrysler Financial, and First American Real Estate Information Services, Inc. Several companies have offices in Solana, a high-profile corporate campus near State Highway 114. Solana's Village Circle also provides a mix of retail spaces and restaurants, plus offers the 296 -room Marriott Solana hotel. The sales tax rate in Westlake is 8.25%. Of the money collected, 6.25% is paid to the state of Texas,1 % to the Town, and the remaining 1 % to a local property tax relief fund and an economic development fund. 'Westlake, a Top Employers premier • Fidelity Investments knowledge • Chrysler Financial based . First American Real Estate Information Services, Inc. communa " • Wells Fargo Bank Solana Office Complex • McKesson Corporation Major & Planned Developments • Fidelity Investments North Texas Campus • Solana Corporate Campus • Chrysler Financial —Westlake Campus • First American Campus • Deloitte University Campus (Under construction) • Marriott/ Solana Hotel 174 Strategic Plan's Organization and Timelines During the strategic planning process, the Town Council and staff Leadership Team developed an overview of the major work related objectives and mission for the Town of Westlake. The vision and mission statements were drafted to reflect the unique characteristics found within our community and the values which are important to our residents. The information is contained within three vision points which describe the areas that the Council has determined are vital to maintaining our Town and providing services to enhance the quality of life of our residents. Vision Point One—Inviting Residential and Corporate Neighborhoods Vision Point Two — We are Leaders Vision Point Three—Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake "Vision without The vision points are then divided into key Result Areas (KRA's) and outcome action is a dream. measures which serve to focus the efforts of the staff on achieving the desired results Action without of the Council. vision is simply These range from issues such as maintaining neighborhood integrity through passing the time. infrastructure maintenance and development standards to promoting historic preservation and citizen involvement. Action with vision is making a Within each outcome measure, the staff has identified key objectives and a timeline in which to complete tasks and reach our goals. The timelines are either assigned short, positive d�erence. " mid, or long-range goals, while some are considered to be on-going and necessary on a - Joel Barker reoccurring basis. Short -Range Goals = 1-2 years Mid -Range Goals = 3 — 5 years Long -Range Goals = 5 or more years On-going Goals The outcome measures are also assigned a Team Leader or Co -Leader who is responsible for working with a staff team to complete or work toward achieving the tasks in each Key Result Area. 175 Community Strengths and Challenges The Westlake Mayor and Town Council are united in their view that the community enjoys many strengths. Westlake has no current ad valorem tax, however, this requires the Town to assess and evaluate alternative sources of revenue to maintain financial stability. The history of responsible planning and zoning, along with a growing corporate campus base is viewed as a benefit to the community. The Mayor, Council and staff continue to anticipate, identify and prepare for external conditions or activities, which would detract from the success and unique development of the Town. Special attention is given to practicing fiscal conservatism while delivering the highest quality of services to our residents. Future questions on such issues as the consideration of oil and gas drilling standards within the Town, creating a retail base, revenue opportunities, efficient service delivery, public safety concerns and the development of Westlake Academy will be important to Westlake elected officials, residents, the business community and staff. Future Milestones and Events • Groundbreaking of Deloitte University • Completion of the Sam and Margaret Lee Arts and Sciences Center Strengths • Fully integrated community duct bank • Access to top quality of life amenities • Development of quality corporate campuses and partnerships • Promotion of the Town as an event and conference location Opportunities and Challenges • Further development of a diversified revenue sources for the Town • Enlarged Westlake Academy campus with track, soccer, and baseball fields • Expanded park system • Attraction of retail development • Development of extensive interconnected trail system with surrounding municipalities • Potential SH 114 connectivity to SH 1-35 • Expansion of eco -friendly / green initiatives within the Town • Further urban sprawl from surrounding communities • Review of maintenance needs of infrastructure and funding for major repairs • Need to identify location of secondary water source and develop existing water supplies 176 VISION POINT ONE -INVITING RESIDENTIAL AND CORPORATE NEIGHBORHOODS The Town is home to several communities; residential, corporate and agricultural uses. Our largest residential development is home to a state of the art golf facility and many beautiful homes. Stagecoach Hills is located along the historic stagecoach line which transported passengers from Keller to Denton. Westlake neighborhoods include: • Aspen Lane • Glenwyck Farms • Mahotea Boone • Paigebrooke Farms • Stagecoach Hills • Terra Bella • Vaquero • Wyck Hill The Town is located along the Tarrant and Denton County borders and has portions of major State highways that surround our perimeter. We are an ideal location for businesses and have enjoyed a long history with our corporate campus developments. Key Result Areas Supporting the Vision Point un -going comprenensive planning Short -Range Goals Update Master Plans: Comprehensive Use, Open Space /Trails, Land Use Mid -Range Goals Precinct Line Rd. Construction Develop Master Plan as Community Focal Point Highest Quality Development and Aesthetic Standards Short -Range Goals • Deloitte Groundbreaking • Update Codes/Amendments • Fidelity Phase II Completion • Finalize Oil and Gas Related Ordinances Mid -Range Goals • Attraction of Retail Development Sensitivity to Neighborhood Integrity Short -Range Goals • Landscaped Entrances Mid -Range Goals • Connected Trail System Long -Range Goals • Town -wide Completed Trail System Open Space Preservation Short -Range Goals • Open Space Land Acquisition • Park Space Expansion Outstanding Community Appearance Short -Range Goals • Streetscape Projects 177 Entrance to Glenwyck Farms Fidelity Investments Construction Project VISION POINT TWO -WE ARE LEADERS Town leaders foresaw the need for a facility to educate the children of Westlake in a local setting and to provide the citizens with a civic campus. In 2003, the Town raised funds to build Westlake Academy, the only open -enrollment charter school owned and operated by a municipality in the State. The Academy offers the rigorous International Baccalaureate curriculum and all residents are eligible to enroll their children. The elected Town Council also serves as the Board of Trustees for the Academy. The Westlake Academy unique arrangement serves to strengthen the working relationship between the Academy and the Town. Westlake is also one of a handful of towns in Texas that does not levy a property tax. Instead, revenue from sales taxes, user fees, and franchise fees fund Town services. Entrance to Westlake Academy Key Result Areas Supporting the Vision Point Premier Educational Facilities and Programs Short -Range Goals • Opening of Arts and Sciences Center High Quality Services Delivery Coupled with Financial Stewardship Short -Range Goals • Review of growth related policies: "Growth pays for Growth" • Public Safety Service Delivery and Funding Review 178 Producing Well Educated Future Leaders and Thinkers Short -Range Goals • Academy Students in Internships at Corporate Campuses • Academy and Deloitte University Mentoring Programs Infrastructure Maintenance and Planning Short -Range Goals • Town Facility Master Plan • Develop Capital Improvement Plans • Drainage Utility and Storm Water Planning Lon -Range Goals • Regional Rail System Environmental Stewardship Initiatives Short -Range Goals • Create Westlake Green Team • Automated Recycling Program • Plan for Environmental Improvements and Water Conservation Strategies VISION POINT THREE -HOSPITALITY FINDS ITS HOME IN WESTLAKE In an effort to foster citizen engagement, enhance our neighborhoods and increase partici- pation in the community, many of the residents serve on various advisory boards that are committed to furthering the mission of the Town and ensuring Westlake is truly a unique community. The Westlake Historical Preservation Society was created to identify, preserve, and perpetuate the history of the Town of Westlake and the Cross Timbers region. The Town is committed to protecting and improving the quality of life of Westlake residents, businesses and students by encouraging, inspiring, educating and entertaining artistic and creative endeavors. The Public Art Society of Westlake provides a wide range of professional and artistic presentations to foster the arts in the community. Westlake is also a member of Tree City USA. The Town must meet strict standards to ensure there are viable tree management plans and programs in place to help support growth and forestry. Key Result Areas Supporting the Vision Point Citizen Engagement and Communication Short -Range Goals • Improve Web Site User Friendliness • Develop Communication Plan • Review E -government Usage for Service Delivery • Conduct Regular Neighborhood Meetings Arts and Culture Short -Range Goals • Implement Westlake Speaker Series to Feature Community Leaders Historic Preservation Short -Range Goals • Integrate Mission of the Historical Preservation Society into Community Events Tourism Development Short -Range Goals • Host Regional Events • Development to Include Additional Hotels and Restaurants 179 WA Campus Fountain ,r 'rte i xnr FIVE (5) YEAR FINANCIAL FORECAST It is important to keep in mind the purpose of a forecast is to get a g eneral picture of what the organization's financial condition over time could be, based upon conservative assumptions. The term "conservative" used in the context of financial forecasting means revenues are forecast at low growth levels or even at a decline (depending on the revenue source). Expenditures, while not necessarily being forecast as declining, are generally forecast with a 2-3% escalation rate, depending on inflation. Forecasts generally have at least one scenario where all that i s as sumed on expenditures i s the curr ent level of ser vice and perhap s so me grow th in salary/wage expenses. The Council can, if they wish, ask th at certain service level adjustments, whether it is se rvice expansion or re duction, be included as alterna to scenarios, particularly if it appears that revenues will not cover expenditures in the out years of the forecast. It i s a Iso i mportant to remember, si nce the p urpose of the f orecast is to ge t an i dea, based on conservative assumptions, as to the Town's financial condition during th e five (5) year planning period, that the forecast is likely to show the Town's financial position to have reductions in fund balance as expenditures begi n to exceed re venues (even with conser vative exp enditure assumptions). This is the reason forecasting is a good tool, as it gives the Council time to strategize as to course corrections we may have to make financially, both in the short and long term. Finally, it is import ant to re member the criticality that economic conditions play in forecasting, particularly as i t re laces to sale s tax, which can be a volatile rev enue so urce. If e conomic conditions improve, sales tax receipts are affected (usually positively) as well as bu ilding permit revenue. OBSERVATIONS SPECIFIC TO THIS FINANCIAL FORECAST In preparing this fiv e (5) ye ar for ecast, t he assumptions are b ased u pon h istorical dat a in conjunction with conservative future projections. While it is impossible to accurately predict future outcomes wi th 1 00% confide nce, this pro -forma is based upon the a vailable data and staff experience. Observations about this forecast include: The five (5) year budget forecast has bee n projected by estimating property tax rates needed to maintain 9 0 opera ting days i n the General Fund. A d ecline i n revenues other than property tax and sales tax is due to the Town's dependence on on e time development fees as well as sales tax revenues and property tax. Large corporate campuses, such as Fidelity and Deloitte, have helped cover the deficit gap between Town expenditures and revenues in the past. No similar projects are on the horizon at this time that will generate this type of fee revenue. • Without the implementation of the property tax in fiscal year 2010-2011, the General Fund would have dropped below a ninety (90) day operating budget and in fiscal year 2013-2014 the five year forecast predicted the General Fund would no longer be able to support our daily operations/maintenance expenditures. The prop erty t ax i mplemented d uring t he curr ent y ear ha s he Iped wi th the c urrent needs of the Tow n, i. e. road and trail r enovations, etc. bu t the To wn s till n eeds to experience significant growth in sale s tax revenue, have another large development under way within the near future, identify alternate revenue sources, or a combination of these options, in order to continue providing the current level and quality of general government pu blic se rvices. Since it is impossibl e to predict ho w qu ickly ano Cher development of this size or natur e wil I oc cur in Westlake, the foreca st s hows on ly anticipated revenue streams from current sources. 180 • We have anticipated revenue bonds in the Utility Fund for the funding of a 1 .0 million gallon grounds torage tank that will be necessary to serve the growth of the Town. Annual payments are anticipated to be $185K annually. The Utility Fund should only be utilized for the development and maintenance of water and sewer services. FORECAST ASSUMPTIONS - FY 2010-2011 The five year financial forecast is based upon the following assumptions: REVENUES: • General Fund o Sales tax revenue is projected at an average of $200K/monthly ■ Includes a conservative one-time audit or other receipt of $100K. (50% will be recorded in the GF). ■ A total of $ 750,000 f or one- time r evenue bas ed on the Economic Development Agre ement with Deloitte fort he taxes paid on t he construction materials used in the Deloitte project has also been projected. ■ None of th ese f unds are record ed i n the GF. They are i n Econ omic Development Agreement Fund and the 4B Economic Development Fund and Property Tax Reduction Fund. o Property tax reven ue estimated a t $l, 000,430 based o n Certified Ta x Roll and adopted rate of $.1562 per $100 of valuation o No gas well revenue is projected. o Building permits/inspection/plan review fees are base d on 10 new home s and no commercial o Franchise fees remained flat o Municipal Court fees were reduced by 5% Utility Fund o Revenues are projected to increase by approximately 2% o Excludes one-time impact fees related to the Deloitte project. EXPENDITURES: • Specific Funds o General Fund - Expenditures reduced by 3.7%. o Visitor Fund - Expenditures reduced by 17`70 o Utility Fund - Expenditures reduced by 2% o CIP -Based on adopted CIP on September 30, 2010 • All Funds o Includes al I ad opted maintenance projec is and eq uipment re placement to maintain current level of service o Salary and wages increase by 2% o All funds ar e bas ed on s taff's "Pr eliminary" bu dget including an in crease of $375,000 payment based on the Economic Development Agreement with Deloitte. (50% of receipts) 181 FORECAST ASSUMPTIONS - FY 2011-2012 AND BEYOND REVENUES: o Sales tax revenue is projected to increase 2% annually o Other revenue is projected to increase by 3% EXPENDITURES: o Includes all adopted maintenance projects and equipment replacement to maintain current level of service o Salary and wages increase by 3% o Other expenditures increase by 3% (excluding any one-time expenditures) o CIP based on adopted CIP on September 30, 2010 182 FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds 183 ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Projected Proiected Proiected Proiected Fund Description FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 Anticipated Tax Rate $0.15620 $0.15620 $0.16900 $0.16800 $0.16950 GENERAL FUND 100 = - - 1,000,430 Property Tax $ 1,151,928 $ 1,301,756 $ 1,319,926 $ 1,358,356 Sales Tax 1,832,205 1,574,000 1,250,000 1,275,000 1,300,500 1,326,510 1,353,040 Revenues 2,172,718 3,295,244 1,637,997 1,687,137 1,737,751 1,789,883 1,843,580 Transfer In - VA 220 Payroll - - 174,971 180,220 185,627 191,196 196,931 Transfer In - OF 500 Payroll - - 227,292 234,111 241,134 248,368 255,819 Transfer In - OF 500 Impact 61,321 40,000 18,000 18,540 19,096 19,669 20,259 Transfer In - PTR 260 shortfall 250,000 50,000 - - - - - Total Revenues &Transfers In 4,316,244 4,959,244 •: ,690 4,546,936 4,785,864 4,895,552 5,027,986 Payroll, Benefits and Related Expenditures (2,012,095) (1,974,824) (2,487,424) (2,562,047) (2,638,908) (2,718,075) (2,799,618) Expenditures (2,122,159) (2,138,926) (1,875,770) (1,932,043) (1,990,005) (2,049,705) (2,111,196) Transfer Out - GMM 600 (77,278) (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) (5,000) Transfer Out - ED 210 (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) Transfer Out - V&E 257 (51,954) (5,000) (35,000) (79,107) (59,400) (40,500) Transfer Out - WA 199 (79,432) Transfer Out - CP 410 (149,185) (600) (2,085,000) Total Expenditures & Transfers • NET R&TI • • 0:. 27,613 35,914 Beginning Fund Balance 2,771,739 2,675,312 3,400,015 1,224,752 1,201,840 1,238,926 1,266,539 Ending Fund Balance 2,675,312 3,400,015 1,224,752 1,201,840 1,238,926 1,266,539 1,302,454 Restricted Funds 193,104 194,540 197,800 197,800 197,800 197,800 197,800 Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 2,482,208 3,205,475 1,026,952 1,004,040 1,041,126 1,068,739 1,104,654 Operating Days 219 284 95 90 90 90 90 VISITOR ASSOCIATION FUND 220 Revenues 539,623 479,975 478,975 493,344 508,145 523,389 539,091 Transfers In - -539,623 - - - - - - Total Revenues & Transfem -In L 479,975 478,975 493,344 508,145 523,389 539,091 Payroll, Benefits and Related Expenditures (134,485) (183,856) - - - - - Expenditures (206,785) (323,480) (241,962) (249,221) (256,697) (264,398) (272,330) Transfer Out- GF 100 Payroll (174,971) (180,220) (185,627) (191,196) (196,931) Transfer Out - DS 300 (368,861) (179,275) (180,944) (182,416) (183,692) (179,722) (180,852) Transfer Out - CP 410 (35,700) (100,000) Transfer Out - VE 257 (18,000) Total Expenditures & Transfers • NET R&TI • • •. •. Beginning Fund Balance 1,451,153 1,244,945 938,309 819,407 682,895 565,023 453,096 Ending Fund Balance 1,244,945 938,309 819,407 682,895 565,023 453,096 342,073 Restricted (Historical/Public Arts) 25,000 - - - - - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 1,219,945 938,309 819,407 682,895 565,023 453,096 342,073 Operating Days 1,305 675 717 580 466 363 266 183 FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds FN EC 11938 ENGINEERING FUND 252 ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Projected Proiected Proiected Proiected Fund Description - FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 1,256 Expenditures 386,752 (463,313) 1,256 (1,264) CEMETERY FUND 255 Transfers Out Revenues 2,400 16,875 16,875 17,213 17,557 17,908 18,266 Transfers In - NET R&TI • • - Beginning Fund Balance 76,569 8 0 0 0 0 Expenditures Ending Fund Balance (474) (24,350) (24,350) (25,081) (25,833) (26,608) (27,406) Transfers Out - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 8 Total Expenditures & Transfers • 0 0 0 • 0: GNOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND 210 0: •. NET R&Tl • • Revenues 250,000 00 - Beginning Fund Balance - 161,430 163,356 155,881 148,406 140,538 132,262 123,562 Ending Fund Balance 35,758 163,356 155,881 148,406 140,538 132,262 123,562 114,422 Restricted Funds Expendures - - - - - - - Unrestricted Endine Balance (proiected) 163.356 155.881 148.406 140,538 132,262 123.562 114,422 FN EC 11938 ENGINEERING FUND 252 Revenues 360,938 - $ $ $ $ Transfers In 25,814 1,256 Expenditures 386,752 (463,313) 1,256 (1,264) Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers • NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance 76,569 8 0 0 0 0 0 Ending Fund Balance 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 Restricted Funds - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 GNOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND 210 Revenues 250,000 375,000 - - - - Transfers In 35,758 35,758 35,758 35,758 35,758 35,758 Total Revenues &Transfers In 285,758 i ,758 35,758 35,758 35,758 35,758 Expendures (285,758) (410,758) (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) (35,758) Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers • NET R&Tl • • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 184 FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds 1W. Anticipated Tax Rate $0.00390 $0.01760 $0.01680 $0.03060 $0.03060 BT SERVICE FUND 300 ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Projected Proiected Proiected Proiected Fund Description FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 413 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND 200 1,132,726 942,106 842,231 654,731 654,731 654,731 654,731 Revenues 917,241 912,375 812,500 637,500 650,250 663,255 676,520 Transfers In - - - - 183,692 179,722 - Total Revenues & Transfers In MW • 0• • 0. 1,498,406 Expendures (1,501,587) I (1,499,750) (1,528,258) (1,629,745) (1,500,028) (1,498,406) (1,498,406) Transfer Out (1,132,726) (942,106) (842,231) (654,731) (654,731) (654,731) (654,731) Total Expenditures & Transfers Out •. NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance 512,793 297,308 267,577 237,846 220,615 216,134 224,658 Ending Fund Balance 297,308 267,577 237,846 220,615 216,134 224,658 246,447 Restricted Funds - - - - - - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 297,308 267,577 237,846 220,615 216,134 224,658 246,447 PROPERTY TAX REDUCTION FUND 260 Revenues 920,830 917,800 818,300 637,500 650,250 663,255 676,520 Transfers In - - - Total Revenues & Transfers In 920,830 917,800 818,300 637,500 650,250 663,255 676,520 Transfer Out - GF 100 (250,000) (50,000) - - - - - Transfer Out - FM 252 (25,814) (1,256) Transfer Out - DS 300 (378,369) (480,103) (662,803) (532,200) (423,538) (417,598) Transfer Out - CP 410 (82,647) (93,550) (1,205,000) Transfer Out - GMM 600 (23,000) (41,274) (33,248) (64,594) (16,500) (61,752) Transfer Out - VE 257 (89,336) (10,000) (32,160) 239,007 312,400 40,500 Total Expenditures & Transfers • NET R&TI • • 562,369 282,289 (918,077) (90,711) 292,463 535,617 237,670 Beginning Fund Balance 505,665 1,068,034 1,350,323 432,246 341,535 633,998 1,169,615 Ending Fund Balance 1,068,034 1,350,323 432,246 341,535 633,998 1,169,615 1,407,286 Restricted Funds - - - - - - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 1,068,034 1,350,323 432,246 341,535 633,998 1,169,615 1,407,286 1W. Anticipated Tax Rate $0.00390 $0.01760 $0.01680 $0.03060 $0.03060 BT SERVICE FUND 300 Property Tax - - 24,980 $ 129,795 $ 129,405 $ 240,415 $ 245,225 Transfer In - 4B 200 1,132,726 942,106 842,231 654,731 654,731 654,731 654,731 Transfer In - PTR 260 - 378,369 480,103 662,803 532,200 423,538 417,598 Transfer In - VA 220 368,861 179,275 180,944 182,416 183,692 179,722 180,852 Total Revenues & Transfers In MW • 0• • 0. 1,498,406 Expenditures (1,501,587) I (1,499,750) (1,528,258) (1,629,745) (1,500,028) (1,498,406) (1,498,406) Transfers Out - - - - - NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 185 FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds 186 ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Proiected Proiected Proiected Proiected Fund Description FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 UTILITY FUND 500 Revenues 2,428,448 2,402,516 2,426,766 2,499,569 2,574,556 2,651,793 2,731,347 Transfers In - - - - - - Total Revenues & Transfers In 2,428,448 2,402,516 2,426,766 2,499,569 2,574,556 2,651,793 2,731,347 Payroll, Benefits and Related Expenditures (196,686) (226,063) - - - - - Expenditures (709,681)1 (743,278)1 (743,307) (765,607) (788,575) (812,232) (836,599) Water Purchases (781,017) (1,051,600) (1,051,600) (1,083,148) (1,115,642) (1,149,112) (1,183,585) Debt Service (Hillwood) (74,927) (50,000) (108,000) (111,240) (114,577) (118,015) (121,555) Debt Service (Keller Overhead Storage) (75,718) (116,053) (116,053) (116,668) (118,212) (119,462) (118,949) Transfer Out - GF 100 Payroll (227,292) (234,111) (241,134) (248,368) (255,819) Transfer Out - UM 600 (15,000) (22,500) Transfer Out - GF 100 (61,321) (40,000) (18,000) Transfer Out - VE 257 (31,170) (159,900) (253,000) Capital Projects Total Expenditures & Transfers • (20,497) (360,000) (248,920) (389,625) (169,572) (168,277) (171,636) NET R&TI • • 0. 000 Beginning Fund Balance 1,003,110 1,496,711 1,289,732 1,203,325 971,325 838,268 621,596 Ending Fund Balance 1,496,711 1,289,732 1,203,325 971,325 838,268 621,596 664,799 Restricted Funds 125,540 135,000 135,000 135,000 135,000 135,000 135,000 Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 1,371,171 1,154,732 1,068,325 836,325 703,268 486,596 529,799 Operating Days 272 193 174 132 108 73 77 VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT FUND 257 Revenue 12,000 50 - - - - - Transfer In - GF 100 51,954 5,000 - 35,000 79,107 59,400 40,500 Transfer In - PTR 260 - 89,336 10,000 32,160 - - - Transfer in - VA 220 - - 18,000 - - Transfer in - OF 500 - - 31,170 159,900 253,000 - Total Revenues & Transfers in 63,954 94,386 10,000 116,330 239,007 312,400 40,500 Expenditures (1,954) (84,176) (81,788) (116,752) (239,007) (312,400) (40,500) Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers Out 00 00 00 NET R&TI • - • 62,000 Beginning Fund Balance - 62,000 72,210 422 Ending Fund Balance 62,000 72,210 422 - Restricted Funds - - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 62,000 72,210 422 186 FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds 187 ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Projected Proiected Proiected Proiected Fund Description FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 UTILITY MAJOR MAINTENANCE FUND 510 Revenue - 50 - $ $ - $ - Transfers In 15,000 22,500 - Expenditures - (7,500) $ $ $ $ Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers Out 00 $ $ $ $ NET R&Tl • • 15,000 35,000 50,000 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance 50,000 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 Restricted Funds - - - - - - - Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 50,000 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 65,050 CAPITAL PROJECT FUND 410 Contributions -Deloitte Trail $ - $ - $ 374,200 $ - $ - $ - $ - Contributions-FM1938Town Imp - - - 367,000 172,000 Contributions -Stagecoach Drainage 16,924 15,450 - - Contributions -Dove Road Trail - 5,500 - - Contributions -Dove Rd Recon & Drainage - 50,800 428,844 - Contributions-Dove/Ottinger Intersectio - - 25,000 330,402 393,354 Interest Income 446 400 - - - Other Sources - Bond Proceeds - - 1,900,000 1,650,000 Transfers in - GF 100 149,185 600 2,085,000 - Transfers In- PTR 260 82,647 93,550 1,205,000 Transfers In - VA 220 35,700 100,000 - - - - Total Revenues & Transfers In 284,902 00 5p640,000172,000 Water Well for Civic Campus - (60,000) - - - Deloitte Trail Connection (374,200) GWF Reed Trail Extension (55,000) FM1938 Town Improvements (Cont) (367,000) (172,000) FM1938 Town Improvements (Govt) (21,450) (100,000) (645,160) (914,320) (1,626,420) (774,000) Stagecoach Hills Drainage (99,571) (50,000) Dove Road Trail Connection (5,500) Dove Road Reconstruct & Drainage (50,800) (428,844) Dove/Ottinger Intersection (25,000) (330,402) (393,354) Mahotea Boone Recon/Drainage (67,056) Ottinger Rd Recon/Drainage WA (50,800) (542,389) Streets Survey (100,000) WA Dining Hall Improvements (139,728) Street Projects FY11/12 thru FY14/15) (768,782) (307,008) (835,910) Total Expenditures & Transfers Out 00 NET R&TI • • 108,881 121,510 230,391 230,391 Beginning Fund Balance 4,417,647 2,734,545 1,908,728 298,818 Ending Fund Balance 230,391 230,391 4,417,647 2,734,545 1,908,728 298,818 298,818 Restricted Funds 149,185 229,945 229,945 229,945 229,945 229,945 229,945 Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 81,206 446 4,187,702 2,504,600 1,678,783 68,873 68,873 187 Fund Description LONE STAR PUBLIC FUND 418 Revenues Transfers In Total Revenues & Transfers In Expenditures Transfers Out • NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds FIVE YEAR FORECAST All Municipal Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 13,569 13,669 13,769 14,044 14,325 14,612 14,904 GENERAL MAJOR MAINTENANCE FUND 600 Revenues Transfers In - PTR 260 Transfers In - GF 100 Total Revenues & Transfers In Expenditures Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers Out NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance ( ARTS & SCIENCES CENTER Revenues Transfers In Expenditures Transfers Out Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance (proj SUMMARY Total Revenues & Transfers in Total Expenditures & Transfers Out MITZO• • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance 50 - ACTUAL ESTIMATED ADOPTED Projected Proiected Proiected Proiected FY 08-09 FY 09-10 FY 10-11 FY 11-12 FY 12-13 FY 13-14 FY 14-15 (38,248) (69,594) (21,500) (66,752) 8,562,870 000 •• 4,237,545 15,000 7,833,206 8,562,870 6,372,386 110 100 100 $ 275 $ 281 $ 287 $ 292 562,745 562,745 562,745 S 6.951.423 S 7.273,721 S 8.000.125 $ 5.809.641 S 5.049.969 S 3.674,800 S 110 00 100 275 281 287 292 13,459 13,569 13,669 13,769 14,044 14,325 14,612 13,569 13,669 13,769 14,044 14,325 14,612 14,904 Unrestricted Ending Balance (projected) 13,569 13,669 13,769 14,044 14,325 14,612 14,904 GENERAL MAJOR MAINTENANCE FUND 600 Revenues Transfers In - PTR 260 Transfers In - GF 100 Total Revenues & Transfers In Expenditures Transfers Out Total Expenditures & Transfers Out NET R&TI • • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance ( ARTS & SCIENCES CENTER Revenues Transfers In Expenditures Transfers Out Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance (proj SUMMARY Total Revenues & Transfers in Total Expenditures & Transfers Out MITZO• • Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance Restricted Funds Unrestricted Ending Balance 50 - - - - 1,075,517 - 23,000 41,274 33,248 64,594 16,500 61,752 (522,258) $ 77,278 - - 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 77,278 23,050 41,274 38,248 69,594 21,500 66,752 92,618 92,618 - 92.618 (62,278) (23,000) (91,324) (38,248) (69,594) (21,500) (66,752) 8,562,870 000 •• 4,237,545 15,000 7,833,206 8,562,870 6,372,386 35,000 50,000 50,050 4,237,545 50,000 50,050 - - 559,485 sn_nno sn.nsn 562,745 562,745 875,517 200,000 350,208 $ 79,432 1,075,517 429,640 (4,094,860) (522,258) $ (11,092,732 3,111, 961 92,618 92,618 - 92.618 7,444,252 $ 12,529,887 $ 12,260,776 $ 16,492,496 1 $ 11,411,664 $ 13,441,643 $ 11,455,502 $ 11,311,437 (14,885,024) (11,871,821) (15,762,833) (13,602,147) (14,201,316) (12,830,671) (11,092,732 0. 9,799,388 7,444,252 7,833,206 8,562,870 6,372,386 5,612,714 4,237,545 7,444,252 7,833,206 8,562,870 6,372,386 5,612,714 4,237,545 4,456,251 492,829 559,485 562,745 562,745 562,745 562,745 562,745 S 6.951.423 S 7.273,721 S 8.000.125 $ 5.809.641 S 5.049.969 S 3.674,800 S 3.893.506 188 # SECTION 10 mance Measures The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org FY 2011 PERFORMANCE MEASURES Background Westlake's Mayor and Council have created a vision and mission for Westlake that are intended to establish the Town as leaders in a number of categories. Attaining leadership recognition implies the use of benchmarks and other tools that gauge the Town's position relative to other municipalities in the metroplex. This performance measurement system will be used as one of the methods for establishing the Town of Westlake's performance. It has been developed with a program -based budget approach that places greater emphasis on the services and activities than the departments that carry them out. Westlake's staff is currently organized to take advantage of cross utilization such that traditional roles and responsibilities are shared among many staff members and departments. Purpose Management, through performance measurements, creates an environment that encourages continuous improvement. Tracking and reporting performance measures on a regular basis allows the Westlake staff to gauge its relative effectiveness with respect to service delivery. It also provides a level of accountability to residents and others so that they are aware of the level of service that they can expect to receive. Performance measures may also be utilized as tools for prioritizing services and making organizational funding decisions. Deciding how responsive, effective or efficient a particular service should be carries implicit costs. Westlake continues to deliver the highest quality services possible while maintaining relatively low provision costs. The professional staff at the Town of Westlake takes pride in the work that they do and the services they offer; the staff welcomes any input that will help the Town improve the quality of life of its residents and guests. The following pages provide detailed cost information, goals and objectives of each of the 42 programs identified by the Town's leadership team. The glossary of terms provided below describes how each field was developed and its relationship to the overall document. Glossary of Terms: • Vision Point - There are three vision points: Inviting Neighborhoods, We Are Leaders, and Hospitality Finds its Home in Westlake. These were developed in conjunction with the Town's current Vision and strategic plan. • Program- Programs are specific functions that are carried out by one or more departments within the Town of Westlake. • Department - The departments that have been identified within each program have been assigned according to the amount of funding they receive that has been identified as pertaining to the program. 190 • Key Department - The "key department" as identified in the table of contents, is the department that receives the largest amount of funding for the corresponding program. • Program Objective - The program objective explains what the department(s) hope to accomplish. This objective should relate to the program and be stated in fairly plain language. • Outcome Measure - The outcome measure is a results -oriented measure related to the program objective; it should clearly identify a desired outcome that is relatively immediate. Where possible, the outcome measure has been tied into the resident survey ("overall satisfaction" rating includes the "neutral" % e.g. it is everyone who didn't say they were dissatisfied with the service) • Impact to Town Vision - The impact to the Town vision is a simple one -sentence statement that summarizes the over-all benefit the program and its associated objective and measures represent to the Town of Westlake. However, this statement is unique because it also ties into the current vision and/or strategic plan that the Town has adopted. It is also generally a long-term objective that is meant to be more permanent than the other outcome and efficiency based measures identified with each program. • Core Services - Core services are the day to day tasks each department undertakes in order to carry out the corresponding program. • Activity Measure - The activity measure is a count of something that each department does that helps it reach the stated objective of the program. Generally, this is one of the tasks listed among the core services that have been identified. • Service Quality Measure - The service quality measure is an efficiency or efficacy measure associated with the activity measure that has been identified. It should reflect how responsive the department is to the citizens of Westlake or how efficient it is at carrying out a specific departmental task that is related to the stated program objective. 191 Performance Measures Program Total Allocation Key Department Vision Point One: Inviting Neighborhoods Comprehensive Planning & Economic Development $ 85,409 Dept. 11 - Administration Building Inspections 32,396 Dept. 12 - Planning & Development Plan Review & Inspections 38,210 Dept. 12 - Planning & Development Gas Well Permit Administration 8,149 Dept. 12 - Planning & Development Code Enforcement 8,710 Dept. 12 - Planning & Development Planning & Zoning 42,348 Dept. 12 - Planning & Development Right of Way (ROW) Management 176,522 Dept. 16 - Public Works Transportation Services 72,172 Dept. 16 - Public Works Parks & Recreation Maintenance 105,606 Dept. 19 - Parks & Rec Vision Point Two: We are Leaders Municipal Governance 197,407 Dept. 11 - Administration Academic Governance 104,148 Dept. 11- Administration Financial Management 126,725 Dept. 11- Administration Municipal Administration 505,969 Dept. 11 - Administration Academic Administration 194,265 Dept. 11- Administration Texas Student Housing 27,990 Dept. 13 - Town Secretary Records Management 26,526 Dept. 13 - Town Secretary Emergency Prevention 57,420 Dept. 14 - Public Safety Emergency Operations 842,595 Dept. 14 - Public Safety Emergency Operations - Billing Services 12,000 Dept. 14 - Public Safety Emergency Operations - Support Services 227,847 Dept. 14 - Public Safety Police Services 753,550 Dept. 14 - Public Safety Municipal Court - Case Processing 86,602 Dept. 15 - Municipal Court Municipal Court - Docketing 90,245 Dept. 15 - Municipal Court Warrant & Jail Services 111,160 Dept. 15 - Municipal Court Municipal Court - Collection Services 26,128 Dept. 15 - Municipal Court Judiciary & Administration 68,670 Dept. 15 - Municipal Court Water Services 1,633,733 Dept. 16 - Public Works Sewer Services 415,906 Dept. 16 - Public Works Solid Waste & Recycling 28,794 Dept. 16 - Public Works Utility Billing & Processing 57,754 Dept. 18 - Finance Westlake Academy Foundation Support Services 24,446 Dept. 18 - Finance Municipal Accounting Services 242,676 Dept. 18 - Finance Academic Support Services 323,217 Dept. 21 - Human Resources Human Resources Administration 12,148 Dept. 21 - Human Resources Human Resources Total Compensation 3,730 Dept. 21 - Human Resources Human Resources Risk Management 14,176 Dept. 21 - Human Resources Human Resources Employment Services 5,916 Dept. 21 - Human Resources Vision Point Three: Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Citizen Engagement & Communication 196,800 Dept. 11 - Administration Election Administration 16,312 Dept. 13 - Town Secretary Municipal IT Operations 18,803 Dept. 20 - Information Technology Municipal Network Operations 3,200 Dept. 20 - Information Technology 192 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Comprehensive Planning & Economic Development I I Totall $ 85,409 General Fund Allocation $ 85,409 Department -10 General Services $ 67,297 Department -11 Administration $ 18,112 Work with a variety of tools which are necessary and beneficial for the Town to recruit new, quality commercial developments, retain existing businesses, and Program Objective market Westlake as a desirable destination for relocating employees, providing amenities and high quality of life standards for current residents. Outcome Measure At least one new business development in -progress or developed (not including prior in -progress projects) annually. Westlake continues to attract strong commercial partners and guide its growth Impact to Town vision and development in conformance with the overall vision for Westlake. Work with developers to discuss potential projects and opportunities consistent with our mission, vision and value statements; Research the impact of incentive agreements on proposed developments and manage financial components and Core Services documentation according to agreement obligations; Prepare comprehensive Administration planning document for Council review; Update land use, open space, thoroughfare, water/sewer, parks and trails master plans; Coordinate the implementation of development codes with staff and update necessary ordinances. Activity Measure Number of economic development plans/presentations reviewed. Service Quality Measure Review 100% of initial development requests/proposals within required deadlines. 193 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Building Inspections I I Totall $ 32,396 General Fund Allocation $ 32,396 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 32,396 To provide technical and administrative guidance for the purposes of permitting Program Objective and inspecting residential and commercial construction projects to ensure compliance with Town ordinances. 100% of completed construction projects comply with Westlake's building Outcome Measure ordinances and standards. Westlake maintains its rural atmosphere and aesthetic appeal through strict Impact to Town vision adherence to the town's building standards and ordinances. Assist developers contractors and property owners with code compliance; Core Services Review code and fee schedules and update as necessary; Process permit Planning & Dev. applications and review plans for compliance; Work with 9-1-1 to communicate addressing system; Establish appropriate block numbers for new lots. Activity Measure Number of inspections conducted monthly. 100% of inspections are carried out within the 48 hours of Service Quality Measure request/identification. 194 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Plan Review and Inspections I Total $ 38,210 General Fund Allocation $ 38,210 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 38,210 To ensure that plans submitted to the Town and constructed in accordance Program Objective with the proposed project will result in a structure that complies with the Town's building codes. Outcome Measure 100% of current projects comply with Westlake's building codes. Westlake maintains its rural atmosphere and aesthetic appeal through strict Impact to Town vision adherence to the town's building standards and ordinances. Review electrical, mechanical, plumbing, structural, and energy code plans; Core Services Handle inspections on new and remodeled construction; Enforce code Planning &Dev. violations. Activity Measure Number of construction projects submitted monthly. Maintain a 100% response time within the established parameters for the type Service Quality Measure of project submitted (e.g. residential = 10 days, Commercial = 20 days etc.) 195 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Gas Well Permit Admin. I Totall $ 8,149 General Fund Allocation $ 8,149 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 8,149 To balance the rights of the property owners with those of the owner or lease Program Objective holder of the minerals below the surface. Outcome Measure 100% of gas wells comply with Westlake's standards and ordinances. Gas wells are erected and operated in such a way as to preserve the rural Impact to Town vision atmosphere and aesthetic appeal of Westlake. Process specific use permit applications for submittal to the Planning and Zoning Commission for ultimate review/recommendation by the Town Core Services Council. Review and approve applications, insurance documentations, and Planning &Dev. site plans for the issuance of gas well pad site permits and gas well permits; Collection of fees related to these permits. Activity Measure Number of gas well permits received monthly. Service Quality Measure Gas well permits are processed and approved within 60 days of receipt. 196 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Code Enforcement I Total $ 8,710 General Fund Allocation $ 8,710 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 8,710 To enforce the high development and living standards relative to the use and Program Objective enjoyment of all properties within the Town to comply with the regulations contained in the Code of Ordinances. Maintain a minimum of a 90% overall satisfaction rating across all code Outcome Measure enforcement categories as measured in the resident survey. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake is a desirable place to live due in part to its strict code en rcement. Respond to complaints, determine action necessary for compliance, issue Core Services notice and take appropriate steps to encourage violator to comply with Planning &Dev. regulations and ordinances approved by the Council. Activity Measure Number of code violations reported and/or identified monthly. Service Quality Measure Respond to all complaints within 48 hours of receipt. 197 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Planning & Zoning I Totall $ 42,348 General Fund Allocation $ 42,348 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 42,348 Attract and maintain the highest quality development within the Town of Program Objective Westlake. Westlake development comports to the current strategic and comprehensive Outcome Measure plans as approved by the Town Council. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake maintains an attractive atmosphere for residents, businesses and corporate partners alike. Assess current entitlements and anticipate development trends to determine Core Services logical plan for future growth; Prepare agenda memos, staff reports, Planning & Dev. resolutions and ordinances for zoning, platting, site plans, SUP's, variances and ordinance amendments. Activity Measure Number of cases taken before P&Z or Town Council Service Quality Measure 100% of deadlines related to processing zoning cases are met. 198 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Right of Way Management I Total $ 176,522 General Fund Allocation $ 176,522 Department -16 Public Works $ 176,522 Preserve, protect, or acquire rights-of-way and corridors in order to implement coordinated land use and transportation planning, to provide for Program Objective future planned growth, to protect public utility infrastructure, and to ensure that the transportation system is adequate to meet future needs. Maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to the Town's Outcome Measure efforts to manage storm water run-off as measured in the resident survey. Westlake is a desirable place to live because the Town helps protect Impact to Town vision residential and commercial properties from the threats of high water and flooding. Work with citizens to correct draining issues; Grade, clean, and remove silt from drainage system; Respond to all 'line locate' calls; Meet with contractors Core Services to determine proper marking of lines; Oversee issues related to the Duct Bank Public Works infrastructure; ROW landscape irrigation, remove trees/limbs from roadways, etc. Activity Measure Number of drainage -related complaints received monthly. Service Quality Measure Drainage -related complaints are acknowledged and responded to within 48 hours. 199 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Transportation Services I I I Total $ 72,172 General Fund Allocation $ 72,172 Department -16 Public Works $ 72,172 Plan, manage and oversee the delivery of a safe, efficient and integrated Program Objective transportation system that supports sustainable economic, social and environmental outcomes. Maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to "maintenance Outcome Measure of Town streets" as measured in the resident survey. Westlake is a desirable place to live and locate because the Town maintains Impact to Town vision its streets and thoroughfares. Request and meet with TxDOT about re -striping, sign, and signal maintenance of State owned equipment within Westlake. Respond to complaints from motorists regarding damaged or obscured traffic control signs. Respond to request from law enforcement official and residents for additional striping, and traffic control/warning signs. Install, repair, and maintain traffic control signs, signals, and pavement markings. Conduct pavement condition survey and rate streets based on amount of deterioration; Patch potholes; Reshape Core Services and re -grade shoulder; Repair/fill pavement edges; Crack seal; Conduct traffic Public Works study and provide reports to law enforcement and municipal court services. Develop Capital Improvement Plan for street reconstruction based on pavement condition survey; Obtain engineering services to design street reconstruction projects; solicit bids and obtain contractor for reconstruction; Provide project management and construction inspection of reconstruction work. Meet with residents and adjacent property owners regarding project progress or concerns. Activity Measure Number of pavement, signal, and sign related complaints received monthly. Service Quality Measure All transportation related complaints are acknowledged and responded to within 48 hours. 200 Vision Point One Inviting Neighborhoods Parks & Recreation Maintenance I I Total $ 105,606 General Fund Allocation $ 105,606 Department -19 Parks & Recreation $ 105,606 To provide planning, construction and preservation services for the Program Objective community in order to have safe, properly maintained open space areas for families and residents to enjoy outdoor activities. Maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 95% with respect to "maintenance Outcome Measure of the Town park" as measured in the resident survey. Westlake is a desirable place to live and work because it offers scenic hiking & Impact to Town vision biking trails that are well-maintained and beautiful. Mowing and weed trimming; Park inspections; Athletic field maintenance; Arbor Day event preparation; Maintenance of the triangle at Dove Rd./Randol Core Services Mill Rd. and at Dove Rd./Precinct Line Rd.; Tree trimming along road ways and Parks & Rec at the Parchman house. Review of submitted development plans and oversight of trail master plan; Maintenance of existing trail ways. Activity Measure Number of mowings annually. Service Quality Measure There are a minimum of 36 mowings annually. 201 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Governance I I I Total I $ 197,407 General Fund Allocation $ 162,854 Department -10 General Services $ 48,514 Department -11 Administration $ 17,668 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 8,099 Department -13 Town Secretary $ 24,748 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 13,829 Department -16 Public Works $ 24,040 Department -17 Facilities $ 8,879 Department -18 Finance $ 13,763 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 3,314 Utility Fund Allocation $ 34,553 Department -16 Public Works $ 34,553 Program Objective Integration of the democratic system into our community through the engagement of citizens in the participation process and the oversight of departments centered around the public service profession. Outcome Measure Maintain an overall average satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to "Accessibility of local government" and "Ensuring the Town's vision is maintained" as measured in the resident survey. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake demonstrates leadership through responsible governance that encourages citizen engagement and participation in the democratic process. Core Services Administration Oversee legislative affairs on behalf of the Town; Conduct council meetings/workshops and assist with policy development; Arrange governance based training for Council. Activity Measure Number of Council Meetings per month. Service Quality Measure Conduct a Minimum of 11 Council meetings per year Core Services Planning & Development To provide Council support on governance issues as it pertains to ordinances, resolutions and policy decisions. Activity Measure Number of ordinances or resolutions prepared annually. Service Quality Measure Prepare a minimum of 10 ordinances or resolutions each year. Core Services Town Secretary Process Board appointments; Handle minute preparation; Prepare agenda packets; Ensure timely posting of legal notifications. Activity Measure Number of Council meeting per month. Service Quality Measure j Minutes are prepared within 5 days of all Council meetings held. 202 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Governance (Continued) I I Total 1 $ 197,407 203 Support the Town Manager with the completion of special project requests, and Core Services policy research as it relates to Town based issues; Research Municipal Court matters Municipal Court and present to Council on an as needed basis. Activity Measure Number of special projects assigned by the Town Manager annually. 100% of special projects are completed within the allocated time frame given by the Service Quality Measure Town Manager. Core Services To provide Council support on governance issues as it pertains to ordinances, Public Works resolutions and policy decisions. Activity Measure Number of presentations to council annually. Service Quality Measure Make a minimum of 3 presentations to the Council each year. Core Services Prepare for and present all facilities updates to the Town Council Facilities meetings/workshops and recommend of policy and ordinances changes. Activity Measure Number of presentations to council annually. Service Quality Measure Make a minimum of 3 presentations to the Council each year. Core Services To provide Council support on governance issues as it pertains to ordinances, Finance resolutions and policy decisions. Activity Measure Number of public record financial reports produced for the Council annually. All public record financial reports produced for the Council are posted to the Town's Service Quality Measure website or otherwise made available to the public within a reasonable timeframe. Core Services Prepare for and present all park and open space updates to the Town Council Parks & Rec meetings/workshops and recommend policy and ordinances changes. Activity Measure Number of presentations to council annually. Service Quality Measure Make a minimum of 3 presentations to the Council each year. 203 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Academic Governance I I I Total $ 104,148 General Fund Allocation $ 104,148 Department -10 General Services $ 18,460 Department -11 Administration $ 17,668 Department -13 Town Secretary $ 19,404 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 33,189 Department -17 Facilities $ 6,511 Department -18 Finance $ 5,602 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 3,314 Establish and implement a structure for the Board of Trustees to govern the Program Objective Academy, including policy creation and adherence to the standards and directives issued by the Texas Education authorizing agency and the International Baccalaureate Organization. Maintain the "authorized" status of the Academy's charter through the Texas Outcome Measure Education Agency Westlake is a leader in education; it is home to one of the nation's premier Impact to Town vision municipally -owned charter schools. Oversee legislative affairs on behalf of the Academy; Conduct board Core Services meetings/workshops and assist with policy development; Arrange governance Administration based training for the Board. Activity Measure Number of board meetings monthly. Service Quality Measure Conduct a minimum of 11 board meetings per year. Core Services Handle minute preparation; Prepare agenda packets; Ensure timely posting of legal Town Secretary notifications. Activity Measure Number of Board meetings per month. Service Quality Measure Minutes are prepared within 5 days of all Board meetings held. Support the Superintendent with the completion of special project requests, and Core Services policy research as it relates to Academy based issues; Participate in the WA and Municipal Court Campus Leadership Team. Activity Measure Number of special projects assigned by the Superintendent annually. Service Quality Measure 100% of special projects are completed within the allocated time frame given by the Superintendent. To create and maintain a high quality learning environment for the students and Core Services Facilities staff at the Westlake Academy. Ensure room temperature and lighting is adequate for learning and teaching. Activity Measure Number of lighting and HVAC maintenance checks monthly. Maintenance checks are performed on Westlake Academy's HVAC and lighting Service Quality Measure systems are performed quarterly and monthly respectively. 204 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Academic Governance (Continued) I I Total $ 104,148 Core Services To provide Board support on governance issues as it pertains to ordinances, Finance resolutions and policy decisions. Activity Measure Number of public record financial reports produced for the Board annually. All public record financial reports produced for the Board of Trustees are posted to Service Quality Measure the Academy's website or otherwise made available to the public within a reasonable timeframe. Core Services Maintain all sports fields and grounds at the Westlake Academy to support Parks & Rec Westlake Academy Events. Provide safe sports fields, campus walkways and open spaces. Number of times sports fields are mowed monthly. Number of campus safety Activity Measure checks monthly. Service Quality Measure Sports fields are mowed and campus safety checks completed on a weekly basis. 205 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Financial Management I I I Total I $ 126,725 General Fund Allocation $ 126,725 Department -10 General Services $ 16,848 Department -11 Administration $ 66,684 Department -18 Finance $ 43,193 Coordination of the financial components, including all enterprise and general fund Program Objective accounts, necessary to provide services to the Town residents. Receive the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Distinguished budget Outcome Measure award each year. As a leader in government, Westlake exhibits the highest level of fiscal Impact to Town vision responsibility and accountability. Monitor revenue and expenditures to remain within budget limitations set by the Board; Prepare and present necessary amendments based on the needs of the Core Services community or as directed by elected officials; Conduct financial policy review in Administration conjunction with the Finance Director; Prepare and present Five -Year Financial Forecast document; Monitor financial sustainability to provide high-quality services. Activity Measure Number of annual budget transmittal letters produced. Produce a minimum of one budget transmittal letter per proposed budget on an Service Quality Measure annual basis. Prepare proposed and approved budget documents; Draft policy budget; Create Core Services Five -Year Financial Forecast; Forecast revenues and expenditures; Co-ordinate Finance budget preparation efforts with Departmental Directors; Incorporate proposed projects into CIP. Activity Measure Date of annual budget presentation to Council/Board. Annual budget for the Town is prepared and presented no later than September Service Quality Measure 15th annually. 206 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Administration I I I Total 1 $ 505,969 General Fund Allocation $ 316,305 Department -10 General Services $ 137,821 Department -11 Administration $ 96,082 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 26,198 Department -13 Town Secretary $ 7,919 Department -17 Facilities $ 35,465 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 12,820 Visitors Assoc. Fund Allocation $ 189,664 Department -11 Administration $ 150,826 Department -17 Facilities $ 22,721 Department -21 Human Resources $ 16,117 Program Objective To direct the efforts of the Town staff in order to provide the highest quality services to our residents, using the most effective and efficient practices while balancing the residents needs with our budgetary allocations. Outcome Measure Achieve an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to "Overall quality of governmental services" as measured in the resident survey. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake demonstrates leadership through service, constantly striving to improve Town services and support to its residents and corporate partners. Core Services Administration Manage employees to provide public services and provide for a team centric model of organizational culture; Manage contracts with outside service providers and incorporate/oversee performance measures associated with third -parties; Draft agenda memos/policies for Council consideration; Conduct annual review of strategic plan and present updates to Council; Co-ordinate professional development opportunities for staff. Activity Measure Number of Leadership Team meetings annually. Service Quality Measure Conduct a minimum of six (6) Leadership Team meetings on an annual basis. Core Services Planning &Development Negotiate and administer contracts for services provided by outside vendor; Prepare annual budget for department; Update web site for contractors/developers; Revise codes when needed. Activity Measure Number of contracts administered per year. Service Quality Measure Review and negotiate all contracts at least once each year. 207 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Administration (Continued) I I Total 1 $ 505,969 208 Provide administrative support to Mayor/Council and administrative services to Core Services advisory boards; Serves as custodian of Town records; Administers necessary oaths Town Secretary of office; Works with marketing firm to promote the Town. Activity Measure Number of Advisory board meetings annually. Number of advisory board minutes (completed within 5 days) and posting (72 hrs Service Quality Measure requirement) as required by law. Provide support for Town Council and BOT meetings ; Coordinate lease Core Services space/repairs with Maguire Partners; Maintain fire station facilities and Pest control Facilities as needed, Security system maintenance and bid processing for upgrades; Point person for weather related occurrences. Activity Measure Number of facility and weather event emergencies responded to annually. Service Quality Measure All issues related to weather event emergencies are resolved within 48 hours. Process payroll for individuals associated with this fund; As HR Director with the Core Services operational duties of IT services - responsibilities also include web site maintenance Human Resources and updates to promote the Town and our services. Activity Measure Number of payroll and benefit transactions processed annually. Service Quality Measure Maintain 100% timely payroll and benefits processing. Participate in long term open space & master trail planning; Prepare RFP's for Core Services services; Manage third -party contract providers; Prepare annual departmental Parks & Rec. budget; Apply for grants when applicable; Secure quotes for services and determine cost effective bids. Activity Measure Number of parks & recreation -related grant requests annually. Service Quality Measure Apply for a minimum of one parks & recreation -related grant annually. 208 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Academic Administration I I I Total 1 $ 194,265 General Fund Allocation $ 194,265 Department -10 General Services $ 39,536 Department -11 Administration $ 133,811 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 20,918 To provide leadership and oversight to Westlake Academy in accordance with the directives given by the Board of Trustees in order to arrive at the highest quality of Program Objective educational outcome while providing a supportive learning environment for our students. Maintain an overall average satisfaction rating of 85% with respect to "Suitability of Outcome Measure campus for learning", "Overall satisfaction with education" and "Quality of Westlake Academy communication" as measured in the parent survey. As a leader in education, Westlake strives to exceed the highest quality educational Impact to Town vision standards through the International Baccalaureate curriculum. Manage employees to provide educational services and provide for a team centric model of organizational culture; Prepare the annual budget for WA and present to the Board; Prepare grant applications on as needed basis; Review and proposed Core Services changes to financial policies; Integrate the budget process with strategic planning Administration efforts; Draft documents for Board review; Conduct annual review of strategic plan with Board and implement goals/objectives with staff; Provide for professional development opportunities; Ensure adequate parent/student communication with WA; Work with affiliate boards as a liaison to Town and elected officials. Activity Measure Number of Westlake Academy Leadership Team meetings held monthly. Conduct Westlake Academy Leadership Team meetings on a monthly basis during Service Quality Measure the school year. Core Services Assist Academy staff, the House of Commons, Westlake Academy Athletic Club and Parks & Rec. student organizations with planning of events/activities for the community. Activity Measure Number of HOC and WA staff meetings attended monthly. Service Quality Measure Participate in a minimum of 6 HOC and WA staff meetings annually. 209 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Texas Student Housing I I I Total $ 27,990 General Fund Allocation $ 27,990 Department -13 Town Secretary $ 27,990 To provide housing scholarships for Texas university communities. At this time Program Objective there are almost 200 Texas high school graduates receiving our university educational aid. Outcome Measure The Town has maintained its partnership with the TSHA. The Town continues its innovative approach to furthering education through Impact to Town vision local and regional partnerships. The Town Secretary's office provides high-level administrative support; serves as the Board Secretary; agenda, minute, packet, and posting duties; scholarship administration process; serves as the webmaster for the TSHA website; updating Core Services the application each year and coordinating a mailing to over 3,200 high schools; Town Secretary responding to phone calls and e-mail inquires; maintains a comprehensive database utilized to track the applications received and awarded; and process letters of notification to the applicants. Activity Measure Number of applications processed. Service Quality Measure 100% of applications are processed within the timeframe provided by TSHA. 210 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Records Management I I I Total $ 26,526 General Fund Allocation I 1 1 $ 26,526 Department -13 Town Secretary I 1 1 $ 26,526 To manage Town records so that they are accessible and are maintained efficiently and cost-effectively, and so that the Town retains records it is required Program Objective to keep, identifies and preserves records with permanent value, and disposes of those of no further use in a secure and timely manner. 100% of the Town's ordinances, resolutions and other articles as designated are Outcome Measure available in a categorized format on the Town's website. As a leader in local government Westlake maintains high standards of fidelity Impact to Town vision and accuracy with respect to the records it keeps. Design and implement records management system; Preserve essential historical documents and adhere to record retention requirements set forth by the state; Core Services Submit all ordinances for codification; Scan, index, file and manage the life -cycle Town Secretary of Council generated records; Process open records requests timely; Coordinate with staff on obtaining requested documents on as needed basis. Activity Measure Total number of open records request on an annual basis. Maintain a 100% response rate on open records requests within the time Service Quality Measure allocated by law. Kill Vision Point Two We are Leaders Emergency Prevention I I I Total $ 57,420 General Fund Allocation $ 57,420 Department -12 Planning & Dev. $ 24,297 Department -14 Public Safety $ 33,123 To prevent the loss of life and property through fire protection inspection, code Program Objective compliance and public education. Provides fire and arson investigations. 100% of commercial and residential properties comply with current safety Outcome Measure standards as established by the Westlake Town Council. Westlake exhibits its leadership through its partnership and cooperation with Impact to Town vision citizens, commercial partners and the community to promote safe and healthy lifestyles. Core Services Coordinate plan review with public safety Staff; Interpret building and fire codes Planning & Dev. to maintain construction compliance. Activity Measure Number of safety-related code inspections per month. Service Quality Measure 100% of the Town's businesses are inspected on an annual basis. Inspections/Code Compliance; Company in-service inspections; Records Core Services Management; Review plans for code compliance of new building fire protection Public Safety systems; Conduct CPR and AED training; Handle evacuation drills and hazard awareness education. Total number of fire code inspections for new residential or commercial Activity Measure construction projects conducted monthly. Service Quality Measure 100% of new construction projects are inspected annually. 212 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Emergency Operations I I I Total $ 842,595 General Fund Allocation $ 842,595 Department -14 Public Safety $ 842,595 To provide emergency services to the general public through incident control and mitigation. To meet the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1710, Program Objective providing a response time of 4 minutes or less 90% of the time with the recommended staffing levels 100% of the time. Maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 97% in each category with respect to "Fire Outcome Measure and Medical Services as measured in the resident survey. Westlake exhibits exceptional leadership through the provision of emergency Impact to Town vision response personnel that meet or exceed the national standards set by NFPA. To provide for the treatment and transportation of emergency medical incidents Core Services throughout the community in order to preserve life and improve health. To prevent Public Safety and eliminate the loss of life and property through fire suppression, prevention, and incident mitigation. Activity Measure Total number of emergency responses monthly. Service Quality Measure Provide a response time of 6 minutes or less, 90% of the time. 213 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Emergency Operations - Billing Services I I Totall $ 12,000 General Fund Allocation $ 12,000 Department -14 Public Safety $ 12,000 Program Objective To provide billing services for the EMS division of the Fire Department, to extend patient care and reduce the cost of EMS operations. Outcome Measure A minimum of 75% of emergency -related bills are collected annually. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake is committed to sound fiscal stewardship so that emergency services can continue to be offered now and in the future. Core Services Public Safety Customer Service, Data Entry, Research and Collections, Billing, Medical Records Management Activity Measure Number of emergency responses monthly. Service Quality Measure 100% of patient reports are submitted to the 3rd party billing agency within 90 minutes of returning to the base of operations. 214 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Emergency Operations - Support Services I I Total $ 227,847 General Fund Allocation $ 227,847 Department -14 Public Safety $ 227,847 To provide all other services needed to support all divisions and programs; overall Program Objective department operational expenses, functions and activities. 100% of active -duty firefighters and emergency personnel have received and Outcome Measure maintained training and certifications as required by their respective positions. The Town demonstrates its leadership by providing top-quality emergency Impact to Town vision services personnel to its residents and commercial partners. To Administer and Manage all functions within the organization; oversight in ensuring the compliance of Federal, State and Local laws and regulations Core Services pertaining to the Town's and Department's operations through implementing, Public Safety review, and revision of policies and procedures; personnel evaluations; program activities; QA Fire and EMS reports. Activity Measure Number of employees who have completed annual training requirements Service Quality Measure All Staff complete 100% of CE requirements annually or as required. 215 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Police Services I I I Total $ 753,550 General Fund Allocation $ 753,550 Department -14 Public Safety $ 753,550 To provide 24/7 law enforcement service to the Town of Westlake by utilizing two sector officers that overlap into the City of Keller. The police patrols will answer Program Objective calls from the public and proactively patrol the neighborhoods and businesses in Westlake. The contract provides additional coverage for major incidents utilizing other sector officers from Keller. Outcome Measure Maintain a minimum average overall satisfaction of 95% for all categories listed under "Police Services" as measured in the resident survey. The Town of Westlake is a leader in its ability to provide a safe environment for its Impact to Town vision residents, visitors and professional community. Police Protection and response to calls for service from the public. Investigation of Core Services Criminal Cases. Animal Control Services. Traffic enforcement and motor vehicle Public Safety collision investigation. Activity Measure Total number of building and neighborhood checks annually. Service Quality Measure Conduct a minimum of 5000 building and neighborhood checks annually. 216 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Court - Case Processing I Total 1 86,602 General Fund Allocation $ 86,602 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 86,602 To provide customer service duties via various points of contact, handle the initial Program Objective citation entry of information in the court software, receipt payments, process deposits and correspond with defendants and other court patrons. Achieve and maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to Outcome Measure "Municipal Court services" as measured in the resident survey. Westlake exhibits leadership through the provision of professional Municipal Impact to Town vision Court administration. Case review and entry; jacket (case file) creation; dismissal processing; court date resets and notifications; late notice reminders. Phone, fax and mail processing; Core Services Lobby service to walk in patrons; Deferred and driver safety request processing; Municipal Court Explanation of court options for violations. Receipt and recording of all payments or dismissal fees (mail, on-line, fax, and in-person); Cash bond posting for warrant case files; Reconciliation of cash drawer; Processing deposits for Finance. Activity Measure Total number of violations entered with date of receipt and date of entry. Service Quality Measure Enter 95% of violations within 3 business days of receipt 217 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Court - Docketing I I I Total $ 90,245 General Fund Allocation $ 90,245 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 90,245 To set case files for plea entry, prosecutorial appointments, property hearings, Program Objective and trial settings, based on the initial plea of guilty or not guilty as entered by a defendant. Provide for accessible and expedient access to the judicial system through the Outcome Measure use of efficient case management practices. Impact to Town vision Westlake exhibits leadership through its orderly conduct of court proceedings. Set cases for plea docket and processing case files as needed based on the type of plea entered by the defendant; Notify attorney representatives of initial hearings for defendants who have retained counsel. Coordinate activities of the prosecutor and defendants to schedule pre-trial dates; Process prosecutorial Core Services motions for Judge's review; Accept motions and related case documents prior to Municipal Court trial for witness subpoena and discovery requests. Schedule hearing dates; Notify defendants, attorneys and officers of pending cases; Process subpoena requests and produce documents for inspection as needed; Process final judgments for each case and deliver appeals to the county court as needed. Number of plea dockets, pro -se pretrial dockets, and attorney dockets per Activity Measure month. Service Quality Measure Conduct a minimum of two plea dockets, one pro -se pretrial docket and one attorney docket per month. 218 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Warrant & Jail Services Total I $ 111,160 General Fund Allocation $ 111,160 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 111,160 Issue arrest warrants, track defendants through the citation information to Program Objective initiate case closure, perform field arrests, and work with surrounding municipalities to process those defendants arrested for Westlake offenses. 100% of delinquent cases are closed, warranted or placed in marshal collections Outcome Measure within 90 days of delinquency. The Town of Westlake exhibits leadership and financial stewardship through the Impact to Town vision effective service and enforcement of judicial orders. Issuance of probable cause affidavits for the Judge to review; Written complaint generation; Review of case files to protect defendants right of protection from unlawful arrest according to the Fourth Amendment; Omni holds are placed on driver license renewals to increase compliance. Contact defendants via Core Services phone/mail to initiate case closure opportunities; Serve warrants in the field Municipal Court through arrest and incarceration; Transport prisoners to the jail facility; Process indigence affidavits for judicial review. Search and custody procedures are handled as directed by the jail facility; Time served requests are presented to the Judge for final approval and judgment Activity Measure Number of cases cleared monthly. Service Quality Measure Annual case clearance rate is maintained at 80% of total warrants issued. 219 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Municipal Court - Collection Services I I Total I $ 26,128 General Fund Allocation $ 26,128 Department -15 Municipal Court $ 26,128 Program Objective Transfer of the aged arrest warrants and delinquent citations to a third party for additional efforts to resolve the pending cases. 100% of eligible warranted cases are placed with the collection agency within one Outcome Measure year from the date of warrant issuance. The Town of Westlake is committed to sound fiscal stewardship through the use Impact to Town vision of third -party vendors to augment the internal collection efforts of the Court. Review of sufficiently aged cases for the electronic transfer of the files to the collection agency; Electronic transfer of the information; Removal of affected cases to a pending status for the collection agency; Proper marking of files and Core Services assessment of collection fees. Case location and receipt generation for payments; Municipal Court Processing of deposit for Finance department transactions; Warrant recall from dispatch. Contract review and discussions with vendors; Billing examination for errors and final payments. Activity Measure Number of warrants placed with the collection agency monthly. Service Quality Measure 100% of eligible cases are submitted to the collection agency each quarter. 220 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Judiciary & Administration I I I Total $ 68,670 General Fund Allocation I 1 1 $ 68,670 Department -15 Municipal Court I 1 1 $ 68,670 To allow defendants and court patrons to settle or direct their cases through the Program Objective judicial process. Maintain 100% compliance with applicable laws and court costs as it relates to Outcome Measure the Municipal Court. Westlake exhibits leadership through the continuing education and training Impact to Town vision efforts of staff personnel necessary to operate an effective judicial branch of government. Signature of final judgment and motions; Issuance of standing orders for Staff direction; Overview of policy and procedures within the Court office; Archival of case files and review of destruction activities. Oversight of staff efforts; Monitoring of processes to remain compliant with changes in the law and as it applies to court costs assessed by the department; Annual performance reviews; Hiring and firing of staff as necessary; Scheduling of court dockets; Work with prosecutor to obtain complaints, and process the pre-trial and trial dockets. Core Services Attend legislative update sessions through the Texas Municipal Courts Education Municipal Court Center to increase compliance and understanding of new procedures; Town Marshal to attend warrant officer and other legally mandated training for TCLEOSE certification; Implement changes in court costs, forms, procedures or defendant notification as needed. Prepare statistical reports for the state, police department, Town Manager and Council - either as needed or on a monthly basis; Preparation of financial reports and monitoring of revenue collections; Budget preparation on an annual basis, to include revenue forecasting and expenditure review. Activity Measure Number of staff training hours on an annual basis. 100% of municipal court clerk certification levels are maintained at the Service Quality Measure appropriate designation for each position. 221 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Water services I I I Total $ 1,633,733 Utility Fund Allocation $ 1,633,733 Department -16 Public Works $ 1,633,733 Deliver safe and reliable potable water to Town customers through the distribution Program Objective system by providing operation, maintenance, repair, and installation of water infrastructure. Achieve and maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to "Quality of Outcome Measure water utility services" as measured in the resident survey. Westlake demonstrates leadership through cooperation and partnerships in the Impact to Town vision provision of water services. Meet with developers and contractors regarding proposed water infrastructure improvements; Inspect water installation and repairs performed by contractors; Repair damaged water mains and equipment; Respond to water main breaks; Restore damaged property related to maintenance operations; Maintain and repair pump station equipment including emergency generators; Maintain SCADA system operations in working order to manage pump station; Flush dead end water lines in accordance with state regulations; Maintain and replace valves; Manage pump station operations to minimize peaks; Inspect and maintain pumps and motors at pump station. Take bacteriological samples every month; Check chlorine readings in water system; Conduct all annual and bi-annual water quality testing; Provide water Core Services quality reports for residents and customers; Meet with Texas Commission on Public Works Environmental Quality to inspect the Town's water system facilities and audit of water system records; Meet with customers regarding water quality complaints and perform additional testing as needed. Develop conservation literature and messages that are included in the Westlake Wire newsletter and water bill inserts for residents and water customers; Assist the Academy with water conservation education by speaking to students, arranging and participating in tours of water and wastewater treatment facilities; Alert customers to violations of water restriction/irrigation ordinance; Represent the Town on Wholesale Advisory and Rate Committees; Liaison to Fort Worth Water Department; Provide impact fee reports for all new connections; Submit projected water system demands to Fort Worth for long term system planning Activity Measure Number of water safety checks completed annually Service Quality Measure 100% compliance with minimum state water safety standards 222 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Sewer Services I I I Total I $ 415,906 Utility Fund Allocation $ 415,906 Department -16 Public Works $ 415,906 Collection of sanitary sewer in order to provide sanitary conditions for residents Program Objective and customers within the Town through the collection system by providing operation, maintenance, repair, and installation of sewer infrastructure. Achieve and maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to Outcome Measure "Quality of wastewater utility services" as measured in the resident survey. Westlake demonstrates leadership through continued participation in regional Impact to Town vision wastewater management efforts. Meet with developers and contractors regarding proposed sewer infrastructure improvements; Inspect sewer installation and repairs performed by contractors; Repair damaged sewer mains and manholes; Clean and televise mains to ensure Core Services integrity of collection system; Respond to sewer overflows by clearing blockages Public Works within the sewer lines; Provide clean up response to mitigate contamination from discharged sewer ; Maintain and repair lift stations. Maintain SCADA system operations in working order to manage lift stations. Activity Measure Number of sewer calls responded to annually with response times Service Quality Measure 100% response rate for sewer emergencies within 1 hour of call 223 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Solid Waste & Recycling I I I Total $ 28,794 Utility Fund Allocation $ 28,794 Department -16 Public Works $ 28,794 To regulate the storage, collection, processing, recovery and disposal of solid Program Objective waste and provide recycling services in order to protect the public safety, health and welfare, and to enhance the environment of the citizens of Westlake. Achieve and maintain a minimum average overall satisfaction of 95% for all solid Outcome Measure waste and recycling categories listed under "Utility Services" as measured in the resident survey. Impact to Town vision Westlake demonstrates leadership through outsourcing solid waste collection services and encouraging greater participation in recycling efforts. Schedule dumpsters for Westlake residents to drop off large debris; handle customer complaints related to missed collection or loose debris; provide Core Services information about service interruptions due to holidays. Schedule and host Public Works hazardous waste collection day at the Academy; handle customer complaints, assist Academy with recycling efforts and education; promote and encourage community recycling efforts. Activity Measure Number of recycling events/mailers per year Service Quality Measure Increase tonnage of solid waste recycling diverted from landfill by 5% 224 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Utility Billing & Processing I I I Total $ 57,754 General Fund Allocation $ 1,535 Department -18 Finance $ 1,535 Utility Fund Allocation $ 56,219 Department -16 Public Works $ 33,794 Department -18 Finance $ 22,425 To provide for the accurate and timely billing of the Town's water, sewer, and Program Objective solid waste services. The program assists customers in establishing and disconnecting utility services, by responding to customer inquiries and disputes. Achieve and maintain an overall satisfaction rating of 90% with respect to Outcome Measure "Quality of water utility services" as measured in the resident survey. The Town of Westlake demonstrates leadership by providing high quality utility Impact to Town vision services in an efficient and cost effective manner. Open/close accounts; Maintenance of Utility STW computer billing module; Review the meter reading report for accuracy and subsequent uploading of the Core Services information to the billing system; Process billing, prepare and receipt payments; Finance Handle customer concerns regarding billing/payment; Prepare and submit quarterly impact fees reports to the City of Fort Worth. Activity Measure Total number of payments processed on an annual basis. Service Quality Measure Maintain an error rate of less than 5% as it relates to payment processing each month. Staff read meters and generate work orders for repair and maintenance of Core Services damaged meters; Meters are reread or tested when customers dispute a water Public Works bill or if staff feels there is a discrepancy; Staff must repair the electronic transmitters on meters periodically due to damage from contractors and rodents. Activity Measure Total number of non -working water meters replaced annually. Service Quality Measure Replace damaged non -working meters within one month. 225 Vision Point Two We are leaders Westlake Academy Foundation - Support Services I I Totall $ 24,446 General Fund Allocation $ 24,446 Department -18 Finance $ 23,277 Department -21 Human Resources $ 1,169 To develop and provide administrative and accounting policies and procedures for Foundation use. Ensure the integrity of the Foundation accounting records Program Objective and provide financial, management, and accounting services support to the Director and Board. Also, to provide the Foundation with a full range of Administrative Support and IT Functions through the HR Department. The Westlake Academy Foundation receives budget recognition on an annual Outcome Measure basis. The Town of Westlake demonstrates leadership through its partnership with Impact to Town vision the Westlake Academy Foundation. Review payment transactions; Payment of A/P and maintenance of accounts payables; Preparation and filing of year-end tax returns; Review deposit bags Core Services for accuracy; Prepare deposit slips, run checks through remote terminal; Finance Handle payroll functions; Prepare reports for Director/Board, including the annual audit and monthly financials. Activity Measure Total number of payment transactions processed on an annual basis. Maintain an error rate of less than 5% as it relates to payment processing Service Quality Measure each month. Monthly processing of electronic donations; Monthly reporting; Records Core Services management functions; New employee orientation, payroll, benefits Human Resources administration, and General HR/Administrative support. Number of Blacksmith/Capital Campaign transactions processed annually; Activity Measure number of payroll and benefit transactions processed annually. Service Quality Measure I Maintain an error rate of less than 5% in processing all transactions. 226 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Accounting Services - Municipal I I Total $ 242,676 General Fund Allocation $ 87,682 Department -18 Finance $ 87,682 Utility Fund Allocation $ 66,900 Department -18 Finance $ 66,900 Visitors Fund Allocation $ 88,094 Department -18 Finance $ 88,094 Program Objective Develop and provide administrative and accounting policies and procedures for organizational use in order to ensure the integrity of the Town's accounting system and provide financial, management, and accounting support to our stakeholder base. Outcome Measure The Town of Westlake achieves GFOA budget recognition on an annual basis. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake is recognized as a leader among municipalities through its dedication to fiscal responsibility. Core Services Finance Review department payment transactions for compliance with Town policy; Schedule payments for check generation; Maintain payment and other accounting transactions; Prepare year-end tax return documents; Review deposit bags for accuracy; Prepare deposit slips and remotely process for immediate credit to the bank; Process Town's bi-weekly payroll; Handle payroll taxes and remit accordingly; Provide payroll data to departmental managers; Prepare financial analysis, including CAFR and quarterly financial reports; Monitor cash investments Activity Measure Submit comprehensive quarterly financial report for Council and Town Manager review. Service Quality Measure Receive an unqualified 'clean' audit report on an annual basis. 227 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Academic Support Services I I Total $ 323,217 General Fund Allocation $ 323,217 Department -17 Facilities $ 74,394 Department -18 Finance $ 125,058 Department -20 IT $ 19,497 Department -21 Human Resources $ 104,268 To develop and provide administrative and accounting policies and procedures for Westlake Academy. Ensure the integrity of accounting records and provide Program Objective financial, management, and accounting services support. Also, to provide a full range of Administrative Support and IT Functions through the HR Department. Outcome Measure The Westlake Academy achieves GFOA budget recognition on an annual basis. Westlake Academy is recognized as a leader in education through its dedication to Impact to Town vision fiscal responsibility. Process invoices, purchase and secure supplies, attend Board meetings and prepare Core Services and give presentations when necessary. Serve as staff liaison for the HOC and work Facilities with staff/students on projects. Secure bids for remodeling projects and prepare bid packets. Assist with long term facility planning and CIP review. Activity Measure Number of capital improvement projects conducted annually. Complete all funded capital improvement projects within approved timeframes and Service Quality Measure budgets. To develop and provide administrative and accounting policies and procedures for Core Services Academy use. Also, to ensure the integrity of the Academy accounting records and Finance provide financial, management, and accounting services support to the CEO of the Academy. Submit comprehensive quarterly financial report for Board of Trustees and Activity Measure Superintendent review. Service Quality Measure Receive an unqualified 'clean' audit report on an annual basis. To manage and operate the Academy's central information technology systems and Core Services networks for all Departments using technology to facilitate the sharing of Information Technology information which is necessary to perform their daily business operations. Number of IT service requests performed annually; maintenance of network and Activity Measure workstation uptime; number of network purchases/upgrades performed annually. Resolve 95% of IT service requests within 48 hours, maintain 95% network Service Quality Measure connectivity/uptime during business hours, complete 100% of budgeted network/workstation upgrades as required. 228 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Academic Support Services (Continued) I I Total $ 323,217 To provide Westlake Academy with a full range of HR & Administrative Support Core Services services, including General Human Resources support, Payroll Processing, Risk Human Resources Management, IT Support, Recruitment and Placement, Compensation Planning, and Benefits Administration in accordance with established goals and objectives. Activity Measure Number of payroll and benefit transactions processed annually. Service Quality Measure Maintain 100% timely payroll and benefits processing. 229 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Human Resources Administration I Total $ 12,148 General Fund Allocation $ 12,148 Department -21 Human Resources $ 12,148 To provide HR administrative guidance to Town leaders and elected officials to Program Objective achieve and maintain best practices, as well as provide various services to our employees. The Human Resources Department for the Town of Westlake has had no qualified Outcome Measure HR -related judgments levied against it by State or Federal agencies. The Town of Westlake demonstrates leadership by possessing and maintaining a Impact to Town vision professional internal Human Resources organization. General administrative, Staff and Council meetings support services; Board and Commission support; Performance measure development; Budget preparation and development; Assistance to legal counsel on various matters; Assistance provided to the Town Manager. Manages and stores of general employee Core Services records, personnel files, benefit enrollment files, litigation documents, Human Resources immigration documents, payroll/tax documents, and investigation documents on all current and former employees. Schedules, reviews, and runs payrolls; Withholds, remits, and reports employment taxes and other employee deductions; Prepares and files tax returns; Provides payroll data and support to the budget process. Number of payroll checks, payroll tax payments, and tax returns processed Activity Measure annually. Service Quality Measure 100% on-time processing for payroll, tax payments, and tax returns. 230 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Human Resources JTotal Compensation I I Total I $ 3,730 General Fund Allocation $ 3,730 Department -21 Human Resources $ 3,730 To provide a market sensitive pay and benefits package for Town management Program Objective to attract, retain and motivate high-performance based individuals. Achieve and maintain compensation standards that are within 5% of market Outcome Measure for all positions currently filled within the Town of Westlake. The Town of Westlake is a leader among municipalities in its dedication to fair Impact to Town vision wages for professional services. Classification Studies; Salary Surveys; Pay Plan Development and Maintenance; Core Services Compensation Consulting, Benefits Design and Administration; Benefits Human Resources Customer Services; Provider Network Administration. Activity Measure Number of salary surveys conducted annually. Service Quality Measure 100% of current positions within the Town of Westlake are surveyed on an annual basis. 231 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Human Resources I Risk Management I I Totall $ 7,868 General Fund Allocation $ 7,868 Department -21 Human Resources $ 7,868 Utility Fund Allocation $ 6,308 Department -21 Human Resources $ 6,308 To provide Risk Management and insurance services for Town Management, Program Objective including the implementation of operational policies and procedures to protect the Town assets and minimize liability. Westlake experiences fewer than 5 preventable liability/property claims per Outcome Measure year. The Town of Westlake exhibits operational excellence and fiscal stewardship of Impact to Town vision public funds through prudent Risk Management practices. Insurance Administration; Insurance Information & Referral, claims processing, Administration of the Worker's Compensation program, Accident Reporting, Core Services Claims processing, Employee Return to Work program, Policy and procedure Human Resources development, Employee Orientation & Training, Audits, Asset Inventory, surplus Property Liquidation. Number of insurance claims and Worker's Compensation claims processed Activity Measure annually. 100% of insurance claims processed within 48 hours, Worker's Compensation Service Quality Measure claims processed within state -required timeframes. 232 Vision Point Two We are Leaders Human Resources I Employment Services I I Totall $ 5,916 General Fund Allocation $ 5,916 Department -21 Human Resources $ 5,916 To provide employment application and consulting services to Town Program Objective management in order to recruit and hire a qualified workforce. Provide an accessible and convenient means for recruiting a talented and Outcome Measure qualified workforce; develop/maintain internal best practices for efficient and effective application processing. Westlake is a leader in service by striving to recruit and maintain the highest Impact to Town vision quality workforce. Job Posting Systems; Employment Advertising; Application Processing; Applicant Information and Referral; Applicant Tracking and Screening, Core Services Recruitment Planning; Policy and Procedure Development; Information and Human Resources Referral; Project Management; Criminal Background Investigations, New Employee Orientation; Skills Development Training; Regulatory Compliance Training Activity Measure Number of applications and background checks processed annually. 100% of applications and background checks are processed within 48 hours of Service Quality Measure the posted deadline for job closing. 233 Vision Point Three Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Citizen Engagement and Communication I I Total $ 196,800 General Fund Allocation $ 53,787 Department -10 General Services $ 25,376 Department -11 Administration $ 18,112 Department -16 Public Works $ 2,671 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 7,628 Utility Fund Allocation $ 3,839 Department -16 Public Works $ 3,839 Visitor's Association Fund Allocation $ 139,174 Department -11 Administration $ 15,550 Department -19 Parks & Rec $ 45,849 Department -20 Information Technology $ 77,775 Program Objective Provide for educational and outreach programs to educate and engage various organizations and community members to improve Westlake's neighborhoods and promote citizen participation and involvement; Utilize technology to effectively communicate with public for timely dissemination of information. Outcome Measure Maintain an overall citizen satisfaction rating of at least 90% with respect to "Effectiveness of Town communication" as determined by the resident survey. Impact to Town vision The Town of Westlake demonstrates hospitality through its efforts to provide information about local events, meetings and other items of relevance. Core Services Administration Utilize the various communication devices such as e -blasts, the Westlake Wire, Westlake e - tube, Town web site, and telephone based voice shots to inform residents of necessary items of interest; Organize meetings, create database of target attendees and invitations, secure a host home and refreshments, develop and produce informational materials for attendees; Presentation of the information by Town staff and elected officials with question and answer sessions for each gathering; Work in partnership with various organizations to ensure that the community events are productive and accessible for the entire Westlake community. Activity Measure Number of Westlake Wire publications annually. Service Quality Measure At a minimum, the Westlake Wire is produced and disseminated quarterly. Core Services Public Works Prepare literature for informational folder distributed at neighborhood meetings. Speak with citizens at neighborhood meetings about their concerns or questions related to Public Works operations and determine what level of assistance is needed to provide a resolution. Activity Measure Number of Westlake Wire articles provided annually Service Quality Measure Minimum of one article per newsletter 234 Vision Point Three Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Citizen Engagement and Communication (Continued) I I Total $ 196,800 235 Plan and coordinate Decoration Day, the Christmas Tree Lighting event, School events Core Services held on the campus and Arbor Day. Also, maintain Tree City designation through the Parks & Rec application process and hosting of an official Arbor Day program. Attend neighborhood gatherings to discuss parks/rec and trail issues on an as needed basis. Activity Measure Number of event planning meetings attended monthly. Service Quality Measure Attend a minimum of 15 event planning meetings annually. Core Services Coordinate departmental review of specific web pages for update and revision; Publish Information Technology new information as needed; Install updates to the system and maintain the software. Activity Measure Number of website updates requested monthly. Service Quality Measure Website updates completed within 24 business hours of request receipt. 235 Vision Point Three Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Election Administration I Total $ 16,312 General Fund Allocation $ 16,312 Department -13 Town Secretary $ 16,312 To provide election services to voters, petitioners, Town departments and Program Objective candidates so they can participate in the election process. Westlake maintains a minimum voter participation rate of 75% in all local Outcome Measure elections. Westlake demonstrates hospitality through its equitable and efficient election Impact to Town vision process. Oversees and administers all aspects of Town elections including posting legal notices according to State election codes, monitoring candidates' filing of Core Services required reports and documents, securing election materials and supplies, Town Secretary conducting joint elections with other entities and ensuring compliance with the local government codes. Activity Measure Number of elections conducted annually. Service Quality Measure Provide a minimum of one email blast to residents per election. 236 Vision Point Three Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Municipal Information Technology Operations I I Totall $ 18,803 General Fund Allocation I 1 1 $ 18,803 Department -20 Information Technology I 1 1 $ 18,803 To manage and operate the Town's central information technology systems and Program Objective networks for Town Departments to facilitate the sharing of information necessary to perform their daily business operations. Achieve a 90% internal satisfaction rating as it pertains to "Overall satisfaction with Outcome Measure I.T. Services" as measured in the annual staff survey. Westlake epitomizes hospitality by providing a technological framework that fosters Impact to Town vision support between elected officials and Town Staff. Repair/maintain/upgrade computers; Computer hardware and software support; Programming; LAN maintenance; Software licenses and upgrades; IT systems planning, design, development/implementation; phone support. Server operations Core Services support; Technical support for commercially available software; Consulting and Information Technology purchasing assistance on hardware and software technology Monitoring All Systems; Verification of Backup Processes; Data Archival and Recovery; Provide and maintain an environment for the operation of sensitive electronic equipment; Provide rack space, power and network connectivity. Activity Measure Numberof computer-related requests for service monthly. 100% of computer-related requests are responded to and/or resolved within 24 Service Quality Measure business hours. 237 Vision Point Three Hospitality Finds Its Home in Westlake Municipal Network Operations I I Total $ 3,200 General Fund Allocation I 1 1 $ 3,200 Department -20 Information Technology I 1 1 $ 3,200 Program Objective To plan, design and implement information technology for Town departments so they can have a reliable technology infrastructure to achieve their business objectives. Outcome Measure Westlake's network continues to provide sufficient band width for daily operations. Impact to Town vision Westlake epitomizes hospitality by providing a technological framework that fosters support between elected officials and Town Staff. Core Services Information Technology Network activity monitoring; Network repair. Deployment of new security systems; Security on remote access systems; Development of security policy/guidelines; Investigations/incident response; physical protection using video surveillance, locks, and access cards. Activity Measure Number of hours of network connectivity annually. Service Quality Measure Maintain a 95%+ average uptime of critical systems. 238 SECTION 11 Westlake Academy The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Westlake Acade V INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE CHARTER SCHOOL �r A&I "W0111%AY .4 -eewml,57 eomwffw'?� // FY 2010/2011 CI�1gm imaI- i"� rim ,Mdget ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICIALS FISCAL YEAR 2010/2011 Laura Wheat Board President Tim Brittan, Larry Corson, Carol Langdon, Rick Rennhack, Clif Cox Board of Trustees Thomas Brymer Superintendent 241 PZIm Association of School Business Officials International MERITORIOUS This Meritorious Budget Award is presented. to Westlake Academy for excellence in the preparation and issuance of its school system budget for the Fiscal Year 2009-2010. The budget is judged to conform to the principles and standards of the ASBO International Meritorious Budget Awards Program. President 243 Executive Director August 11, 2010 Board of Trustees Westlake Academy 2600 J. T. Ottinger Road Westlake, TX 76262 Honorable Board Members: RE: Transmittal of Proposed FY 2010-2011 Westlake Academy Budget: "Building Our Learning Community" As Superintendent for Westlake Academy, I am submitting for your consideration the Proposed Budget for FY 2010-2011. This Proposed Budget for Westlake Academy encompasses all teaching and extra -curricular operating expenditures as well as State public school funding and private donations used to support the daily school operations of Westlake Academy in the 2010- 11 school year. This Proposed 2010-2011 General Fund Budget totals $4,425,054. It reflects the Board's discussion and direction from its June 18, 2010 budget retreat. A comparison of the Proposed Westlake Academy General Fund 2010-2011 Budget to the 2009- 2010 Amended Budget is as follows: While Westlake Academy continues to operate in an economic climate that presents challenges, it continues to grow in enrollment and perform at a high level in all areas of our student's education. This budget was prepared and is recommended with the intent of keeping those factors in mind and in balance, while pursuing the Academy's adopted strategic plan's vision and desired outcomes. Those are: 244 VISION: "Westlake Academy is a nurturing, community -owned International Baccalaureate charter school whose mission is to achieve academic excellence and to develop live -long learners who become responsible global citizens. " Desired Outcomes High Student Achievement Strong Parent & Community Connections Financial Stewardship & Sustainability Student Engagement -Extracurricular Activities Effective Educators & Staff As with last year's budget, we continue the use of a theme to focus on the essence of what we do as an organization when we identify and prioritize our resources as we prepare and consider a budget. I would offer for FY 2010-2011 the theme "Building Our Learning Community" . There is much written in educational literature about schools as "learning communities", much of which is centered on the faculty being a professional learning community. A learning community is often characterized as having these attributes (SEDL): • supportive and shared leadership • supportive conditions • collective creativity • shared personal practice • shared values and vision While there is no doubt that our faculty is a critical component in building a learning community, I would endorse the view that one's concept of a learning community should be broader. It must also encompass our students, parents, elected officials, and the community in which our students live. In FY 2010-2011 Westlake Academy has a unique opportunity to broaden this concept of a learning community with our highly involved parent body to maximize this idea of a learning community as we pursue the school's continuous improvement. On behalf of the staff of Westlake Academy, as well as the municipal staff involved in providing staff support to the Academy, I would like to thank the Board for their leadership in pursuing educational excellence. I would like to recognize Finance Director Debbie Piper for her dedication, hard work, and diligent thoroughness in putting this budget together. Also, the Academy's Leadership Team, particularly Administrative Coordinator Ben Nibarger, is to be commended for their involvement and input into this document. A team is required if a school is to be successful as a learning community. And, that team must involve and consist of all the various facets of Westlake Academy; our faculty, administrators, parents, students, and the Board. Working as a team we can build our Westlake Academy learning community in a way that will make our students responsible global citizens in the twenty first century global market place in which they will live and work. � .s Thomas E. Brymer Town Manager/Superintendent Westlake Academy 245 Introduction The FY 2010-2011 Budget for Westlake Academy encompasses all teaching and extra -curricular operating expenses as well as State public school funding and private donations used to support the daily school operations of Westlake Academy. A comparison of the Proposed Westlake Academy General Fund 2010-2011 Budget to the 2009- 2010 Estimated Budget is as follows: As with last year's budget, we continue the use of a theme to focus on the essence of what we do as an organization when we identify and prioritize our resources as we prepare and consider a budget. The theme for FY 2010-2011 is "Building Our Learning Community". There is much written in educational literature about schools as "learning communities", much of which is centered on the faculty being a professional learning community. A learning community is often characterized as having these attributes (SEDL): • supportive and shared leadership • supportive conditions • collective creativity • shared personal practice • shared values and vision 246 I. Budget Approach As a public school, Westlake Academy is unique. The Academy is an open enrollment chartered school which features the International Baccalaureate (IB) curriculum for grades K-12. In fact, being a K-12 IB school helps us to comply with our charter in terms of offering something unique, not duplicating what is offered by the independent school districts that serve Westlake. Additionally, it is the only municipally owned chartered school in Texas and is one of only a handful of such schools in the country. It is unique in that it is a young school, having opened in 2003, that has added one (1) grade level per year since then. In 2009-2010 the Academy graduated its first senior class, another major milestone for the school. The Academy has a track record of continuous improvement centered on achieving strong student academic performance. Over time, it has added a wide variety of extra -curricular activities to provide a well-rounded education for our students. In August 2009 the Academy added a major facility improvement with the opening of its new Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center. Each year of its existence, Westlake Academy has prided itself on improving all aspects of its operations and services so it can be recognized as one of the top chartered schools in the state and nation. Through building our learning community, this spirit of continuous improvement is carried forward in this 2010-2011 Budget for Westlake Academy. The 2010-2011 Budget continues movement towards placing the Academy's budget into a program based format that ties to the Academy's strategic plan and performance metrics contained in that plan. While including customary financial information related to funding levels, we have also included the following additional information to provide an accurate picture of the many dimensions of Westlake Academy: • Mission/vision and value statements • Student enrollment and projections • Academic programmes and athletics • Performance measurement • Organizational structure • General financial structure and facilities • Budget process description • Budget summary and analysis o Revenue sources o Proposed staffing levels o Proposed service level adjustments o Detail of Athletics Fund o Detail of Transportation/Parking Fund o Fund balance and Assigned for Technology/FF&E o Unfunded needs o Analysis of Westlake Academy by Fund o Future Board Direction and Financial Forecasting • Organizational Chart • Position Summary 247 • Proposed 2010-2011 Salary Scale • Fiscal and Budgetary Policies • Investment Policy II. Budget Systemic Framework - "Governing and Managing for Outcomes" The budget document is but one part of a system designed to link together critical governance and management decision making tools. This system is called "Governing and Managing for Outcomes" and is designed to integrate: • Strategic planning • Five (5) year financial forecasting, budgeting, and performance measurement linked to priorities, objectives, and outcomes • Reporting to monitor progress in outcome achievement and accountability for results • Aligning resources to prioritized outcomes • Long term approach to ensure financial sustainability • Working within Board adopted financial policies for the Academy • Maintaining core services III. Budget Challenges: Confronting Realities and Pursuing Opportunities While Westlake Academy has achieved much and has the potential to do even more, there are realities that must be recognized and confronted so proactive solutions can be identified and implemented to maintain a positive course. One of these challenges is to get a clear idea of our per student costs and determine the acceptable level of funding to use in terms of delivering the outcomes the Board has identified. The per student cost since FY 2003-2004 as well as the projected FY 2010-2011 budget at Westlake Academy is: Expenditures per Student $10,000 $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 $2,000 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 (Excludes in -direct cost of Payroll and Debt Payment- General Fund only) 248 Section X of this transmittal letter describes the Academy's financial structure and provides details about the existing challenges. However, these challenges are easily identifiable. They are: • Enrollment in FY 2011-2012 is projected to increase while per student State public education revenues are projected to be flat after FY 2010-2011 unless State per student funding is increased by the Texas legislature. • Donations via the Westlake Academy Foundation's Blacksmith campaign have remained at the same suggested per student annual donation of $1,800 since the Blacksmith campaign's inception 6 years ago and averages around $800 per student in actual giving. • Town of Westlake FY 2010-2011 annual investment in Westlake Academy is at $324,607 in indirect operating cost contributions as well as $1,501,778 in annual debt service payments for campus land and facilities. With municipal sales tax revenues falling and not having a municipal ad valorem (property) tax, the ability of the Town to invest further in the Academy is quite limited, if non-existent. • Funding for new facilities is hampered by both the lack of State public education funding for facilities for chartered schools and by the Town's maximized financial participation referenced in the previous bullet point. • Demand for new course offerings at the DP level is increasing, as well as for other programs, as we are now a fully operational K-12 school. Within these realities we can create opportunities, which could include: • Increased per student parent funding by the Blacksmith Program • Research, investigate, and then discuss with the Westlake Academy community the possibility of increasing class size to a maximum of 25 in certain upper grades such as Grades 9-12 • Aggressive marketing and development programs via the Westlake Academy Foundation to increase donor giving from individuals, businesses, corporations, foundations, grants, and other existing or new funding partners for the Academy • Create new funding streams through week night adult education courses that use the Academy building for a fee (this also is a great community outreach tool to build support for the Academy). These could be either community education type courses similar to those offered by municipal parks and recreation departments or courses offered by area junior colleges using the Academy as a satellite campus. • Using technology to offer classes via the web, thus having a virtual campus to teach from without the need to increase facilities. 249 • Pursuing partnerships with other charter and/or IB schools, as well as institutions of higher education, and share faculty training, academic programmes or programme resources to expand our academic/extra-curricular offerings to our students without additional capital investment in facilities. IV. Mission/Vision and Values In 2008, the Westlake Academy Board of Trustees held its first strategic planning retreat and arrived at a mission/vision statement as well as value statements for the Academy. The IB learner profile supports these statements. This strategic planning was further developed in FY 2009-2010 with the development and adoption by the Board of Westlake Academy's first five (5) year strategic plan that directly drives the budget process. The Westlake Academy mission/vision and values statement are seen below. "Westlake Academy is a nurturing, community -owned International Baccalaureate charter school whose mission is to achieve academic excellence and to develop life-long learners who become responsible global citizens. " V. Student Enrollment and Projections The Academy is known world-wide for its academic excellence and International Baccalaureate curriculum which focuses on developing caring, knowledgeable, inquiring young people who will help create a more peaceful world through intercultural respect and understanding. The Academy was the fifth school in the country to offer the IB curriculum from Kindergarten through high school. Admission applications received for children residing in the school's secondary boundaries wishing to participate in the enrollment lottery generally exceeds 700 students on an annual basis. 250 As a result, our enrollment has grown steadily since our September 2003 opening when we began operations as a Grades 1-6 PYP school. In FY 2010-2011, the enrollment is expected to be as follows: Grade 12 Grades 3-11 Grades 1-2 Kindergarten Total Students FY 2010-2011 ENROLLMENT Perrg ade Totals 34 34 40 to 60 380 40 80 36 36 530 * A third 5th grade class is being added for the 2010-2011 school year. The same enrollment information shown in an alternative format: Primary Programme PYP G K-6 Middle Year Programme MYP G7-10 Diploma Programme DP G11-12 Total Students FY 09-10 FY 10-11 % Increase 275 296 7.6% 155 160 3.2% 61 74 21.3% 491 530 7.9% Per Board direction from its June budget retreat, in FY 2010-2011, student enrollment will increase to an average of 20 students per class (Kindergarten, Grade 11, and Grade 12 excepted). Additionally, a third Grade 5 class will be added in FY 2010-2011. Total enrollment history by grade and future projections is as follows: 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Total Students 324 MC26434- FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 1-6 K-7 K-8 K-9 K-10 K-11 K-12 K-12 As a municipally owned and operated chartered school, Westlake Academy's attendance boundaries, and its resulting student demographics, differ from those of a typical independent 251 school district. As set out in the Academy's charter granted by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), Westlake Academy's "primary boundaries" cover the corporate boundaries of the Town of Westlake. Children living in Westlake are automatically eligible to attend Westlake Academy, if they choose to enroll. The Academy also has what TEA defines as "secondary boundaries" that are geographically extensive and cover a major part of the Dallas -Fort worth Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA). Children residing in these secondary boundaries (which are public school districts identified in the Academy's charter) may attend Westlake Academy after being selected from a waiting list created by an annual lottery for student vacancies. Enrollment by grade, primary boundary res idency, and secondary boundary (school district of residency) is illustrated below: WESTLAKE ACADEMY STUDENT CENSUS - MAY 2010 V1. Academic Programmes Westlake Academy is authorized by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to offer: • The IB Primary Years Programme (grades K-6) • The IB Middle Years Programme (grades 7-10) • The IB Diploma Programme (grades 11-12) These three curricula combine synergistically to form the IB Continuum which is the cornerstone of the educational efforts pursued by Westlake Academy to produce IB diploma graduates. 252 Primary Secondary Boundaries Included in appropriate ISD Westlake Carroll Keller Northwest Other Siblings Due to School Due to Town Residents ISD* No. of %of ISD* No. of %of ISD* No. of %of Districts No. of %of on Wait List Employee Employee Grade Total No. of %of No. of %of No. of %of No. of %of Level Students stud. Stud. Stud. Stud. Stud. stud. Stud. Stud. Stud. Stud. Stud stud. stud. Stud. Stud. stud. K 36 15 42% 1 3% 17 47% 3 8% 0 0% 2 6% 2 6% 1 3% 1 39 11 28% 2 5% 14 36% 3 8% 9 23% 1 3% 2 5% 1 3% 2 37 10 27% 2 5% 17 46% 4 11% 3 11% 0 0% 5 14% 1 3% 3 39 20 51% 2 5% 6 15% 9 23% 2 5% 6 15% 1 3% 1 3% 4 44 19 43% 1 2% 11 25% 8 18% 5 11% 1 2% 1 2% 1 2% 5 39 18 46% 1 3% 14 36% 6 15% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 6 41 16 39% 2 5% 14 34% 6 15% 3 7% 4 10% 2 5% 0 0% 7 41 15 37% 5 12% 14 34% 6 15% 1 2% 10 24% 2 5% 0 0% 8 39 10 26% 3 8% 16 41% 7 18% 3 8% 8 21% 1 3% 1 3% 9 39 9 23% 5 13% 15 38% 9 23% 1 3% 1 3% 1 3% 0% 10 36 2 6% 4 11% 19 53% 7 19% 4 11% 1 3% 0 0% 0 0% 11 37 8 22% 4 11% 17 46% 4 11% 4 11% 0 0% 1 3% 2 5% 12 1 24 2 8% 1 40/6 14 58% 4 170/6 3 13% 0 0% 0 0% 1 4% 155 32% 33 7% 188 38% 76 15% 38 8% 34 7% 18 4% 9 2% Totals 491 V1. Academic Programmes Westlake Academy is authorized by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to offer: • The IB Primary Years Programme (grades K-6) • The IB Middle Years Programme (grades 7-10) • The IB Diploma Programme (grades 11-12) These three curricula combine synergistically to form the IB Continuum which is the cornerstone of the educational efforts pursued by Westlake Academy to produce IB diploma graduates. 252 The IB programmes encourage students to be active learners, well-rounded individuals and engaged community members. Universities and colleges actively recruit IB graduates, often offering them credit or advanced standing for their IB work. Leading public and private universities and government officials recognize IB as excellent preparation for success in post secondary education and in life. Students who earn an IB diploma are equipped with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to compete with students around the world. The IB continuum is not only a pathway for students to an academically -rigorous, internationally recognized education. It prepares students for success in college or university by: • Focusing on the transference of learning with understanding to worthy tasks; • Fostering critical thinking, intellectual, and emotional maturity; and • Learning intellectual coherence through the alignment of what is taught and what is tested. When schools implement the full continuum of IB programmes, they realize several benefits: • An increased number of students prepared for and applying to the Diploma Programme as well as IB Diploma graduates; • Improved standardized test scores; • An understanding and appreciation of the world's cultures and histories among their students; and • A sense of community and shared goals among parents, students, teachers, and administrators. The IB programme related costs contained in this budget total $36,330 ($69/per person for FY 2010-2011) and are comprised of the following. Cost for Maintaining the IB Programmes PYP MYP DP Total Annual Fees $7,350 $8,400 $10,080 $25,830 Evaluation Visits $3,500 $3,500 $3,500 $10,500 * PYP visit was completed in FY 2008-2009 * MYP visit to be completed in FY 2010-2011 *DP visit to be completed in FY 2012-2013 (Future evaluation visits will be every five years) The IB curriculum continues to be the top reason parents seek out Westlake Academy for their child's education as evidenced in this response from the 2010 parents' survey: 253 Q1. Overall Satisfaction With Westlake academy Services and Programs by percentage of parents who rated the item as a 1 to 5 on a 5 -point scale (excluding don't knows and not applicable] Suitability of campus for beaming IB curriculum DP teachersifaculty Sociallemotional progress of child PYP Curriculum Opportunities for parental involvement Academic progress of child PYP teachersltaculty Overall satisfaction with education Teachers response time Maintenance of the Academy Effectiveness of the WAF MYP teacherslfaculty DP curriculum The four douse system for students Methods of WA communication 53°�G 32% 111a 39% 41°% 16% 37°6 Ji�n4 is X it / 14% 35°% 43% 12% 1 10% 36%° -- -- 42%— --- 11% 12% 3494 41°x6 10% t 14% 38% 36% i f% 0 15% 39% 15% 11% 2 51°x6 14% 13% EO% 442% 14% 14% I'% 2 21% 13% 281 jp% 30% 5% 32% 1 33ia 28% 7% 41% 22% 9fi% 0% 20% 40% 60°% 80% 104% NVery Satisfied (5) MSatisfed (4) �Weutral (3) ®Dissatisfied (1!2) Source: ETC" Institute (July 2010 - Tf'estdake Academy Board of Trustees Parent Surto) VII. Westlake Academy Athletics While mentioning our academic programs, we must also take a moment and focus on our a+hletics for the coming school year. Athletics at the Academy are intended to and out our students' education and compliment their class room work. One of the Academy's athletic program's special features is that it offers all our students an opportunity to actually play at least one sport of their choosing (many play several). Another special attribute of Westlake Academy athletics is the tremendous core of talented parents who volunteer as coaches and assistant coaches, as well as serve in the Westlake Academy Athletic Club (WAAC). It should be noted that it w ill require the continued infusion of WAAC dollars to operate the Athletics Program at the level desired in FY 2010-2011. The Athletic Program budget is detailed in the "Budget Summary and Analysis" section. In FY 2009-2010 the Athletics Program continued making significant strides in its overall program design and performance. VIII. Performance Measurement The budget is a means to allocate financial resources to create certain educational outcomes as predetermined by the Board. These outcomes can lend themselves to measurement. By various 254 metrics, we can ascertain the point at which Westlake Academy is performing at a high level. We can also identify areas where additional emphasis or resources are needed to generate continuous improvement in terms of the outcomes the Board has identified as a priority. In that light, different types of measures are presented to examine the Academy's past and desired future student academic performance. Over time it is anticipated these measures will grow in their usefulness as we continue to identify the results we wish to achieve. One type of measure is an "absolute measure" such as standardized test results. This chart shows the Academy's State mandated TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills) Results over time by subject area as well as the campus ratings by the Texas Education Agency (TEA): Description FY 03/04 FY 04/05 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 Reading/English Language Arts 98% 98% 99% 98% 99% 100% 98% Writing 97% 97% 99% 91% 93% 100% 96% Social Studies N/A N/A 99% 95% 98% 100% 99% Mathematics 97% 91% 95% 91% 93% 98% 94% Science 93% 85% 78% 88% 96% 99% 99% Texas Accountability Rating Exemplary Recognized Recognized Recognized Exemplary Exemplary Exemplary The Academy's Strategic Planning has other metrics identified to measure Specific Outcomes needed to attain the Desired Outcome of High Student Achievement. These include use of the SAT, PSAT, Stanford Test as tools to assess student performance in relation to Westlake Academy, and other Texas charter schools, Texas public schools, and benchmark schools so as to be in the top 5% of those schools. Parents, as well as community perceptions, regarding Westlake Academy, are also important as a measure for evaluating areas of strength as well as areas for improvement. These perceptions can also help identify opportunities for community outreach and partnerships. The f ollowing are key indicato rs resulting from t he Town's 2010 rece nt DirectionFinder (citizens) survey of Westlake residents, as well as results from the Board's 2010 Westlake Academy Parents' Survey. 255 Q1-1 Overall, how satisfied are you with the quality of education provided by the Academy? Very Satisfie /Very Dissatisfied 2% SatisfiedDissatisfied • Neutral 9% .'. Q16. Would you support increasing the overall size of the student body at the Academy if the class size were maintained or potentially reduced? by percentage of parents Yes 64% r . r Don't kno.,.,: 8'%0 No 28% Source: ETC Institute (July 2010 - Westlake Acadmy Board of Trustees Parent Survey) 256 Q3. Agreement with Various Statements About Communication and Outreach at Westlake Academy by percentage of parents who rated the Rem as a I to 5 on a 5 -point scale (excluding don't knows and not applicable) Reception staff is friendly and helpful 32% 44% 15% 9% I have been encouraged to volunteer 39% 3D% 18% 12% Written communication is clearleasy 20% 23% 13% Am interested in more parent educationftraining 191�� 32% 22°': Academy keeps me informed 32% -j -j 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% jostrongly Agree (5) DAgree (4) =Neulral (3) 1:1Disagree (112) &,,mrce ETC InstRute (Juty 2010 - Wesilake Academy Board of Trustees Parent Survey) 257 Q2. Westlake Academy Services and Programs That Parents Felt Were Most Important by percentage of parents who selected the item as one of their top three choices IB curriculum Academic 11 child PYP tzT.-rls 01. cu I ty preparation process Socia=nal progress of child Teacherliparent communication PYP CUFTICUIUM Overall satisfaction with education Communication about child's issues DP teachersfiaculty MYP teacherstfaculty MYP Curriculum UP Curriculum Extracurricular sports programs Ouality of communication Suitability of campus for learning Grading system Other extracurricular programs Secondary Counseling department Primary Counseling department Opportunities for parent input School website Opportunities involvement of communication School uniform vendor Teachers response time Maintenance of the Academy Five y strategic plan 03' New main entrance security check-in 46% 44% 21% 28, 16 115. 131/. 13% 12% il% 11% 10% 9% 7% 6% 6% 5% 5% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 20% 40% 60% I= 1st Choice =2nd Choice =3rd Choice Source ETC Institute (July 2010 - Westlake Academy Board of Trustees Parent SurveA) Q2. Westlake Academy Services and Programs That Parents Felt Were Most Important by percentage of parents who selected the item as one of their top three choices IB curriculum Academic 11 child PYP tzT.-rls 01. cu I ty preparation process Socia=nal progress of child Teacherliparent communication PYP CUFTICUIUM Overall satisfaction with education Communication about child's issues DP teachersfiaculty MYP teacherstfaculty MYP Curriculum UP Curriculum Extracurricular sports programs Ouality of communication Suitability of campus for learning Grading system Other extracurricular programs Secondary Counseling department Primary Counseling department Opportunities for parent input School website Opportunities involvement of communication School uniform vendor Teachers response time Maintenance of the Academy Five y strategic plan 03' New main entrance security check-in 46% 44% 21% 28, 16 115. 131/. 13% 12% il% 11% 10% 9% 7% 6% 6% 5% 5% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 20% 40% 60% I= 1st Choice =2nd Choice =3rd Choice Source ETC Institute (July 2010 - Westlake Academy Board of Trustees Parent SurveA) IX. Organizational Structure The organizational structure for Westlake Academy is established by its charter which is granted through an authorizer on behalf of the State, the Texas Education Agency (TEA). Westlake Academy is governed by a six member elected Board of Trustees that also serves as the Town Council for the Town of Westlake, the entity that owns and operates the Academy. The Board of Trustees appoints a Superintendent to oversee the Academy's management and operations. The Superintendent also serves as Westlake's Town Manager. The Academy's organizational structure is based on research into management of municipally owned charter schools. The current structure was adopted by the Board in Resolution 09-23 on December 7, 2009. The Superintendent is responsible for the implementation of the Board's policy agenda for Westlake Academy, facilitating the Board's strategic plan, formulating policy recommendations for Board consideration, as well as managerial oversight of the Academy's budget administration, finances, and budget preparation. Superintendent responsibilities also include selection of the principals for both the Primary and Secondary Years Programmes. The Academy's Superintendent oversees the Westlake Academy Leadership Team (WALT) which is charged with the responsibility of managing the school's on-going academic and extra -curricular operations. Each principal is responsible, with advisement from the Superintendent, for selection and evaluation of the faculty and staff involved in providing their Programme's academic services. The senior management structure for the Academy is: The 2011-2012 school year is an assessment year for the Academy's Middle Years Programme. For that reason, initially the MYP Principal will focus on Grades 7-10. Eventually Grades 11-12 will become part of this position's purview. Until then, the school's IB Diploma Coordinator will serve as the Diploma Programme team lead. X. General Academy Financial Structure and Facilities Overview A. Campus Facilities The land and buildings that comprise the Westlake Academy campus are owned by the Town of Westlake, a municipality incorporated under State law as a Type A general law city. Westlake Academy opened in 2003 with Grades 1 through 6 and has added a grade each subsequent year. With the commencement of the 2009-2010 school year, the final component was added with the 12th grade inaugural graduating class. The campus is located 258 on twenty three (23) acres adjacent to J.T. Ottinger Road, which is near the intersection of State Highways 114 and 170. The original campus included three (3) stand alone academic buildings with a total of twenty nine (29) classrooms, administrative offices, restrooms, a library, breakout area, a performance hall, dining and kitchen area, locker rooms, and a gym. These buildings total 52,600 square feet. The Academy interior design includes wood, vinyl covering, carpet and tile flooring. The hallways are lined with wooden lockers and carpet flooring. The Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Center opened in August of 2009 and added another 8,400 square feet of building space to the campus. This facility includes one art room, two science labs, five offices, a workroom, conference room, restrooms and breakout space. B. Capital Costs/Debt Service The Town of Westlake has issued certificates of obligation and general obligation bonds to fund the construction of the campus. As of FY 2010-11 there is $32,266,379 (principal and interest) of outstanding bonded indebtedness to retire these bonds. Included in this total, is the 2008 issuance of $2.5 million in G.O. bond debt to fund a portion of the new $5.1 million Sam and Margaret Lee Arts & Sciences Building. Annual debt service payments are expensed to the Town's municipal budget and the revenue stream presently utilized to make the annual debt service payment is comprised of municipal sales tax. However, the legal pledge securing these bonds, should this present sales tax revenue source not be adequate to retire this debt, is an ad valorem tax which the Town would be required to implement on all property within its corporate limits. Presently the Town of Westlake levies no ad valorem tax and there is no direct limit on debt for the Town. The Constitution of the State of Texas provides that the ad valorem tax levied by the Issuer for general purposes and for the purpose of paying debt service requirements of the Issuer's general obligation debt shall not exceed $1.50 for each $100 of assessed valuation of taxable property. While there are future facility needs, there are currently no funded buildings or large projects for Westlake Academy contained in the Town's CIP (capital improvement plan) due to the unavailability of funding. C. Direct Operating Costs In addition to owning the Westlake Academy campus facilities, the Town of Westlake is responsible for the daily maintenance costs of the campus grounds and buildings. Per Board direction from its June budget retreat, FY 2010-2011 will be the first fiscal year all direct costs to operate the campus are expensed to the Academy's operating budget (as opposed to the previous practice of expensing much of that cost in the Town's municipal budget). Direct costs moved from the municipal budget to the Academy's operating budget in FY 2010-2011 total $243,213. D. Indirect Operating Costs Further, the Town of Westlake provides various administrative support services for the Academy to avoid duplication of costs. This fact was used as part of the charter application process with the TEA to help bolster the Town's case for having a community school without duplicating cost structures and required resources. These indirect operating costs are contained in the Town's municipal budget and are estimated to be approximately $324,607 in 259 FY 2010-2011. These support services for the Academy that generate indirect costs paid by the Town of Westlake are: • Human resources • Information technology • Risk management • Finance and accounting services • Facility maintenance services • General administrative services (Superintendent) • Board support services including policy advisement and strategic planning (Superintendent) • Official Board records maintenance and election administration (Town Secretary) As other indices in this letter show, such as the Academy's growing enrollment and staffing levels, this has created an increased demand for the level of support services that the Town provides the Academy. Per Board direction at its June budget retreat, beginning in FY 2011- 2012, indirect costs for these services provided by the Town will be expensed to the Academy operating budget. E. Financial Structure Summary In summary, the full cost structure for Westlake Academy for FY 2010-2011 (all funds), including the Proposed FY 2010-2011 Westlake Academy Budget is $12,219. Overall Cost Summary Proposed FY 10-11 Proposed Westlake Academy Budget $ 4,649,822 Estimated Town Funded Indirect Operational Costs (Support Services) 324,607 Subtotal All Operating Costs 4,973,129 Annual Debt Service Payment 1,501,778 Grand Total $ 6,476,207 260 $14,000 $13,500 $13,000 $12,500 $12,000 $11,500 $11,000 Expenditures per Student (Includeds full -cost structure - All Funds) $13,865 FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 $12,933 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 XI. Westlake Academy FY 2010-2011 Budget Process A. Academy Budget and Strategic Planning Process and Calendar The Academy's budget process integrates with its strategic planning process and covers the financial cycle starting with budget planning and ending with the audited financial report: • October/December 2009 Strategic Plan preparation process occurs • December 2009 Westlake Academy Leadership Team (WALT) begins planning FY 2010-2011 Budget • January 2010 WALT meets with WA affiliates for joint planning for FY 2010-2011 • January -March 2010 Staff presents draft WA Strategic Plan to Board of Trustees (BOT) • February 2010 Discussion with BOT of broad overview of WA's 2010- 2011 Budget (i.e. early input, including review of updated WA financial forecast) • April 5, 2010 BOT adoption of five year strategic plan • April/May 2010 Proposed budget preparation for 2010-2011 (Faculty input) • June/July 2010 Westlake Academy parents' survey conducted • June 18, 2010 FY 2010-11 Proposed Budget and Strategic Planning Retreat with BOT 261 • August 16, 2010 Board consideration/adoption of Westlake AcademyFY 2010-2011 Budget • August- September 2011 Budget Amendments for FY 2010-2011 • Fa112010 Begin strategic plan update/review process for FY 2011- 2012 • December 2010 Annual Financial Report for FY 2009-2010 B. Staff Budget Preparation Methodology The Academy's budget process is site based, instructionally driven, and reflects the Board's strategic priorities and outcomes. The Budget Calendar and Five -Year Financial Forecast are also reviewed with the Board of Trustees at least annually. The goal of the Academy's budget preparation process is to incorporate all the school's planning efforts into a single process; "Governing and Managing for Outcomes". Budget preparation begins by soliciting input from faculty as to their projected needs for academic programme delivery in the upcoming fiscal year. The information is placed onto budget work sheets which are then reviewed by the Westlake Academy Leadership Team (WALT). Increases or decreases in funding are identified as "service level adjustments" (SLA's). SLA's can be utilized to add a new program or service as well as tracking increased or decreased funding levels for an existing or expanded service/program. Proposed funding and SLA's are then reviewed by the WALT with the Superintendent including all proposed staffing levels. A preliminary budget is fashioned by the Superintendent for final review, including instructional impacts and reallocation of existing funds, as well as requests for additional funds. When determined to be complete and in concert with available resources and the strategic plan, the Superintendent submits a recommended Westlake Academy Budget for consideration by the Board of Trustees. C. Board of Trustee Budget Review The Board of Trustees regularly receives financial updates during the course of the fiscal year including any revisions to the five-year financial forecast. Upon receipt of the proposed annual Westlake Academy budget, the Board conducts budget workshops to review proposed outcomes for the next fiscal year, expenditure and revenue levels, proposed staffing levels and service level adjustments, compliance of the budget with fiscal policies, as well an updated five (5) year financial forecast. D. Budtet Adoption In addition to Board budget workshops held from February to June, the Board of Trustees holds the required public meeting and adopts the budget in August prior to beginning the fiscal year, which runs from September I" to August 31st XII. Budget Summary and Analysis A. Expenditure Summary The FY 2010-2011 Proposed Westlake Academy Budget totals $4,649,822 (including ALL funds) and is summarized as follows: 262 EXPENDITURES (BY OBJECT) 61XX Payroll & Related Items 62XX Contracted Services 63XX Supplies & Materials 64XX Other Operating 65XX Debt Service Total Expenditures EXPENDITURES (BY FUNCTION) 11 - Instructional 12 - Resources & Media 13 - Staff Development 21 - Instructional Leadership 23 - School Leadership 31 - Guidance & Counseling 33 - Health Services 35 - Food Services 36 - CoCurricular/Extracurricular Activities 41 - Administrative 51 - Maintenance & Operations 53 - Data Processing 61 - Community Services 71 - Debt Service Total Expenditures B. Revenue Sources Proposed Percentage Budget of Total FY 10/11 Budget $ 3,396,643 73% 641,745 14% 258,287 6% 353,147 8% - 0% $ 4,649,822 100% $ 2,595,282 56% 93,256 2% 136,250 3% 133,415 3% 298,877 6% 164,757 4% 54,529 1% 9,700 0% 114,098 2% 279,300 6% 546,560 12% 158,851 3% 64,949 1% - 0% $ 4,649,822 100% Westlake Academy's revenues to fund its annual budget come from two major sources. First, public education funding is provided by the State of Texas which accounts for 88.7% of this budget revenues. The funding is provided on a per student basis and is projected to be $7,073 per student for FY 2010-2011. The following chart show s the Stat e's per student funding level (State Foundation funds only) for the Academy since inception as well as the projected FY 2010-2011: 263 Donations provided by the Westlake Academy Foundation's Blacksmith Program constitute the second largest funding source for the Westlake Academy Budget which totals 9.25%. Absent other revenue sources, if it were not for this private donation support from the parents that participate in the Foundation's Blacksmith campaign, the Academy's Budget would not be fully funded and could not provide educational services at their current level. Presently the Westlake Academy Budget receives no ad valorem revenues as the Town of Westlake does not levy an ad valorem tax. Since the inception of the Foundation's Blacksmith program, annual amounts raised from the Academy parent body are as follows: Revenue Sources State Revenues FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Foundation School Program FY 08/09 Adopted Estimated Proposed State Revenue (TRS and Medicare On -Behalf) Audited Budget Budget Budget Local & Intermediate Sources - - 6,044 6,165 Blacksmith Apprentice Program (WAF) $ 394,129 $ 420,000 $ 435,095 $ 419,230 Gifts and Donations 20,000 - 3,000 - Investment Earnings 4,617 3,000 625 1,500 Lunchroom Revenues 6,339 8,600 - 3,000 WAF Salary Reimbursement 64,858 64,858 64,858 64,858 Local Revenue 25,341 11,000 16,388 12,000 Athletic Activities Income 32,743 48,006 44,953 51,953 Transportation & Parking - - - 32,840 Total Local & Intermediate Sources 506,248 555,464 564,919 585,381 State Revenues Foundation School Program 2,960,589 3,443,120 3,379,040 3,748,836 State Revenue (TRS and Medicare On -Behalf) 202,539 174,285 193,989 189,630 Medicare Part D On -Behalf - - 6,044 6,165 Total State Revenues 3,163,129 3,617,405 3,579,073 3,944,631 TOTAL REVENUES $ 3,669,377 $ 4,172,869 $ 4,143,993 $ 4,530,013 264 4,500,000 4,000,000 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 Revenues by Dollars FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Audited Adopted Budget Estimated Budget Proposed Budget 100% - - 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Revenues by Percentage FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Audited Adopted Budget Estimated Budget Proposed Budget 265 Lunchroom Revenues Investment Earnings ■ Gifts and Donations ■ Local Revenues WAF Salary Reimbursement ■ Blacksmith Apprentice Program (WAF) ■ State Revenues Lunchroom Revenues Investment Earnings ■ Gifts and Donations ■ Local Revenues WAF Salary Reimbursement ■ Blacksmith Apprentice Program (WAF) ■ State Revenues Blacksmith Program Contributions $500,000 $400,000 r $300,000" FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 actual actual actual estimated proposed C. Total Budgets for All Governmental Funds The following schedule presents a comparison of revenues and expenditures for all Governmental Funds in the Academic Services Budget. Budgets for the General Fund, the Food Service Fund (a Special Revenue Fund) and the Debt Service Fund must be included in the official district budget (legal or fiscal year basis). The Academy does not maintain a Food Service Fund or a Debt Service Fund; therefore; the only fund legally adopted will be the General Fund. For informational purposes only, budgets for Special Revenue Funds are included throughout the presentation. 266 All Governmental Funds - Total Revenues All Governmental Funds - Total Expenditures Adopted Estimated Proposed Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 General Fund $ 3,661,645 $ 4,172,869 $ 4,211,154 $ 4,530,013 Special Revenue Funds 96,610 139,680 332,131 162,768 Total Governmental Funds $ 3,758,255 $ 4,312,549 $ 4,543,285 $ 4,692,781 All Governmental Funds - Total Expenditures All Governmental Funds - Expenditures by Object Code Adopted Estimated Proposed Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 General Fund $ 3,709,086 $ 3,918,033 $ 4,092,898 $ 4,425,054 Special Revenue Funds 96,610 139,680 270,131 224,768 Total Governmental Funds $ 3,805,696 $ 4,057,713 $ 4,363,029 $ 4,649,822 All Governmental Funds - Expenditures by Object Code 63XX Supplies & Materials 64XX Other Operating 65XX Debt Service Total Expenditures D. Proposed Staffing Levels 252,376 252,105 305,659 258,287 126,878 184,643 295,481 353,147 82,991 42,000 41,496 - $ 3,805,697 $ 4,057,713 $ 4,363,029 $ 4,649,822 As we examine proposed major areas of expenditures such as staffing, it is helpful to think about and evaluate them based on their impact on these suggested desired outcomes for the Academy (see Section IV for more detail): ➢ High Academic Achievement ➢ Strong Parent & Community Connections ➢ Financial Stewardship & Sustainability ➢ Student Engagement ➢ Effective Educators & Staff As indicated in the previous charts, 73% of Westlake Academy's Operating Budget as adopted are payroll related, i.e. - salaries and wages plus fringe benefit cost. A detailed personnel schedule is provided in this adopted budget. A summary schedule of recommended positions with a comparison to the current approved budget is as follows: 267 Adopted Estimated Proposed Actual Budget Budget Budget FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 61XX Payroll & Related Items $ 2,790,289 $ 3,090,775 $ 3,275,786 $ 3,396,643 62XX Contracted Services 553,162 488,190 444,608 641,745 63XX Supplies & Materials 64XX Other Operating 65XX Debt Service Total Expenditures D. Proposed Staffing Levels 252,376 252,105 305,659 258,287 126,878 184,643 295,481 353,147 82,991 42,000 41,496 - $ 3,805,697 $ 4,057,713 $ 4,363,029 $ 4,649,822 As we examine proposed major areas of expenditures such as staffing, it is helpful to think about and evaluate them based on their impact on these suggested desired outcomes for the Academy (see Section IV for more detail): ➢ High Academic Achievement ➢ Strong Parent & Community Connections ➢ Financial Stewardship & Sustainability ➢ Student Engagement ➢ Effective Educators & Staff As indicated in the previous charts, 73% of Westlake Academy's Operating Budget as adopted are payroll related, i.e. - salaries and wages plus fringe benefit cost. A detailed personnel schedule is provided in this adopted budget. A summary schedule of recommended positions with a comparison to the current approved budget is as follows: 267 Primary Instructional Secondary Instructional Special Education Sub -total Instructional Staff FY 09/10 FY 10/11 Actual Proposed Increase 18.00 20.90 2.90 15.77 16.75 0.98 2.00 2.00 - 35.77 39.65 3.88 Instructional Aides 3.70 3.75 0.05 Librarian 1.00 1.00 � Counselors 2.00 2.00 Nurse 1.00 1.00 10 Clerical Staff 5.00 4.40 -0.60 Leadership 4.60 5.00 0.40 Information Technology 1.70 1.80 0.10 Strings 0.25 0.25 - Day -Porter 0.60 0.60 - Sub -total Other Staff 19.85 19.80 -0.05 TOTAL EMPLOYEES 55.62 59.45 3.83 70 60 Total Staff 50 40 � 30 20 10 0 - FY 05/06 FY 06/07 FY 07/08 FY 08/09 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 K-8 K-9 K-10 K-11 K-12 K-12 With a few exceptions, new positions included in the proposed Westlake Academy Budget comport to discussions held with the Board at their June 18, 2010 budget retreat. Recommended new positions will be discussed below under proposed service level adjustments. E. Proposed Service Level Adiustments This budget makes use of Service Level Adjustments (SLA's) to track any cost changes. These cost changes can be due to increased operating costs for an existing program, increased operating costs due to program expansion, or costs for the reallocation of existing funding. SLA's can also outline cost decreases that occur for a variety of reasons including efficiencies, not spending the fully budgeted allocation in the current fiscal year, or service level reductions that reduce cost. 268 Generally speaking, Service Level Adjustments proposed in this budget are those that fall in the category of increased operating costs for existing programs. Some SLA's are proposed due to existing program expansion, such as adding a third fifth grade class. In terms of SLA's involving new expenditure areas to target for recommendation to the Board for FY 10-11, staff recommends three (3) areas: new positions, employee compensation, staff training, and absorbing operational costs for the Arts & Sciences Building. ➢ Direct Operating Costs (formerly charged to Town): Total: $243,213 Desired Outcome: Financial Stewardship and Responsibility In FY 2010-2011 the Academy will begin to pay the entire operating costs including maintenance and upkeep of the physical facility. For the last six years this was charged to the Town's budget and is being transferred to the Academy. This includes contracts for grounds, janitorial, HVAC, lighting, etc. ➢ New Positions: Desired Outcome: High Student Achievement Total: $203,137 In FY 10-11, it is proposed to add 3.83 full-time equivalent employees (FTE's) to the Westlake Academy Budget. It should be noted that the additional FTE's shown below are illustrated as "whole" positions. These additions, like many existing positions in the Academy, are allocated on a percentage basis to more than one function. • One MYP Spanish Teacher • One 5th grade classroom teacher • One MYP Physics/Math Teacher • One Library Aide • One Part-time MYP Art Teacher ➢ Employee Compensation and Benefits: Total: $67,705 Desired Outcomes: Effective Educators & Staff High Student Achievement With 72% of the Academy's Budget funding allocated to employee pay and benefits, it is important that we offer competitive salaries, wages, and benefits to attract and retain a strong faculty base, even in a difficult economy. It is proposed to shift our teacher's pay scale to provide for a 2% pay increase and a $7,000 increase in coaching stipends which will be offset by an increase in athletic fees in FY 2010- 2011. ➢ IB Fee Increase: Total: $2,000 Desired Outcome: High Student Achievement ➢ Bus Operating Costs: Total: $20,000 Desired Outcome: High Student Achievement Student Engagement 269 Two (2) 18 to 20 passenger buses were funded by generous donations by parents during the Westlake Academy Foundation's Gallery Night function. These buses will be utilized to transport Academy students to various class field trip and athletic events. This is a new service for which operating costs for gasoline, insurance, and other operating expenses will be funded by the student usage fees and the Academy. ➢ Graduation Ceremony Expenses: Total: $10,000 Desired Outcome: Student Engagement Strong Parent & Community Connections This would provide a reasonable amount of adequate funds in-line with the actual costs incurred in our first senior commencement ceremony in 2010. F. Athletics Program As mentioned previously, the Academy's Athletic Program is intended to move this program forward in FY 2010-2011. The budget for the program is: Revenues Uniform Replacement Fee Equipment Replacement Fee Donations Tournament Receipts Registration Fees Miscellaneous Total Revenues Expenditures Officials Field Rentals Uniforms Supplies Equipment Trophies/Awards Tournament Entry Fees League Fees Total Expenditures Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over (under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers in Transfers out Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) Net Changes in Fund Balance Fund Balance, Beginning Fund Balance, Ending (Assigned) 270 FY 09/10 FY 10/11 $ 7,931 $ 7,931 2,185 2,185 8,301 8,301 1,585 1,585 20,523 27,523 4,429 4,429 44,953 51,953 10,265 11,000 848 1,000 19,130 5,000 3,013 5,000 1,093 8,000 802 1,000 2,710 5,000 1,540 2,000 39,401 38,000 5,553 13,953 - (7,000) - (7,000) 5,553 6,953 2,332 7,885 $ 7,885 $ 14,838 G. Transportation/ParkinLy Fund H. Fund Balance and Assigned for Technology/FF&E The ending fund balance for the General Fund portion of the Academic Services Budget is estimated as follows: FY 09/10 FY 10/11 % Inc(Dec) Fund Balance $515,053 $500,218 -2.88% The goal for the fund balance of the General Fund for FY 2010-2011 is to have this balance be equivalent to at least 41 operating days. In FY 2010-2011, it is recommended to use this fund balance as follows: Total Estimated Fund Balance @ 08-31-11 $ 615,056 Assigned Fund Balance 114,838 Total Estimated Fund Balance (Unassigned) $ 500,218 The Academy needs to continue the practice begun in FY 2009-2010 of setting aside funds for replacement of computers, furniture, and fixtures. It is intended, at th a end of F Y 2010-2011 (assuming the fund balance show n here occurs), to assign $100,000 for Technology/FF&E (furniture/fixture & equipment) for Westlake Academy to begin to accumulate funding for these future replacement needs that are currently unfunded and $14,838 for athletic activities. I. Unfunded Needs As with any budget, there are yet other needs that new dollars could support. This may be an area where consideration by the Westlake Academy Foundation to increase it's per student suggested funding contribution would help. 271 FY 10/11 Revenues Parking Fees $ 12,840 Transportation Fees 20,000 Total Revenues 32,840 Expenditures Bus Operations (Fuel/Supplies) 20,000 Total Expenditures 20,000 Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues Over (under) Expenditures 12,840 Other Financing Sources (Uses) Transfers in - Transfers out (12,840) Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) (12,840) Net Changes in Fund Balance - Fund Balance, Beginning - Fund Balance, Ending (Assigned) $ - H. Fund Balance and Assigned for Technology/FF&E The ending fund balance for the General Fund portion of the Academic Services Budget is estimated as follows: FY 09/10 FY 10/11 % Inc(Dec) Fund Balance $515,053 $500,218 -2.88% The goal for the fund balance of the General Fund for FY 2010-2011 is to have this balance be equivalent to at least 41 operating days. In FY 2010-2011, it is recommended to use this fund balance as follows: Total Estimated Fund Balance @ 08-31-11 $ 615,056 Assigned Fund Balance 114,838 Total Estimated Fund Balance (Unassigned) $ 500,218 The Academy needs to continue the practice begun in FY 2009-2010 of setting aside funds for replacement of computers, furniture, and fixtures. It is intended, at th a end of F Y 2010-2011 (assuming the fund balance show n here occurs), to assign $100,000 for Technology/FF&E (furniture/fixture & equipment) for Westlake Academy to begin to accumulate funding for these future replacement needs that are currently unfunded and $14,838 for athletic activities. I. Unfunded Needs As with any budget, there are yet other needs that new dollars could support. This may be an area where consideration by the Westlake Academy Foundation to increase it's per student suggested funding contribution would help. 271 J. Analysis of Operating Budget by Fund General Fund The General Fund is budgeted at $4,425,054 for FY 2010-2011. This fund is established to account for resources financing the fundamental operations of the Academy, in partnership with the community, to enable and motivate our students to reach their full potential. All revenues and expenditures not required to be accounted for in other funds are included here. This is a budgeted fund and any fund balances are considered resources available for current operations. Fund balances may be appropriated by the Board of Trustees by budget amendment to implement its responsibilities. The 2010-2011 budget plans to decrease fund balance by approximately $14.8K. This fund also includes the newly created Transportation/Parking Fund—Fund 197 as well as the Athletic Activities Fund—Fund 198. This budget leaves the Academy's ending fund balance at 11 % of the General Fund's current operating expenditures. The Academy's target for FY 2010- 2011 is forty-one (41) operating days. Special Revenue Funds These funds are budgeted at $224,768 in total and are established to account for grant funds from federal, state or local sources or expenditures legally restricted for specified purposes. Any unused balances are returned to the grantor at the close of specified project periods. The Academy has six (6) Special Revenue Funds budgeted for FY 2010-2011 as follows: K. Future Board Direction and Financial Forecasting The Board, at its June 18, 2010 planning retreat, directed staff to include the following in FY 2010-2011: • Add all Academy related direct operating costs, previously in the municipal budget, into the Academy's operating budget • Increase class size to an average of twenty (20) Beginning in FY 2011-2012 the Board directed: • Move all indirect Academy operating costs now expensed in the municipal budget to the Academy operating budget. • Budget Blacksmith funding at a 75% level • Increase enrollment via an expanded block schedule. The following financial forecast reflects this Board direction: 272 2010-2011 Special Revenue Funds Budget IDEA B - Formula $ 69,097 IDEA B - Preschool 1,796 ARRA Title XIV - SFSF Stimulus 72,136 Advanced Placement Incentives 5,750 Technology Allotment 13,989 Hudson Foundation 62,000 Total Special Revenue Fund $ 224,768 K. Future Board Direction and Financial Forecasting The Board, at its June 18, 2010 planning retreat, directed staff to include the following in FY 2010-2011: • Add all Academy related direct operating costs, previously in the municipal budget, into the Academy's operating budget • Increase class size to an average of twenty (20) Beginning in FY 2011-2012 the Board directed: • Move all indirect Academy operating costs now expensed in the municipal budget to the Academy operating budget. • Budget Blacksmith funding at a 75% level • Increase enrollment via an expanded block schedule. The following financial forecast reflects this Board direction: 272 FIVE YEAR FORECAST General Fund Beginning Fund Balance $ 522,937 $ 615,056 $ 411,401 $ 340,295 $ 335,160 REVENUES: Local Revenue Westlake Foundation reimbursement for Salary 64,858 64,858 64,858 64,858 64,858 WAF, WAAC, Grants, Scrip, Other Local Rev 12,000 12,000 12,240 12,485 12,734 Blacksmith Apprentice Program (75% FY 11-12 & future) 419,230 361,883 373,748 385,613 385,613 Interest Earned 1,500 1,500 1,530 1,561 1,592 Food Services 3,000 3,000 3,060 3,121 3,184 Athletic Activities 51,953 53,512 55,117 56,771 58,474 Transportation/Parking 32,840 15,900 18,860 18,860 18,860 Total Local Revenue 585,381 512,652 529,413 543,268 545,314 State Revenue TEA Foundation funds 3,748,836 4,314,698 4,455,990 4,597,450 4,597,450 TRS On-behalf/Medicare Part B (Offset in Salary exp) 195,795 199,711 203,705 207,780 211,935 TOTAL REVENUES 4,530,013 5,027,062 5,189,108 5,348,497 5,354,699 EXPENDITURES: Object Code 61 XX - Salaries 3,253,614 3,593,687 3,665,560 3,738,872 3,813,649 Object Code 62XX - Professional & Contracted Services 641,745 985,604 1,005,316 1,025,423 1,045,931 Object Code 63XX - Supplies & Materials 224,298 231,027 235,647 235,647 235,647 Object Code 64XX - Other Operating Costs 305,397 314,559 320,850 320,850 320,850 Object Code 65XX - Debt Service - 93,000 20,000 20,000 - Object Code 66XX - Capital Assets 133,000 TOTAL EXPEDITURES 4,425,054 5,217,877 5,247,374 5,340,792 5,416,078 OTHER RESOURCES/USES Other Resources 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 Other Resources (Setting up capital lease for portables) 133,000 Transfers Out (19,840) (19,840) (19,840) (19,840) (19,840) Excess Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures 92,118 (203,655) (71,106) (5,134) (74,218) ENDING FUND BALANCE 615,056 411,401 340,295 335,160 260,942 Assigned - Technology/FFE 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 Assigned - Uniform/Equipment Replacement 14,838 15,283 15,741 - - ENDING FUND BALANCE (BASED ON 75% BSA donations) $ 500,218 $ 296,118 $ 224,553 $ 235,160 $ 160,942 $$ Per Operating Day $ 12,123 $ 14,296 $ 14,376 $ 14,632 $ 14,839 # of Operating Days (based on 365) (75% BSA donations) 41 21 16 16 11 ENDING FUND BALANCE (BASED ON 75% BSA donations) $ 500,218 $ 296,118 $ 224,553 $ 235,160 $ 160,942 Additional 25% Blacksmith Apprentice donations 120,628 124,583 128,538 128,538 ENDING FUND BALANCE (BASED ON 100% BSA donations) $ 500,218 $ 416,745 $ 349,136 $ 363,698 $ 289,480 # of Operating Days (based on 365) (100% BSA donations) 41 29 24 25 20 Key Assumptions: A State Funding based on current FY 09-10 funding formula for all five years B FY 11-12 and future years - Blacksmith Apprentice Program budgeted at 75% C FY 11-12 - Includes four (5) new Secondary teachers and a third section in G7 - G10; G11 will grown to 3 sections in FY 12-13; G12 will grow to 3 section in FY 13-14 D FY 11-12 - Added 3 portable buildings E FY 11-12 - Approximately $325K added for indirect payroll costs of services performed by Town staff F 3% increase in all other expenditures FY 11/12; 2% increase in all other expenditures FY 12/13, then held flat. G 2% increase in Salary and Professional & Contracted Services each year. H Assigned fund balance reflects the portion being held for equipment/uniform replacement as well as FF&E and technology equip. 273 SECTION 12 munity Profile The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org TowN of WESTLA KE COMMUNITY PROFILE General Information The Town of Westlake is a one -of -a -kind community, an oasis with rolling hills, grazing longhorns, and soaring red-tailed hawks, located in the heart of the Fort Worth -Dallas metropolitan area. Inviting neighborhoods and architecturally vibrant corporate campuses find harmony among our meandering roads and trails, lined with native oaks and stone walls. We are leaders in education, known for our innovative partnerships between the Town -operated Charter school and our corporate neighbors. We are environmental stewards exemplifying the highest standards. Hospitality finds its home in Westlake, as a community, we are fully involved and invested in our rich heritage, vibrant present and exciting, sustainable future. QLV aka o Denton nm cwe Ponder '. O.W. F'oi- He-man Fr shady Lade Elm Drop O neva Argyle ca alcay N itnl k ti /y illage � The Col 61 yd B rconvrlle e0a9 f/ Flower Le'Msvllle H o as Q E Mound newarrc Rnann +r. pnycw TT ec,•aad— 4 - a Peden Haslet Sou tWake Ccppell _ -Ruckin nam 26T 37T Keller �^.rapev.ne p r. ;e,< I ::atl g aney _ c -an 86, 121 R.. 1 rr = = Rowiett Rockwall.. M e ie City DFW Gerlaind 6T 61 ckland Azle 61 ODlleyville r T5 4T 174 � ... le 4T^ Nor�rt 161 ;�Ic-.an I •sry h'lue Mound + , Lake raj' RDhland Hls AWD0tl" 4 g:na:v� X93 v3 Hhie a ren k Rl- and :. t. HuGhard year •a,a.endo Lakes:J Hahorn Cl Hurst an. k orn - 9T \.A. HMIs if l - 121 Tr411be0PY. cr en6ett Park I — Dallas e Wane 61v `; �': A'lesqui[e setrleme t r *r c�., Fort Worth60 ,._, Grand ® Famey °' II Arlington Prairie (rP'1H 1 a r L R=1rh IAII 1T5 s'pr nq, - E 7a Atarcnin+nn 366 -eek lakyg a„..,n l Ione Benbrook 163 1 ens .466. I te,a:rr. E- Ed? I R=.F i Hak - 4 I'VI .:_ Kennedale soviet: I {•.,,I 6uncanvlGe .;eagc•�:I.e / Bess lr _ _ _ - - HPMh1n9 k+11 fteaervalr E±mrm n,� p lheatland Z' � 1 k� b mw9ey �r _eoa ICHIII Lancaster GI 175 ,ek9rave .Men field - r..atnck Buriesurt ".. .i Re”67 H Irts TT Warsaw ) .5 ua Ferres 28 O ( 1•" Red Oak I India Westlake is conveniently located between DFW Airport and Alliance Airport, on the south side of State Highway 114, providing quick, easy access to all areas of the Dallas -Ft. Worth Metroplex. The unique location of Westlake is ideal for many of its major corporate campuses and residential communities. A common ideal shared by our corporate and individual residents is their support of the existing character, charm of the community and a commitment to excellence in new development. 275 History of Westlake The Town of Westlake has a short but fascinating history. The geographic region, known place where the cross timbers met t prairie, holds tales of settlers from the Peters Colony, Indian treaties signed by Sam Houston, tremendous archeological treasures, and some of the oldest settlements in north Texas. The region has always been known for its natural bounty, its trade value, and its wonderful people. The Town of Westlake and northeast Tarrant County has maintaine that distinction over the years, beco one of the most desirable and sou places to live in America. SM STR.EEC' In 1956, Dallas lawyer Glenn Turner purchased about 2,000 acres along State Highway 114. The area came to be known as Circle T Ranch. Soon after, ranches and homeowners in the surrounding community incorporated, taking the name Westlake. The area included what is known today as Westlake, plus the area north, to the northern shore of Denton Creek. In the early 1970s, Houston developers Johnson and Loggins and professional golfer Ben Hogan approached Westlake about building a golf course, country club, and a housing development. Residents' interests differed. In 1973, Westlake disannexed what is now known as Trophy Club, clearing the way for the upscale housing development and golf course. Nelson Bunker Hunt, a Texas oil millionaire, purchased the Circle T Ranch in the 1970s and it became a social hub for glamorous parties attended by celebrities from around the world. Hunt declared bankruptcy in 1989 and the Circle T Ranch was purchased by Ross Perot Jr. in 1993. 276 Lake Turner on the Circle T Ranch Westlake Local Government The Town was incorporated in 1956 as a Type A General Law Town under the rules of the State of Texas. The Town Council is comprised of a Mayor and five Council Members who are elected at large for a two year staggered term each May. The Council is entirely responsible for creating Town policy. The Council directs the Town Manager and Chief Executive Officer of the Town to administer the daily operations of the Town and ensure that Town policies are enforced. Laura Clifton Wheat Cox Mayor ------------ Westlake Operations '1 Tim Rick Carol Brittan Rennhack Langdon ----------- Council Members --------------------------- The Town of Westlake is anticipating an operating budget of $15,056,299 for fiscal year 2010/2011 and includes approximately 85 full-time equivalent employees (municipal and academic). The Town of Westlake provides a full level of public services to its citizens as well as operates the only municipal Charter School in the state. In a recent survey of the Town residents, 91 % were either satisfied or very satisfied with the overall quality of life in Westlake. The services provided by the Town received the following satisfaction ratings: Q1. Overall Satisfaction With Town Services by Major Category by percentage of respondents who rated the item as a 1 to 5 on a 5 -paint scale (excluding don't knows:', Quality of public safety services Effectiveness of Town communication Westlake's emergency preparedness efforts Quality of customer service provided by the Town Quality ofwastewater utility services Quality of water utility services Maintenance of Town streets Town efforts to manage storm water run-off Parks, trails. and recreation programs�facilities Westlake Academy 40% 43% 12%1- 32% 44% 15% 101/6 26% 47% 24% 29% 443/0 11% 28% 44% 31% 40% 15% 14% 24% 1 46% J 1-17 13°Yw ! 50% g 37°0 241 A23% 1 % 27.ra 21%, 0% 20% 4fl% 60% 80% 100! =Very Satisfied (5) =Satisfied (4) =Neutral (3) ®Dissatisfied (112) Source: ETC buterute DerecreonFenrler (July 2010- IVestlake_ TX) The Town contracts for solid waste collection and disposal, as well as collaborating with Keller, a neighboring community, for police services. 277 Westlake Community Events Westlake is a family -friendly environment where events are held to help get our residents out and participating in activities with their children and neighbors. Arbor Day The Westlake Arbor Day Celebration is held each October. This annual celebration is an afternoon of activities, live entertainment, best cookie competitions, auctions, and a variety of great food. Kids' activities have included pony rides, face painting, games, crafts, and an obstacle course. In addition, there are educational sessions on tree care advice, and complimentary trees. Admission is free. Decoration Day The Westlake Preservation Historical Society sponsors its annual "Decoration Day" event each Memorial Day in Westlake at the Odd Fellow Cemetery. This community event is a public commemoration of veterans, both past and present, who have served our country and defended our freedom and liberties. Activities include live music, treasure hunts for the kids, and a homemade ice-cream competition. Past events have included live reenactments of people and events pertaining to Westlake's history. The event ends at sunset. Masterwork Concert Series The Masterworks Music Series is a variety of free music programs sponsored by the Town of Westlake, Maguire Partners, and ARTSNET. These free concerts are for arts lovers of all ages and feature instrumental a vocal music ranging from Country & Western to Blues & Jazz with the entertainment of local, regional and national artists. The concert season begins in April and features an exciting performance each Thursday through the month of May. Performances are held at the Solana Village Center. 278 Westlake Academy The Westlake Academy is an Open Enrollment Charter School that opened September 1, 2003. Y Westlake Academy distinguishes itself among neighboring educational �f offerings with a particular focus on international -style academics. 0• The programs of the International Baccalaureate Organization (Primary Years + Program, Middle Years Program, Diploma Program) have been selected as ar 1the educational model. Educational technology will be pervasive and will 4 infuse the classroom curriculum. An environment rich with heritage, the Westlake Academy mission is to provide educational opportunities to each child in keeping with his or her individual needs. The primary geographic service area for Westlake Academy is the town limits of Westlake; students from other locations may be considered if seats are available. Westlake Academy serves as a full K-12 charter school and graduated their first class of seniors in the 2009-2010 school year. Westlake Academy is a premier learning establishment that is ranked in the top three (3%) percent of all public schools in the State of Texas and prides itself on providing a learning environment where students have the resources and facilities to excel. tO7 Westlake Academy Campus Pictures 279 Westlake Facts, Figures, & Statistics The Town of Westlake has experienced exponential growth in the last decade. The 2000 census reports 207 residents and current estimates place the around 800 residents with an estimated population of 900 by 2011. The Town is approximately 20% built out with the majority of development continuing to be corporate campuses. There has been an increase over the last decade in high-end residential development located around the Vaquero Golf Course and in Glenwyck Farms. The Town's focus on high-quality development has led to more than 1.4 million square feet of commercial space, valued at over $200 million, being added since 2005 and an additional 750,000 square feet will be added in the next twelve months. The Town has seen a slight decrease in building permits however, the construction size and value have increased significantly over the last 10 years. In 2009, the average size of new home construction was 13,500 square feet with an estimated value of $2.17 million. Vaquero Estates Vaquero Estates Country Club F.M. 1938, Precinct Line Road construction began in FY 09/10 and will create a major north, south corridor. In addition, Deloitte University Campus is in the beginning phases of construction of their $160 million dollar, 160 acre, international training facility. The facility will feature over 800 rooms, office space, conference centers, amenity centers, and as well as many parks, trails, and water features. This development is another step towards Westlake's goal to become an education centered community. Deloitte University Campus rendering 280 Area Employers The DFW Metro area is home to more Fortune 500 companies than any other area in the United States and a few of the closer major employers are listed as well as major employers located within the Town of Westlake. The Solana Office Complex was the first of many corporate headquarters built by IBM in the 1980's. Since then Westlake has collected additional corporate residents like, Fidelity Investments, Wells Fargo, Core Logic (formerly First American Title), Chrysler Financial, Levi Strauss, and many more. Location Westlake is seven square miles, located along the Northeast border of Tarrant County and partially extended into the southern portion of Denton County. Westlake is twelve miles to the west of DFW Airport and seven miles to the east of the Alliance Airport. Sales Tax Rate Sales Tax Rate is 8.25%, with 6.25% going to the state, 1% as a local tax, .5% as an economic development sales tax, and .5% as a property reduction sales tax. Property Tax The Town of Westlake currently assesses NO city property tax. Property within the Town is assessed a property tax by Tarrant county, Tarrant County College, and the Tarrant County Hospital District at a combined rate of 62.9 cents per $100 valuation. In addition, properties are assessed by one of three school districts contained within Westlake's borders. The combined total property tax rate, depending on the taxing school district, is as follows: • Carroll ISD - $2.044567 per $100 Northwest ISD - $1.984567 per $100 • Keller ISD - $2.115867 per $100 Properties located in Tarrant County and the Northwest ISD will receive their county tax assessment from the Tarrant County Tax Assessor, while a separate assessment for Northwest ISD taxes will be issued by the Denton County Tax Assessor. Denton County & School Taxes Properties located in Denton County and the Northwest ISD are taxed at a combined rate of $1.57094 per $100 valuation by the following entities: • Northwest ISD - $1.6048 per $100 281 • Denton County - $0.2498 per $100 Number of Number of Major Employers Employees Larger Local Employers Employees AMR Corporation 15,143 Fidelity Investments 3,600 Bell Helicopter/Textron 4,873 CoreLogic 2,400 BNSF Railway 2,500 Chrysler Financial 950 Sabre Holdings 3,000 Wells Fargo 600 Gaylord Texan Resort 2,000 Marriott Solana Hotel 150 DFW Airport 1,900 Walco International 145 Healthmarkets 1,200 Vaquero Club 132 Levi Strauss 92 Location Westlake is seven square miles, located along the Northeast border of Tarrant County and partially extended into the southern portion of Denton County. Westlake is twelve miles to the west of DFW Airport and seven miles to the east of the Alliance Airport. Sales Tax Rate Sales Tax Rate is 8.25%, with 6.25% going to the state, 1% as a local tax, .5% as an economic development sales tax, and .5% as a property reduction sales tax. Property Tax The Town of Westlake currently assesses NO city property tax. Property within the Town is assessed a property tax by Tarrant county, Tarrant County College, and the Tarrant County Hospital District at a combined rate of 62.9 cents per $100 valuation. In addition, properties are assessed by one of three school districts contained within Westlake's borders. The combined total property tax rate, depending on the taxing school district, is as follows: • Carroll ISD - $2.044567 per $100 Northwest ISD - $1.984567 per $100 • Keller ISD - $2.115867 per $100 Properties located in Tarrant County and the Northwest ISD will receive their county tax assessment from the Tarrant County Tax Assessor, while a separate assessment for Northwest ISD taxes will be issued by the Denton County Tax Assessor. Denton County & School Taxes Properties located in Denton County and the Northwest ISD are taxed at a combined rate of $1.57094 per $100 valuation by the following entities: • Northwest ISD - $1.6048 per $100 281 • Denton County - $0.2498 per $100 SECTION 13 Appendix The Town of Westlake * 3 Village Circle #202 * Westlake, Texas 76262 * www.westlake-tx.org Account: A separate financial reporting unit for budgeting, management, or accounting purposes. All budgetary transactions whether revenue or expenditure, are recorded in accounts. Adopted Budget: The budget as modified and finally approved by the Town Council. The adopted budget is authorized by resolution that sets the legal spending limits for the fiscal year. Accounts Payable: A liability account reflecting amount of open accounts owed to private persons or organizations for goods and services received by a government (but not including amounts due to other funds of the some government or to other governments). Accounts Receivable: An asset account reflecting amounts owed to open accounts from private persons or organizations for goods or services furnished by the government. Accrual Accounting: Recognition of the financial effects of transactions, events, and circumstances in the period (s) when they occur regardless of when the cash is received or paid. Activity: A service performed by a department or division. Allocation: A part of a lump -sum amount, which is designated for expenditure by specific organization units and/or for special purposes, activities, or objects. Amortization: Payment of principal plus interest over a fixed period of time. Appropriation: An authorization made by the legislative body of a government, which permits officials to incur obligations against and to make expenditures of governmental resources. Specific appropriations are F,_V Q I- T L ML usually made at the fund level and are granted for a one-year period. Appropriation Ordinance: The official enactment by the legislative body establishing the legal authority for officials to obligate and expend resources. Assets: Resources owned or held by the Town which has monetary value Audit: An examination, usually by an official or a private accounting firm retained by the Town Council, of organization financial statements and the utilization of resources. Balance Sheet: The basic financial statement, which discloses the assets, liability, and equities of an entity at a specific date in conformity with General Accepted Accounting Principles. Balanced Budget: A budget adopted by the Town Council and authorized by resolution where the proposed expenditures are equal to or less than the proposed revenues plus fund balances. Basis of Accounting: A term used referring to when revenue, expenditures, expenses, and transfers - and related assets and liabilities - are recognized in the accounts and reported in the Town's financial statements. Bond: A written promise to pay a specified sum of money, called the face sum of money, called the principal amount, at a specified date or dates in the future, called the maturity date (s), together with periodic interest at a specified rate. Bond Covenant: A legally enforceable agreement with bondholders that requires the governmental agency selling the bond to meet certain conditions in the repayment of the debt. 283 Bond Ordinance: A law approving the sale of bonds that specifies how proceeds may be spent. Bond Funds: Resources derived from issuance of bonds for financing capital improvements. Budget: The Town's financial plan for a specific fiscal year that contains an estimate of proposed expenditures and the proposed means of financing them. Budget Amendment: A revision of the adopted budget that, when approved by the Council, replaces the original provision. Budget Calendar: Schedule of key dates which the Town follows in the preparation and adoption of the budget. Budget Document: Instrument used by the budget -making authority to present a comprehensive financial plan of operations to the Town Council. Budgetary Control: The control or management of the organization in accordance with an approved budget for the purpose of keeping expenditures within the limitations of available appropriations and revenues. Capital Expenditures: Any major non- recurring expenditure or expenditure for facilities, including additions or major alterations, construction of highways or utility lines, fixed equipment, landscaping or similar expenditures. Cash Basis: A basis of accounting under which transactions are recognized when cash changes hand Certificates of Obligations (CO's): Similar to general obligation bonds except certificates require no voter approval. Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR): This report summarizes financial data for the previous fiscal year in a standardized format. Contingency: A budgetary reserve set aside for emergencies or unforeseen expenditures not otherwise budgeted. Contractual Services: The costs related to services performed for the Town by individuals, businesses, or utilities. Cost: The amount of money or other consideration exchanged for property or services. Cost may be incurred before money is paid; that is, as soon as liability is incurred. Council: The Mayor and five council members collectively acting as the legislative and policymaking body of the town Current Assets: Those assets which are available or can be made readily available to finance current operations or to pay current liabilities. Those assets which will be used up or converted into cash within one year. Some examples are cash, temporary investments, and accounts receivable collected within one year. Current Liabilities: Debt or other legal obligation arising out of transactions in the past which must be liquidated, renewed, or refunded within one year. Debt Service Fund: A fund used to account for the moneys set aside for the payment of interest and principal to holders of the Town's general obligation and revenue bonds, the sale of which finances long-term capital improvements, such as facilities, streets and drainage, parks and water/wastewater systems. Deficit: The excess of expenditures over revenues during an accounting period; or, in the case of proprietary funds, the excess of expense over income during an accounting period. Department: A major administrative division of the Town that indicates overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. Depreciation: Change in the value of assets (equipment, buildings, etc. with a useful life of 5 years or more) due to the use of the asset. EMS: Emergency Medical Services Encumbrances: The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase an item or service. Enterprise Fund: A fund established to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises - where the intent of the governing body is that the costs of providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. Excess Fund Balance: The excess of a fund's current assets over its current liabilities and required reserve limits. Exempt: Personnel not eligible to receive overtime pay and who are expected to work whatever hours are necessary to complete theirjob assignments. Expenditures: Outflow or non - enterprise funds paid or to be paid for an asset obtained or goods and services obtained. Expenses: Outflow of enterprise funds paid or to be paid for an asset obtained or goods and services obtained. Fiscal Policy: The Town's policies with respond to spending and debt management as they relate to government services, programs, and 284 capital investments. Reflect a set off principals for the planning and programming of government budgets. Fiscal Year: A 12 -month period to which the annual operating budget applies and at the end of which a government determines its financial position and the result of its operations. The Town of Westlake's fiscal year begins each October 1 st and ends the following September 30th. Fixed Assets: Assets of a long-term character, which are intended to continue to be held or used, such as land, buildings, improvements other than buildings, machinery, and equipment. Franchise Fee: A fee levied by the Town Council on businesses that use Town property or right-of-way. This fee is usually charged as a percentage of gross receipts. Full -Time Equivalent (FTE): The measure of authorized personnel often referred to as worker -years. The full time equivalent of 1 person (1 FTE) approximately represents 2080 hours of work per year. Fund: A fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources, together with all related liabilities and residual equities or balances, and changes therein, which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Fund Accounting: A governmental accounting system that is organized and operated on a fund basis. Fund Balance: The excess of a fund's current assets over its current liabilities, sometimes called working capital or fund equity. A negative fund balance is often referred to as a deficit. GAAP -Generally Accepted Accounting Principles: Uniform minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. They govern the form and content of the financial statements of an entity. GAAP encompass the conventions, rules and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practice at a particular time. They include not only broad guidelines of general applications, but also detailed practices and procedures. GAAP provide a standard by which to measure financial presentations. GASB: Acronym for Government Accounting Standards Board, an independent, non-profit agency responsible for the promulgation of accounting and financial reporting procedures for governmental entities. GFOA: Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada General Fund: The fund used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. The General Fund is tax supported. General Obligation Bonds: Bonds sold and guaranteed by the Town, in which the full faith and credit of the Town is pledged for repayment. Governmental Funds: The funds through which most governmental functions typically are financed. The acquisition, use, and financial resources and the related current liabilities are accounted for through governmental funds (General, Special Revenue, Capital Projects, and Debt Service Funds). Goal: Generalized statements of where an organization desires to be at some future time with regard to certain operating elements (e.g. financial condition, service levels provided, etc.) Grant: A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function. Typically, these contributions are made to local governments from state or federal governments. Infrastructure: Basic public investments such as streets, storm drainage, water and sewer lines, streetlights and sidewalks. Inter -fund transfer: The transfer of money from one fund to another. Investments: Securities and real estate held for the production of revenues in the form of interest, dividends, rentals, or lease payments. L.F. (Linear feet): Length in feet Lift Station: The Town's collection system relies on gravity to collect water. When the system gets to an unreasonable depth, a lift station pumps the water to a higher elevation so the gravity process can begin again. Line -item budget: A budget format in which departmental outlays are grouped according to the items that will be purchased. MGD: Million gallons per day Maintenance: The upkeep of physical properties in condition for use or occupancy. Examples are the inspection of equipment to detect defects and the making of repairs. Modified Accrual Accounting: This method of accounting is a combination of cash and accrual accounting since expenditures are immediately incurred as a liability while revenues are not recorded until they are actually received or are 285 "Measurable" and "available for expenditure". This type of accounting basis is conservative and is recommended as the standard for most government funds. Municipal: Of or pertaining to a Town or its government. Non -departmental: Accounts for expenditures or professional services and other general government functions, which cannot be allocated to individual departments. Non-exempt: Personnel eligible to receive overtime pay when overtime work has been authorized or requested by the supervisor. Object Code: The standard classification of the expenditures such as office supplies or rental of equipment. Objectives: Specific, measurable targets set in relation to goals. Operating Budget: Plan for current expenditures and the proposed means of financing them. The annual operating budget is the primary means by which most of the financing, acquisition, spending, and service delivery activities of the Town are controlled. The use of annual operating budgets is required by State law. Operating Expenditure: Expenditure on an existing item of property or equipment that is not a capital expenditure. Ordinance: An authoritative command or order. This term is used for laws adopted by a municipality. Performance Measures: Specific quantitative measures of work performed within an activity or program. They may also measure results obtained through an activity or program. Personnel Services: Expenditures for salaries, wages and related fringe benefits of Town employees. Prompt Payment Act: Adopted in July, 1985 by the State, the Act requires the Town to pay for goods and services within 30 days of receipt of invoice or the goods or services, whichever comes later. If this is not satisfied, the Town may be charged interest on the unpaid balance at the rate of 1 % per month. Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax (PTR): '/2 cent sales tax approved by the Town of Westlake voters in May, 2006. Texas law allowed the Town to collect the new 1/2 cent sales tax that does not share the restrictive spending limitations on revenues designated to the 4A Economic Development Fund 1/2 cent sales tax. 4A sales tax was dissolved and replaced with this sales tax. Proposed Budget: The financial plan initially developed by departments and presented by the Town Manger to the Town Council for approval. Proprietary Funds: Operation that operates like a private operation, in which services are financed through user charges and expenditures include the full cost of operations. Public Hearing: An open meeting regarding proposed operating or capital budget allocations, which provide citizens with an opportunity to voice their views on the merits of the proposals. PVC: Acronym for polyvinyl chloride, a plastic compound used for water and sewer pipes. Reserve: An account used to indicate that a portion of fund resources is restricted for a specific purpose, or is not available for appropriation and subsequent spending. F�. V Q I- T L V. NrL Resolution: A formal statement of opinion or determination adopted by an assembly or other formal group. Resources: Total dollars available for appropriations, including estimated revenues, fund transfers, and beginning fund balances. Retained Earnings: The excess of total assets over total liabilities for an enterprise fund. Retained earnings include both short-term and long- term assets and liabilities for an enterprise fund. Revenues: Funds that the government receives as income. It includes such items a tax payment, fees from specific services, receipts from other governments, fines for forfeitures, grants, shared revenues and interest income. ROW: Acronym for right-of-way Sales Tax: A general "sales tax" is levied on persons and businesses selling merchandise or services in the town limits on a retail basis. The categories for taxation are defined by state law. Monies collected under authorization of this tax are for the use and benefit of the town. SCADA: Acronym that stands for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. SCADA refers to a system that collects data from various sensors at a remote location and then sends this data to a central computer which then manages and controls the data. Special Revenue Fund: A fund used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources that are legally restricted to expenditure for specified purposes. Supplies: A cost category for minor items (individually priced at less than $5,000) required by departments to conduct their operations. 286 TMRS: Acronym for the Texas Municipal Retirement System, a pension plan for employees of member cities within the State of Texas. TRA: Trinity River Authority - A separate governmental entity responsible for providing water and wastewater services in the Trinity River basin. The Town contracts with TRA for treatment of wastewater. TXDOT: Texas Department of Transportation Transfer -In: Funds expended in one fund and received in other. User Charges: The payment of a fee for direct receipt of a public service by the party benefiting from the service. Working Capital: Budgeted working capital is calculated as a fund's current assets less current liabilities and outstanding encumbrances. Working capital does not include long-term assets or liabilities. For budgetary purposes, working capital, rather than retained earnings, is generally used to reflect the available resources of enterprise funds. FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES I. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The overall intent of the following Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements is to enable the Town to achieve a long-term stable and positive financial condition. The watchwords of the Town's financial management include integrity, prudent, stewardship, planning, accountability, and full disclosure. The more specific purpose is to provide guidelines to the Town Manager and Finance Director in planning and directing the Town's day-to-day financial affairs and in developing recommendations to the Town Manger and Town Council. The scope of these policies generally span, among other issues, accounting, purchasing, auditing, financial reporting, internal controls, operating and capital budgeting, revenue management, cash and investment management, expenditure control, asset management, debt management, and planning concepts, in order to: • Present fairly and with full disclosure the financial position and results of the financial operations of the Town in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), and • Determine and demonstrate compliance with finance related legal and contractual issues in accordance with provisions of the Texas Local Government Code and other pertinent legal documents and mandates. The Town Council will annually review and approve the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy Statements as part of the budget process. II. SUMMARY OF POLICY INTENDED OUTCOMES This policy framework mandates pursuit of the following fiscal objectives: • Operating Budget: Prepare, conservatively estimate revenues, present, and adopt the Town's annual operating plan. • Revenues Management: Design, maintain, and administer a revenue system that will assure a reliable, equitable, diversified, and sufficient revenue stream to support desired Town services. • Expenditure Control: Identify priority services, establish appropriate service levels, and administer the expenditure of available resources to assure fiscal stability and the effective and efficient delivery of services. • Fund Balance/Retained Earnings: Maintain the fund balance and retained earnings of the various operating funds at levels sufficient to protect the Town's creditworthiness as well as its financial position from emergencies. • Debt Management: Establish guidelines for debt financing that will provide needed capital equipment and infrastructure improvements while minimizing the impact of debt payments on current revenues. • Intergovernmental Relationships: Where feasible, coordinate efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives, share the cost of providing governmental services on an equitable basis and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal level. • Grants: Seek, apply for and effectively administer within this policy's guidelines, Federal, State, and foundation grants-in-aid which address the Town's current priorities and policy objectives. 287 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES • Economic Development: Initiate where feasible, encourage, and participate in economic development efforts to create job opportunities and strengthen the local tax base and economy • Fiscal Monitoring: Prepare and present regular reports that analyze, evaluate, and forecast the Town's financial performance and economic condition. • Financial Consultants: With available resources, seek out and employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants in the management and administration of the Town's financial functions. • Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Reporting: Comply with prevailing Federal, State and local statues and regulations. Conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). • Capital Improvement Plan/Budget and Program: Multi-year planning, forecasting, preparation, and control of the Town's capital improvement plan/budget. • Capital Maintenance and Replacement: Annually review and monitor the state of the Town's capital equipment and infrastructure, setting priorities for its replacement and renovation based on needs, finding alternatives, and availability of resources. • Internal Controls: To establish and maintain an internal control structure designed to provide reasonable assurances that the Town's assets are safeguarded and that the possibilities for material errors in the Town's financial records are minimized. Ill. OPERATING BUDGET • Preparation - Budgeting is an essential element of the financial planning, control and evaluation process of municipal government. The "operating budget" is the Town's annual financial operating plan. The budget includes all of the operating departments of the Town, the debt service fund, all capital projects funds, and the internal service funds of the Town. The proposed budget will be prepared with the cooperation of all Town departments, and is submitted to the Town Manager who makes any necessary changes and transmits the document to the Town Council. A budget preparation calendar and timetable will be established and followed in accordance with State law. Revenue Estimates for Budgeting - In order to maintain a stable level of services, the Town shall use a conservative, objective, and analytical approach when preparing revenue estimates. The process shall include analysis of probable economic changes and their impacts on revenues, historical collection rates, and trends in revenues. This approach should reduce the likelihood of actual revenues falling short of budget estimates during the year and should avoid mid -year service reductions. • Balanced Budget - As per State Law, current operating revenues, including Property Tax Reduction Sales Tax transfers (which can be used for operations), will be sufficient to support current operating expenditures. Annually recurring revenue will not be less than annually recurring operating budget expenditures (operating budget minus capital outlay). Debt or bond financing will not be used to finance current expenditures. Proposed Budget Process - a proposed budget shall be prepared by the Town Manager with the participation of all of the Town's department directors. ❖ The proposed budget shall include four basic segments for review and evaluation: (1) personnel costs, (2) base budget for operations and maintenance costs, (3) service level adjustments for increases of existing service levels or additional services, and (4) revenues. 288 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES ❖ The proposed budget review process shall include Council participation in the review of each of the four segments of the proposed budget and a public hearing to allow for citizen participation in the budget preparation. ❖ The proposed budget process shall allow sufficient time to provide review, as well as address policy and fiscal issues, by the Town Council. ❖ A copy of the proposed budget shall be filed with the Town Secretary when it is submitted to the Town Council as well as placed on the Town's website. • Budget Adoption - Upon the determination and presentation of the final iteration of the proposed budget as established by the Council, a public hearing date and time will be set and publicized. The Council will subsequently consider a resolution which, if adopted, such budget becomes the Town's Approved Annual Budget. The adopted budget will be effective for the fiscal year beginning October 1. The approved budget will be placed on the Town's web site. • Budget Award - Each year the Council approved operating budget will be submitted annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and consideration for the Award for Distinguished Budget Presentation. • Budget Amendments - Department Directors are responsible for monitoring their respective department budgets. The Finance Department will monitor all financial operations. The budget team will decide whether to proceed with a budget amendment and, if so, will then present the request to the Town Council. If the Council decides a budget amendment is necessary, the amendment is adopted in resolution format and the necessary budgetary changes are then made. • Central Control - Modifications within the operating categories (salaries, supplies, maintenance, services, capital, etc.) can be made with the approval of the Town Manager. Modifications to reserve categories and interdepartmental budget totals will be made only by Town Council consent with formal briefing and Council action. • Planning - The budget process will be coordinated so as to identify major policy issues for Town Council by integrating it into the Council's overall strategic planning process for the Town. Each department shall have a multi-year business plan that integrates with the Town's overall strategic plan. • Reporting - Monthly financial reports will be prepared by the Finance Department and distributed to and reviewed by each Director. Information obtained from financial reports and other operating reports is to be used by Directors to monitor and control departmental budget. Summary financial reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. • Performance Measures & Productivity Indicators - Where appropriate, performance measures and productivity indicators will be used as guidelines to measure efficiency, effectiveness, and outcomes of Town services. This information will be included in the annual budget process as needed. • Contingent Appropriation - During the budget process, staff will attempt to establish an adequate contingent appropriation in each of the operating funds. The expenditure for this appropriation shall be made only in cases of emergency, and a detailed account shall be recorded and reported. The proceeds shall be disbursed only by transfer to departmental appropriation. All transfers from the contingent appropriation will be evaluated using the following criteria: ❖ Is the request of such an emergency nature that it must be made immediately? ❖ Why was the item not budgeted in the normal budget process? ❖ Why can't the transfer be made within the department? 289 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES IV. REVENUES MANAGEMENT A. REVENUE DESIGN PARAMETERS. The Town will pursue the following optimum characteristics in its revenue system: • Simplicity - The Town, where possible and without sacrificing accuracy, will strive to keep the revenue system simple in order to reduce costs, achieve transparency, and increase citizen understanding of Town revenue sources. • Certainty - A knowledge and understanding of revenue sources reliability increases the viability of the revenue system. The Town will understand, to the best of its ability, all aspects of its revenue sources and their performance, as well as enact consistent collection policies to provide assurances that the revenue base will materialize according to budgets, forecasts, and plans. • Equity - The Town shall make every effort to maintain equity in its revenue system: i.e. the Town shall seek to minimize or eliminate all forms of subsidization between entities, funds, services utilities, and customer classes within a utility. • Administration - The benefits of a revenue source will not exceed the cost of collecting that revenue. Every effort will be made for the cost of collection to be reviewed annually for cost effectiveness as a part of the Town's indirect cost and cost of service analysis. • Adequacy, Diversification and Stability - The Town shall attempt, in as much as is practical, to achieve a balance in its revenue system. The Town shall also strive to maintain a balanced and diversified revenue system to protect the Town from fluctuations in any one source due to changes in local economic conditions which adversely impact that revenue source. B. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS. The following considerations and issues will guide the Town in its revenue policies concerning specific sources of funds: • Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development - The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are being considered to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as a part of the evaluation for each proposed economic development project. • Non -Recurring Revenues - One-time or non-recurring revenues will not be used to finance on-going operational costs. Non-recurring revenues will be used only for one-time expenditures such as long- lived capital needs or one-time major maintenance projects that occur infrequently. Non-recurring revenues will not be used for budget balancing purposes except to cover the one-time expenditures described above. • Investment Income - Earnings from investment of available monies, whether pooled or not, will be distributed to the funds in accordance with the equity balance of the fund from which monies were provided to be invested. • Property Tax Revenues - The Town shall endeavor to avoid a property tax by revenue diversification, implementation of user fees, and economic development. C. USER -BASED (DEMAND DRIVEN) FEES AND SERVICE CHARGES. For services that are demand driven and can be associated with a user fee or charge, the direct and indirect costs of that service will be offset by a fee where possible. The Town staff will endeavor to prepare a review of all fees and charges annually, but not less than once every three years, in order to ensure that these fees provide for, at minimum, full cost recovery of service. 290 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES D. ENTERPRISE FUND RATES. Utility rates and rate structures for water and sewer services will be constructed to target full cost of service recovery. Annually the Town will review and adopt water and sewer utility rates and a rate structure that generates revenue sufficient to fully cover operating expenses, meet the legal restrictions of all applicable bond covenants, provide for an adequate level of working capital, and recover applicable general/administrative costs. The Solid Waste function will have rates that fully recover all costs and maintain an adequate balance. The Cemetery Fund will be structured to operate on lot sales and endowments. • General and Administrative (G&A) Charges - Where feasible, G&A costs will be charged to all funds for services of indirect general overhead costs, which may include general administration, finance, customer billing, facility use, personnel, technology, engineering, legal counsel, and other costs as deemed appropriate. These charges will be determined through an indirect cost allocation study following accepted practices and procedures. E. INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES. As a general rule, intergovernmental revenues (grants) will not be utilized for on-going operating costs. Any potential grant opportunity will be examined to identify all costs related to matching and continuation of program requirements. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications. If it is determined that accepting a grant with on-going cost conditions is in the interests of the Town, all the operating and maintenance costs must be included in the financial forecast and their ultimate effect on operations and revenue requirements be known. F. REVENUE MONITORING. Revenues as they are received will be regularly compared to budgeted revenues and variances will be investigated. This process will be summarized in the appropriate budget report. V. EXPENDITURE CONTROL • Appropriations - The point of budgetary control is at the department level in the General Fund and at the fund level in all other funds. When budget adjustments among Departments and/or funds are necessary, they must be approved by the Town Council. • Current Funding Basis - The Town shall operate on a current funding basis. Expenditures shall be budgeted and controlled so as not to exceed current revenues plus the planned use of fund balance accumulated through prior year savings. (The use of fund balance shall be guided by the Fund Balance/Retained Earnings Policy Statements.) • Avoidance of Operating Deficits - The Town shall take immediate corrective actions if at any time during the fiscal year expenditure and revenue re -estimates are such that an operating deficit (i.e., projected expenditures in excess of projected revenues) is projected at year-end. Corrective actions can include a hiring freeze, expenditure reductions, fee increases, or use of fund balance within the Fund. • Balance/Retained Earnings Policy- Expenditure deferrals into the following fiscal year, short-term loans, or use of one-time revenue sources shall be avoided to balance the budget. • Maintenance of Capital Assets - Within the resources available each fiscal year, the Town shall maintain capital assets and infrastructure at a sufficient level to protect the Town's investment, to minimize future replacement and maintenance costs, and to continue service levels. • Periodic Program Reviews - The Town Manager shall undertake periodic staff and third -party reviews of Town programs for both efficiency and effectiveness. Privatization and contracting with other governmental agencies will be evaluated as alternative approaches to service delivery. Programs which are determined to be inefficient and/or ineffective shall be reduced in scope or eliminated. 291 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES • Purchasing - The Town shall make every effort to maximize any discounts offered by creditors/vendors. Staff shall also use competitive bidding in accordance to State law, as well as intergovernmental partnerships and purchasing cooperatives to attain the best possible price on goods and services. • Prompt Payment - All invoices will be paid within 30 days of receipt in accordance with the prompt payment requirements of State law. VI. FUND BALANCE/RETAINED EARNINGS • General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance - The Town shall strive to maintain the General Fund undesignated fund balance at, or in excess of, 90 days of operation. • Retained Earnings of Other Operating Funds - In the Utility Fund, the Town shall strive to maintain positive retained earnings positions to provide sufficient reserves for emergencies and revenue shortfalls. • Use of Fund Balance/ Retained Earnings - Fund Balance/Retained Earnings shall be used only for emergencies, not recurring expenditures, or major capital purchases that cannot be accommodated through current year savings. Should such use reduce the balance below the appropriate level set as the objective for that fund, recommendations will be made on how to restore it. VII. DEBT MANAGEMENT • Debt Issuance Analysis - All consideration of debt issuance for major capital assets will be prepared within the framework of a Council approved multi-year capital improvement plan and forecast for all Town facilities and infrastructure. • Analysis of Debt Issuance and Debt Issuance Alternatives - Staff will explore alternatives to the issuance of debt for capital acquisitions and construction projects. These alternatives will include, but not be limited to, (1) grants- in- aid, (2) use of reserves, (3) use of either current on-going general revenues or one-time revenues, (4) contributions from developers and others, (5) leases, (b) user fees, and (7) impact fees. Use of Debt Financing - The useful life of the asset or project shall, at a minimum, exceed the payout schedule of any debt the Town assumes. Debt financing instruments to be considered by the Town may include: ❖ General obligation bonds. These must be authorized by a vote of the citizens of Westlake. ❖ Revenue bonds. These bonds generate capital requirements necessary for continuation or expansion of a service which produces revenue and for which the asset may reasonable be expected to provide for a revenue stream to fund the debt service requirement. ❖ Certificates of obligation. These can be authorized by Council approval with debt service by either general revenues or backed by a specific revenue stream or a combination of both. ❖ Lease/purchase agreements. These shall only be used to purchase capital assets that can not be financed from either current revenues or fund balance/retained earnings and to fund infrastructure improvements and additions. 292 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES • Assumption of Additional Debt - The Town shall not assume more tax -supported general purpose debt than it retires each year without first conducting an objective analysis as to the community's ability to assume and support additional debt service payments. Affordability Targets - The Town shall use an objective multi-year analytical approach to determine whether it can afford to assume new general purpose debt beyond what it retires each year. This process shall compare generally accepted standards of affordability to the current values for the Town. The process shall also examine the direct costs and benefits of the proposed expenditures. The decision on whether or not to assume new debt shall be based on these costs and benefits and on the Town's ability to "afford" new debt as determined by the aforementioned standards. The Town shall strive to achieve and/or maintain these standards at a low to moderate classification. Debt Structure - The Town shall structure its debt payment schedules for general purpose debt to ensure level principal repayment schedules. The Town shall not assume any debt with "balloon' repayment schedules which consist of low annual payments and one large payment of the balance due at the end of the term. While balloon payment structures minimize the size of debt payments during the period, they force a large funding requirement on the budget of the final year. Given the uncertainties of the future, level payment schedules improve budget planning and financial management. • Sale Process - The Town shall use a competitive bidding process in the sale of debt unless the nature of the issue warrants a negotiated bid. The Town shall award bonds based on a true interest cost (TIC) basis as long as the financial advisor agrees that the TIC basis can satisfactorily determine the lowest and best bid. • Bond Rating Agencies Presentations - Full disclosure of operations and open lines of communication shall be made to the bond rating agencies. Town staff, with assistance of financial advisors, shall prepare the necessary materials and presentation to the bond rating agencies. • Continuing Disclosure - The Town is committed to continuing disclosure of financial and pertinent credit information relevant to the Town's outstanding securities. • Debt Refunding - Town staff and the financial advisor shall monitor the municipal bond market for opportunities to obtain interest savings by refunding outstanding debt. As a general rule, the present value savings of a particular refunding should exceed 3.5% of the refunded maturities. VIII. INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS The Town will pursue coordinated efforts with other governmental agencies to achieve common policy objectives, share the cost of providing government services on an equitable basis, and support favorable legislation at the State and Federal levels. • Inter -local Cooperation in Delivering Services - In order to promote the effective and efficient delivery of services, the Town shall actively seek to work with other local jurisdictions in joint purchasing consortia, sharing facilities, sharing equitably the costs of service delivery, and developing joint programs to improve service to its citizens. • Legislative Program - The Town shall cooperate with other jurisdictions to actively oppose any State or Federal regulation or proposal that mandates additional Town programs or services and does not provide the funding to implement them. Conversely, as appropriate, the Town shall support legislative initiatives that provide more funds for priority local programs. 293 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES IX. GRANTS • Grant Guidelines - The Town shall apply, and facilitate the application by others, for only those grants that are consistent with the objectives and high priority needs previously identified above in these policies. The potential for incurring on-going costs, to include the assumption of support for grant funded positions from local revenues, will be considered prior to applying for a grant. • Grant Review - All grant submittals shall be reviewed for their cash match requirements, their potential impact on the operating budget, and the extent to which they meet the Town's policy objectives. If there are cash match requirements, the source of funding shall be identified prior to application. Staff will focus on one-time grants to avoid long-term implications related to additional expenditures in future years. • Grant Program Termination - The Town shall terminate grant funded programs and associated positions when grant funds are no longer available unless alternate funding is identified. X. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • Positive Business Environment - The Town shall endeavor, through its regulatory and administrative functions, to provide a positive business environment in which local businesses can grow, flourish and create jobs. The Town Council and Town staff will be sensitive to the needs, concerns and issues facing local businesses. • Commitment to Business Expansion, Diversification, and Job Creation - The Town shall encourage and participate in economic development efforts to expand Westlake's economy to increase local employment. These efforts shall not only focus on newly developing areas but also on other established sections of Westlake where development can generate additional jobs and other economic benefits. • Coordinate Efforts with Other Jurisdictions - The Town's economic development program shall encourage close cooperation with other local jurisdictions, chambers of commerce, and groups Interested in promoting the economic well-being of this area. • Cost/Benefit of Incentives for Economic Development - The Town will use due caution in the analysis of any tax or fee incentives that are used to encourage economic development. A cost/benefit (fiscal impact) analysis will be performed as part of such evaluation for each prospect. Economic development agreements will contain performance language as to the business's proposed economic impact to Westlake in exchange for Town incentives with adequate "claw -back" provisions for the Town. XI. FISCAL MONITORING • Financial Status and Performance Reports - Quarterly reports comparing expenditures and revenues to current budget, projecting expenditures and revenues through the end of the year, noting the status of fund balances to include dollar amounts and percentages, and outlining any remedial actions necessary to maintain the Town's financial position shall be prepared for review by the Town Manager and the Council. • Compliance with Council Policy Statements - The Fiscal and Budgetary Policies will be reviewed annually by the Council and updated, revised or refined as deemed necessary. Policy statements adopted by the Council are guidelines, and occasionally, exceptions may be appropriate and required. However, exceptions to stated policies will be specifically identified, and the need for the exception will be documented and fully explained. 294 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES XII. FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS To employ the assistance of qualified financial advisors and consultants as needed in the management and administration of the Town's financial functions. These areas include but are not limited to investments, debt administration, financial accounting systems, program evaluation, and financial impact modeling. Advisors shall be selected on a competitive basis using objective questionnaires and requests for proposals based on the scope of the work to be performed. XIII. ACCOUNTING, AUDITING, AND FINANCIAL REPORTING To comply with prevailing local, state, and federal regulations relative to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting. Accounting practices and financial reporting shall conform to generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, (AICPA), and the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA). The Board shall select an independent firm of certified public accountants to perform an annual audit of all operations • Accounting - The Town is solely responsible for the recording and reporting of its financial affairs, both internally and externally. The Town's Finance Director is responsible for establishing the structure for the Town's chart of accounts and for assuring that procedures are in place to properly record financial transactions and report the Town's financial position. External Auditing - Town will be audited annually by outside independent accountants (auditors). The auditors must be a CPA firm and must demonstrate significant experience in the field of local government auditing. They must conduct the town's audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and be knowledgeable in the Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement program. The auditors' report on Town's financial statements will be completed within a timely period of the Town's fiscal year-end. The auditor will jointly review the management letter with the Town Council, if necessary. In conjunction with this review, the Finance Director shall respond in writing to the Town Council regarding the auditor's Management Letter, addressing the issued contained therein. The Town will not require auditor rotation, but will circulate request for proposal for audit services on a periodic basis as deemed appropriate. • External Financial Reporting - Town will prepare and publish a comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR). The CAFR will be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and will be presented annually to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for evaluation and awarding of the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting. • Responsibility of Auditor to Town Council - The auditor is retained by and it accountable directly to the Town Council and will have access to direct communication with the Town Council if the Town Staff is unresponsive to auditor recommendations or if the auditor considers such communication necessary to fulfill its legal and professional responsibilities. • Internal Financial Reporting - The Finance Department will prepare internal financial reports sufficient for management to plan, monitor, and control Town's financial affairs. XIV. CAPITAL BUDGET AND PROGRAM • Preparation - The Town's capital budget will include all capital projects funds and all capital resources. While the capital budget will be prepared annually on a project basis, it will be based on an on-going, multi-year capital improvement plan (CIP) that shows all funded and unfunded projects as identified by staff for all Town facilities and infrastructure. The multi-year CIP will be reviewed annually, updated by staff and presented to the Council for its review and approval. The annual 295 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES capital budget will be prepared by the Finance Department with the involvement of responsible departments based on the multi-year CIP. • Control - All capital project expenditures must be appropriated in the capital budget. The Finance Director must certify the availability of resources before any capital project contract is presented to the Town Council for approval. Program Planning - The capital budget will be taken from the capital improvements project plan for future years. The planning time frame for the capital improvements project plan should normally be five years, with a minimum of at least three years. The replacement and maintenance for capital items should also be projected for the next five years. Future maintenance and operational costs will be considered so that these costs can be included as appropriate in the annual budget. Financing Programs - Where applicable and with Council approval, impact fees, pro -rata charges, assessments, or other fees should be used to fund capital projects which have a primary benefit to specific, identifiable property owners. ❖ Recognizing that long-term debt is usually a more expensive financing method, alternative financing sources will be explored before debt is issued. When debt is issued, it will be used to acquire major assets with expected lives which equal or exceed the average life of the debt issue. • Reporting - Periodic financial reports will be prepared to enable the department directors to manage their capital budgets. Summary capital project status reports will be presented to the Town Council quarterly. XV. CAPITAL MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT The Town recognizes that deferred maintenance and not anticipating capital replacement needs increases future capital costs. Annually, available funds will be evaluated during the budget process and a percentage of each operating fund's budget will be recommended to the Council for transfer. Upon approval by the Council, the recommended amount will be transferred to the appropriate funds (General or Utility Major Maintenance and Vehicle & Equipment Replacement) for major maintenance/ replacement of street, building roof, flooring, air conditioning, equipment, etc. XVI. INTERNAL CONTROLS Written Procedures - Whenever possible, written procedures will be established and maintained by the Finance Director for all functions involving purchasing, cash handling and/or accounting throughout the Town. These procedures will embrace the general concepts of fiscal responsibility set for in this policy statement. Department Directors' Responsibilities - Each department director is responsible for ensuring that good internal controls are followed throughout his/her department, that all directives or internal controls are implemented, and that all independent auditor internal control recommendations are addressed. Departments will develop and periodically update written internal control procedures. XVII. ASSET MANAGEMENT Investments - The Finance Director shall promptly invest all Town funds with the depository bank in accordance with the provisions of the current Bank Depository Agreement or in any negotiable instrument authorized by the Town Council. Further, investments shall be made in accordance with the Investment Policy approved by the Town Council for the Town of Westlake that meets the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act (PFIA), Section 2256 of the Texas Local Government Code. The Finance Director will issue quarterly reports on investment activity to the Town Council. 296 FISCAL & BUDGETARY POLICIES Cash Management - Town's cash flow will be managed to maximize the cash available to invest. Such cash management will entail the centralization of cash collections, where feasibility, including utility bills, building and related permits and license, fines, fees, and other collection offices as appropriate. Periodic review of cash flow position will be performed to determine performance of cash management and conformance to investment policies. The underlying theme will be that idle cash will be invested with the intent to (1) safeguard assets, (2) maintain liquidity, and (3) maximize return. Fixed Assets and Inventory - Such assets will be reasonably safeguarded and properly accounted for and prudently insured. The fixed asset inventory will be updated regularly. Capitalization Criteria - For purposes of budgeting and accounting classification, the following criteria must be capitalized: ❖ The asset is owned by the Town of Westlake ❖ The expected useful life of the asset must be longer than one year, or extend the life on an identifiable existing asset by more than one year ❖ The original cost of the asset must be at least $5,000 ❖ The asset must be tangible ❖ On-going repairs and general maintenance are not capitalized ❖ New Purchases - All costs associated with bringing the asset into working order will be capitalized as part of the asset cost. This includes start up costs, engineering or consultant type fees as part of the asset cost once the decision or commitment to purchase the asset is made. The cost of land acquired should include all related costs associated with its purchase ❖ Improvements and Replacement - Improvement will be capitalized when they extend the original life of an asset or when they make the asset more valuable than it was originally. The replacement of assets components will normally be expenses unless they are a significant nature and meet all the capitalization criteria. • Computer System/Data Security - The Town shall provide security of its computer/network system and data files through physical and logical security systems that will include, but are not limited to: network user authentications, firewalls, content filtering, spam/virus protection, and redundant data backup. 297 INVESTMENT POLICY I. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of the Town of Westlake (the "Town") that the administration of its funds and the investment of those funds shall be handled as its highest public trust. Investments shall be made in a manner which will provide the maximum security of principal invested through limitations and diversification while meeting the daily cash flow needs of the Town and conforming to all applicable state and Town statutes governing the investment of public funds. The receipt of a market rate of return will be secondary to the requirements for safety and liquidity. It is the intent of the Town to be in complete compliance with local law and the Texas Public Funds Investment Act (the "Act", Texas Government Code 2256). The earnings from investments will be used in a manner that best serves the public trust and interests of the Town. II. SCOPE This Investment Policy applies to all the financial assets and funds held of the Town. Any new funds created by the Town will be managed under the provisions of this Policy unless specifically exempted by the Town Council and this Policy. III. OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGY It is the policy of the Town that all funds shall be managed and invested with four primary objectives, listed in order of their priority: safety, liquidity, diversification and yield. These objectives encompass the following. Safety of Principal Safety of principal is the foremost objective of the Town. Investments shall be undertaken in a manner that seeks to insure the preservation of capital in the overall portfolio. The suitability of each investment decision will be made on the basis of safety. Liquidity The Town's investment portfolio will remain sufficiently liquid to enable it to meet all operating requirements which might be reasonably anticipated. Investment decisions will be based on cash flow analysis of anticipated expenditures. Diversification Diversification is required in the portfolio's composition. Diversification of the portfolio will include diversification by maturity and market sector and will include the use of a number of broker/dealers or banks for diversification and market coverage. Competitive bidding will be used on each sale or purchase. Yield The Town's investment portfolio shall be designed with the objective of attaining a reasonable market yield, taking into account the Town's risk constraints and cash flow needs. A reasonable market yield for the portfolio will be defined as the six month (180 day) U.S. Treasury Bill which compares to the portfolio's maximum weighted average maturity of six months. The authorized investment purchased will be of the highest credit quality and marketability supporting the objectives of safety and liquidity. Securities, when not matched to a specific liability, will be short term to provide adequate liquidity. The portfolio shall be diversified to protect against market and credit risk in any one sector. The maximum weighted average maturity of the portfolio will be no more that 180 days and the maximum stated maturity of any security will not exceed two years. The funds are combined for investment purposes but the unique needs of all the funds in the portfolio are recognized and represented. 298 INVESTMENT POUCY Effective cash management is recognized as essential to good fiscal management. Cash management is defined as the process of managing monies in order to ensure maximum cash availability. The Town shall maintain a cash management program which includes timely collection of accounts receivable, prudent investment, disbursement of payments within invoice terms and the management of banking services. IV. LEGAL LIMITATIONS, RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY Specific investment parameters for the investment of public funds in Texas are stipulated in the Public Funds Investment Act, Chapter 2256, Texas Government Code, (the "Act"). The Act is attached as Exhibit A. The Public Funds Collateral Act, Chapter 2257, Texas Government Code, specifies collateral requirements for all public funds deposits. The Collateral Act is attached as Exhibit B. The Interlocal Cooperation Act, Chapter 791, Texas Government Code, authorizes local governments in Texas to participate in a Texas investment pool established thereunder. V. DELEGATION OF INVESTMENT AUTHORITY The Finance Director, acting on behalf of the Council, is designated as the Investment Officer of the Town and is responsible for all investment management decisions and activities. The Council is responsible for considering the quality and capability of staff, investment advisors, and consultants involved in investment management and procedures. All participants in the investment process shall seek to act responsibly as custodians of the public trust. The Investment Officer shall develop and maintain written administrative procedures for the operation of the investment program which are consistent with this Investment Policy. Procedures will include safekeeping, wire transfers, banking services contracts, and other investment related activities. The Investment Officer shall be responsible for all transactions undertaken and shall establish a system of controls to regulate the activities of subordinate officials and staff. The Investment Officer shall designate a staff person as a liaison/deputy in the event circumstances require timely action and the Investment Officer is not available. No officer or designee may engage in an investment transaction except as provided under the terms of this Policy and the procedures established by the Investment Officer and approved by the Town Manager. VI. PRUDENCE The standard of prudence to be used in the investment function shall be the "prudent person" standard and shall be applied in the context of managing the overall portfolio. This standard states: "Investments shall be made with judgment and care, under circumstances then prevailing, which persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs, not for speculation, but for investment, considering the probable safety of their capital as well as the expected income to be derived." 299 INVESTMENT POUCY Limitation of Personal Liability The Investment Officer and those delegated investment authority, when acting in accordance with the written procedures and this Policy and in accord with the Prudent Person Rule, shall be relieved of personal liability in the management of the portfolio provided that deviations from expectations for a specific security's credit risk or market price change are reported in a timely manner and that appropriate action is taken to control adverse market effects. VII. INTERNAL CONTROLS The Investment Officer shall establish a system of written internal controls which will be reviewed annually with the independent auditor of the Town. The controls shall be designed to prevent loss of public funds due to fraud, employee error, and misrepresentation by third parties, or imprudent actions by employees of the Town. VIII. AUTHORIZED INVESTMENTS Acceptable investments under this policy shall be limited to the instruments listed below. The choice of high-grade government investments and high-grade, money market instruments are designed to assure the marketability of those investments should liquidity needs arise. A. Obligations of the United States Government, its agencies and instrumentalities, not to exceed two (2) years to stated maturity and excluding mortgage backed securities; Fully insured or collateralized certificates of deposit from a bank doing business in the State of Texas and under the terms of a written depository agreement with that bank, not to exceed one year to stated maturity; C. No-load, SEC registered money market mutual funds. No more than 80% of the entity's monthly average balance may be invested in money market funds D. Public Funds interest bearing accounts; and Constant dollar, AAA -rated Texas Local Government Investment Pools as defined by the Public Funds Investment Act. If additional types of securities are approved for investment by public funds by state statute, they will not be eligible for investment until this Policy has been amended and the amended version adopted by the Council. Delivery versus Payment All investment security transactions shall be conducted on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis to assure that the Town has control of its assets and/or funds at all times. IX. AUTHORIZED FINANCIAL DEALERS AND INSTITUTIONS Securities broker/dealers may be primary or regional broker/dealers and will meet other criteria as determined by the Investment Officer including state registration and completion of a Town Broker/Dealer questionnaire (attached as Exhibit D). The following criteria must be met by authorized firms. - annual provision of an audited financial statement, - proof of certification by the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) - proof of current registration with the Texas State Securities Commission, and - completion of the Town's broker/dealer questionnaire. 300 INVESTMENT POUCY Every bank and broker/dealer with whom the Town transacts business will be provided a copy of this Investment Policy to assure that they are familiar with the goals and objectives of the investment program. The firm will be required to return a signed copy of the Certification Form (attached as Exhibit C) certifying that the Policy has been received and reviewed and only those securities approved by the Policy will be sold to the Town. X. DIVERSIFICATION AND MATURITY LIMITATIONS It is the policy of the Town to diversify its investment portfolio. Invested funds shall be diversified to minimize risk or loss resulting from over -concentration of assets in a specific maturity, specific issuer, or specific class of securities. Diversification strategies shall be established and periodically reviewed. XI. SAFEKEEPING AND COLLATERALIZATION The laws of the State and prudent treasury management require that all purchased securities be bought on a delivery versus payment (DVP) basis and be held in safekeeping by either an approved, independent third party financial institution or the Town's designated depository. Securities Owned by the Town All safekeeping arrangements shall be approved by the Investment Officer and an agreement of the terms executed in writing. The safekeeping bank may not be within the same holding company as the bank from which the securities are purchased. The custodian shall be required to issue original safekeeping receipts to the Town listing each specific security, rate, description, maturity, CUSIP number, and other pertinent information. Collateral Collateralization shall be required on all bank time and demand deposits for principal and accrued interest amounts over the FDIC insurance coverage of $100,000 (by tax identification number). In order to anticipate market changes and provide a level of additional security for all funds, collateral with a market value equal to 102% of the total deposits are required. The pledging bank will be made contractually liable for monitoring and maintaining the collateral levels at all times. All collateral will be held by an independent third party bank outside the holding company of the bank, pledged to the Town. Authorized collateral will include only: - Obligations of the US Government, its agencies and instrumentalities to include mortgage backed securities which pass the bank test, - Municipal obligations rated at least A by two nationally recognized rating agencies. The custodian shall be required to provide original safekeeping receipts clearly marked that the security is pledged to the Town. XII. REPORTING The Investment Officer shall submit quarterly reports to the Council containing sufficient information to permit an informed outside reader to evaluate the performance of the investment program and in full compliance with the Act. At a minimum the report shall contain: - Beginning and ending market value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio - Beginning and ending book value of the portfolio by market sector and total portfolio - Change in market value during the period - Detail on each asset (book, market, description, par ad maturity date) - Earnings for the period - Overall weighted average maturity of the portfolio 301 INVESTMENT POLICY The report will be prepared jointly by all involved in the investment activity and be signed by the Investment Officer. It will contain all elements as required by the Act and be signed by the Investment Officers as in compliance with the Act and this Policy. Market prices for assignment of market values will be obtained from an independent source. The three month Treasury Bill average yield for the reporting period will be reported as a gauge of performance and risk. XIII. DEPOSITORIES The Town will designate one banking institution through a competitive process as its central banking services provider at least every five years. This institution will be used for normal banking services including disbursements, deposits, and safekeeping of Town owned securities. Other banking institutions from which the Town may purchase only certificates of deposit will also be designated as a depository. All banking arrangements will be in written form in accordance with FIRREA which requires a resolution of approval of the agreement by the Bank Council or Bank Loan Committee. XIV. INVESTMENT POLICY ADOPTION BY COUNCIL The Town's Investment Policy and its incorporated strategies shall be adopted by resolution annually by the Council. 302 Town of Westlake FYI 0/11 Budget Calendar Mar -10 * Orientation and overview of 2010-11 budget process * Five Year Projection spreadsheets distributed for input * Detail forms for Capital Projects, major maintenance and Capital projects available * Review of calendar and processes with Council Apr - 10 * Year-end estimate spreadsheets distributed (09/10 Amendments) * Finance amends FY 09/10 Budget - becomes Base FY 10/11 * Department Heads access budget to remove one time revenues and expenditures * Operating baseline budget available for editing * Service level adjustment forms available on shared drive May - 10 * Detail review by Finance re: budgets/service level adjustments and capital project requests * Goals and Objectives available for editing on shared drive * Town Manager and Finance begin reviews with departments Jun - 10 * Budget module open for changes to budgets per reviews * Presentation of 5 -year forecast Jul - 10 * Preparation for Budget Retreat * Preparation of Power Point Aug -10 * Budget Retreat * Publish notice regarding consideration of property tax * Notice for Public Hearings posted in newspaper Sep - 10 * First Public Hearing on Tax Increase * Second Public Hearing on Tax Increase * Publish notice of Public Hearing on Budget * Publish notice regarding consideration of property tax * Budget Workshop * Public Hearing on Budget * Present Amended FY09/10 Municipal budget for Approval * Present Proposed FYI 0/1 1 Municipal budget for Approval * Adoption of FY10/1 1 Operating Budget and possible Tax Rate Oct - 10 * Fiscal Year 2010-2011 begins 303