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Res 15-19 Adopting the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action PlanTOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. 15-19 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, ADOPTING THE TARRANT COUNTY HAZARD MITIGATION ACTION PLAN, JUNE 2015. WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake recognizes the threat that natural hazards pose to people and property within the Town of Westlake; and WHEREAS, the Town of Westlake has prepared a multi -hazard mitigation plan, hereby known as Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Plan, June 2015 in accordance with the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000; and WHEREAS, Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, June 2015 identifies mitigation goals and actions to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property in the Town of Westlake from the impacts of future hazards and disasters; and WHEREAS, adoption by the Town of Westlake demonstrates their commitment to the hazard mitigation and achieving the goals outlined in the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, June 2015. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, THAT: SECTION 1: That the Town of Westlake Town Council does hereby adopt the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan, June 2015. SECTION 2: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. Resolution 15-19 Page t of 2 SECTION 3: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 24TH DAY OF AUGUST, 2015. ATTEST: KellylEdward own Secretary Laura Wheat, Mayor Nomas E. fIryms , w Manager r Resolution 15-19 Page 2 of 2 Tarrant County, Texas Local Mitigation Action Plan —June 2015 TARRANT COUNTY LOCAL MITIGATION ACTION PLAN The plan was prepared under the direction of the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee. For additional information, please contact Nicholas F. LaGrassa with the North Central Texas Council of Governments at 817-695-9235. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 LMAP-1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Mitigation should form the foundation of every emergency management agency's plans and procedures. Emergency management agencies must adopt mitigation practices to reduce, minimize, or eliminate hazards in their community. The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan (LMAP) identifies the hazards faced in the community, vulnerabilities to these hazards, and mitigation strategies for the future. The plan fulfills the requirements of the Federal Disaster Mitigation Act as administered by the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Tarrant County LMAP is a guide for all communities that participated in its development. Participating municipalities include the Cities of Arlington, Azle, Bedford, Blue Mound, Colleyville, Crowley, Euless, Forest Hill, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Haslet, Hurst, Keller, Kennedale, Lake Worth, Lakeside, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Saginaw, Southlake, Watauga, Westlake, and Westworth Village. The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Tarrant County, and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) also participated in development of the Tarrant County LMAP. Representatives and citizens from participating communities attended public meetings to discuss the hazards their communities face and the vulnerabilities those hazards present. Representatives from each participating municipality reviewed drafts of the LMAP and added input to the mitigation strategies presented in the plan. Tarrant County citizens were also active participants in the development of the plan. Citizens attended public meetings that were advertised online and in news articles to share their concerns about hazards faced in the community and how to mitigate the effects of these hazards. All participants involved in this plan understand the benefits of developing and implementing mitigation plans and strategies. Elected officials, public safety organizations, planners, and many others have worked together to develop and implement this LMAP, proving that they have the vision to implement mitigation practices and therefore reduce the loss of life and property in their communities. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ES -1 TARRANT COUNTY LOCAL MITIGATION ACTION PLAN Table of Contents TARRANT COUNTY LOCAL MITIGATION ACTION PLAN.............................................1 EXECUTIVESUMMARY...........................................................................................................1 PREFACE.......................................................................................................................................1 Section 1 PLAN, BACKGROUND, AND PURPOSE.............................................................1-1 1.1 Overview................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Authority...................................................................................................................1-1 1.3 Scope.........................................................................................................................1-1 1.4 Purpose..................................................................................................................... 1-2 1.5 Consistency with Federal and State Mitigation Policies .......................................... 1-2 1.6 Goals and Objectives................................................................................................ 1-3 Section 2 COMMUNITY PROFILE........................................................................................ 2-1 2.1 Overview................................................................................................................... 2-1 2.2 Demographics........................................................................................................... 2-2 2.3 Economy................................................................................................................... 2-5 2.4 Climate......................................................................................................................2-6 2.5 Land Use................................................................................................................... 2-8 2.5.1 Current Land Use.......................................................................................... 2-8 2.5.1.1 Manufactured Homes................................................................... 2-10 2.5.2 Future Land Use......................................................................................... 2-13 2.5.3 Watersheds..................................................................................................2-16 2.6 Transportation.........................................................................................................2-16 2.6.1 Commuter Rail............................................................................................ 2-17 2.6.2 Airports....................................................................................................... 2-18 2.6.3 Transit......................................................................................................... 2-20 2.7 Tarrant County Capabilities.................................................................................... 2-20 2.8 Government............................................................................................................ 2-36 Section 3 PLANNING PROCESS............................................................................................ 3-1 3.1 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee ................................ 3-1 3.1.1 Additional Partners....................................................................................... 3-1 3.2 Plan Organization..................................................................................................... 3-6 3.3 Planning Team Goals and Objectives....................................................................... 3-6 3.4 Multijurisdictional Considerations........................................................................... 3-7 3.5 Review of Existing Technical/Planning Information ............................................. 3-13 3.6 Public Involvement................................................................................................. 3-14 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 i TABLE OF CONTENT Section 4 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT .................................................. 4-1 4.1 Natural Hazards........................................................................................................ 4-5 5-2 4.1.1 Tornadoes..................................................................................................... 4-5 4.1.2 Flooding...................................................................................................... 4-14 4.1.3 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds ..................................................... 4-52 4.1.4 Hail.............................................................................................................4-70 4.1.5 Lightning.....................................................................................................4-83 5.1.7 Winter Storms............................................................................................... 4.1.6 Winter Storms............................................................................................. 4-95 5.1.8 Dam Failure.................................................................................................. 5-6 4.1.7 Drought..................................................................................................... 4-106 5-7 4.1.8 Wildfires................................................................................................... 4-118 4.1.9 Extreme Temperatures.............................................................................. 4-128 5-8 4.1.10 Expansive Soils.........................................................................................4-138 5.1.12 Lightning.......................................................................................................5-9 4.2 Technological Hazards......................................................................................... 4-150 4.2.1 Power Failure............................................................................................ 4-150 5.1.15 Expansive Soils........................................................................................... 5-11 4.2.2 Infectious Disease Outbreak.....................................................................4-151 City of Arlington Mitigation Strategy.................................................................... 5-12 5.3 4.2.3 Hazardous Materials Release....................................................................4-153 5-20 5.4 4.2.4 Terrorism..................................................................................................4-157 5-31 5.5 4.2.5 Dam Failure.............................................................................................. 4-159 4.3 Vulnerability of Critical Facilities........................................................................ 4-167 Section 5 MITIGATION STRATEGIES................................................................................. 5-1 5.1 Mitigation Goals and Considerations....................................................................... 5-2 5.1.1 Goals that Address Multiple Hazards........................................................... 5-2 5.1.2 Tornadoes and Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds .............................. 5-3 5.1.3 Flooding........................................................................................................5-4 5.1.4 Power Failure................................................................................................ 5-4 5.1.5 Hail...............................................................................................................5-5 5.1.6 Wildfires....................................................................................................... 5-5 5.1.7 Winter Storms............................................................................................... 5-6 5.1.8 Dam Failure.................................................................................................. 5-6 5.1.9 Infectious Disease Outbreak......................................................................... 5-7 5.1.10 Drought 5-7 5.1.11 Terrorism...................................................................................................... 5-8 5.1.12 Lightning.......................................................................................................5-9 5.1.13 Hazardous Materials Release...................................................................... 5-10 5.1.14 Extreme Temperatures................................................................................ 5-10 5.1.15 Expansive Soils........................................................................................... 5-11 5.2 City of Arlington Mitigation Strategy.................................................................... 5-12 5.3 City of Azle Mitigation Strategy............................................................................ 5-20 5.4 City of Bedford Mitigation Strategy....................................................................... 5-31 5.5 City of Blue Mound Mitigation Strategy................................................................ 5-49 5.6 City of Colleyville Mitigation Strategy.................................................................. 5-62 5.7 City of Crowley Mitigation Strategy...................................................................... 5-73 5.8 Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Mitigation Strategy ................................. 5-86 5.9 City of Euless Mitigation Strategy....................................................................... 5-104 5.10 City of Forest Hill Mitigation Strategy................................................................. 5-111 5.11 City of Fort Worth Mitigation Strategy................................................................ 5-123 ii Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 TABLE OF CONTENT 5.12 City of Grapevine Mitigation Strategy ............................................... 5.13 Haltom City Mitigation Strategy........................................................ 5.14 City of Haslet Mitigation Strategy...................................................... 5.15 City of Hurst Mitigation Strategy....................................................... 5.16 City of Keller Mitigation Strategy...................................................... 5.17 City of Kennedale Mitigation Strategy ............................................... 5.18 City of Lake Worth Mitigation Strategy ............................................. 5.19 Town of Lakeside Mitigation Strategy ............................................... 5.20 North Central Texas Council of Governments Mitigation Strategy... 5.21 City of North Richland Hills Mitigation Strategy .............................. 5.22 City of Richland Hills Mitigation Strategy ......................................... 5.23 City of Saginaw Mitigation Strategy .................................................. 5.24 City of Southlake Mitigation Strategy ................................................ 5.25 Tarrant County Mitigation Strategy .................................................... 5.26 City of Watauga Mitigation Strategy .................................................. 5.27 Town of Westlake Mitigation Strategy ............................................... 5.28 City of Westworth Village Mitigation Strategy .................................. .................. 5-132 .................. 5-146 .................. 5-156 .................. 5-164 .................. 5-170 .................. 5-183 .................. 5-200 .................. 5-208 .................. 5-216 .................. 5-220 .................. 5-231 .................. 5-248 .................. 5-254 .................. 5-258 .................. 5-268 .................. 5-283 .................. 5-296 Section 6 EXECUTING THE PLAN........................................................................................ 6-1 6.1 Plan Implementation................................................................................................. 6-1 6.2 Evaluation................................................................................................................. 6-1 6.3 Multijurisdictional Strategy and Considerations...................................................... 6-2 6.4 Plan Update............................................................................................................... 6-2 6.5 Plan Maintenance...................................................................................................... 6-2 6.6 Incorporation into Existing Planning Mechanisms ................................................... 6-5 Section 7 SUMMARY.... 7.1 Conclusion .... 7.2 References..... List of Tables .................................................. 7-1 .................................................. 7-1 .................................................. 7-1 Table2-1 Demographics.............................................................................................................. 2-2 Table2-2 Economy...................................................................................................................... 2-5 Table 3-1 Tarrant County LMAPC.............................................................................................. 3-1 Table 3-2 Jurisdiction Stakeholder Outreach............................................................................... 3-2 Table3-3 Calendar of Events...................................................................................................... 3-7 Table 3-4 Jurisdiction Participation in the Tarrant County LMAP............................................. 3-8 Table 3-5 Type of Jurisdiction Participation............................................................................... 3-9 Table 3-6 Jurisdiction Outreach Methods.................................................................................. 3-14 Table 4-1 Hazards Included in the Risk and Vulnerability Assessment ...................................... 4-1 Table 4-2 Hazards Not Included in the Risk and Vulnerability Assessment ............................... 4-2 Table 4-3 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan Hazard Ranking ................................. 4-4 Table4-4 EF Scale.......................................................................................................................4-2 Table 4-5 Confirmed Tornadoes in Tarrant County.................................................................... 4-5 Table 4-6 Significant Floods Events in Tarrant County............................................................ 4-17 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 iii TABLE OF CONTENT Table 4-7 Tarrant County Communities Participating in the NFIP........................................... 4-32 Table 4-8 NFIP Compliance Activities...................................................................................... 4-33 Table 4-9 Repetitive Loss Properties in Tarrant County and Participating Jurisdictions.......... 4-44 Table 4-10 Potential Losses from Flooding............................................................................... 4-51 Table 4-11 Beaufort Wind Scale................................................................................................ 4-52 Table 4-12 Severe Thunderstorm and High Winds................................................................... 4-54 Table 4-13 TORRO Hail Storm Intensity Scale........................................................................ 4-70 Table4-14 Hail Events.............................................................................................................. 4-71 Table 4-15 Lightning Activity Scale.......................................................................................... 4-83 Table 4-16 Lightning Strikes in Tarrant County........................................................................ 4-85 Table 4-17 Winter Storm Events............................................................................................... 4-98 Table 4-18 Tarrant County Drought History........................................................................... 4-109 Table 4-19 Keetch-Byram Drought Index............................................................................... 4-118 Table 4-20 Wildfires in Tarrant County.................................................................................. 4-120 Table 4-21 Extreme Weather Events....................................................................................... 4-131 Table 4-22 Significant Hazmat Releases in Tarrant County ................................................... 4-154 Table 4-23 Tarrant County Dams............................................................................................ 4-161 Table 6-1 Jurisdiction Representatives for Plan Implementation, Evaluation and 4-96 Maintenance..................................................................................................................... 6-3 Table 6-2 Jurisdiction Incorporation into Planning Mechanisms ................................................ 6-6 List of Figures Figure 2-1 Location Map of Tarrant County, Texas.................................................................... 2-2 Figure 2-2 Arlington Existing Land Use..................................................................................... 2-9 Figure 2-3 City of Arlington Manufactured Home Parks.......................................................... 2-11 Figure 2-4 City of Grapevine Manufactured Home Parks......................................................... 2-12 Figure 2-5 City of Fort Worth Future Land Use........................................................................ 2-14 Figure 2-6 City of Southlake Future Land Use.......................................................................... 2-15 Figure 2-7 Tarrant County Transportation Routes..................................................................... 2-17 Figure 2-8 Airports in Tarrant County....................................................................................... 2-19 Figure 2-9 Fire Stations in Tarrant County................................................................................ 2-34 Figure 2-10 Hospitals in Tarrant County................................................................................... 2-35 Figure 2-11 Police Stations in Tarrant County..........................................................................2-36 Figure 3-1 Example of Tarrant County LMAP Survey............................................................. 3-17 Figure 4-1 Vulnerability Classifications...................................................................................... 4-3 Figure 4-2 Tornado Tracks (1950-2011) and Population Density (2010) ................................... 4-1 Figure 4-3 Average Annual Number of Tornadoes Averaging Period: 1991 - 2010 .................. 4-1 Figure 4-4 Tornado Touchdowns in Tarrant County................................................................... 4-3 Figure 4-5 Tarrant Flood Zones................................................................................................. 4-24 Figure 4-6 Sperry -Piltz Ice Accumulation Index....................................................................... 4-96 Figure 4-7 Regional Snowfall Index.......................................................................................... 4-96 Figure 4-8 Drought Severity Index.......................................................................................... 4-107 Figure 4-9 Texas Drought Monitor (as of May 2014)............................................................. 4-108 Figure 4-10 Tarrant County WUI Response Index.................................................................. 4-121 lV Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 TABLE OF CONTENT Figure 4-11 Tarrant County Fire Intensity Scale..................................................................... 4-122 Figure 4-12 Wind Chill Chart ..................................................................................................4-128 Figure 4-13 National Weather Service Heat Index.................................................................. 4-129 Figure 4-14 Extreme Heat in Texas......................................................................................... 4-130 Figure 4-15 Expansive Index................................................................................................... 4-140 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 V PREFACE Mitigation Vision for the Future Mitigation should be the very foundation of every emergency management agency's plans and procedures. Emergency management agencies must adopt mitigation practices to reduce, minimize, or eliminate hazards in their community. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (PL 106- 390) outlines the criteria for communities to successfully implement hazard mitigation practices. Tarrant County and its cities and townships realize the benefits achieved by the development and implementation of mitigation plans and strategies. Tarrant County and participating jurisdiction elected officials, public safety organizations, planners, and many others have worked together in the development and implementation of this Local Mitigation Action Plan, proving that they have the vision to implement mitigation practices and therefore reduce the loss of life and property in their communities. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PF- Section 1 PLAN, BACKGROUND, AND PURPOSE 1.1 Overview The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan (LMAP) as written fulfills the requirements of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Disaster Mitigation Act provides federal assistance to state and local emergency management to mitigate the effects of disasters. The LMAP also encourages cooperation among various organizations and crosses political subdivisions. The following communities participated in the update of the Tarrant County LMAP: the Cities of Arlington, Azle, Bedford, Blue Mound, Colleyville, Crowley, Euless, Forest Hill, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Haslet, Hurst, Keller, Kennedale, Lake Worth, Lakeside, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Saginaw, Southlake, Watauga, Westlake, and Westworth Village. Also participating were Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Tarrant County, and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). The City of Fort Worth includes land in portions of Denton, Parker, and Wise Counties. 1.2 Authority Section 409 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act Title 44 CFR as amended by Section 102 of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 gives state and local governments the framework to evaluate and mitigate all hazards as a condition of receiving federal disaster funds. The Tarrant County LMAP is a requirement of the law. In Texas, federal regulatory authority for Local Mitigation Action Planning resides with FEMA Region VI. 1.3 Scope The scope of the Tarrant County LMAP encompasses all areas of Tarrant County, as noted in Section 1.1. The plan will identify the natural and technological hazards that could threaten life and property in our communities. The scope of this plan includes both short-term and long-term mitigation strategies, implementation, and possible sources of project funding. The plan also contains the following information: ■ General information about the plan (Executive Summary). ■ The vision for mitigation in our community (Preface). ■ The profile of Tarrant County, its geography, history, physical features, and other community indicators (Section 2: Community Profile). ■ The planning process and the involvement of all cities, state and federal governments, the public, the private sector, and other community players (Section 3: Planning Process). Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 1-1 Section 1 ■ Documentation of Tarrant County's past and predicted exposure to natural hazards and the potential risks that include the impacts on critical infrastructure with anticipated losses (Section 4: Risk and Vulnerability Assessment). ■ An overview of Tarrant County's capabilities to implement hazard mitigation goals, objectives, and policies that will effectively mitigate risks to our community (Section 5: Mitigation Strategies). ■ Procedures for maintaining an effective, long-range LMAP and the strategy to implement it (Section 6: Executing the Plan). ■ Critical facilities information. 1.4 Purpose The purpose of the Tarrant County LMAP is to identify risks and vulnerabilities and to formulate a plan of action to reduce damage and loss of life from natural and technological disasters. This plan shall serve as a benchmark for future mitigation activities and will identify mitigation goals and objectives for Tarrant County and its cities and townships. The plan will also prioritize potential risks and vulnerabilities in an effort to minimize the effects of disasters in our community. Realizing that identifying our community's risks and working collectively toward the prevention of disasters in our community is in everyone's best interest, the NCTCOG has taken a lead role in the development of the Tarrant County LMAP. Mitigation planning is imperative to lessen the impact of disasters in Tarrant County. The written plan is an excellent method by which to organize Tarrant County's mitigation strategy. The implementation of the plan and its components is vital to preparing a community that is resistant to the effects of a disaster. The implementation of the LMAP will reduce loss of life and property and allow the community to prosper with minimal disruption of vital services to citizens. The LMAP provides a risk assessment of the hazards Tarrant County is exposed to and puts forth several mitigation goals and objectives that are based on that risk assessment. The LMAP has been formally adopted by each participating entity and is required to be updated every five years. 1.5 Consistency with Federal and State Mitigation Policies The LMAP is intended to enhance and complement state and federal recommendations for the mitigation of natural and technological hazards in the following ways: ■ Substantially reduce the risk of loss of life, injuries, and hardship from the destruction of natural and technological disasters on an ongoing basis. ■ Improve the public's awareness of the need for individual preparedness and building safer, more disaster -resilient communities. ■ Develop strategies for long-term community sustainability during community disasters. ■ Develop governmental and business continuity plans that will continue essential private sector and governmental activities during disasters. 1-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLAN, BACKGROUND, AND PURPOSE FEMA publishes many guidance documents for local governments for mitigating natural disasters. The Tarrant County LMAP fully recognizes, adopts, incorporates, and endorses the following principles: ■ Develop a strategic mitigation plan for Tarrant County. ■ Enforce current building codes. ■ Develop incentives to promote mitigation. ■ Incorporate mitigation of natural hazards into land use plans. ■ Promote awareness of mitigation opportunities and programs throughout our community on a continual basis. ■ Identify potential funding sources for mitigation projects. The private sector is often an overlooked segment of the community during disasters. It is vital that this sector of a community is included in mitigation efforts that are consistent with state and federal recommendations such as the following: ■ Develop mitigation incentives with insurance agencies and lending institutions. ■ Encourage the creation of a business continuity plan for the continuance of commerce during disasters. ■ Partner with businesses in an effort to communicate with customers about the hazards in the community and possible solutions. Individual citizens must be made aware of the hazards they face. Additionally, they must be educated regarding how to protect themselves from the hazards they face. They must be shown that mitigation is an important part of reducing loss of life and property in their community. Their support is critical to the success of any mitigation effort. The Tarrant County LMAP supports the following FEMA recommendations regarding individual citizens: ■ Become educated on the hazards that you and your community face. ■ Become part of the process by supporting and encouraging mitigation programs that reduce vulnerability to disasters. ■ Take individual responsibility for safeguarding yourself and your family prior to a disaster. 1.6 Goals and Objectives The following goals and objectives are the basis of this plan and summarize what the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPQ will accomplish because of implementing this plan. ■ Maximize the use of all resources by promoting intergovernmental coordination and partnerships in the public and private sectors. ■ Harden our communities against the effects of disasters through the development of new mitigation strategies and strict enforcement of current regulations that have proved effective. ■ Reduce and, where possible, eliminate repetitive damage and loss of life and property from disasters. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 1-3 Section 1 ■ Bring greater awareness throughout the community about potential hazards and the need for community preparedness. ■ Continue training for Tarrant County departments. 1-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Section 2 COMMUNITY PROFILE 2.1 Overview Tarrant County is located in the state of Texas and has a total area of 897 square miles (863 square miles of land and 34 square miles of water). The county seat is in Fort Worth. The 2010 census reported a population of 1,809,034. Tarrant County is the 26th most populous county in the United States and the third most populous in Texas. Tarrant County is one of 254 counties in Texas, which were originally set up by the State of Texas to serve as decentralized administrative divisions providing state services and collecting state taxes. Tarrant County, one of 26 counties created out of the Peters Colony, was established in 1849. It was named for General Edward H. Tarrant, commander of militia forces of the Republic of Texas at the Battle of Village Creek in 1841. The Village of Grapevine; the Texas Ranger outpost of Johnson's Station (in what is now south Arlington); and Bird's Fort, a short-lived private fort just south of present-day Euless, were early areas of western civilization in the region. Where the Tarrant County Courthouse is now located, a military post was established in 1849 by a company of the 2nd U.S. Dragoons under the command of Major Ripley A. Arnold. The fort was named in honor of General William Jenkins Worth, a hero of the Mexican War and commander of United States forces in this region. The first county seat election was held in 1851 and the location receiving the most votes, a few miles to the northeast, became Tarrant County's first county seat, designated Birdville as required by the statute creating the county. After the military post closed in 1853 and the small towns of Fort Worth and Birdville grew, competition began between them to be the seat of county government. A second special county seat election was held in 1856, when Fort Worth edged out Birdville by only a handful of votes. Fights ensued over the next four years by supporters of both locations. Finally, in 1860, another special election was held. This time, Fort Worth, by now the larger town, received 548 votes. The geographical center of Tarrant County, a compromise location, garnered 301 votes. From as early as 1856, regular stagecoach service passed through Tarrant County, carrying mail and passengers from the east on to the frontier forts and the West Coast. By the 1870's, mail stagecoaches arrived and departed from downtown Fort Worth six days a week. After the Texas & Pacific Railroad reached Tarrant County and Fort Worth in 1876, Fort Worth became the largest stagecoach terminus in the Southwest - a hub for rail passengers to continue their journeys west by stagecoach. Today, Tarrant County has a population of over 1.8 million, more than 2,700 times larger than in 1850, when its inhabitants numbered only 664. Information on the individual participating jurisdictions can be found in Appendix B. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-1 Section 2 Figure 2-1 Location Map of Tarrant County, Texas Boundaries as of January 1, 1990 SOME 0 50 100 160 200 KOomaren ' 0 6D 100 160 200 m- 2.2 Demographics 0 Tarrant County's 2012 population was 1,880,153, which is a 3.9% increase from the 2010 population count. The table below includes U.S. Census Bureau demographic data. Table 2-1 Demographics' Population, 2012 estimate Population, 2010 (April 1) estimates base 1,880,153 26,059,203 1,809,034 25,145,561 ' U.S. Census Bureau: State and County Quick Facts. Data derived from Population Estimates, American Community Survey, Census of Population and Housing, State and County Housing Unit Estimates, County Business Patterns, Nonemployer Statistics, Economic Census, Survey of Business Owners, Building Permits, Consolidated Federal Funds Report 2-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE ., county Population,% change, April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 3.9% 3.6% Persons under 5 years,%, 2012 7.6% 7.5% Persons under 18 years,%, 2012 27.5% 26.8% Persons 65 years and over,%, 2012 9.6% 10.9% Female persons,%, 2012 50.9% 50.3% White alone,%, 2012 (a) 76.2% 80.6% Black or African American alone,%, 2012 (a) 15.6% 12.3% American Indian and Alaska Native alone,%, 2012 (a) 0.9% 1.0% Asian alone,%, 2012 (a) 5.0% 4.2% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone,%, 2012 (a) 0.2% 0.1% Two or more races,%, 2012 2.2% 1.7% Hispanic or Latino,%, 2012 (b) 27.4% 38.2% White alone, not Hispanic or Latino,%, 2012 50.7% 44.5% Living in same house 1 year & over,%, 2007-2011 81.7% 82.1% Foreign born persons,%, 2007-2011 15.6% 16.2% Language other than English spoken at home,% age 5+, 2007-2011 27.0% 34.4% High school graduate or higher,% of persons age 25+, 2007-2011 84.0% 80.4% Bachelor's degree or higher,% of persons age 25+, 2007-2011 28.9% 26.1% Veterans, 2007-2011 120,596 1,618,413 Mean travel time to work (minutes), workers age 16+, 2007-2011 25.7 24.8 Housing units, 2011 723,263 10,098,750 Homeownership rate, 2007-2011 63.0% 64.5% Housing units in multi -unit structures,%, 2007-2011 27.9% 24.0% Median value of owner -occupied housing units, 2007-2011 $136,100 $126,400 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-3 Section 2 f-eop uounty 261,231.71 Households, 2007-2011 643,917 8,667,807 Persons per household, 2007-2011 2.73 2.79 Per capita money income in the past 12 months (2011 dollars), 2007-2011 $27,920 $25,548 Median household income, 2007-2011 $56,178 $50,920 Persons below poverty level,%, 2007-2011 14.2% 17.0% Land area in square miles, 2010 863.61 261,231.71 Persons per square mile, 2010 2,094.7 96.3 Metropolitan or Micropolitan Statistical Area Dallas -Fort Worth - Arlington, TX Metro Area Business Quick Private nonfarm establishments, 2011 37,210 525,420 Private nonfarm employment, 2011 687,510 8,987,663 Private nonfarm employment,% change, 2010-2011 2.3% 2.3% Nonemployer establishments, 2011 146,030 1,975,620 Total number of firms, 2007 158,104 2,164,852 Black -owned firms,%, 2007 10.3% 7.1% American Indian- and Alaska Native -owned firms,%, 2007 0.7% 0.9% Asian -owned firms,%, 2007 6.1% 5.3% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander -owned firms,%, 2007 S 0.1% Hispanic -owned firms,%, 2007 11.8% 20.7% Women -owned firms,%, 2007 30.0% 28.2% Manufacturers' shipments, 2007 ($1000) 43,337,529 593,541,502 Merchant wholesaler sales, 2007 ($1000) 25,801,512 424,238,194 Retail sales, 2007 ($1000) 24,931,407 311,334,781 Retail sales per capita, 2007 $14,582 $13,061 Accommodation and food services sales, 2007 ($1000) 3,763,516 42,054,592 Building permits, 2012 7,372 135,514 2-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE 2.3 Economy Tarrant County is traditionally a diverse center of manufacturing and a booming tourism destination. Currently, there is an expected annual growth rate of 1.2% for manufacturing jobs and government, transportation, communication, and utilities sector jobs continue to show growth as well. Major employers in the area include American Airlines, Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems, Bell Helicopter Textron, Radio Shack Corporation, Sabre Pier 1 Imports, and Burlington Northern Santa Fe. . The local economy is also bolstered by tourism. Attractions such as Legoland at Grapevine Mills, Six Flags Over Texas, Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, and Sea Life Aquarium not only bring thousands of jobs to the area, but also bring millions of tourists who support the service industry. In addition to these attractions, hundreds of thousands of people travel to see the Texas Rangers and Dallas Cowboys play in Arlington during their respective seasons. An economic snapshot of Tarrant County is found in the table below. Table 2-2 Economy2 Unemployment Rate 7.40% 8.60% Recent Job Growth 0.58% 0.35% Future Job Growth 33.76% 32.10% Sales Taxes 8.25% 5.00% Income Taxes 0.00% 4.70% Income per Cap. $26,492 $26,154 Household Income $56,532 $50,935 Income Less Than 15K 9.00% 12.37% Income between 15K and 25K 8.99% 10.53% Income between 25K and 35K 10.40% 10.88% Income between 35K and 50K 15.62% 15.37% Income between 50K and 75K 21.44% 20.14% Income between 75K and 100K 13.81% 12.41% 2 http://www.besiplaces.net/econotny/county/texas/tarrant Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-5 Economy Tarrant County United States Income between I OOK and 150K 13.05% Income between 150K and 250K 5.56% 5.01% Income between 250K and 500K 1.94% 1.86% Income greater than 500K 0.17% 0.16% Management, Business, and Financial Operations 16.14% 14.04% Professional and Related Occupations 20.46% 20.61% Service 12.23% 14.45% Sales and Office 29.54% 26.75% Farming, Fishing, and Forestry 0.08% 0.70% Construction, Extraction, and Maintenance 9.00% 9.42% Production, Transportation, and Material Moving 12.56% 14.05% 2.4 Climate Tarrant County is located in North Central Texas, approximately 250 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico. It is near the headwaters of the Trinity River, which lie in the upper margins of the Coastal Plain. The rolling hills in the area range from 500 to 800 feet in elevation. According to the National Weather Service, Tarrant County's climate is humid subtropical with hot summers. It is also continental, characterized by a wide annual temperature range. Precipitation varies considerably, ranging from less than 20 to more than 50 inches annually. Winters are mild, but northers occur about three times each month and often are accompanied by sudden drops in temperature. Occasional periods of extreme cold are short-lived; even in January, mild weather occurs frequently. The highest temperatures of summer are associated with fair skies, westerly winds, and low humidity's. Characteristically, hot spells in summer are broken into three- to five-day periods by thunderstorm activity. There are only a few nights each summer when the low temperature exceeds 80° F. Summer daytime temperatures frequently exceed 100° F. Air conditioners are recommended for maximum comfort indoors and while traveling via automobile. Throughout the year, rainfall occurs more frequently during the night. Usually, periods of rainy weather last for only a day or two, and are followed by several days with fair skies. A large part of the annual precipitation results from thunderstorm activity, with occasional heavy rainfall over brief periods of time. Thunderstorms occur throughout the year, but are most frequent in the spring. 2-6 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Hail falls on about two or three days a year, ordinarily with only slight and scattered damage. Windstorms occurring during thunderstorm activity are sometimes destructive. Snowfall is rare. The average length of the warm season (freeze -free period) in the Dallas -Fort Worth Metroplex is about 249 days. The average last occurrence of 32° F or below is mid-March and the average first occurrence of 32° F or below is in late November.3 The impact of climate change on weather patterns and natural hazards is increasingly questioned and researched. The United States Environmental Protection Agency conducted the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report to determine how climate change would impact Region 6, which includes the State of Texas. Their basic findings are listed below.4 ■ There is a shift toward a warmer climate with an increase in extreme high temperatures and a reduction in extreme low temperatures. These changes have been especially apparent in the western half of North America. ■ Abnormally hot days and nights and heat waves are very likely to become more frequent. Cold days and cold nights are very likely to become much less frequent. ■ Heat waves cause increased stress. This may lead to more illness and death, particularly among the young, elderly and frail. ■ Respiratory disorders may be exacerbated by warming -induced deterioration in air quality. ■ It is likely that droughts will become more severe in the southwestern United States, in part because precipitation in the winter rainy season is projected to decrease. ■ The growing season length is expected to increase. However, as temperature rises, crops grown in the Southwestern United States will increasingly experience temperatures above their optimum, and animal production of meat or dairy products will be impacted by temperature extremes. ■ Weeds and other invasive plants will continue to migrate northward. ■ Arid areas are very likely to experience increases in erosion and fire risk. ■ An increase in the length of the forest fire season and the area subject to forest fires may increase. ■ Additional stress to ground water and surface water sources that are already overtaxed in many areas may occur. ■ Changes in the abundance and spatial distribution of species and expanded ranges of tree - killing insects and vector-borne and tick-borne diseases may occur. ■ Precipitation is likely to be less frequent but more intense, and precipitation extremes are very likely to increase. ■ Management of Western reservoir systems is very likely to become more challenging as runoff patterns continue to change. 3 "National Weather Service Weather Fort Worth Climatology." National Weather Service Forecast. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency, 27 Oct. 2012. a "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis," Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-7 Section 2 ■ Increased weather related losses of property may result. ■ The Gulf Coast area may experience rising sea levels. 2.5 Land Use 2.5.1 Current Land Use The most current Tarrant County 5 -Year Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development was developed for July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2015. The plan was created as a guide to improving public infrastructure; sustaining and providing decent affordable housing; creating a suitable living environment through public service projects; providing decent, affordable housing; and maintaining decent, affordable ways to prevent homelessness. Currently, Tarrant County's land use is mostly residential or commercial, with minimal land currently used for agriculture purposes. Single-family, low-density residential and manufactured housing occupies 24% of land in the City of Fort Worth and 43% of land in the City of Arlington. Current land use and all future developments are obliged to the Subdivision and Land Use Regulations, administered by the Tarrant County Engineering Department. The City of Fort Worth encompasses 350 square miles, most of which is residential. Single-family homes occupy 27% of residential land use in Fort Worth, with multifamily homes representing a comparatively small proportion of developed land. Fort Worth has a strong industrial base, with industrial land use occupying 6% of developed land and commercial use occupying 5% of developed land. THIS AREA INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK - 2-8 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Figure 2-2 Arlington Existing Land Use The City of Arlington -� Existing Land Use VACANT -UN DEVELOPABLE VACANT -DEVELOPABLE ------ �� SINGLE-FAMILY I MULTI -FAMILY OFFICE l;l INSTITUTIONAL o ------i ENTERTAINMENT/RECREATION -� E ItITERSTATE 3o cw I COMMERCIALIRETAIL --^ TRANSPORTATIONIUTILITIESICOMMUNICATION r..y MAN UFACTURINGMAREHOUSE/INDUSTRIAL ! � RaluBocmiLLRB '✓�� PARKIOPEN i s � sfDp¢'+ - I MIXED USE E ABRAtsI ST� .� •hp� EPARKTRDWDR. � f 'te Pantego i Elm -y WPIANEER PWY L� ri +r m Rill .. AMP Lake �►�[ �� Arlington DwG la atieR� ' w IF I his r- ��.. �� ft WN 1 BA WDWG IN RD le- _�_ r I I--, i t I s • +� 1 A! \\IL -At I jrA - •EDE �� S a NRi RDpie 002m5 5Mlles I i I D'•claimer Th dm has eren compiletl by The ClyofAdmgrton sing var us officialantl unofficial sources. AllM1wgh every eRort made to ensure the accuracy of 1M1Is data, nu such gaarinlee Is gFren w Impfietl APIpNGraN Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-9 Section 2 2.5.1.1 Manufactured Homes According to FEMA, a manufactured (mobile) home is a structure, transportable in one or more sections, which is built on a permanent chassis and is designed for use with or without a permanent foundation when attached to the required utilities. The term "manufactured home" does not include a recreational vehicle. Generally, manufactured homes must meet the same requirements as stick built or conventional housing. The construction of manufactured homes presents unusual vulnerabilities to natural and technological hazards. They are more vulnerable to flood damage, wind damage, and hail. As a result, there are building code standards solely for manufactured homes. Because they are usually residential buildings, they must be elevated so that the lowest floor is above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE). Additionally, manufactured homes must be elevated and anchored to a permanent foundation to resist flotation, collapse, or lateral movement. Many communities within Tarrant County do not have manufactured home parks within their jurisdiction, but there are many that do. For example, the City of Arlington has 16 manufactured home parks in its jurisdiction, as shown in Figure 2-3. The City of Keller has 70 manufactured homes, and the City of Southlake has 124. The City of Grapevine has 552 manufactured homes within 7 manufactured home parks as identified in Figure 2-4. Unfortunately, there are no dry hydrants located within the City of Grapevine manufactured home parks. The City of Grapevine has identified this as a priority need in their mitigation strategies. The City of Arlington and City of Grapevine manufactured home parks are shown are shown to illustrate the existence of these homes and the importance of including them in mitigation efforts. - THIS AREA INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK - 2-10 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Figure 2-3 City of Arlington Manufactured Home Parks The City of Arlington Locations of Manufactured Homes - l Lamplighter Mobile Home Park >N She rwoodi Forest la Oakwaed Lane West Camp Mobile Home Park Trailer Park COMMUNITY PROFILE s !� E INTERSTATE 34 FWY l E ABRAAI ST x r ; z LPanteor,E�o WPoNEER,PM Arlington 0 y f zDWG ® 0I 2.5 I Declaimer: nhrs data has been complied by The City afA .&. slog van salfitlaland u n andel s0a:ces.. Aphoagh av Fry efrpR made: a the 1--y dlhis deb, na such RuemnNe is given wimp tl EPARK ROW DR I' *IN 'a IN'a WS E BARON RD rI.ti-:�..lrai�:�A�Y.�r..rT...e.� �•� 1Y1L'J:141�RL1:�41✓ O EDEN RD � W HARRIS RD • Pleasant Acres Mahile HomePark Hooks Mohi9e Home Park 5 Miles 1i ARLINGTON Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-11 • Q L _� Y1wwV:aaLti�NwMfY{-1r:W E a • IN SII—T RO ® 0I 2.5 I Declaimer: nhrs data has been complied by The City afA .&. slog van salfitlaland u n andel s0a:ces.. Aphoagh av Fry efrpR made: a the 1--y dlhis deb, na such RuemnNe is given wimp tl EPARK ROW DR I' *IN 'a IN'a WS E BARON RD rI.ti-:�..lrai�:�A�Y.�r..rT...e.� �•� 1Y1L'J:141�RL1:�41✓ O EDEN RD � W HARRIS RD • Pleasant Acres Mahile HomePark Hooks Mohi9e Home Park 5 Miles 1i ARLINGTON Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-11 Section 2 Figure 2-4 City of Grapevine Manufactured Home Parks it Mobile Home Locations 0 , If rfl ilk L-AkeIde,Pky N on zv.p Pack L "rov 0 1 all. -V� hc C rz) 6 P -JI k DVF-Rd-7, 1;tiek Park 'A W - Nor I h�w st Fwy IL w uallis.Rd Ld I G 114 -j L Parc � Pat l; 360• r F 0 Da 1. Corbin's Trailer Park At 2. Van Til Mobile Home Park 3. Grapevine Estates Z7 4. Shady Oaks Mobile Home Park 1) D-5 11 2 Wes 5. Mimosa Trailer Park__-__-- I 6. Trailwood Mobile Home Park 1- 7. Wheel Estates GourceE: Esfl, De-ome, NWMQ, TortTaln, lrgEnnWq Incmnx" P Culp., GE O. WSGS, W. WS, NRCM, GeWageF IGN, Kada;MF NL, OnImnes swft PW Japan, ME -n. Esd anima wng I pDg, mOssbopD, and the GIS user& nr Lrirty A 2-12 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE 2.5.2 Future Land Use Tarrant County is currently working to build more affordable housing for extremely low-income, very low-income, low-income, and moderate -income homeowners. Better housing provides better protection from the elements, which is essential to mitigating hazards. Tarrant County has found that commercial development is needed in smaller member cities that face an aging housing stock of depreciating value and failing infrastructure. Water and sewer line improvements are priority needs according to many of Tarrant County's jurisdictions. Improving streets and storm drainage systems in poor neighborhoods is also a priority. From a mitigation standpoint, improving streets allows for more efficient evacuations and improving overall water, wastewater, and storm water flow will decrease the threats of flooding in urban neighborhoods. The City of Fort Worth expects city limits to expand from 350 miles in 2011 to 372 square miles in 2030 or approximately 1.2 square miles per year. As a result of this growth, population is expected to grow 50% by 2032. With these projections, 69% of the City's total land area should be developed in the year 2032, a 23% growth from the year 2000. A map of future land use for the City of Fort Worth is included as Figure 2-5. The City of Southlake recently completed their future land use planning. The City identified nine goals to assist in their planning that include promoting quality development, maintaining a balanced approach to growth and development, development of an innovative mobility system, supporting an integrated parks, recreation, and open space system, creating a diversified and sustainable economy, encouraging the conservation, protection, and proper management of the environment, and full coordination with private sector partners. Their resulting future land use map is Figure 2-6 - THIS AREA INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK - Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-13 Section 2 Figure 2-5 City of Fort Worth Future Land Use 10 5 0 10 Miles Gv 2-14 TalTant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Figure 2-6 City of Southlake Future Land Use of SOuthlake 2030 Plan 130-1-Y SOUTHLAKE LU Future Land Use Plan Legend Consolidated Underlying Land Use designations Future Land Use Categories 100 YEAR FLOOD PLAIN Ordinance 1022 CORPS OF ENGINEERS BOUNDARY �`"`` Approved March 20, 2012 r - PUS LIC PARKVOPEN SPACE — PUBLICJSEMI PUBLIC 1 % X14 LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL �. w r sever Nry porn lyebudrusey -� OFFICE COMMERCIAL «} ff9appmarrWe Evoydroewae 7— - RETAILCOMMERCiAL ddMa. rro0a Ib eraue [M 63�reCyd Sha. tle1a, II� REGIONAL RETAIL z:.: Notes: _ MIXED USE d9 a Mas rel Vreane ra ane mal rol Cs Reale refer b fine Scuthlal e2MO Plan • TOWN CENTER -u ,J and all ill eorrrronenl Helrcxts kraddlma rKormaton I� INDUSTRIAL �t t 2 O 3 O QSmall Area Plan Stiles .. • - a — -i - -n- AceRP's ve plan consWexonng regU ors or esWish QRKorn mended Land Use Changes *�.,. _4 i zoning dstnol Dourdr*s N 11'/rte E 14V S Scale- 1:54000 1 inch = 4500 feet [t" WR Th. ddelgefieenCnnplrflPhe LU $0"M WA di ibr ini mjmel city d01b pwptsas Vaao�e dre�elaMlmlS,o eeucee was used la gMherttm d -e. endr OM rid rep[Serl an m1he9M"d X14 sever Nry porn lyebudrusey ff9appmarrWe Evoydroewae 7— ddMa. rro0a Ib eraue [M 63�reCyd Sha. tle1a, PC d9 a Mas rel Vreane ra ane mal rol Cs slAib rur lesrY, evyieerY Jr. sa s. pv pury9 Ad s etts nm� nee a oven® ,J Or 119W ONa n'ereit asmLsr aCb dClts 2 O 3 O Last Basemap Revision - 01112012 i5'LDN' Depaltmert of Planning and Deuetopment Services Geographic Information Systems Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-15 Section 2 2.5.3 Watersheds Multiple watersheds exist in Tarrant County, including the Upper West Fork Trinity, the Lower West Fork Trinity, Clear Fork Trinity, and the Big Fossil Creek, which is a primary drainage system for northern Tarrant County. The Trinity River is the largest river basin whose watershed area is entirely within the State of Texas and the third largest river in Texas by average flow volume. It is also known as the Upper West Fork Trinity Watershed. The basin's namesake river was named La Santisima Trinidad, "the Most Holy Trinity," by early Spanish explorers. The Trinity River flows to Trinity Bay, which drains to the Gulf of Mexico. Smaller streams within the basin include the Clear, East, and West forks of the Trinity River and Cedar, Chambers, and Richland creeks. The Clear Fork of the Trinity rises in northwestern Parker County and flows first southeast and then northeast forty-five miles to join the West Fork of the Trinity at Fort Worth in central Tarrant County. The Trinity River is a major part of Fort Worth's rich and colorful history. In 1849, an army outpost was established on the banks of the river at the confluence of the West Fork and the Clear Fork, and that convergence anchors downtown Fort Worth today. The Lower West Fork Trinity Watershed is located in North Texas. It is part of the Trinity River Basin. The Lower West Fork is classified as a fourth -level (sub -basin) with a unique 8 -digit. The Lower West Fork Watershed covers an area of 1513.7 square miles and crosses into seven counties. These counties include Dallas, Ellis, Hood, Johnson, Parker, Tarrant, and Wise. The watershed either totally covers or partially spans across 55 cities/towns. The West Fork of the Trinity River is the primary river in the watershed. The Big Fossil Creek watershed is one of the most rapidly developing suburban areas in the greater Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex. The North Central Texas Council of Governments, a coalition of North Central Texas member city and county governments and related organizations, is working with the Army Corps of Engineers to develop a long-term urban management plan for Big Fossil Creek and its watershed. This project is intended to serve as a model for the North Texas region in dealing with the effects of growth and urban sprawl on near -urban watersheds, which are pressured, by such rapid growth and expansion. With the presence of a major interstate highway, a major regional airport, and the new Texas Motor Speedway complex, the watershed is expected to experience tremendous growth over the next 20 years. As an integral part of the preparation of the long-term plan for growth in the area, extensive modeling of environmental GIS data was undertaken to form the most accurate assessment of the areas of concern in the watershed. 2.6 Transportation Multiple forms of transportation exist in Tarrant County, including railways, highways, and airports. An overview of each of these forms of transportation is provided in this section. Figure 2-7 illustrates the major transportation routes in Tarrant County. 2-16 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Figure 2-7 Tarrant County Transportation Routes ------- ��s _--- - - ---- - "' ----------------- Tarrant ^, County Transportation 1 I Routes Rail a t� ,o 1 Primary Highway Secondary Highway Access Ramp iMajor Arterial 1 1 1 . neo 1 sa; s Y 1 1 1 � 1 _ 1 [ � � u 1 i i i sE 1 f N . 1 xo 1 S � � r aeq r F—rymcy PnRandws 2.6.1 Commuter Rail Tarrant County has three major rail lines. They include Trinity Railway Express (TRE), TEX Rail, and Cotton Belt Rail. TRE is a commuter rail service between Fort Worth and Dallas. TRE is provided by the Fort Worth Transportation Authority (The T) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). The commuter service makes several stops in between Fort Worth and Dallas. Service is conducted Monday through Saturday (no service on Sunday). Another railway that services Tarrant County is TEX Rail, it is a 27 -mile commuter rail project being developed by the Fort Worth Transportation Authority (The T) and will be the next passenger rail service coming to Tarrant County. The service is projected to have over 15,000 daily riders using 10 rail stations at full build out. The line begins in downtown Fort Worth at the existing T&P Station (currently served by the TRE commuter service) and travels through the ITC station, also in downtown Fort Worth, continuing across Northeast Tarrant County to the City of Grapevine and into Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW). The terminus point at DFW Terminal B Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-17 Section 2 will be adjacent to a DART Rail Station, which will also serve the airport and connect to points North and East of DFW International Airport. The Cotton Belt Rail Line is a planned 67.7 -mile commuter rail line in Tarrant County, Dallas County, Collin County, and Rockwall County, that will provide service from Dallas's northeast suburbs to Southwest Fort Worth with a major terminal at DFW International Airport. The corridor would connect downtown Fort Worth, Grapevine, and DFW International Airport with Carrollton (at a junction with both the Denton County Transportation Authority A -train commuter rail line and DART's Green Line light rail line), Addison, Richardson, and Plano. The current name for the line comes from the St. Louis Southwestern Railway, a former subsidiary of the Southern Pacific Railroad commonly known as the Cotton Belt Railroad, which previously owned the line. DART purchased the right-of-way in 1990 for future transit use. In 2010, the Regional Transportation Council of the North Central Texas Council of Governments sought permission to enter a public- private partnership for the rail line. Using private money to build the rail line, they argue, the project's construction timeline could be shortened. 2.6.2 Airports Tarrant County houses multiple airports that are used publically. Figure 2-8 depicts nine airports that are located within Tarrant County, the four largest being the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Fort Worth Alliance Airport, Fort Worth Meacham International Airport and Arlington Municipal Airport. The four largest airports are described below. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) is partially in the cities of Grapevine and Euless in Tarrant County and Irving in Dallas County. As of April 2013, DFW is the world's third busiest airport by aircraft movements. In terms of passenger traffic, it is the eighth busiest airport in the world. It is the largest hub for American Airlines. DFW International Airport is considered to be an Airport City. In terms of land area, at 17,207 acres, it is the largest airport in Texas. DFW has its own post office zip code, and public services, including its own police, fire protection, and emergency medical services. The United States Postal Service gave the airport its own city designation, DFW International Airport, TX. The members of the airport's Board of Directors are appointed by the "owner cities" of Dallas and Fort Worth. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport achieved a major milestone in 2013 by reaching 200 nonstop destinations, with the announcements of new service by American Eagle to Hermosillo and Zacatecas, Mexico. The new flights, which began in June 2013, gave DFW International Airport a grand total of 200 destinations, including 52 international and 148 U.S. domestic destinations. Fort Worth Alliance Airport is a city -owned public use airport located 14 miles north of the central business district of Fort Worth on Interstate 35W. Billed as the world's first purely industrial airport, it was developed in a joint venture among the City of Fort Worth, the Federal Aviation Administration, and Hillwood Development Company, a real estate development company owned by H. Ross Perot, Jr. Alliance Airport has 9,600' and 8,200' runways. The airport is owned by the City of Fort Worth and managed by Alliance Air Services, a subsidiary of Hillwood Development, and is the second largest airport facility in North Texas, behind DFW. Besides general aviation services, the airport serves as a maintenance hub for FedEx Express aircraft and can serve as an auxiliary cargo -handling destination relieving FedEx's primary Dallas -area hub at DFW. Fort Worth Meacham International Airport is located at the intersection of Interstate 820 and U.S. Business Highway 287 in northwest Fort Worth, 5 miles from the downtown business district. 2-18 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Meacham International Airport has two parallel runways and a crosswind runway. Currently Fort Worth Meacham International Airport is catering to private and small corporate air traffic. The Arlington Municipal Airport is a full-service general aviation "reliever" airport. Runway 16/34 is 6,080 ft. x 100 ft. with medium intensity lighting and a full parallel taxiway. An Instrument Landing System (ILS) provides a precision approach and two published non -precision approaches are available to assist aircraft operations in inclement weather. The MALSF is being converted to MALSR, and is projected to be completed in February 2014. Construction was recently completed on a 4,900 ft. x 75 ft. west parallel taxiway. Approximately 300 aircraft are based at Arlington. The City owns and manages: 96 t -hangars, a 10,000 sq. ft. maintenance hangar, and 51 tie down spaces. Figure 2-8 Airports in Tarrant County ___�_� 1____FmtWorthXliance-________________________________ r COP 1 Has!--[ 1 PE.s3R. ACgYG CDP 1 1 1 Nm*. AW&gd Ba, 1 1 1 Dallas -Fort Worth International 1 1 1 1 Sa�lar Si-'-�-•. Tarrant County Airports Sa�law 1 1 - N OL091P 1 1 +1u�I 1 1 1 _A'<'. Part Worth Meacham International i i i 1 NAS Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base 1 1 1 Vied¢ver -.. 1 1 Fort Viom PanteW1 1 i ArlrgMn Grand Prairie ldunicipal 1 ©ri OanMg m :�aruEr= 1 1 1 F�r4filCi d ®Nio i FCl'e51 HID Arrslgl>lA tilunickpat 1 1 E�j�Rmage 1 M;ar111E4dae 1 i Sycamore Strip i 1 S i 1 1 Enerp�rteyr P+egoradrteas 1 R��.hrr, r^� 1 1 Fort YWOrdI S pinks -_-- Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-19 Section 2 2.6.3 Transit Tarrant County has several transit/paratransit companies and programs that service the county. One of the major providers is the Fort Worth Transportation Authority (The T). The T is the operator of the bus system in Fort Worth, Texas and Richland Hills, Texas area. The T also partners with DART of Dallas through the TRE, which offers commuter rail service from downtown Fort Worth to DFW International Airport and downtown Dallas. Arlington has a program called Ride 2 Work. This program will provide transportation to qualified, low-income and moderate -income Arlington residents to help them access a broad range of employment-related activities, including jobs, job training, job interviews, educational resources, and child care. To qualify for Ride 2 Work, you must live in the City of Arlington, have a household income that is low or moderate according to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standards, be unable to be eligible to ride Handitran, and need transportation to work or a work-related activity like training, interviews, education, or childcare. Arlington also has a program called Handitran, which is a service to the community that promotes individual independence. Handitran transports elderly and disabled citizens to essential services, medical appointments, work, or any location within our service area, utilizing a scheduling and dispatching system. There is also the Hurst, Euless, and Bedford (HEB) transit, which is a service operating in the Cities of Hurst, Euless, and Bedford. The primary focus of the service is transporting people to and from work and work-related activities. The service is provided to individuals that have limited transportation options and do not qualify for existing programs such as the Northeast Transportation Services (NETS) or the Catholic Charities transportation program, Wheels. Trips must begin and end within HEB or the TRE stations at CentrePort/DFW International Airport and Hurst/Bell. The Northeast Transportation System is a partnership of the cities of Bedford, Euless, Grapevine, Haltom City, Hurst, Keller, and North Richland Hills. NETS is a door-to-door, demand responsive paratransit service and is available to any resident of a participating city who is disabled or 55 years of age or older. NETS may be used for medical appointments, socialization, employment, essential shopping, and education purposes. NETS brings many organizations together to provide this service to its customers. The Board of Directors of the NETS Urban Transit District is comprised of the city manager of each member city. The NETS Board establishes the annual budget, fare policy, and passenger eligibility requirements. 2.7 Tarrant County Capabilities The planning and response capabilities of any county are vital to its success in hazard mitigation. A few keys areas to ensure strong capabilities include having plans and policies in place to guide development and mitigation projects, understanding and identifying critical infrastructure, and having trained staff to assist with mitigation planning and respond to disasters. The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPC) conducted a review of its legal, staffing, and financial capabilities related to hazard mitigation planning. The results of these capabilities can be found in Appendix C and provide the details regarding resources available for each jurisdiction to accomplish hazard mitigation activities. In addition to identifying the 2-20 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I February 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE administrative, fiscal, and legal and regulatory capabilities each jurisdiction possesses, each participating jurisdiction provided information on how they could improve their capabilities in the table below. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-21 Section 2 Arlington Azle Bedford Arlington has the capability to hire additional staff or Fiscal capabilities are limited to: Local train existing staff to augment and expand the hazard property and sales tax; Fines and user fees; mitigation program. Grants Our ability to achieve our capabilities would be enhanced with additional staff, more training and some equipment needs. Risk reduction could improve with additional staff positions and additional funding. Add 1- Emergency assistant; 1- Land Manager; 1- Civil Engineer; 1 - Surveyor. Additionally any specific training for these new positions and updating our plan to incorporate these new resources. These improvement goals cannot be met without additional funding. Additional capacity building would require additional revenue, grant funding or free training. City leadership, which includes City Council members, Senior City Management, Department Heads, and senior supervisory personnel, will continue to review current practices, laws, codes and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens of our community relating to potential hazards identified within our city. Staff can handle legal and regulatory enforcement at this time. Local government (city) ordinances and Fiscal capabilities are limited to: Local adopted national codes. Enforcement of property and sales tax; Fines and user fees; Local, State and Federal laws. Police Grants Department; Fire Marshal; Building Official; Code Enforcement Officer; City Attorney. City leadership, which includes City Council members, Senior City Management, Department Heads, senior Blue Mound has the capability to hire additional staff or Fiscal capabilities are limited to: Local supervisory personnel, and the City Blue Mound train existing staff to augment and expand the hazard property and sales tax; Fines and user fees; Attorney, will continue to review current mitigation program. Grants practices, laws, codes and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens of our community relating to potential hazards identified within our city. The City of Colleyville will be adding more public safety The City will continue to look at combiningColleyville resources with other cities to reduce the cost Council will consult the City Colleyville personnel to the staff. The leadership team will be of services, such as jail, animal control, and Attorney to make codes and policies that trained on the roles of the EOC. courts. make the citizens safer Add staffing to the Fire and Police Department. Enhance training for Fire and Police. Enhance training Continue to improve tax base by improving Review and update City Ordinances and Crowley of all staff assigned to operations in the EOC. Add staff economic development. Apply for eligible Codes to ensure they are up to date with to other City Department as needs of the City grow. grants as they come available. current standards and needs. 2-22 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 DFW Conduct After Action Conferences to determine the level of effectiveness of the current staffing and administrative levels. Conduct annual assessments to ensure that adequate funding is made available to maintain and enhance current capabilities. Also, review capital requests for hazard reduction elements. Administrative Capabilities may be improved upon Fiscal Capabilities may be expanded upon primarily through training and education. We have and improved through more active utilization been able to adequately maintain staffing, however of grant opportunities. Fiscal opportunities Euless taking advantage of existing training opportunities and for improvement may exist through grant actively training new personnel will be beneficial. management position(s) and/or education Refresh training/education and update training will be and training. beneficial for tenured staff. The city has no plans to add additional staff. Training is Forest Hill planned for directors and managers with responsibilities within the EOC, and members of the city's Damage Assessment Team. The City of Fort Worth can complete the Enterprise Resource Planning tool to improve access to data sets across the business enterprise in real time. The City of Fort Worth can implement the recommendations from Fort Worth the compensation study currently underway to allow for better allocation of personnel resources, recruit better staff, and retain knowledgeable tenured employees. The City of Fort Worth can provide additional training and planning to reduce risk. The city currently participates in regional partnerships in the delivery of services and plans to continue to do so. Regional partners within the community will be utilized to implement educational programs with a shared cost. Use of grant funding will be explored to implement mitigation action items found to be too costly for the normal operating budget to support. The City of Fort Worth can complete the Enterprise Resource Planning tool to improve access to data sets across the business enterprise in real time. The City of Fort Worth can provide additional training to meet state and federal fiscal management and auditing standards. The City of Grapevine will continue to look at The City of Grapevine will be conducting training to combining resources with other cities to Grapevine enhance the leadership team in its roles of the EOC. reduce the cost of services. In addition, the city will explore grant opportunities applicable to risk reduction. COMMUNITY PROFILE As incidents transpire, conduct after action conferences to ensure all plans and regulations are relevant and up to date. Ensure that annual reviews of plans incorporate hazard reduction activities. Legal and Regulatory Capabilities may be expanded upon and improved through the solicitation of more involvement from the City Attorney's Office and all departments discussions and planning. City leadership, including members of the City Council, City Manager, City Attorney and senior management staff, will review current practices, codes, and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens as it relates to the potential hazards identified within the city. The City of Fort Worth can provide additional training on legal issues and regulatory capabilities for mitigation standards, and risk reduction and resiliency. Grapevine City Council will consult the City Attorney to make codes and policies that make the citizens safer. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-23 Section 2 The City of Haltom City will be adding more public The City will continue to find additional Haltom City safety personnel to the staff. The leadership team will efficiencies through management policies be trained on the roles of the EOC. directed towards good fiscal responsibility The city has no plans to add additional staff. Training is Haslet planned for directors and managers with responsibilities within the EOC and members of the city's Damage Assessment Team. The city currently participates in regional partnerships in the delivery of services and plans to continue to do so. Regional partners within the community will be utilized to implement educational programs with a shared cost. Use of grant funding will be explored to implement mitigation action items found to be too costly for the normal operating budget to support. Current fiscal capabilities allow the City to Additional training in various emergency management function adequately. Additional funding to Hurst disciplines would improve our ability to prepare, allow for more training, functional and full - mitigate, plan and respond to emergencies. scale exercises would improve upon our current situation. The city has no plans to add additional staff. Training is planned for directors and managers with Keller responsibilities within the EOC, members of the city's Damage Assessment Team, and volunteer members of the city's CERT program. Kennedale Lake Worth The city may hire or contract with additional staff Lake Worth has the capability to hire additional staff or train existing staff to augment and expand the hazard mitigation program. The city currently participates in regional partnerships in the delivery of services and plans to continue to do so. Regional partners within the community will be utilized to implement educational programs with a shared cost. Use of grant funding will be explored to implement mitigation action items found to be too costly for the normal operating budget to support. Construction grant funds for Emergency Operations Center Fiscal capabilities are limited to: Local property and sales tax; Fines and user fees; Grants The City Council of Haltom City will consult the City Attorney to adopt codes and policies that make the Haltom City a safer place to live and call home. City leadership, including members of the City Council, City Administrator and City Attorney, will review current practices, codes, and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens as it relates to the potential hazards identified within the city. Hurst is constantly looking to improve items like codes and ordinances to improve building resiliency, citizen safety and mitigate hazards. Funding for additional staffing would improve the capability to manage legal and regulatory capabilities. City leadership, including members of the City Council, City Manager, City Attorney and senior management staff, will review current practices, codes, and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens as it relates to the potential hazards identified within the city. The city can build adequate emergency facilities to increase its legal and regulatory capabilities. City leadership, which includes City Council members, Senior City Management, Department Heads, and senior supervisory personnel, will continue to review current practices, laws, codes and ordinances to ensure 2-24 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Lakeside NCTCOG North Richland Hills Richland Hills Saginaw Lakeside has the capability to hire additional staff or train existing staff to augment and expand the hazard mitigation program. Through training of new and existing staff, COG can increase the awareness of natural hazards and personal mitigation activities The City of North Richland Hills will be adding more public safety personnel to the staff. The leadership team will be trained on the roles of the EOC. Continued education of city employees on community risk reduction practices incorporating all city departments. Increase in public education activities to inform the residents and business community of risk reduction practices in place already and those that can be put in place to reduce impact of natural and manmade destructive events. Continued updating of building codes, city ordinances and emergency operating plans to improve the planning, preparedness and response to events. The City of Saginaw does plan to add staff as annual funding permits. Training is planned for department Fiscal capabilities are limited to: Local property and sales tax; Fines and user fees; Grants Through mitigation grants, COG could increase the budget for mitigation projects. COG has no taxation authority and relies on user fees and grants to fund programs The City will continue to find additional efficiencies through management policies directed towards good fiscal responsibility The City's tax revenue has gradually increased over the past three years with additional sales tax revenue increase forecasted. Property values in the City have gradually risen which will slowly increase property tax revenues. With the increase in tax revenues, the continued fiscal management of city bond issuance, and the continuation of pursuing state and federal grants for mitigation project funding the city will continue to work towards mitigating risk to the city. Due to the size of the city additional staffing is not an option. Sharing services and programs with surrounding communities will be the greatest impact on expanding and improving risk reduction. The City aggressively participates in local and regional partnerships in the delivery of COMMUNITY PROFILE the safety of the citizens of our community relating to potential hazards identified within our city. City leadership, which includes City Council members, Senior City Management, Department Heads, and senior supervisory personnel, will continue to review current practices, laws, codes and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens of our community relating to potential hazards identified within our city. COG currently has no legal or regulatory authority. The only means of expanding this capability would be an amendment to the Texas State Constitution The City Council of North Richland Hills will consult the City Attorney to adopt codes and policies that make NRH a safer place to live and call home. During 2014 the City has reviewed, updated and adopted a new Comprehensive Plan, (adopted May 2014), updated and adopted by ordinance the 2012 Edition of the ICC Building and Fire Codes (Jan and Feb 2014), Zoning Ordinances were revised, updated and adopted in conjunction with the Comprehensive Plan (May 2015) and the City will, in 2015-16 will move from a city Emergency Operating Plan (currently up to date with the State of Texas) to the Tarrant County EOP. The City Engineer with consultants are preparing changes in ordinances to increase the city's CRS rating to reduce risk. City leadership, which includes City Council members, Senior City Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-25 Section 2 Chiefs, Directors and Managers from within all city departments with responsibilities in emergency response operations and responsibilities within the Emergency Operations Center or EOC. In addition, continued training is planned for the City's Citizen Patrol and CERT organizations. Additional training to increase capabilities is always beneficial. We are currently developing a multiyear training and exercise program that will increase the Southlake capabilities and awareness levels of staff with roles and responsibilities during an EOC-level event. The EOC response teams are trained twice a year, and conduct at least one exercise a year. Our Tarrant County Administrative and Technical Capabilities can be expanded and improved to reduce risk with additional staffing, increased training to Tarrant County include position specific training, participation in workshops, conferences, trainings and exercises. These capabilities could be expanded with additional funding and grants. services and plans to not only continue these partnerships but expand where possible. Partner agencies and organizations in our local and regional area will be utilized to implement educational programs sharing the costs. Use of grant funding will be pursued to implement mitigation actions that may not or cannot be funded through normal operational budgeting due to the high cost associated. We always strive for the highest level of fiscal responsibility and efficiency. This aligns with our City's strategy map to "adhere to financial management principles & budget, invest to provide & maintain high quality public assets, achieve fiscal wellness standards, and establish & maintain internal controls. We are currently working on acquiring training and exercise materials for our finance staff through the regional disaster finance coordination program. Our Tarrant County Fiscal Capabilities include Community Grants, Homeland Security Grants, Urban Area Security Initiative Grants and utilizing Tarrant County funds (budget) to increase our level of capability and to reduce risk. Management, Department Heads, senior supervisory personnel, and the City Attorney, will continue to review current practices, laws, codes and ordinances to ensure the safety of the citizens of our community relating to potential hazards identified within our city. Southlake routinely updates and responds to change in legislation for implications on operations; for example, changes in the fire code. Additionally, Southlake adopts and updates codes and policies to continue to ensure Southlake remains one of the top-ranked communities in the country. Tarrant County has the capability to initiate resolutions through Tarrant County Commissioners Court to increase our level of capability in emergency preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery. Once the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan has been approved, the Office of Emergency Management will submit the HazMap to Commissioners Court for approval and submit to City Councils across Tarrant County to approve Plan for participating jurisdictions. Approved Plan can be placed onto the Tarrant County Website for public view. Resolution, Court Order, 50529, 10/16/1958. The Office of Civil Defense of Fort Worth and Tarrant 2-26 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE County, Texas performs a service for the entire County of Tarrant and has prepared a Preliminary Operational Survival Plan for the Target Area of Tarrant County wherein the basic concept of emergency government operations. 2. Court Order: 42978, 11/26/1973, Identification of Flood Plain Areas as part of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) for Tarrant County. 3. Court Order: 58828, 08/27/1987, Additional Communications Request from the City of Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management. 4. Tarrant County agreement with Fort Worth for the provision of Emergency Management under the City of Fort Worth Office of Emergency Management, Commissioner's Court Order #58675 dated 7/27/1987. 5. Tarrant County adopted a joint resolution and authorized execution of an inter -jurisdictional emergency management program agreement establishing the Fort Worth — Tarrant County Inter -Jurisdictional Agency for Emergency Management. This joint resolution included the cities of Blue Mound, Dalworthington Gardens, Edgecliff Village, Haslet, Kennedale, Lakeside, Lake Worth, Pantego, Pelican Bay, Sansom Park, Westlake, Westover Hills, and Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-27 Section 2 Westworth Village, Commissioner's Court 58675 dated 6/1/1989. 6. Court Order: 65397, 04/23/1991, Contract between the City of Fort Worth and Tarrant County for Emergency Management Services. 7. Adoption of Fort Worth — Tarrant County Emergency Management Plan, Commissioner's Court Order #70837, dated 6/21/1994. 8. Court Order: 78270, 04/14/1998, Appointment of Tarrant County Fire Marshal under Texas Local Government Code, Section 352.001 established the Office of County Fire Marshal. 9. Court Order: 82684, 04/04/2000, Tarrant County Local Declaration of Disaster for March 28, 2000 tornado that caused tremendous physical and economic losses. 10. Court Order: 88095, 07/23/2002, Resolution supporting Tarrant County's Participation in the North Central Texas Council of Government's Regional Emergency Management Planning Program. 11. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of White Settlement, Commissioner's Court Order#93498, dated 8/31/2004. 12. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of River Oaks, Commissioner's Court Order #95009, dated 3/22/2005. 13. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of Everman, 2-28 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE Commissioner's Court Order #95337, dated 4/12/2005. 14. Court Order: 96092, 08/23/2005, Tarrant County Adoption of the National Incident Management System in accordance with HSPD-5 Homeland Security Presidential Directive — 5. 15. Disaster Declaration for Tarrant County due to significant sheltering operations for Hurricane Katrina from August 28th through mid- September 2005 from the State of Louisiana. 16. Disaster Declaration for Tarrant County due to significant sheltering operations for Hurricane Rita from September 18 through early October 2005 from the Texas Gulf Coast. 17. Joint Resolutions between Tarrant County and the Cities of Azle, Keller, and Saginaw, Commissioner's Court Order #100221, dated 3/27/2007. 18. Court Order: 100421, 04/24/2007 Disaster Declarations for Severe Thunderstorms and Flooding occurred on March 30th and April 13th that caused significant individual, physical and economic losses in Tarrant County. 19. Court Order: 100565, 05/15/2007, Approval to Update the Tarrant County Local Emergency Planning Committee General Membership List and Chairpersons Appointment Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-29 Section 2 for Submission to the State Emergency Response Commission. 20. Court Order: 102960, 0412912008, Disaster Declaration of Disaster due to severe thunderstorms, severe winds, tornadoes, flooding that occurred on April 23, 2008. 21. Disaster Declaration for Tarrant County for significant shelter operations for Hurricane Gustav from August 25 through Mid - September 2008 for evacuees from Louisiana. 22. Disaster Declaration for Tarrant County for significant shelter operations for Hurricane Ike from September 15t through Mid - September 2008 for evacuees from the Texas Gulf Coast. 23. Court Order: 104534, 12/9/2008, Approval of a Resolution Adopting the Fort Worth Hazard Mitigation Plan that represent the unincorporated areas of Tarrant County, 19 out of the 41 jurisdictions represented in the Hazard Mitigation Plan. 24. Court Order: 104856, 02/03/2009, Approval revising Amendment 1 to the Interlocal Agreement for Emergency Management with the City of Fort Worth to establish the creation of the Tarrant County Office of Emergency Management and designation of the Tarrant County Emergency Management Coordinator. 2-30 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE 25. Court Order: 105584, Declaration of Disaster for Tarrant County For H1 N1 Influenza. 26. Court Order: 107929, 04/27/2010, Approval of National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System Application to the Federal Emergency Management Agency to reduce flood losses, facilitate accurate insurance rating and promote the awareness of flood insurance in Tarrant County. 27. Court Order: 108488, 08/03/2010, Approval of 2010 Membership to the Tarrant County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC). 28. Disaster Declaration for Tropical Storm Hermine (causing widespread flooding from Guatemala to Oklahoma) from 9/8- 9/9/2010 flooding occurred causing damage throughout Tarrant County. 29. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of Hurst, Commissioner's Court Order #109022, dated 9/28/2010. 30. Court Order: 109311, 11/23/2010, Approval of an Interlocal Agreement with the City of Fort Worth to provide funding for the Joint Emergency Operations Center (JEOC) Project. 31. Court Order: 112555, 04/10/2012, Declaration of Disaster for tornadoes impacting Tarrant County on April 3, 2012. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-31 Section 2 Watauga Additional staffing Increase funding from grant sources to enhance mitigation Westlake can improve its administrative capabilities Wesltkake can expand and improve its use Westlake with respect to Emergency Management and Hazard of existing fiscal capacities through more Mitigation by creating, funding, and staffing at least one specific targeting of those capabilities toward 32. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of North Richland Hills, Commissioner's Court Order #114212, dated 11/27/2012. 33. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of Crowley, Commissioner's Court Order #115515, dated 7/2/2013. 34. Court Order: 116819, 12/27/2013, Disaster Declaration for Tarrant County due to Winter Storm / Ice Storm that occurred from December 5-10, 2013 that resulted in impassable roads, transportation accidents, damage to critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges, caused numerous closures that impacted citizens, businesses and the economy within Tarrant County. 35. Court Order: 117392, 04/01/2014 utilize Nixle 360 as internal utilization for providing emergency notification / messaging to county employees (Emergency Notification System). 36. Joint Resolution between Tarrant County and the City of Grapevine, Commissioner's Court Order #118104 dated 7/29/2014. Inter -local Agreements & Contracts. integrate mitigation strategies into existing Capital Improvement plan Westlake will maximize its efforts toward hazard management and increased risk reduction through continuous and 2-32 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Westworth Village full-time management or management -support level position dedicated to those task areas. Such position(s) would allow more continuous focus and consistent effort to be applied directly hazard management and risk reduction. Hire a full time Emergency Management Position hazard management and risk reduction goals. We will better integrate our fiscal planning practices to include specific risk reduction strategies and programs, to include funding personnel, education and training in those areas. Westlake can expand its eligibility and use of both State and Federal grants for mitigation and risk reduction projects and programs. Increase funding for full time EMC and add funding for cont. education and cross training of other department employees COMMUNITY PROFILE comprehensive review and implementation of existing Legal and Regulatory capabilities. Specifically, all existing Codes and Ordinances, Comprehensive Plans, Capital Improvement Plans, and Regulations will be regularly reviewed with a view towards integration of and compliance with Hazard Mitigation Plans and Risk Reduction strategies and programs. As new strategies and risks are identified existing regulations can be modified or reviewed to include the newest information and guidance. Adjust Ordinances as needed to include Penalties for failing to comply with Mitigation ordinances. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-33 COMMUNITY PROFILE The Tarrant County LMAPC conducted a review of all critical infrastructures in Tarrant County. Critical infrastructure is a term used to describe assets that are essential for the functioning of Tarrant County and its jurisdictions. This includes but is not limited to those facilities that provide electricity, natural gas, oil products, telecommunications, potable water, public health, transportation systems, emergency response, and schools. Below are maps showing the emergency response (fire stations, hospitals, and police stations) critical facilities in Tarrant County. A full list of Tarrant County's critical infrastructure can be found in Appendix G. Figure 2-9 Fire Stations in Tarrant County r. F F E F A F � F i r F F F FF F F � F F F F F F F CF Tarrant County Fire Stations i i F F F F n. F + F imF i ,�,,, F F irs F ams i F anL —ia r■. F F F F — F F— F F Fj rF r c F i e F F F r F — FIRF F F Fire Station i F F F i F F —'F O"ly r F F F F ..a � Fri». F F F W21F �} F F F F F F F F F r r fit F r r F F i F c F is F F F F aw i F F �+ r F r �r'r a■� r F F F r r y.a i � 9++ r F — r r r F■F F r t-r,fa.wy h.p.r.rwea i F `• Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-34 COMMUNITY PROFILE Figure 2-10 Hospitals in Tarrant County --------------------, __-t------------------ T;z; r a E pa � ill' r 1 I �i 27 1 12' i �I I 1 r W� + Lekes� + @ rm+r1A Park ot SNV', age rel M'nPo �a?a. eU, a 't girth Sao �ea jilk 4 Q.. r EdgccFiR ViYeg �.,_.. @ + r CJ m i 1 A A Tarrant County Hospitals I Hospital 1 1 �a 1 1 1 ® 1 xw 1 1 1 X63 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 h W 3w aso 1 4 Emargoncy Proyaradn css Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-35 Section 2 Figure 2-11 Police Stations in Tarrant County ------_------_-_ emer -------------------- 1 1 � � 1 9 1 ,21 1 1 1 16, yes 1 1 +� 1 1 i 1 1 1 sa 1 4 I 1 1 I rr!.11 I / V � v it/� O 1 110 V 1 1 7e 1 -------------------- ;2;" ©1— � � 1 "1 ,21 1 1 16, yes deo I ,sa +� 1 1 i 1 1 1 sa 1 4 1 A 1 2.8 Governments Tarrant County Law Enforcement 1; Police Station M �mergs,lcy P-p—d— County government structure is spelled out in the Texas Constitution, which makes counties functional agents of the state. Thus, counties, unlike cities, are limited in their actions to areas of responsibility specifically spelled out in laws passed by the legislature. At the heart of each county is the Commissioners Court. Each Texas county has four precinct commissioners and a county judge who serve on this court. Although this body conducts the general business of the county and oversees financial matters, the Texas Constitution established a strong system of checks and balances by creating other elective offices in each county. The major elective offices found in most counties include the county judge, county attorneys, county and district clerks, county treasurers, sheriffs, tax assessor -collectors, justices of the peace, and constables. As a part of the checks and balances system, counties have an auditor appointed by the district courts. 5 http://www.county.org/texas-county-government/county-govt-structure/Pages/default.aspx 2-36 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 COMMUNITY PROFILE While many county functions are administered by elected officials, others are run by individuals employed by the Commissioners Court. They include such departments as public health and human services, personnel and budget, and in some counties, public transportation, and emergency medical services. North Central Texas Council of Governments The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is a voluntary association of, by, and for local governments and was established to assist local governments in planning for common needs, cooperating for mutual benefit, and coordinating for sound regional development. NCTCOG's purpose is to strengthen both the individual and collective power of local governments and to help them recognize regional opportunities, eliminate unnecessary duplication, and make joint decisions. NCTCOG serves a 16 -county region of North Central Texas, which is centered on the two urban centers of Dallas and Fort Worth. NCTCOG has over 230 member governments including 16 counties, numerous cities, school districts, and special districts. Each member government appoints a voting representative from its governing body. These voting representatives make up the General Assembly, which annually elects the Executive Board. The Executive Board, composed of 13 locally elected officials, is the policy-making body for all activities undertaken by the Council of Governments, including program activities and decisions, regional plans, and fiscal and budgetary policies. The Board is supported by technical, study, and policy development committees and a professional staff headed by the executive director. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 2-37 Section 3 PLANNING PROCESS Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(c)(1) The plan shall document the planning process used to develop the plan, including how it was prepared, who was involved in the process, and how the public was involved. 3.1 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) was tasked with developing the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPC). The Tarrant County LMAPC was tasked with the development and completion of the Local Mitigation Action Plan (LMAP) as required per state and federal guidelines. The NCTCOG managed the project, organized the data, set meeting dates, documented in-kind services, and worked with the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) to complete this plan. The table below lists the members of the Tarrant County LMAPC. Table 3-1 Tarrant County LMAPC Irish Hancock City of Arlington, Emergency Management Administrator Nicholas F. LaGrassa NCTCOG, Emergency Preparedness Program Assistant Carrie Little City of Grapevine, Emergency Management Coordinator Molly Thoerner NCTCOG, Director of Emergency Preparedness Keith Wells City of Fort Worth, Senior Emergency Management Officer William T. Wessel Tarrant County, Emergency Management Specialist 3.1.1 Additional Partners Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(b)(2) An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process shall include: (2) An opportunity for neighboring communities, local and regional agencies involved in hazard mitigation activities, and agencies that have the authority to regulate development, as well as businesses, academia and other private and non-profit interests to be involved in the planning process. The Tarrant County LMAPC relied on the assistance of various public and private organizations to compile the data, maps, and other vital components of the plan. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-1 Section 3 A range of stakeholders were invited and encouraged to participate in the development of the LMAP. Stakeholder involvement was encouraged through notifications and invitations to agencies and individuals to participate. These included representatives from Tarrant County and each participating jurisdiction, private sector businesses, voluntary agencies, citizens, and surrounding counties. Surveys were also distributed to the public to elicit feedback regarding community concerns of hazards and strategies for mitigation. Tarrant County engaged Arlington ISD, Birdville ISD, Burton Hill Elementary, Crowley ISD, Fort Worth ISD, Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, Hurst -Euless -Bedford ISD, Keller ISD, Kennedale ISD, Northwest ISD, University of Texas in Arlington, and White Settlement ISD to address hazard mitigation in educational facilities located within county boundaries. Each ISD, Burton Hill Elementary, and University of Texas in Arlington are stakeholders in Tarrant County's Hazard Mitigation Planning Team (HMPT) and may utilize this LMAP to independently seek funding, outside of FEMA Mitigation funds, to procure items outlined in the Mitigation Strategies listed in Section 5. In addition to the mitigation planning committee meetings, Tarrant County encouraged open and widespread participation in the mitigation planning process through the publication of newspaper notices promoting open public meetings. These media advertisements and survey instruments provided local officials, residents, businesses, academia, and other private interests in Tarrant County the opportunity to be involved and offer input throughout the local mitigation planning process. Tarrant County encouraged continued stakeholder involvement by reminding all participating jurisdictions to make announcements and notifications consistent with their existing local plan adoption procedures. It will be the responsibility of each participating jurisdiction and its local governing body to determine if and how any additional specific stakeholder groups or individuals should be involved in the planning process going forward. Many departments, agencies, and individuals were contacted to provide information as the committee gathered data for capability and vulnerability assessments. The table below provides the details on which stakeholders were contacted by each jurisdiction, the method of communication used, and the information received for use in the Tarrant County LMAP. Table 3-2 Jurisdiction Stakeholder Outreach Arlington American Red Volunteer Lead E-mail Provided information on sheltering Cross Tarrant County needs Arlington Arlington ISD Public Safety E-mail Provided information on improving Manager early warning and notification Arlington Globe/Rangers Public Safety E-mail Did not provide information Ballpark Manager University of Emergency Management Provided information on: Sheltering, Arlington Texas in Arlington Coordinator and Meeting Early Warning and Notification, Planner Public Education Arlington Texas Health Resource Emergency Management Officer E-mail Did not provide information 3-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan i June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS Jurisdiction AH:1047Or Title Contact rapinou oT Information Provided Organization of Arlington Dallas Cowboys Public Safety Officer E-mail Did not provide information Arlington Medical Center of Emergency E-mail Did not provide information Arlington Management Officer Arlington USMD Emergency Management Planner E-mail Did not provide information Arlington Parks at Arlington Manager E-mail Did not provide information Mall Arlington Six Flags Over Texas Public Safety Officer E-mail Did not provide information Arlington Christian Provided information on volunteer Arlington Disaster Network Board Member E-mail management (FBOs) Arlington Mission Arlington Director E-mail Did not provide information Azle Azle Water Department Water Superintendent E-mail/in-person Review plan and make suggestions Azle Azle Street Parks/Street E-mail/in-person Review plan and make suggestions Department Superintendent Azle Azle Building Official Building Official E-mail/in-person Review plan and make suggestions Azle Azle Police Department Lieutenant E-mail Review plan and make suggestions Azle Azle Stormwater Manager Stormwater Manager E-mail/in-person Review plan and make suggestions Azle Azle Fire Department Fire Chief/EMC In-person Review plan and make suggestions Azle Azle Emergency EMC p Review plan and make suggestions Management Stakeholders Bedford included city personnel only. Stakeholders Blue Mound included city personnel only. Colleyville American Red Disaster Specialist E-mail Provided information on sheltering Cross needs. Colleyville Grapevine Emergency Phone Sheltering/evacuation information Colleyville ISD Management Colleyville NWS Ft. Worth Phone/e-mail Weather history Crowley Crowley DPW Director Phone Available resources Crowley Crowley Police Department. police Chief Phone Available resources Crowley Crowley Finance Director Phone None Department. Crowley Crowley ISD Administrative Phone None Assistant DFW American Red Regional Director Previous Provided information on sheltering Cross agreement needs DFW Oncor Distribution Services E-mail Power system design and Consultant vulnerabilities Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-3 Section 3 Jurisdiction , r:h%7 Or Title Contact rapinou oT Information Provided Organization of Euless American Red Disaster Specialist E-mail Provided information on sheltering Cross needs and agreements Euless Hurst Euless Risk Management Phone/e-mail Provide information on sheltering, Bedford ISD transportation, food preparation Euless Grapevine Risk Management Phone/e-mail Provide Information on sheltering, Colleyville ISD transportation, food preparation Euless ONCOR Area Manager Phone Outage and repair information and historical data Euless Atmos Energy Area Manager Phone Outage and repair information, line location, historical data, risks Euless Trinity River Authority of Texas Area Manager Phone Water availability Euless DFW Police/Fire Chiefs Phone/e-mail Airport disaster plan Forest Hill American Red EM Coordinator E-mail/phone Provide information on sheltering Cross needs Forest Hill Fort Worth ISD EM Coordinator Phone Provide info on local FW ISD Schools Fort Worth National Weather Warning Coordination Telephone, in- Severe weather hazard/mitigation Service Meteorologist person, e-mail information Naval Air Station Telephone, in- Common hazard information, Fort Worth Fort Worth Joint EMC person potential mitigation projects Reserve Base Extensive coordination throughout Fort Worth Neighboring cities OEM Offices Telephone, in- project, including common hazard person, e-mail information, ongoing and/or potential joint mitigation projects Fort Worth NCTCOG Various Various Extensive coordination throughout project Fort Worth Tarrant County Various Various Extensive coordination throughout OEM project Tarrant County Emergency Public Health Hazard Risk Fort Worth Public Health Preparedness E-mail Assessment Department Coordinator Fort Worth Tarrant Regional Hydrologist Telephone Hazards associated with lakes and Water District levees Texas Fort Worth Commission on Dam Safety Program E-mail Dam locations Environmental Manager Quality Army Corps of Chief D Grapevine En Engineers ergenceputy E-mail Did not respond Management Grapevine E-mail and Summary of outreach efforts, Grapevine Colleyville ISD Risk Manager phone student population numbers, critical facility information Grapevine Texas Parks and Natural Resources E-mail Did not respond Wildlife Specialist Oncor Electric E-mail and Summary of electrical delivery grid Grapevine Delivery Area Manager phone for the area, overview of priority restoration, understanding of critical 3-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Grapevine Paradigm Pipeline Grapevine NuStar District Manager Haltom City American Red Disaster Specialist E-mail Cross Haltom City BISD Assistant E-mail tank farm immediately adjacent to Superintendent Haltom City ONCOR Community Liaison Haslet Haslet FD Support President Provided Information on evacuation Group transportation Haslet Local Lions Club President Haslet Northwest ISD Administration Monthly meeting Stakeholders Hurst included city Will provide buses for mass Lake Worth personnel only Operations PLANNING PROCESS Keller facility restoration and redundant Administrative Office delivery systems Kennedale Maps of pipeline and summary of E-mail materials carried in pipelines running through Grapevine Information on product in storage at E-mail tank farm immediately adjacent to Communications city limits E-mail Provided information on sheltering Specialist needs Phone Provided Information on evacuation Information Tech. transportation E-mail Power grid information Monthly meeting Provide manpower assistance as needed Monthly meeting Provide manpower assistance as needed Phone Will provide buses for mass Lake Worth transportation Keller Keller ISD Administrative Office Phone Kennedale American Red Disaster Specialist E-mail Cross Kennedale Kennedale ISD Communications E-mail Specialist Mansfield- Information Tech. Kennedale Kennedale Manager E-mail Dispatch Lake Worth Director of Telephone and Lake Worth Independent Operations in-person School District Stakeholders Lakeside included city personnel only. Stakeholders North Richland Hills included city personnel only. Stakeholders Richland Hills included city personnel only. Saginaw Eagle Mountain Administration E-mail Saginaw ESD Stakeholders Southlake included city personnel only American Red Disaster Tarrant County Cross Specialist/Emergency E-mail Services personnel Provided site specific info for the schools in the City of Keller Provided information on sheltering security needs and contacts Updated KISD Emergency Contact Information Updated emergency incident response assignments Lake Worth Independent School District Emergency Action Plan No pertinent information provided Provided information on sheltering needs Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-5 Section 3 3.2 Plan Organization The LMAPC was responsible for the organization, data collection, and completion of the plan. It was the responsibility of the members of the LMAPC to include all pertinent departments within their respective governments and to request information as needed for the completion of the plan. These other departments include a variety of organizations whose input and data is vital to the success and accuracy of the plan. The LMAPC conducted several meetings and involved all available departments and resources in an effort to gain any information that would increase the effectiveness of the plan. The LMAPC was also tasked with including any external organizations that could benefit from the overall effectiveness of the plan. The LMAPC is aware of the importance of including a variety of external and internal organizations. Their input is vital to the short-term and long-term success of the plan. External organizations include but are not limited to the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM); the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); the National Weather Service (NWS); local citizens, businesses, and industry; media outlets, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) representatives; and others. These agencies and organizations were invited to the public meetings, provided information for data collection, and provided feedback on documents throughout the planning process. The plan is based on the data gathered and identified by all committee members, the public, and all jurisdictions in an effort to prioritize mitigation projects in order of severity in an effort to reduce loss of property and life. 3.3 Planning Team Goals and Objectives The Tarrant County LMAPC, early in the process, established a set of goals and objectives to ensure the effectiveness of this plan. These goals and objectives established the paradigm for the planning process. These goals and objectives are as follows: 3-6 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 AgencV o Title Contact aletnoa OT Provided Jurisdiction Organization of Information City of Watauga Watauga Water & Sewer Keith Miertchin Phone Flood maps and utility information Utilities Public Works and In-person Shared information regarding Westlake Planning Directors meetings contingency plans and operations Departments Westlake Westlake Head of School and In-person Shelter and emergency operation Academy Principles meetings plans City of Keller Westlake Public Service E-mail None provided Department Westlake Resident Security g Mana ers E-mails and Monthly EP updates and Businesses face-to-face coordination of emergency plans Westworth Village Burton Hill Principal Phone Provided space availability for Elementary shelter and staging use Westworth Village Burton Hill Baptist Pastor Phone Provided space availability for Church shelter and staging use 3.2 Plan Organization The LMAPC was responsible for the organization, data collection, and completion of the plan. It was the responsibility of the members of the LMAPC to include all pertinent departments within their respective governments and to request information as needed for the completion of the plan. These other departments include a variety of organizations whose input and data is vital to the success and accuracy of the plan. The LMAPC conducted several meetings and involved all available departments and resources in an effort to gain any information that would increase the effectiveness of the plan. The LMAPC was also tasked with including any external organizations that could benefit from the overall effectiveness of the plan. The LMAPC is aware of the importance of including a variety of external and internal organizations. Their input is vital to the short-term and long-term success of the plan. External organizations include but are not limited to the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM); the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); the National Weather Service (NWS); local citizens, businesses, and industry; media outlets, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) representatives; and others. These agencies and organizations were invited to the public meetings, provided information for data collection, and provided feedback on documents throughout the planning process. The plan is based on the data gathered and identified by all committee members, the public, and all jurisdictions in an effort to prioritize mitigation projects in order of severity in an effort to reduce loss of property and life. 3.3 Planning Team Goals and Objectives The Tarrant County LMAPC, early in the process, established a set of goals and objectives to ensure the effectiveness of this plan. These goals and objectives established the paradigm for the planning process. These goals and objectives are as follows: 3-6 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS ■ Actively involve and gain support from interested city governments and Tarrant County for the reduction of disasters in our community. ■ Prioritize identified mitigation projects. ■ Seek and implement any grant funding for the reduction of disasters in Tarrant County and its cities. ■ Monitor, evaluate, and update the progress of the plan as needed. ■ Form partnerships among local, state, and federal agencies to make Tarrant County more resistant to the effects of disasters. The table below is the time line agreed upon by the planning team for the development of the Tarrant County LMAP. Table 3-3 Calendar of Events May 13, 2013 Kickoff meeting and public meeting of mitigation process September 5, 2013 Public meeting #2 September 10, 2013 Draft risk assessment and mitigation strategies developed September 30, 2013 Draft LMAP developed October 3, 2013 Public meeting #3 October 9, 2013 Draft updated LMAP with changes required from public meeting for submittal to TDEM and FEMA for official review March 2014 — June 2014 State review period July 2014 - August 2014 FEMA review period September 2014 Final draft updated plan based on State of Texas and FEMA recommendations September 2014 Public meeting #4 October 2014 Jurisdictions obtain signatures from chief elected officials November 30, 2014 Final approval obtained from jurisdictions and forwarded to FEMA 3.4 Multijurisdictional Considerations Tarrant County, like many counties in Texas, has numerous cities. All cities were notified of the requirement concerning the Tarrant County LMAP and process. Representatives from all cities and townships and Tarrant County were invited to the general session meeting on April 24, 2013 to receive information regarding the planning process. Many jurisdictions decided to participate in the Tarrant County LMAP; however, some jurisdictions determined they would not participate. Benbrook, River Oaks, and Trophy Club participated in other FEMA -approved hazard mitigation Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-7 Section 3 plans. Participating and nonparticipating communities located within Tarrant County are listed in the bale below. Table 3-4 Jurisdiction Participation in the Tarrant County LMAP Arlington Keller Azle Kennedale Bedford Lake Worth Blue Mound Lakeside Colleyville North Central Texas Council of Governments Crowley North Richland Hills Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Richland Hills Euless Saginaw Forest Hill Southlake Fort Worth Tarrant County Grapevine Watauga Haltom City Westlake Haslet Westworth Village Hurst Benbrook Pelican Bay Dalworthington Gardens River Oaks Edgecliff Village Sansom Park Everman Trophy Club Mansfield Westover Hills Pantego White Settlement The communities that are participating in development of the Tarrant County LMAP have worked collectively over the past months to gather data that included known hazards, flood -prone areas, areas of vulnerability, existing mitigation plans and projects, and technical information for the plan. The data was forwarded to the NCTCOG for review and plan development. Subsequent meetings have been held in an effort to ensure that all information is correct and that all agencies' 3-8 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS and organizations' input was included as presented. A chronology of meetings and events is listed in Section 3.6. Municipalities participated by providing input and data for the risk assessment section as well as the mitigation strategies. In addition to providing input via e-mail, phone call, and in-person contact, municipalities attended public meetings held to introduce and discuss various elements of the plan. Each jurisdiction was an active participant in the planning and development process. Coordination of the Tarrant County LMAP planning process was managed by the NCTCOG. The jurisdictions' individual contributions are listed in the table below. Table 3-5 Type of Jurisdiction Participation Arlington Azle Bedford Blue Mound Colleyville Crowley x x x 1� x x x Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-9 Planning Meeting 1 Irish Hancock Planning Meeting 2 Planning Kwaheri Harris Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Eddy Wood Planning Meeting 2 Will Scott Planning Meeting 2 Rick Garnett Planning Meeting 1 Planning James Meeting 1 Richardson Planning Meeting 2 Planning Bobby Sewell Meeting 1 Planning Meeting 2 Planning Bill Shelton Meeting 1 Planning Meeting 2 Shawn Fannan Planning Kenny Phillips Meeting 1 Planning Meeting 2 Luke Planning Thompson Meeting 1 x x x 1� x x x Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-9 Section 3 DFW Euless Forest Hill Fort Worth Grapevine Haltom City Haslet Hurst Keller 3-10 2015 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June Planning Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Pleasant Brooks Planning David McCurdy Meeting 1 Planning Meeting 2 Christina Wood Planning Meeting 2 Sue Kunze Planning Meeting 2 Matthew Miller Planning Meeting 1 Joe Kraft Planning Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Ed Henderson Keith Wells Planning Meeting 1 Carlos Gomez Planning Meeting 2 Planning Carrie Little Meeting 1 Planning Meeting 2 Brian Fuller Planning Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 1 Perry Bynum Planning Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Kirt Mays David Palla Planning Meeting 1 Planning Brent Craft Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 David Jones Planning Meeting 2 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June PLANNING PROCESS Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-11 Planning Meeting 3 Kennedale Mike McCurry x x x Lake Worth Mike Voorhies x x x Lee Pitt Planning Lakeside Meeting 1 Sean Hughes x x x Francisco San Planning Miguel Meeting 1 x x x Planning Meeting 1 Nicholas Planning LaGrassa Meeting 2 x x x Planning Meeting 3 Planning NCTCOG Andrea Wilson Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Planning Molly Thoerner Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 Melanie Devine Planning Meeting 2 Angie Strickler Planning Meeting 3 Kirk Marcum Planning Meeting 1 x x x Planning North Richland Hills Billy Owens Meeting 2 x x x Planning Meeting 3 Sean Hughes x x x Richland Hills Bill Bell x x x Saginaw Doug Spears x x x Planning Southlake Kyle Taylor Meeting 1 Planning x x x Meeting 2 Planning Tarrant County William Wessel Meeting 1 Planning x x x Meeting 2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-11 Section 3 James Planning Taborsky Meeting 3 Planning Mark Fulmer Meeting 1 x x x Planning Meeting 2 Stewart Planning DeJarnett Meeting 1 Planning Watauga Randy Barkley Meeting 1 x x x Planning Meeting 2 Jason Martin, Public Meeting 1 Westlake Public Meeting Troy Crow Planning x x x Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 1 Westworth Village Brandy Barret Planning x x x Meeting 2 Planning Meeting 3 3-12 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS 3.5 Review of Existing Technical/Planning Information An important aspect of the planning process involved the review of existing federal, state, and local plans, studies, reports, and technical information as well as the ordinances, regulations, and resolutions of each participating jurisdiction for incorporation into the Tarrant County LMAP. Plans and documents reviewed by various members of the committee include: State/Federal Data, Reports, and Plans Utilized ■ 2010 United States Census Data o Information utilized throughout community profile section, jurisdiction profiles, and to understand the impact of certain hazards on vulnerable populations ■ Texas Department of Natural Resources, water and land cover data o Incorporated into the plan through watershed information, flooding data, and expansive soils identification ■ FEMA regulations and guidance o Utilized as planning guidance to ensure appropriate planning information, hazard and vulnerability analysis, and mitigation actions were incorporated into the plan per FEMA requirements ■ State of Texas Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(b)(3) An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process shall include: (3) Review and incorporation, if appropriate, of existing plans, studies, reports, and technical information. o Incorporated hazard information identified in the State of Texas HMP throughout the Tarrant County LMAP, including information on hazard vulnerabilities o Ensured mitigation actions identified in Tarrant County LMAP aligned with State mitigation priorities County/Regional Plans, Ordinances, Data Utilized ■ Fort Worth Hazard Mitigation Action Plan o Reviewed for information pertinent to the newly developed Tarrant County LMAP, including planning partners, stakeholders, identified hazards, and previous mitigation actions. ■ City of Arlington Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment o Utilized information for description and profile of technological hazards ■ Dallas Fort Worth Urban Area Security Initiative Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) o Utilized information for description and profile of technological hazards ■ North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) GIS User Group Data Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-13 Section 3 o Incorporated into the plan via maps of critical infrastructure located in the County and individual jurisdictions, identified hazard vulnerabilities, and mitigation action impacts These documents provided valuable guidance in the planning process. Some served to acquaint committee members with the many roles of emergency management. Planning guides helped to tie together the phases of mitigation planning for committee members from a broad range of backgrounds outside mitigation and emergency management. State and federal response and homeland security documents were referenced to ensure Tarrant County's goals supported these plans and promoted compliance with requirements. The State of Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(b)(1) An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process shall include: (1) an opportunity for the public to comment on the plan during the drafting stage and prior to plan approval. Texas Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) formed the basis for identifying and analyzing the natural hazards and technological hazards that could affect Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions. 3.6 Public Involvement To be an effective plan, input from the public is vital. The LMAPC recognizes the valuable input that the public can provide on the plan. Additionally, public input builds support, ensures a strong base for future mitigation activities, and allows Tarrant County citizens the opportunity to have their interests included in the plan. The public was invited to participate in the development of this plan via the internet and press releases by the NCTCOG as well as press releases by participating jurisdictions. Each participating jurisdiction conducted public outreach as identified in the Table 3-6. Although outreach efforts were extensive, no public feedback was received by Tarrant County or the participating jurisdictions and therefore no information was incorporated into the Tarrant County LMAP. Table 3-6 Jurisdiction Outreach Methods Arlington Public Meetings #2 and E-mail Sent to stakeholders which included Unknown #3 citizens Azle Public Meeting #1 Press Release Posted to City of Azle website 5/5/2013 Azle Kick off Meeting US Mail Sent by mail to residents on water bill 9/12/2012 Bedford Public Meeting #3 Press Release Posted to Tarrant County website 5/12/2013 Bedford Public Meeting #2 Public Notice Posted on City website 9/5/2013 Blue Mound N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A outreach Colleyville Public Meeting Press release Colleyville website, e-mail, posted at 8/27/2013 city hall 3-14 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS MethodJurisdiction Outreach Distribution Contact Colleyville Public Meeting Press release Colleyville website, e-mail, posted at 2/20/2013 City Hall Crowley N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A outreach DFW Airport N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A outreach Euless Public Notice Internet Posting Posted to City of Euless website 5/20/2013 Euless Public Meeting Press Release Advertised by NCTCOG 10/3/2013 Forest Hill Public Notifications New Articles City of Forest Hill Unknown Forest Hill Public Notifications Auto Dialing System City of Forest Hill Unknown Fort Worth Public Meeting #1 Press Release Unknown 5/13/2013 Fort Worth Public Meeting #2 Press Release Posted to City website and calendar 9/5/2013 Fort Worth Public Meeting #3 Press Release Posted to City website 10/3/2013 Fort Worth Public Meeting #4 Press Release Posted to City website 12/16/2013 Fort Worth Public Survey E-mail Website/Internet Unknown Grapevine Planning Process Announcement Posted to City of Grapevine website 5/7/2013 Initiation Grapevine Public Meeting #2 Announcement Posted to City of Grapevine website 8130/2013 and social media Grapevine Public Meeting #3 Announcement Posted to City of Grapevine website 9/30/2013 and social media Haltom City Public Meeting #3 Press Release Posted to Tarrant County Website 9/20/2013 Haltom City Public Survey Meetings CERT monthly meeting third Monday 2/1/2013 of each month. Haltom City NCTCOG Meetings/Web site Posted on the NCTCOG website 8/1/2013 Haslet Public Inquiry Online Posting Posted on Haslet FD website Oct -Dec 2013 Hurst Public Survey E-mail Link to Tarrant County website 5/14/2013 Hurst Public Meeting Press Release Posted to City website 9/5/2013 9/13/2013 (and Hurst Public Survey Press Release Posted to City website currently ongoing) Keller N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A outreach Kennedale Emergency Notification Service Registration Opt -In Portal Posted to Kennedale website 4/5/2014 Kennedale Emergency Notification Service Registration News Letter Sent to Water Service customers 4/25/2014 Lake Worth Public Meeting #1 Press Release Posted to the City website and City 1/21/2014 Hall Public Board Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-15 Section 3 MethodJurisdiction Outreach Distribution Contact Future Public Meeting #2 Press Release Posted to the City website and City 1/30/2014 Network Westworth Public Survey Press Release Posted to City website Village Hall Public Board Westworth Public Survey Press Release Posted to Police Department website Village 5/14/2013 Tarrant County Pre Plan Website Currently on Tarrant County website Lakeside N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A about the hazard mitigation planning process and contribute ideas about Tarrant County's risks, vulnerabilities, and mitigation strategies, to the plan. outreach NCTCOG Public Meeting #1 Press Release Distributed to Fort Worth Star 5/1/2013 Telegram NCTCOG Public Meeting #2 Press Release Distributed to Fort Worth Star 8/29/2013 Telegram NCTCOG Public Meeting #3 Press Release Distributed to Fort Worth Star 10/26/2013 Telegram North N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A Richland Hills outreach Richland Hills N/A Did not attempt N/A N/A outreach Saginaw Public Inquiry Online Posting Posted on City of Saginaw website Apr - Jul, 2013 Southlake Hazard Mitigation Plan Web Posting Posted to City of Southlake website 8/13/2014 Public Meeting Southlake Hazard Mitigation Plan Web Posting Posted to City of Southlake website 9/13/2014 Public Meeting Tarrant County Public Meeting #3 Press Release Posted to Tarrant County website 9/20/2013 Tarrant Public Meeting #2 E-mail Distributed on the Tarrant County 9/4/2013 County Listsery Tarrant Kick Off Meeting E-mail Distributed on the Tarrant County 5/10/2013 County Listsery Watauga Public meeting #1 Press Release City website and newsletter 7/26/2013 Watauga Public Meeting #2 Press Release City website and newsletter 9/5/2013 Watauga Public Meeting #3 Press Release City website and newsletter 10/3/2013 Westlake Public Meeting #1 I #2 Press Releases Newspaper of record (FWST) Prior to Meeting Dates Twice monthly e-mail Westlake All citizens Future communique. Westlake ECN / Notification All citizens Future Network Westworth Public Survey Press Release Posted to City website Village 5/14/2013 Westworth Public Survey Press Release Posted to Police Department website Village 5/14/2013 Westworth Public Survey Monthly City Announced to 50+ attendees at 5/14/2013 Village Luncheon monthly town hall style luncheon Westworth Public Meeting Press Release Posted to City website Village 9/30/2013 Public Meetings The main activity for public involvement was invitation to public meetings where they could learn about the hazard mitigation planning process and contribute ideas about Tarrant County's risks, vulnerabilities, and mitigation strategies, to the plan. 3-16 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 PLANNING PROCESS The first public meeting was held on May 13, 2013. The meeting introduced the hazard mitigation planning process, including the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, the importance of public participation, and the overall approach to planning. Complete meeting notes, rosters, and notices can be found in Appendix D. The second meeting was held on September 5, 2013 and was an opportunity for attendees to review all hazard profiles, vulnerabilities, and mitigation strategy recommendations. Complete meeting notes, rosters, and notices can be found in Appendix D. A third meeting was held on October 3, 2013 prior to the approval of this plan to present an overview to county residents and solicit input to the final draft. The complete meeting notes, rosters, and notices for this meeting can be found in Appendix D. A fourth meeting will be held on August 5, 2014 to present the approved Tarrant County LMAP to the public. The complete meeting notes, rosters, and notices for this meeting can be found in Appendix D. Public Survey A public survey was created that included 10 questions and asked residents about their concerns regarding the hazards faced in the community, family and home disaster preparedness, and actions Tarrant County and municipalities can take to make the community safer. Below is an example of a survey question. Several of the questions used a matrix of responses, giving a range of options for response. Many of the questions also allowed open-ended responses, allowing for explanation of their answers. Unfortunately, despite extensive outreach efforts, minimal responses were received. As a result, this information could not be incorporated into the Tarrant County LMAP. Figure 3-1 Example of Tarrant County LMAP Survey Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 3-17 Section 3 2. The following hazards have been identified as having a potential to affect 4+ Create Chart + Download Tarrant County. Please mark the three hazards that are of most concern to your neighborhood or home. 3-18 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Response Response Percent Count Damllevee failure 2.5% 2 Drought 37. a% 36 Health alertlepidemic 27.2% 22 Flood 16.0% 13 Wildfire Irk 12.3% 14 Tomado 60.2% 65 Hazardous materials release 23.5% 19 Terrorist threat :-: 8.6% 7 Natural gas shortage 6.2% 5 Power outage 49.4% 40 Thunderstorm 40.7% 33 Winter storm 14.8% 12 Tropical StormlHurricane u 3.7% 3 other (please specify) 2 Shown Responses answered question 81 skipped question 19 3-18 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Section 4 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(c) (2) (i) The risk assessment shall include a description of the type, location, and extent of all natural hazards that can affect the jurisdiction. The plan shall include information on previous occurrences of hazard events and on the probability of future hazard events. Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(c) (2) (ii) The risk assessment shall include a description of the jurisdiction's vulnerability to the hazards described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section. This description shall include an overall summary of each hazard and its impact on the community. To develop effective hazard mitigation strategies, it is first necessary to identify and profile all hazards facing the community. The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPC) conducted a risk assessment of the hazards faced in the community. A risk assessment measures the potential loss of life, personal injury, economic injury, and property damage resulting from natural and technological hazards by assessing the vulnerability of people, buildings, and infrastructure to natural and technological disasters. Several methods were used to identify risks to the community. These methods included evaluating historical data from scientific and news media sources, soliciting opinions and experiences from participating jurisdictions and Tarrant County residents, and surveying risks identified in the State of Texas Hazard Mitigation Plan that were pertinent to Tarrant County. Following the risk assessment, a vulnerability assessment was conducted by the Tarrant County LMAPC. The vulnerability assessment predicts the extent of damage that may result from a hazard of a given intensity in a given area on the existing and future build environment. Determining the community's vulnerability involved identifying the threats posed to people, property, and the environment. This also included identifying critical facilities that could be affected by each hazard. The table below shows the natural and technological hazards identified in the LMAP. Table 4-1 Hazards Included in the Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Tornadoes Frequency, previous incidents, countywide hazard Power failure Frequency, previous incidents, countywide hazard Flooding Frequency, previous incidents Severe thunderstorms and high winds Frequency, previous incidents, countywide hazard Hail Countywide hazard Infectious disease outbreak Previous incidents, potential adverse impact Lightning Frequency, countywide hazard Hazardous materials spills Frequency, potential adverse impact Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-1 Section 4 Terrorism Potential adverse impact Winter storms Frequency, previous incidents, countywide hazard Dam failure Potential adverse impact Drought Previous incidents, countywide hazard Wildfires Freauencv. potential adverse impact Extreme temperatures Frequency, countywide hazard Expansive soils Potential adverse impact The hazards listed in the table below were not profiled due to geographic location, low occurrence, or low potential for damage. Table 4-2 Hazards Not Included in the Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Avalanche Geographic proximity Civil disturbance Low occurrence, low vulnerability Coastal erosion Geographic proximity Earthauakes Low occurrence. low vulnerabilitv Hurricane/tropical storms Geographic proximity Karst topography Low occurrence Landslides Low occurrence Sinkholes Low vulnerability Tsunami Geographic proximity Volcano Geographic proximity The following information was included in each hazard profile: ■ Hazard Definition. Definition of the hazard will include a description of the hazard and the general threats that they pose. All hazards were identified using statistical data and records from a variety of sources, including presidential disaster declarations, National Weather Service data, maps, and hazmat response data. The lists of hazards are based on frequency, severity, probability, potential loss, vulnerability, and large-scale effects on Tarrant County. ■ Hazard Identification. Each hazard will be profiled to explain how it will affect or has affected Tarrant County. This will include areas prone to specific hazards and the effects that they have had on Tarrant County infrastructure. It also includes previous incidents that have affected Tarrant County. ■ Assets Exposed to Hazard. The risk and vulnerability analysis compares identified hazards with the inventory of affected critical facilities and the effects on the population that is exposed to each hazard. This section will also include a vulnerability assessment for future development, such as schools, water, and waste treatment facilities and other critical infrastructure. ■ Vulnerability. The county's vulnerability to each hazard will be summarized based on a common set of definitions and classifications used to estimate vulnerability and rank hazards. 4-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan i June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Figure 4-1 identifies classifications of vulnerability. Each profile was analyzed on the criteria for frequency of occurrence, the amount of warning time prior to the hazard occurring, the amount of area potentially affected by the hazard, and the severity of impact should the hazard occur. Figure 4-1 Vulnerability Classifications Frequency of Occurrence: Probability 1 = Unlikely <1% probability of occurrence in the next 100 years 2 = Occasionally 1-10% probability of occurrence per year, or at least one chance in next 100 years 3 = Likely >10% but <100% probability per year, at least 1 chance in next 10 years 4 = Highly Likely 100% probable in a year Warning Time: Amount of time generally given to alert people to hazard 1 = More than 12 hours 2 = 6-12 hours 3 = 3-6 hours 4 = None—Minimal Geographic Extent: How large an area would likely be affected? 1 = Localized 2 = Community -wide 3 = Countywide Potential Impact: Severity and extent of damage and disruption 1 =Negligible Isolated occurrences of minor property damage, minor disruption of critical facilities and infrastructure, and potential for minor injuries 2 = Minor Isolated occurrences of moderate to severe property damage, brief disruption of critical facilities and infrastructure, and potential for injuries 3 = Moderate Severe property damage on a neighborhood scale, temporary shutdown of critical facilities, and/or injuries or fatalities 4 = Major Severe property damage on a metropolitan or regional scale, shutdown of critical facilities, and/or multiple injuries or fatalities ■ Multijurisdictional Concerns. This component of the hazard profile will identify what areas of Tarrant County are most vulnerable to effects of the hazard. ■ Land Use and Development Trends. This component of the risk and vulnerability analysis will identify land use trends, identify Tarrant County's land use and development plans, and reference current plans and regulations in place regarding land use plans and trends that could prevent the impact of the disaster. ■ Hazard Summary. A summary of the hazard profile will be provided. The process of developing the Tarrant County LMAP began with a review of the hazards faced in the community. The below ranking of hazards was conducted by assigning a score to each hazard based on the frequency of the hazard, impact potential, severity of damage, and overall jurisdiction's risks where they vary from the risks facing the entire planning area. 44 CFR Requirement 201.6 (c)(2)(ii)(C) Providing a general description of land uses and development trends within the community so that mitigation options can be considered in future land use decisions. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-3 Section 4 economic disruption. Several hazards received the same score. The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPQ discussed those hazards in which the score was tied and determined the order in which the hazards should be ranked. These decisions were based on collective knowledge of past events, jurisdictional capabilities, and potential impact. Upon review of the hazard ranking, the Tarrant County LMAPC determined that due to the low impact and the level of experience that Tarrant County jurisdictions have handling hazardous materials incidents, the hazard should be ranked lower than the given score of 13. Following discussion, the hazardous materials release hazards was ranked #8, following lightning strikes. Table Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan Hazard Ranking Frequency Warning Geographic Potential Hazard Vulnerable Critical Ranking Hazard of Time Extent Impact Score Facilities Economic Disruption Occurrence Communications, schools, medical care facilities, Utility lines down, None- Community -hospital, medical care disruption, 1 Tornadoes Likely Minimal wide Major 13 water/sewer/electric, transportation routes transportation infrastructure, impaired, business and businesses, residential residential impact homes Communications infrastructure, transportation 2 Power Failure Highly None- Localized - Minor 13 infrastructure, medical care Business and Likely Minimal Countywide facilities, hospitals, schools, residential impact businesses, residential homes Communications Businesses, roads infrastructure, transportation damaged/closed, 3 Flooding* Likely 3-6 Community- Major 12 infrastructure, medical care utilities affected, hours wide facilities, hospitals, schools, transportation routes businesses, residential impaired, evacuations homes Severe Communications, schools, Utility systems Thunderstorms Highly 3-6 Community- medical care facilities, disrupted, business and 4 and High Likely hours wide Moderate 12 hospital, residential impact, hail Winds** water/sewer/electric, damage to crops, roads transportation infrastructure damaged/closed Communications, schools, Utility systems Highly 3-6 Community- medical care facilities, disrupted, business and 5 Hail*** Likely hours wide Moderate 12 hospital, residential impact, hail water/sewer/electric, damage to crops, roads transportation infrastructure damaged/closed Communications Infectious More infrastructure, transportation Business/industry 6 Disease Highly than 12 Countywide Negligible 12 infrastructure, medical care impact, health care Outbreak Likely hours - Major facilities, hospitals, schools, system impact, and businesses, residential communications impact homes Communications, schools, Utility systems 7 Lightning Highly None - Localized Minor 11 medical care facilities, hospital, disrupted, business and Likely Minimal water/sewer/electric, residential impact, transportation infrastructure roads damaged/closed Communications Business/industry and Hazardous Localized - infrastructure, transportation residential impact, S Materials Highly None- Community- Moderate 13 infrastructure, medical care evacuation, Release Likely Minimal wide facilities, hospitals, schools, environmental impact, businesses, residential transportation routes homes impaired 9 Terrorism Unlikely None- Community- Major 11 Communications Utility systems Minimal wide infrastructure, transportation disrupted, business and 4-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Vulnerable Critical Economic Disruption EM Om Facilities infrastructure, medical care residential impact, facilities, hospitals, schools, evacuations, roads businesses, residential damaged/closed homes Communications More infrastructure, transportation 10 Winter storms Likely than 12 Countywide Moderate 10 infrastructure, medical care Utility lines down, hours facilities, hospitals, schools, livestock threatened businesses, residential homes Communications infrastructure, transportation Businesses, roads 11 Dam Failure Unlikely 3-6 Community- Major 10 infrastructure, medical care damaged/closed, hours wide facilities, hospitals, schools, utilities affected, businesses, residential evacuations homes More Agriculture, business 12 Drought Likely than 12 Countywide Minor 9 Agri -business and residential impact, hours fire suppression Communications infrastructure, transportation Agricultural, residential 13 Wildfires Likely 6-12 Localized Minor g infrastructure, medical care impact, road closures, hours facilities, hospitals, schools, utility impacts, businesses, residential evacuations homes More Businesses, roads 14 Extreme Likely than 12 Countywide Minor g Medical care facilities, damaged/closed, Temperatures hours elderly care facilities utilities affected Expansive More Pipelines, sewers, and Businesses, roads 15 Likely than 12 Localized Negligible 6 damaged/closed, Soils hours pavements. utilities affected *For the purposes of the hazard flooding, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term "warning". ** For the purposes of the hazard Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term "warning". *** For the purposes of the hazard Hail, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term "warning". 4.1 Natural Hazards Natural hazards such as floods, tornadoes, winter storms, and the like are an enduring condition around the human environment. Natural hazards become disasters when they intersect with the human environment. In Texas, natural disasters have had devastating effects on human lives, property, the economy, and the community. 4.1.1 Tornadoes Hazard Definition The Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan Committee (LMAPC) reviewed historical data from both SHELDUS and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in researching the past events and effects of tornadoes in the Tarrant County. A tornado is a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 mph or more. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Tornado season in Texas runs ordinarily from March through August; however, tornadoes can strike at any time of the year if the essential conditions are Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-5 present6. The state of Texas averaged 155 annual tornadoes over the past 20 years. The tornado tracks and population risk nationwide are depicted in Figure 4-2. Figure 4-3 depicts the average number of tornadoes per state in the United States between 1991 and 2010. Figure 4-2 Tornado Tracks (1950.2011) and Population Density (2010) FIM Figure 4-3 Average Annual Number of Tornadoes Averaging Period: 1991 - 2010 .1 ze t� n . s r ti f t' An average of 12 5 3 r NOA A•w 1 tornadoes occur in the United States ' ...s ,.... r. 6each year t_ Source: NatloT,u, Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-1 Section 4 The National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) utilizes the recently updated Enhanced Fujita (EF) Scale to rate the severity of tornadoes. In terms of extent, Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions may experience tornadoes ranging from EFO (65-85 mph) to EF4 (166-200 mph). The table below describes the EF Scale and associated wind speed categories. Table 4-4 EF Scale' Hazard Identification In the past 50 years, 55 tornadoes have touched down in Tarrant County. History shows that Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions will potentially experience several tornadoes in one year, although they have not had a tornado touch down every year. Trend analysis indicates that a tornado will touch down in Tarrant County every other year. This equates to a 50 percent chance of a tornado touching down in Tarrant County or the participating jurisdictions in any given year. Figure 4-4 shows a sample of tornado touchdowns in Tarrant County since 1957. Due to the large amount of tornado activity, not all tornadoes are visible on the map, but it serves the purpose The Enhanced Fujita Scale still is a set of wind estimates (not measurements) based on damage. It uses 3 -second gusts estimated at the point of damage based on a judgment of levels of damage to various indicators. These estimates vary with height and exposure. The 3 -second gust is not the same wind as in standard surface observations. Standard measurements are taken by weather stations in open exposures, using a directly measured "1 - minute mile" speed. 4-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Fastest 1/4 3 Second Gust EF 3 Second Gust 3 Second Gust F Number EF Number Mile (mph) (mph) Number (mph) (mph) 0 40-72 45-78 0 65-85 0 65-85 1 73-112 79-117 1 86-109 1 86-110 2 113-157 118-161 2 110-137 2 111-135 3 158-207 162-209 3 138-167 3 136-165 4 208-260 210-261 4 168-199 4 166-200 5 261-318 262-317 5 200-234 5 Over200 Hazard Identification In the past 50 years, 55 tornadoes have touched down in Tarrant County. History shows that Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions will potentially experience several tornadoes in one year, although they have not had a tornado touch down every year. Trend analysis indicates that a tornado will touch down in Tarrant County every other year. This equates to a 50 percent chance of a tornado touching down in Tarrant County or the participating jurisdictions in any given year. Figure 4-4 shows a sample of tornado touchdowns in Tarrant County since 1957. Due to the large amount of tornado activity, not all tornadoes are visible on the map, but it serves the purpose The Enhanced Fujita Scale still is a set of wind estimates (not measurements) based on damage. It uses 3 -second gusts estimated at the point of damage based on a judgment of levels of damage to various indicators. These estimates vary with height and exposure. The 3 -second gust is not the same wind as in standard surface observations. Standard measurements are taken by weather stations in open exposures, using a directly measured "1 - minute mile" speed. 4-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT of illustrating the wide distribution of tornado activity in the region. The numbers seen on the map indicate the intensity of the tornado according to its classification on the EF scale. Figure 4-4 Tornado Touchdowns in Tarrant County$ , 0 , -1 e 0 Ea9 e , n e St7i�7 L■I clu K a PIE uin-e Ica— �aL7T}I I',0 s ' Ar!Int :seri .0 Vol BE! rclok t , - F rwe. OCI:=1 4 i '.c'7 r.k: I� �' -� - '� i. r K'i'n-' e cr-owley—, \/13ek2l n N % j Tornadoes in Tarrant County come in a wide range of sizes, ranging from those reported but not confirmed to those measuring up to an EF3. The City of Fort Worth experienced tornadoes in March of 2000 and April of 2002. The March 28, 2000 tornado was rated as an F3 (designated using the Fujita Scale) as it moved across the west side of Fort Worth and into downtown causing 2 deaths, 103 injuries, and estimated $500 million in damage. A major disaster declaration was made for the event. Several high-rise buildings were struck by the tornado. One of the high-rise buildings has since been imploded and replaced with a parking lot and another required all infrastructures to be removed and rebuilt. The April 16, 2002 tornado was rated as an F3. It touched down in the Carver Heights neighborhood east of Loop 820 and moved north into the Handley neighborhood. The tornado caused no deaths, 7 injuries, and an estimated $5 million in damage. Haltom City reported a tornado in April 2007 that killed 1 person, injured 30 people, damaged 35 homes, and caused $485,000 in damage. North Richmond Hills reported an EFO tornado in April 2003 that caused $20,000 of damage. Watauga reported a tornado in 2011 that damaged homes and uprooted trees. 8 http://www.tomadohistoryproject.com/tornado/Texas/Tarrant/map Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-3 Section 4 On February 11, 2009, the City of Colleyville was impacted by an EF1 tornado that struck the center of the City. The tornado measured 100 yards wide and traveled 1/2 miles on the ground. Fortunately, only 10 structures were damaged, mostly from damaged roofs and downed fences. The City of Saginaw has experienced several tornadoes. In February 2001, a tornado with 70 mph winds injured two people, damaged 20 structures, and caused an estimated $750,000 in damages. Another tornado caused in excess of $1 million when, in April 2008, it damaged 15 structures in a heavy industrial and commercial area. Grapevine has also experienced several tornadoes over the years, with FO tornadoes 1957 and 1976, and an F1 tornado in 1981. These tornadoes have injured 2 people and caused over $30,000 in damage. Arlington has not been spared the damage of tornadoes either. A tornado in March 2000 initially damaged a restaurant, but as the F3 tornado moved east, it struck the Arlington Airport before it paralleled I-20, crossing the interstate about 1 mile west of Highway 360. The tornado then moved northeast, causing F2 damage to a neighborhood just northeast of Grand Prairie Airport. In spite of the damage, there were no deaths or serious injuries in Arlington or Grand Prairie. One of the most devastating tornado events in North Texas history occurred on April 3, 2012. 22 tornadoes were confirmed in what was an outburst of tornado activity. It is estimated that at least 1,100 homes in the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area were damaged, including at least 350 that were destroyed. No deaths were reported, but 29 injuries occurred. In Tarrant County, Kennedale and Arlington were primarily impacted. The tornado damaged 500 homes in the City of Arlington, with 8 Reflectivily Velocity injuries reported and costs totaling $1.2 million. ` • ' ' ' ' ' 133 PM CDT Survey Complete - Subject to Final Revilew L%,r,%W NafioW Wn he, Sv— w ,kmsW*d Apr 4 2012 In Kennedale, the EF2 tornado destroyed 3 mobile homes, 2 masonry workshops, and 133 homes, and damaged 23 businesses. The City of Kennedale municipal water tower was damaged by a 40 -foot long steel bar joist that was ripped from a warehouse and deposited on top of the 125 -foot high water tower. It took 5 days for volunteers and City staff to clear all debris from the neighborhoods. Governor Rick Perry issued a disaster declaration for Tarrant County as a result of the storm. Tarrant County reported that tornadoes caused 3 fatalities and 89 injuries since 1996. The table below lists reported tornadoes in Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions since 1980. 4-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Table 4-59 Confirmed Tornadoes in Tarrant County TARRANT CO. 4/2/1980 17:30 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 10/13/1981 13:30 CST Tornado F1 0 2 25.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 4/28/1982 17:00 CST Tornado F1 0 0 250.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 6/3/1983 17:47 CST Tornado FO 0 0 0.03K O.00K TARRANT CO. 3/18/1984 17:13 CST Tornado FO 0 0 0.25K O.00K TARRANT CO. 6/7/1989 15:00 CST Tornado F1 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 4/5/1990 20:33 CST Tornado F2 0 0 2.500M O.00K Mansfield 9/13/1993 7:10 CST Tornado F2 0 0 5.000M O.00K Arlington 9/13/1993 7:37 CST Tornado F2 0 5 5.000M O.00K Edgecliff Village 4/25/1994 18:42 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K Fort Worth 11/20/1994 6:00 CST Tornado FO 0 0 500.00K O.00K Fort Worth 4/19/1995 19:40 CST Tornado F2 0 0 4.000M O.00K North Richland Hills- 5/7/1995 21:15 CST Tornado F1 0 4 3.300M O.00K BENBROOK 2/20/1997 12:00 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 3/28/2000 18:18 CST Tornado F3 2 80 O.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 3/28/2000 19:05 CST Tornado F3 0 0 O.00K O.00K MANSFIELD 5/4/2001 20:43 CST Tornado F1 0 2 5.000M O.00K EVERMAN 4/16/2002 16:42 CST Tornado FO 0 0 15.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/16/2002 16:49 CST Tornado FO 0 0 2.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/16/2002 16:52 CST Tornado FO 0 0 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/16/2002 16:59 CST Tornado F3 0 0 250.00K O.00K NORTH RICHLAND HILLS 4/5/2003 20:05 CST Tornado FO 0 0 20.00K 2.00K EULESS 4/5/2003 20:19 CST Tornado FO 0 0 1.00K O.00K KELLER 4/23/2004 19:18 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K y Source: National Climatic Data Center, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html 10 Information on each event may be found by clicking on location link. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-5 Section 4 Property .. Damage �MEMEMOM Estimate ARLINGTON 6/1/2004 20:07 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K RICHLAND HILLS 6/1/2004 20:12 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/25/2005 15:14 CST Tornado FO 0 0 O.00K O.00K MANSFIELD 4/25/2005 15:30 CST Tornado FO 0 0 1.00K O.00K DALWORTHINGTON 4/3/2007 19:20 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 100.00K O.00K BENBROOK 4/13/2007 16:55 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 150.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/13/2007 17:09 CST -6 Tornado ER 1 0 2.000M O.00K HASLET 4/17/2007 17:30 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 15.00K O.00K BIRDS 4/23/2008 20:35 CST -6 Tornado EF2 0 0 1.00OM O.00K GRAPEVINE S LAKE ARP 2/10/2009 21:15 CST -6 Tornado ER 0 0 750.00K O.00K BENBROOK LAKE 9/7/2010 13:56 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 O.00K O.00K RICHLAND HILLS 10/23/2010 11:55 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 15.00K O.00K (FWH)CARSWELL AFB FT 5/11/2011 12:55 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 30.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN LAKE 5/24/2011 18:45 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 1.00K O.00K KENNEDALE 4/3/2012 12:21 CST -6 Tornado EF2 0 7 200.000M O.00K TARRANT 4/3/2012 12:58 CST -6 Tornado EFO 0 0 55.00K O.00K Totals: 3 100 229.985M 2.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. It can be assumed that all structures and facilities within Tarrant County could be damaged by a tornado because tornadoes are among the most unpredictable of weather phenomena and are indiscriminate as to when or where they strike. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a tornado and no way to predict when or where a tornado will occur. People are vulnerable to the effects of tornadoes, including power outages, disruption to transportation routes, damage to shelter, flying debris, etc. There is a 50 percent chance of a tornado occurring in any given year in Tarrant County. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment can be significant. Environmental risks can include flying debris and destruction of critical infrastructure that damage and affect water supply and contamination of potable water for public consumption. The risk and vulnerability to tornadoes for each participating jurisdiction is detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an 4-6 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Critical Asset Vulnerability Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of a tornado. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While a Vulnerable Populations tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Arlington. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Vulnerable Populations In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Azle. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While a Vulnerable Populations tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Bedford. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan i June 2015 4-7 Section 4 MIS [114.Z111111111 Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Blue Mound. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. AL City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While a Vulnerable Populations tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Colleyville. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While a Vulnerable Populations tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Crowley. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of a tornado. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the Vulnerable Populations airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during a tornado incident. Should the airport be impacted by a tornado, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts. Damage to fuel storage tanks could impact soil, and water systems. City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city facilities and public schools. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While a Vulnerable Populations tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. 4-8 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-9 Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Euless. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Forest Hill. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Fort Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Grapevine. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-9 Section 4 LCity .,111 l(VA11611 gold MIS [0 Critical Asset Vulnerability Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Haltom City. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haslet Vulnerable Populations The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. 4-10 There are multiple train tracks and distribution centers located in the city. Hazardous materials Environmental Vulnerability spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in environmental impacts to the city of Haslet. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Hurst. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Keller. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. LCity of Kennedale Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Kennedale. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. 4-10 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-11 .,. City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Lake Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Lakeside. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of North Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-11 Section 4 City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake 4-12 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 �1111 11 Mr.] 1111 , ,, City of Saginaw The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Saginaw. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Southlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to Tarrant County. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake 4-12 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Multijurisdictional Concerns Likely None -Minimal Community -wide Major There is not sufficient data to identify a preferred path that tornadoes seek in Tarrant County. All participating jurisdictions are vulnerable to the effects of a tornado and no participating jurisdiction is more or less vulnerable than the next. All mitigation projects will consider a countywide approach. Tarrant County and its municipalities use the International Building Code and enforcement policy. Land Use and Development Trends Continued development in Tarrant County will result in an increase in the potential for damage from tornadoes. Tarrant County and its cities and towns have a land use plan that clearly identifies future development. Tarrant County enforces the Texas State Building Code, which requires Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-13 The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability tornado. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the town, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Westlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Westworth Village Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a tornado. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While a tornado poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a tornado threat or relocate after a tornado has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a tornado could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Westworth Village. Such impacts could include contamination of soil and water systems. Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of tornadoes for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should a tornado impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Tornadoes Multijurisdictional Concerns Likely None -Minimal Community -wide Major There is not sufficient data to identify a preferred path that tornadoes seek in Tarrant County. All participating jurisdictions are vulnerable to the effects of a tornado and no participating jurisdiction is more or less vulnerable than the next. All mitigation projects will consider a countywide approach. Tarrant County and its municipalities use the International Building Code and enforcement policy. Land Use and Development Trends Continued development in Tarrant County will result in an increase in the potential for damage from tornadoes. Tarrant County and its cities and towns have a land use plan that clearly identifies future development. Tarrant County enforces the Texas State Building Code, which requires Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-13 Section 4 structures to be designed and constructed for wind loads. The use and enforcement of these codes provides reasonable protection from most natural hazards, including tornadoes. Updating building codes and the adoption of these codes will reduce vulnerability and damage from tornadoes. New technology allows for high wind -resistant windows, either by directly installing windows capable of withstanding high winds or applying a film that protects the window. This reduces property damage by reducing the number of broken windows and reduces injuries and deaths by reducing broken glass. Although Tarrant County currently has no regulatory capabilities regarding this technology, it is advised that new developments include high wind -resistant windows. Hazard Summary Overall, Tarrant County has high exposure to potential damage from tornadoes. Should a tornado hit certain portions of Tarrant County that are highly concentrated with homes or any of the critical facilities identified, depending upon the strength and duration of the event, significant damage could occur. Due to the destructive nature of tornadoes, it is imperative that pre -disaster mitigation measures be identified. 4.1.2 Flooding Hazard Definition Overflow of rivers and streams due to severe storms or torrential rains may result in significant flooding. Different variables impact flooding, including topography, ground saturation, previous rainfall, soil types, drainage, basin size, drainage patterns of streams, and vegetative cover. Flooding may occur slowly or become a flash flood, such as in the case of a dam failure. Urban areas experience flash flooding as storm drainage systems and sewers become overwhelmed, pouring water onto streets and into homes and businesses. The Tarrant County LMAPC researched historical data from the NCDC, the NWS, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) as well as information from past newspaper articles relating to flooding in Tarrant County. When flooding occurs, jurisdictions in the planning area can expect to see flooding that ranges from minor street flooding to water levels up to seven feet in low-lying areas. Hazard Identification There are two types of flooding that can occur almost anywhere. The first is general flooding, which is defined by the NWS as, "an overflow of water onto normally dry land. The inundation of a normally dry area caused by rising water in an existing waterway, such as a river, stream, or drainage ditch; ponding of water at or near the point where the rain fell." The second type is flash flooding, which is defined as, "a flood caused by heavy or excessive rainfall in a short period of time, generally less than 6 hours." Flash flooding can also be caused by a levee or dam failure. Typically, general flooding is a longer term event, whereas flash flooding is usually shorter in duration. Flash flooding does not have the warning time of general flooding, and therefore poses a greater risk to Tarrant County citizens. Flood -related damages due to historic events within Tarrant County occur due to flash flooding from severe thunderstorms or the remnants of Gulf hurricanes and tropical storms. One of the primary factors affecting mitigation actions in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions is the issue of stream bank erosion. Stream bank erosion is in and of itself not a threat or hazard to 4-14 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT the citizens of the LMAP participating jurisdictions; however, when stream banks are not properly built and protected, flooding will cause them to quickly erode and cause debris flow. This is a primary factor in losses and damages sustained. Therefore, to prevent the impacts of flooding, many jurisdictions recognize the importance of stream bank changes to correct drainage flow and will complete mitigation projects to address the issue. Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions experience flooding events on a regular basis. The corresponding table below combines major flooding events over the last 22 years. The NCDC lists 172 flooding events in Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions since 1990 and additional events have been reported by the jurisdictions as well. The economic impact of each flooding event varies greatly. The flooding incidents in Tarrant County range from costing a few hundred dollars up to millions of dollars. A flooding event in 2007 cost an estimated $2 million to Haltom City. This flood destroyed or majorly damaged 156 homes, including numerous manufactured homes. The floodwaters caused 1 death and 30 people were injured. Haltom City is not the only jurisdiction to be severely impacted by flooding in Tarrant County. On September 9, 2010, the remnants of Hurricane Hermine tracked across North Texas, dropping almost 7 inches of rain on Southlake in less than 24 hours. Southlake experienced 14 road closures during this time. The most severe road closure occurred at 3400 N. White Chapel, where a small creek flooded and washed the pavement off the bridge spanning the creek. The bridge was the only property affected during this incident. After being examined by an engineer, it was determined that the bridge was structurally sound and was re -paved and reopened within the week. This also impacted Colleyville, who shares the bridge as a transportation route. The City of Colleyville also experienced a flooding event in 2004. On July 28, 2004, a front came through the DFW area with up to 5 inches of rain. The rain caused the low water crossing to be closed because of the high water. Two cars got stuck in the crossings before they could be closed. The fire department had to go out to the scene and rescue the occupants of the cars. Flooding events in 2002 and 2007 impacted the City of Saginaw. Five different flooding events, two in 2002 and three in 2007, caused stormwater flooding, closed roadways, and damaged buildings. Attempting to deal with the overwhelmed stormwater and drainage system taxes the City's Public Works department, racking up overtime costs as well as equipment and repair costs. Schools and businesses were either closed or delayed, and first responders were taxed by the calls for help. The City of Watauga was fortunate to escape without any fatalities or injuries when floods impacted the City in 1990 and 2007. Heavy rains brought by severe thunderstorms damaged roadways and homes, causing an estimated $432,302 in costs for the city. The Town of Westlake is not prone to serious flooding but does have some areas that are of concern. The Town of Westlake is located near Turner Lake, located on Circle T Ranch. In heavy rains, Turner Lake commonly overflows the spillway, sending water downstream through Trophy Club and eventually to Lake Grapevine. The result of these issues is an almost 100 percent chance that the Town of Westlake will experience flash flooding in a given year. The City of Keller faced significant floods in 1935, 1942, 1949, 1957, 1962, 1964, and 1966. More recently, a flood in July 2004 caused damage to several homes along Big Bear Creek. A June 2007 flood caused damage to 20 homes along Big Bear Creek. To address these issues, drainage Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-15 Section 4 improvement projects were implemented, and Keller has identified other mitigation projects to decrease or eliminate flooding in the area. The Valley View Branch above Highway 10 in Hurst has a rich history of flooding. Localized flash flooding in the area in 2000 damaged several homes. Flooding occurred at a later date in which 10 apartments in a small apartment complex were damaged. As a result of these flooding events, Hurst removed a bridge to increase water flow in the channel and several homeowners in the area participated in the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program buyout program to return their lots to green space. Although the State of Texas did install a new bridge in this location, the Trinity Railway Express bridge was unable to be moved, which forced the State of Texas to keep constructed culverts under the bridge closed and caused flooding. The City of Arlington has experienced its fair share of flooding events. A flooding event occurred on July 29, 2004, when flooding resulted in 27 high water rescues, 12 streets closed, and 7 homes evacuated. One man drowned when his SUV was swept down Rush Creek by high water. Another flooding event in occurred in Arlington on September 8, 2010 when remnants of Tropical Storm Hermine caused widespread flooding, submerging many low-lying pockets under several feet of water. Firefighters had to use ladders and boats to reach stranded residents and over 20 roadways, including several arterial streets, were flooded and closed due to hazardous conditions. The flooding caused intermittent power outages, temporary road closures, evacuations, contaminated water supplies in some areas, and hazardous post flood conditions. Approximately 250 homes were flooded or left uninhabitable throughout the City. Fort Worth has also not been immune to flooding events. In early June 2000, very heavy rains of up to 11 inches fell in just a few hours over the far west side of Fort Worth. Flash flooding occurred along Farmer's Branch Creek. Streets, homes, and businesses were damaged by the floodwaters. The event resulted in a Small Business Administration Disaster Declaration. In late June 2004, significant flooding occurred in many parts of the City of Fort Worth following heavy rains. Homes, businesses, the zoo, and utilities were affected by the flooding. Some portions of Tarrant County received two separate "500 -Year" rain events. A local state of disaster was declared on June 9 and again on August 2 primarily due to widespread flooding. Following the 2004 storms, the City of Fort Worth created a Storm Water Management Utility as a division of the Transportation and Public Works Department. The Storm Water Management Utility has been very active in improving drainage through an aggressive program of system maintenance and capital projects. In May 2007, heavy rains caused flooding that damaged or destroyed several homes in Fort Worth. Parking lots were flooded and a creek was out of its banks near the intersection of Highways 121 and 360. Water was reported to be 8-10 inches deep on Interstate 20 near Hulen Mall in Fort Worth. Multiple vehicles were stalled in high water, and officials estimate about 50 people had to be rescued. The City of Fort Worth received the remnants of Tropical Storm Hermine in September 2010 as it moved through the western portions of North Central Texas dropping up to 12 inches of rain in some locations and producing 8 tornadoes. Significant flash flooding occurred during the late evening hours of September 7 through September 8. Numerous high water rescues and evacuations were conducted. Floodwaters damaged streets, homes, and businesses. This storm was also experienced in the City of Kennedale, where heavy rains flooded mobile homes and businesses. 4-16 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Bedford experienced flooding as a result of Tropical Storm Ike in 2010, causing $500,000 in structural damage. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport has experienced flooding on several occasions between 2006 and 2012 at Bear, Grapevine, and Hackberry Creek. Flash flooding caused road closures on each of these occasions. Information on these occurrences may be found in Table 4-6. There are no flooding events on record for the cities of Haslet, Lakeside or Westworth Village but there is still risk related to flooding, as identified in the vulnerability section of this hazard profile. The North Central Texas Council of Governments is located within the city of Arlington but has not experienced a flood at their facility. The table below lists the significant flooding events in Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions from 2000 to 2012. Table 4-6 Significant Floods Events in Tarrant County Flash GRAND PRAIRIE 2/22/2000 21:19 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 3/28/2000 19:15 CST Flood 2 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 4/11/2000 18:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash ARLINGTON 4/16/2000 1:05 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash WHITE SETTLEMENT 4/30/2000 22:15 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/3/2000 23:45 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash WHITE SETTLEMENT 6/3/2000 23:45 CST Flood 0 0 2.000M O.00K Flash BENBROOK 6/4/2000 2:50 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash MANSFIELD 6/4/2000 2:50 CST Flood 0 0 700.00K O.00K Flash CROWLEY 6/4/2000 4:50 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/4/2000 8:45 CST Flood 0 0 25.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/4/2000 12:10 CST Flood 0 0 100.00K O.00K Flash BLUE MOUND 6/11/2000 14:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/14/2000 20:12 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/14/2000 20:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 6/17/2000 13:10 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-17 Section 4 Flash AZLE 2/12/2001 10:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 2/15/2001 11:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 2/15/2001 11:30 CST Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 2/15/2001 19:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 2/27/2001 15:35 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 2/27/2001 16:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 3/11/2001 23:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash KELLER 5/6/2001 0:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash EULESS 7/1/2001 6:00 CST Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 7/1/2001 6:40 CST Flood 0 0 2.00K O.00K Flash ARLINGTON 7/1/2001 7:00 CST Flood 0 0 20.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 7/1/2001 7:00 CST Flood 0 0 300.00K O.00K Flash BENBROOK 7/1/2001 7:50 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash MANSFIELD 7/1/2001 8:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash MANSFIELD 8/31/2001 13:15 CST Flood 0 0 50.00K O.00K Flash GRAND PRAIRIE 8/31/2001 13:29 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 9/4/2001 15:50 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 9/18/2001 18:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 1/31/2002 1:54 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 1/31/2002 6:12 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash HALTOM CITY 3/19/2002 16:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 3/19/2002 16:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash EULESS 3/19/2002 17:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 3/20/2002 6:00 CST Flood 1 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 4/7/2002 13:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash HALTOM CITY 4/7/2002 16:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K 4-18 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 FT WORTH FT WORTH FT WORTH NORTH RICHLAND HILLS FT WORTH MANSFIELD FT WORTH FT WORTH FT WORTH PANTEGO COUNTYWIDE AZLE CROWLEY ARLINGTON ARLINGTON MANSFIELD FT WORTH ARLINGTON FT WORTH HALTOM CITY ARLINGTON ARLINGTON KELLER RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-19 Flash 5/5/2002 5:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 5/9/2002 22:20 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 10/18/2002 16:09 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 9/11/2003 13:05 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 9/11/2003 15:05 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 9/18/2003 18:47 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 9/18/2003 19:00 CST Flood 0 0 10.00K O.00K Flash 1/16/2004 19:40 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 4/30/2004 20:45 CST Flood 3 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 5/27/2004 18:44 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/2/2004 22:15 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/6/2004 22:42 CST Flood 0 0 1.00OM O.00K Flash 6/9/2004 7:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/9/2004 13:50 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/9/2004 17:10 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/15/2004 15:30 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/28/2004 9:36 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 6/28/2004 11:00 CST Flood 0 0 100.00K O.00K Flash 6/28/2004 13:44 CST Flood 0 0 10.00K O.00K Flash 6/29/2004 12:14 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 7/28/2004 17:33 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 7/28/2004 19:00 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 7/29/2004 4:00 CST Flood 1 0 15.00K O.00K Flash 7/29/2004 5:00 CST Flood 0 0 50.00K O.00K Flash 7/29/2004 5:55 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash 8/19/2004 5:45 CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-19 Section 4 FT WORTH COUNTYWIDE KELLER COUNTYWIDE RICHLAND HILLS FT WORTH ARLINGTON ARLINGTON SAGINAW HURST GRAPEVINE FT WORTH NORTH RICHLAND HILLS HALTOM CITY FT WORTH FT WORTH HALTOM CITY DFW AIRPORT LAKE WORTH AZLE AZLE 4-20 2015 8/19/2004 5:50 3/19/2006 12:53 5/5/2006 2:35 7/5/2006 16:00 9/11/2006 18:30 10/10/2006 7:00 12/29/2006 16:50 12/29/2006 19:02 1/12/2007 16:00 3/13/2007 15:20 3/30/2007 19:32 4/24/2007 13:50 5/212007 18:00 5/2/2007 18:15 5/7/2007 18:00 5/812007 3:15 5/24/2007 15:00 5/30/2007 9:30 5/30/2007 9:30 6/17/2007 23:11 6/2612007 18:50 6/2612007 16:12 6/26/2007 18:50 6/27/2007 18:25 6/30/2007 1:50 6/30/2007 2:00 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June Flash CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST Flood 0 0 300.00K O.00K Flash CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 1 0 250.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 70.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 10.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 1 0 30.000M O.00K CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 300.00K O.00K CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 10.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June SAGINAW ARLINGTON FT WORTH NORTH RICHLAND HILLS FT WORTH DFW AIRPORT BENBROOK ARLINGTON WATAUGA MANSFIELD FT WORTH BLUE MND AR RIVER OAKS MANSFIELD POLTECHNIEC DFW AIRPORT BENBROOK BLUE MOUND SAGINAW KELLER GREATER SW INTL ARPT HURST GRAPEVINE DFW AIRPORT 7/1/2007 15:00 7/2/2007 13:30 7/2/2007 16:10 7/3/2007 16:30 7/23/2007 18:02 7/23/2007 18:02 9/9/2007 14:34 4/17/2008 19:27 4/17/2008 19:30 4/17/2008 19:40 4/17/2008 19:45 6/25/2008 20:13 11/10/2008 19:39 11/10/2008 19:39 4/27/2009 6:36 5/2/2009 16:59 5/2/2009 16:59 6/10/2009 18:23 6/11/2009 2:00 6/11/2009 2:00 6/11/2009 2:30 6/11/2009 3:00 6/11/2009 9:50 6/11/2009 10:15 6/11/2009 10:24 6/11/2009 10:24 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-21 Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST -6 Flood 0 3 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 20.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 450.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 4.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 30.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 15.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 10.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 2.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 0.50K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K CST -6 Flood 0 0 LOOK O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 6.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 25.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 1.00K O.00K Flash CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-21 Section 4 HURST 7/26/2009 19:01 CST -6 Flood 0 0 8.00K O.00K Flash GRAND PRAIRIE 9/13/2009 3:39 CST -6 Flood 0 0 150.00K O.00K Flash DFW AIRPORT 9/13/2009 3:39 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash HODGE 10/21/2009 17:01 CST -6 Flood 0 0 15.00K O.00K NORTH RICHLAND Flash HILLS 10/21/2009 17:23 CST -6 Flood 0 0 0.25K O.00K Flash AZLE 10/25/2009 21:07 CST -6 Flood 0 0 5.00K O.00K Flash FOREST HILL 5/17/2010 16:45 CST -6 Flood 0 0 50.00K O.00K Flash EAGLE 9/8/2010 8:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 20.000M O.00K AZLE 9/8/2010 13:00 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K BEDFORD 9/8/2010 13:00 CST -6 Flood 0 0 500.00 K 250.00 K DFW AIRPORT 9/8/2010 13:00 CST -6 Flood 0 0 0.00 K 0.00 K KENNEDALE 9/8/2010 13:00 CST -6 Flood 0 0 0.00 K 0.00 K Flash WESTOVER HILLS 5/23/2011 9:50 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K EAGLE 1/25/2012 2:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 100.00K O.00K Flash RICHLAND HILLS 1/25/2012 6:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 30.00K O.00K Flash DFW AIRPORT 1/25/2012 6:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash KELLER 8/18/2012 17:09 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash KELLER 8/18/2012 17:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Flash FT WORTH 8/18/2012 18:10 CST -6 Flood 0 0 50.00K O.00K WESTLAND 8/18/2012 19:00 CST -6 Flood 1 0 O.00K O.00K DFW AIRPORT 8/18/2012 19:00 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 9/20/2013 6:30 CST -6 Flood 0 0 30.00K O.00K Flash HURST 10/26/2013 20:20 CST -6 Flood 0 0 50.00K O.00K FT WORTH BLUE MND Flash AR 10/26/2013 20:22 CST -6 Flood 0 0 O.00K O.00K Totals: 10 3 0 0 Although not every jurisdiction in Tarrant County is flooded every year, there is a 90% chance that Tarrant County or the participating jurisdictions will experience a flood event in any given 4-22 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT year. To better understand which areas are most vulnerable to flooding, Tarrant County works with the State of Texas and FEMA to map 100 -year and 500 -year flood zones in Tarrant County. Figure 4-5 shows Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions flood zones. Maps identifying flood zones and high hazard flooding areas for each jurisdiction may be found in Appendix E. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-23 Section 4 Figure 4-5 Tarrant Flood Zones Roanoke r ,Onys:luo Pecan Acres 'r'aY- ti til �i.a`� 5cuthlake .ii Grapevine t 1 Pe can N 114 .- s - Ps. branch r 0)!ley V,Ile 3R7 W'a-auca @FWAi n,�rt _. �i Saginav; Blue M3 -n,i 131 3 IL rth Richland ,1ilis B,-dford Euless La<cside 19� &3 ,<r'..c;rth Hti'*nm City Ric^la^d H - TDI. ,-som Pcrk i51 R ver C3, Tarrant Coalnty l�Vhitr' ;ti.,iemcllt ?gym Lerdry Hwy Team Lanc3r+ Hwy 11317 r 180 Ar ingtc i 80 ;. r"antego Spur 'Spur EPirn,t 4kY✓'J(.1alld5 Dal volthington I 303 3s7 d;ardens County 157 for , [s�nk]ror Rot"a1� nP�gan h- emoa4a4 M6'MY Edocciff u L F,re1, !AIII Kcrncda!e Is7 sTM Everl.,.. - � Sv I .i ieatl Mb.. 354 ,r ` 1187 C-Ovele, Rendr,r Burleson vI„nsrield ? 100 -YR (APPX) 500 -YR Assets Exposed to Hazard IN Property RiskNulnerability. Tarrant County has identified flood zones within the county. All properties within a floodplain have an increased chance of flooding. The vulnerability of these structures is very high, depending on the probability of that area flooding within a 10 - year or 100 -year period. Many of the assets previously exposed to flooding have been mitigated through the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) buyouts or by implementing infrastructure changes such as widening culverts to better direct floodwaters. 4-24 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. People living in and around identified floodplain areas are more vulnerable to a flooding incident than those who live/work out of floodplain areas, but these areas can still be affected depending on the severity of the flooding incident. There is a significant chance of a flooding incident occurring in any given year in Tarrant County. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high for a flooding incident should one occur. Most of the environmental risks would be access to water and the effects floodwater has on public water supply. Flooding can affect and create contamination of potable water for public consumption. The risk and vulnerability to flooding for each participating jurisdiction is detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Stadium Critical Asset Vulnerability worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of a flood. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Arlington. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Vulnerable Populations In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Azle. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-25 Section 4 ..e IIM Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Bedford. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Blue Mound. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Colleyville Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Colleyville. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Crowley. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of a flood. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the Vulnerable Populations airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during a flood incident. Should the airport be impacted by a flood, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts. Damage to fuel storage tanks could impact soil, and water systems. City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city facilities and public schools. 4-26 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Euless. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Forest Hill. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Fort Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Grapevine. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-27 Section 4 difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Haltom City. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. There are multiple train tracks and distribution centers located in the city. Hazardous materials Environmental Vulnerability spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in environmental impacts to the city of Haslet. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Hurst. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. # 4D City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Keller. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. jCity of Kennedale Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Kennedale. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Lake Worth 4-28 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Lake Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Lakeside. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. MW City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of a flood. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of North Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8% of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Saginaw Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-29 Section 4 ..e IIM The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Saginaw. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a Critical Asset Vulnerability flood. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Southlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to Tarrant County. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake Critical Asset Vulnerability The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at $300,000, 4-30 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Vulnerable Populations Environmental Vulnerability Critical Asset Vulnerability Vulnerable Populations Environmental Vulnerability Vulnerability RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in environmental impacts to the Town of Westlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of a flood. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below the poverty line. While a flood poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of a flood threat or relocate after a flood has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by a flood could result in environmental impacts to the city of Westworth Village. Such impacts could include contamination of soil and water systems. The following chart provides the potential impact of flooding for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should flooding impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Flooding 44 CFR Requirement 201.6 (c)(2)(ii) The risk assessment must also address National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) insured structures that have been repetitively damaged by floods. Likely 3-6 Hours" Community -wide Major *For the purposes of the hazard Flooding, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term "warning". **The warning time for flash flooding likely will be minimal to zero. Multijurisdictional Concerns Previous mitigation measures have occurred at the local and county level, some of which were identified in the hazard identification section of this hazard profile. Tarrant County participates in the NFIP of the FEMA. As a participating community, Tarrant County has adopted floodplain management practices through several ordinances that severely limit the development allowed in 100 -year floodplains (the area inundated by a storm that has a 1 percent chance of happening in any year). Tarrant County prohibits new construction within the regulatory flood protection Tarrant county Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-31 Section 4 elevation. No structures are permitted within the floodway. In the flood fringe district, only structures that are a minimum of 1 foot above the regulatory flood protection elevation are permitted. To provide a sense of the flood risk in a community, it is also beneficial to summarize the policies in force and claims statistics from the NFIP. The U.S. Congress established the NFIP with the passage of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The NFIP is a federal program enabling property owners in participating communities to purchase insurance as a protection against flood losses in exchange for state and community floodplain management regulations that reduce future flood damages. Participation in the NFIP is based on an agreement between communities and the federal government. If a community adopts and enforces a floodplain management ordinance to reduce future flood risk to new construction in floodplains, the federal government will make flood insurance available within the community as a financial protection against flood losses. Tarrant County has been a member of the NFIP since 1974. All eligible participating jurisdictions participate in the NFIP. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and the NCTCOG are not eligible and therefore do not participate. They actively work with other jurisdictions to ensure awareness of floodplain issues and compliance programs. The table below identifies the Community Identification number and map dates for each eligible participating jurisdiction. Table 4-7 Tarrant County Communities Participating in the NFIP 485454 Arlington, City of Tarrant County 480584 Azle, City of Parker County/Tarrant # County 480585 Bedford, City of Tarrant County 480587 Blue Mound, City of Tarrant County 480590 Colleyville, City of Tarrant County 480591 Crowley, City of Tarrant County 480593 Euless, City of Tarrant County 480595 Forest Hill, City of Tarrant County 480596 Fort Worth, City of Denton County/Tarrant # County 480598 Grapevine, City of Denton County/ Dallas # County/ Tarrant County 480599 Haltom City, City of Tarrant County 8/7/1970 12/31/1974 9/25/2009 3/8/1974 10/15/1985 9/25/2009 12/28/1973 7/18/1977 9/25/2009 12/17/1973 7/16/1980 9/25/2009 5/10/1974 12/1/1982 9/25/2009 5/15/1979 4/15/1981 9/25/2009 3/22/1974 4/3/1985 9/25/2009 1/23/1974 8/1/1978 9/25/2009 9/17/1971 6/4/1980 4/18/2011 06/28/1974 11/17/1982 04/18/2011 6/28/1974 2/1/1978 9/25/2009 4-32 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT 480600 Haslet, City of Denton County/Tarrant 11/1/1974 10/15/1985 (NSFHA) # County 480601 Hurst, City of Tarrant County 6/14/1974 10/15/1985 9/25/2009 480602 Keller, City of Tarrant County 11/19/1976 9/30/1982 9/25/2009 480603 Kennedale, City of Tarrant County 2/1/1974 11/15/1984 9/25/2009 480605 Lake Worth, City of Tarrant County 11/19/1976 1/6/1993 9/25/2009 480604 Lakeside, Town of Tarrant County 4/13/1973 8/23/2000 (NSFHA) 480607 North Richland Hills, City of Tarrant County 6/28/1974 4/1/1981 9/25/2009 480608 Richland Hills, City of Tarrant County 3/15/1974 2/16/1977 9/25/2009 480610 Saginaw, City of Tarrant County 3/8/1974 9/17/1980 9/25/2009 480612 Southlake, City of Denton County/Tarrant 2/15/1974 7/5/1982 4/18/2011 # County 480582 Tarrant County Tarrant County 2/7/1975 8/4/1987 9/25/2009 480613 Watauga, City of Tarrant County 3/8/1974 6/1/1982 9/25/2009 480614 Westlake, Town of Denton County/Tarrant 12/10/1976 6/2/1993 4/18/2011 480616 Westworth Village, City of Tarrant County 3/8/1974 6/3/1986 9/25/2009 Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions are actively involved in ensuring compliance with the NFIP program. As a result, they manage and provide floodplain management programs to provide awareness to their citizens as well as mitigate against future flooding. The table below lists the programs currently in progress and planned for each participating jurisdiction for compliance in the NFIP program. Table 4-8 NFIP Compliance Activities Conducting NFIP community workshops to provide information and incentives for property owners to acquire flood insurance Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation Arlington certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains The Storm Water Department frequently goes into the community to educate citizens about and the benefits of flood insurance. The Storm Water Division, part of Public Works and Transportation, is responsible for issuing floodplain permits. The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-33 Section 4 Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation Implementing damage reduction measures for The Engineering Department is responsible for existing buildings such as acquisition, issuing floodplain permits. relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of 85 properties were acquired in 2010 through the drainage ways and retention basins HMGP program. Taking action to minimize the effects of issuing floodplain permits. flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation Improved the drainage system around home that planning Created a public education campaign for citizens. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation Placed a high water warning system in the creek that certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing buildings floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June certificates for all new and improved buildings The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing Azle located in floodplains floodplain permits. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation Storm water management policy and public outreach planning of storm water. The Public Works Department's Flood Plain Administrator is responsible for issuing floodplain Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation permits after review of: (1) LOMR's approved by certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM FEMA, and (2) elevation certificates prepared by buildings registered surveyors. The Public Works Department's Flood Plain Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation Administrator is responsible for issuing floodplain certificates for all new and improved buildings permits after elevation certificates have been Bedford located in floodplains prepared by registered surveyors. Implementing damage reduction measures for Seven properties were acquired in 2012 through the existing buildings such as acquisition, HMGP program. Public Works Department provides relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of an ongoing program of maintenance of drainage drainage ways and retention basins channels and storm drainage systems. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood Flood warning, emergency response, and warning, emergency response, and evacuation evacuation planning are all implemented through planning City's website and emergency phone notifications. Blue Mound Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Engineering Department is responsible for buildings issuing floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings The Engineering Department is responsible for located in floodplains issuing floodplain permits. Colleyville Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of Improved the drainage system around home that drainage ways and retention basins have flooded. Taking action to minimize the effects of Placed a high water warning system in the creek that flooding on people, property, and building floods our roads. Updated codes to require retention contents through measures including flood ponds in new development/ 4-34 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Crowley DFW Euless Forest Hill Fort Worth RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning The Building Official is responsible for issuing floodplain permits. The Building Official is responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins. Installation of retention basins on new construction. Flood warning by way of existing public notification systems, emergency response, and evacuation planning. DFW is not eligible to participate in the NFIP program Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Building Department is responsible for issuing buildings floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings The Building Department is responsible for issuing located in floodplains floodplain permits. Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, Ac relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of flo drainage ways and retention basins con Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building quired 1 property in 2003 to remove from the odplain. Maintenance of drainage ways is ducted regularly. contents through measures including flood Areas are monitored during flooding conditions and warning, emergency response, and evacuation citizens notified through our automatic phone system planning if and when necessary. Conducting NFIP community workshops to provide information and incentives for property owners to acquire flood insurance Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood City Floodplain Administrator provides insurance information to all residents annually by direct mail. Also sends annual letters to all properties in Repetitive Loss Areas and to Repetitive Loss Structures. Also works with NFIP outreach staff to host and conduct periodic flood insurance workshops for lenders and insurance agents. City Floodplain Administrator maintains copies of all elevation certificates available for pre -FIRM and post -FIRM structures. City Floodplain Administrator maintains copies of all new and improved buildings located in floodplains. Purchased 163 properties in the floodplain with City funds, and 12 properties in the floodplain with FEMA grant funds. High Water Warning System is deployed at 53 roadway crossings prone to overtopping during Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-35 Section 4 warning, emergency response, and evacuation storm events. City is presently evaluating an active planning Flood Early Warning System. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing buildings floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing located in floodplains floodplain permits. Implementing damage reduction measures for Grapevine existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of Acquired 3 properties in 2012 through the HMGP drainage ways and retention basins program. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Rain gauge warning system in place. Conducting NFIP community workshops to provide information and incentives for property Community outreach through our City Cross roads owners to acquire flood insurance publications. Flood plain awareness campaigns. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Planning & Development Department is buildings responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings The Public Works Department is responsible for Haltom City located in floodplains issuing floodplain permits. Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of Acquired multiple properties in 2010 & 2011 through drainage ways and retention basins the HMGP program. Taking action to minimize the effects of Made efforts to identify areas within our city where flooding on people, property, and building the potential for ponding and areas that may be contents through measures including flood prone to flash flooding. These areas do receive warning, emergency response, and evacuation some early response to warn the public of the planning potential of flooding. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM floodplain permits. Haslet buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation The Land Use Department is responsible for issuing certificates for all new and improved buildings floodplain permits. located in floodplains Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, Hurst relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning 4-36 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT NCTCOG NCTCOG is not eligible for participation in the NFIP program. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation North Richland Hills certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM Public Works is responsible for issuing floodplain buildings permits. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-37 Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM Elevation certificates records are on file for buildings properties with the City. No new construction is allowed in a FEMA Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation designated SFHA. Improved buildings within a SFHA certificates for all new and improved buildings are required to be in compliance with the City's Flood located in floodplains plain ordinance. Keller Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Conducted (Drainage Improvements) Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Low Water Crossing Signs are in place. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation Floodplain certificate required if in floodplain. certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation Floodplain certificate required if in floodplain. certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains Implementing damage reduction measures for Maintenance is ongoing for existing buildings within Kennedale existing buildings such as acquisition, Kennedale. relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Taking action to minimize the effects of Flood warning and emergency notifications are flooding on people, property, and building made through the City of Kennedale's emergency contents through measures including flood notification system. warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM In 2009, City of Lake Worth Ord #920 adopted the buildings FEMA Standards to Flood Damage Prevention. Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, Lake Worth relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of City acquired multiple properties in the flood plain drainage ways and retention basins several years ago. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building Monitored by FD/PD/PW and appropriate actions are contents through measures including flood taken to mitigate and respond to flooding events. warning, emergency response, and evacuation Telephonic alert system in place to assist in warning planning the public. Lakeside participates in programs managed by Tarrant County. Please see Tarrant County information Lakeside for details on NFIP compliance programs. NCTCOG NCTCOG is not eligible for participation in the NFIP program. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation North Richland Hills certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM Public Works is responsible for issuing floodplain buildings permits. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-37 Section 4 nw.. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings Public Works is responsible for issuing floodplain located in floodplains permits. Conducting NFIP community workshops to Information is provided on city's website. Questions provide information and incentives for property are answered by City's Engineer in Public Works owners to acquire flood insurance who maintains log of inquiries and questions. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation Richland Hills Public Works/City Engineer is certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Issued buildings with change of ownership. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings Richland Hills Public Works I City Engineer t is Richland Hills located in floodplains responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of Acquired 1 property in 2012 through the HMGP drainage ways and retention basins program. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building With the levee system in place in Richland Hills a contents through measures including flood pump fail I loss warning system has been installed to warning, emergency response, and evacuation notify personnel if pumps fail signaling potential planning flooding. Saginaw participates in programs managed by Saginaw Tarrant County. Please see Tarrant County information for details on NFIP compliance programs. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM For structures on lots in floodplain buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation We do not allow construction within floodplain; certificates for all new and improved buildings E.G. if a portion of the lot is in the floodplain. Southlake located in floodplains Areas that have a history of flooding are well known Taking action to minimize the effects of and documented. The Comprehensive Emergency flooding on people, property, and building Management Plan accounts for the warning, contents through measures including flood response, and evacuation functions that would be warning, emergency response, and evacuation utilized during a response to any hazard, including a planning flooding event. Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM The Tarrant County Transportation Department is buildings responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings The Tarrant County Transportation Department is located in floodplains responsible for issuing floodplain permits. Implementing damage reduction measures for Tarrant County existing buildings such as acquisition, Acquired 1 property in 2007 through the HMGP relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of program and 1 property in 2012 through the LPDM drainage ways and retention basins program. Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Rain gauge warning system in place. 4-38 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Implementing damage reduction measures for existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Watauga Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings located in floodplains Implementing damage reduction measures for Westlake existing buildings such as acquisition, relocation, retrofitting, and maintenance of drainage ways and retention basins Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Completing and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for pre -FIRM and or post -FIRM buildings Requiring and maintaining FEMA elevation certificates for all new and improved buildings Westworth Village located in floodplains Taking action to minimize the effects of flooding on people, property, and building contents through measures including flood warning, emergency response, and evacuation planning Maintain flood channel Rain gauge warning system in place. Town Engineer Contracted Town Engineer. Acquired 3 properties in 2012 through the HMGP program. Accomplished via close monitoring of watershed and groundwater flow/ Overflow conditions. The Code Compliance Department is responsible for issuing & reviewing floodplain permits. The Code Compliance Department is responsible for issuing & reviewing floodplain permits. Our Public Works & Police Departments monitor area creeks and roads to ensure barricade, flow issue, and evacuations are made as needed. Participation in the NFIP implies a level of floodplain compliance and enforcement as well. The following table details each NFIP participating community's floodplain activities. Stormwater Executive Arlington Manager, Department of Public Works & Transportation Azle Storm Water Manager Bedford has a contacted Bedford Flood Manager - Dick Perkins - (dick.perkins()sbcglobal.net) Flood Damage Prevention, Ordinance No. 10-011 Stormwater 821-01-02 Ordinances Chapter 62 Sections 62-1 thru 62-30 The City of Arlington uses permitting processes, fines and legal suits to enforce floodplain ordinances. Voluntary correction, fines or fees Through - Variances, Fines, Fee's Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-39 Section 4 Blue Mound Colleyville Crowley DFW Euless Forest Hill Fort Worth Grapevine Haltom City Haslet Hurst Keller Kennedale 4-40 2015 Blue Mound does not have a There are no floodplain floodplain manager ordinances in place. City Engineer Building Official List the position that acts as Floodplain Manager. Civil Engineer Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance, Chapter 50 of the Code of Ordinances 082009-97 Our floodplain manager coordinates all floodplain issues with the local jurisdiction that coincides with the given area of the Airport. Chapter 38 of Euless Municipal Ordinances There are no floodplain ordinances to enforce. Regulated through permitting, building inspections and code enforcement Permits and Fees All ordinances, including enforcement, from Coppel, Euless, Grapevine and Irving remain in place and are enforced by those organizations. Fines Public Works Engineer City Engineer Public Works Director City Engineer Public Works Director Building Inspector is a State Certified Floodplain Manager Grapevine Code of Ordinances ARTICLE X. - FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION, Section 7 Chapter 38 - FLOOD PROTECTION AND PREVENTION of the Haltom City Code of Ordinances Section 11 - 210 Flood Plain District, Permit Fee 3.02.004 Ordinances Numbers -1086, 1183, 1274, 1499, 2058 (current) Flood Hazard Prevention Ordinance (2009) Ord. No. 230, § 1, 0311412002 Fees and Fines Regulated through permitting, building inspections and code enforcement Floodplain development fee is $500. Building Permits are required and projects are reviewed before permits are issued to ensure compliance. A violation of this ordinance is subject to assessment of civil penalties between $100 to $2,000 per day the offense continues. No permit issuance if application in conflict with ordinance; Stop Orders; Ordinance Violation Citation;Fine up to $2,000 per ordinance violation offense Application for new development won't be approved without assessment of impact fees pursuant to this article, and no water and wastewater tap shall be issued and no building permit shall be issued unless the applicant or builder has paid the impact fees calculated and imposed hereunder. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June No permit issuance if application in Flood Hazard Prevention conflict with ordinance; Stop Orders; Public Works Director Ordinance Ordinance Violation Citation; Fine up to $2,000 per ordinance violation offense City of Fort Worth Floodplain #18816-09-2009 Floodplain Building permitting requirements, Manager Provisions Ordinance Chapter 7 Code Compliance personnel, fees Articles VIII and fines, boards and commissions. Public Works Engineer City Engineer Public Works Director City Engineer Public Works Director Building Inspector is a State Certified Floodplain Manager Grapevine Code of Ordinances ARTICLE X. - FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION, Section 7 Chapter 38 - FLOOD PROTECTION AND PREVENTION of the Haltom City Code of Ordinances Section 11 - 210 Flood Plain District, Permit Fee 3.02.004 Ordinances Numbers -1086, 1183, 1274, 1499, 2058 (current) Flood Hazard Prevention Ordinance (2009) Ord. No. 230, § 1, 0311412002 Fees and Fines Regulated through permitting, building inspections and code enforcement Floodplain development fee is $500. Building Permits are required and projects are reviewed before permits are issued to ensure compliance. A violation of this ordinance is subject to assessment of civil penalties between $100 to $2,000 per day the offense continues. No permit issuance if application in conflict with ordinance; Stop Orders; Ordinance Violation Citation;Fine up to $2,000 per ordinance violation offense Application for new development won't be approved without assessment of impact fees pursuant to this article, and no water and wastewater tap shall be issued and no building permit shall be issued unless the applicant or builder has paid the impact fees calculated and imposed hereunder. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Jurisdiction Floodplain Manager Floodplain ordinances �Iooclplain 41rainance Lake Worth City Manager Ordinance 920 adopted Fine structure is listed in Ordinance 7/14/2009 920. Lakeside Town Administrator Ordinance 302 Fine: $2,000 for each violation plus court costs. North Richland Chapter 102- Floods and Regulated through permitting, Hills City Engineer Stormwater Management, Article building inspections and code 11- Flood Damage Prevention enforcement Per City Ordinance the City Manager or their designee is Richland Hills Code of Flood prevention is enforced the Floodplain Administrator. Ordinances, Chapter 42 - through the use of ordinances, Richland Hills The City Manager has Floods, Article 11. Flood Damage permit fees and plan reviews, and assigned the position of Prevention, Sections 42-31 thru fines assigned by City Judge if Floodplain Manager to the 42.110 necessary City Engineer. Issuance of permits for work approved after review and no Economic Flood Damage Prevention issuance of permits not meeting or Saginaw Development/Public Works Ordinance 2009-09. Article 1 in direct conflict of codes, ordinances and/or safety Director in coordination with Chapter 38 of City Code of requirements. Issuance of Stop the City Engineer Ordinances. Orders and citations. Fines of $200 to $2000 per ordinance violation, per day. The ordinance allows for fines, Southlake Civil Engineer/ Floodplain Ordinance 641-A however, we typically do not assess Manager fines. We work with the property owner to mitigation any violations. Tarrant County participates in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) through Court Order #: 111021, was approved by Commissioners Court on 8/23/2011. This allows our County Engineer, in coordination with the District Attorney, to enforce flood plain regulations as set forth in the CFR 44, parts 59- 78. Continued compliance is difficult with our lack of authority Tarrant County County Engineer I to impose building codes and/or Floodplain Administrator zoning in the unincorporated areas of Tarrant County. Despite our ability to enforce building codes, etc., we do have several mechanisms in place which triggers checks by the County Engineer to ensure development within the unincorporated areas are done so according to not only our Court Order and the CFR 44, but also according to best management practices within the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-41 Section 4 Watauga Public Works Director - Keith Miertschin 4-42 2015 16 county COG regions. Driveway permits, septic tank permits, platting, fire code inspections are a few of the items which trigger further investigation to ensure development is properly permitted and constructed. In addition, any infrastructure work that occurs within the unincorporated areas are signed and sealed by the County Engineer and as part of the requirements set forth by the Court Order and CFR 44, designs are done according to those standards as well. City of Watauga Code of Ordinances; Subpart B - Land Development; Chapter 105 Enviormental Protection; Sec. 105-25. - Enforcement. Suspension or revocation of permit; issuance of citation. In the event that any person holding a site development permit pursuant to this article violates the terms of the permit or implements site development in such a manner as to have a materially adverse effect on the health, welfare, or safety of persons residing or working in the neighborhood or development site so as to be materially detrimental to the public welfare or injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood, the city may suspend or revoke the site development permit or issue citations for violations. Violations; penalty. No person shall construct, enlarge, alter, repair, or maintain any grading, excavation, or fill, or cause the same to be done, contrary to or in violation of any terms of this article. Any person, partnership or corporation violating any of the provisions of this article shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and each day during which any violation of any of the provisions of this article is committed, continued, or permitted shall constitute a separate offense. Upon conviction of any such violation, such person, partnership, or corporation shall be punished by Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June Westlake Graham Associates Westworth Mayor or Mayor's Designee Village RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Article Il: Floodplain Article 3.06 FLOOD HAZARD PREVENTION 3.06.001 to 3.06.075 Tarrant County Repetitive Loss Information a fine in accordance with the general penalty provision in section 1-7. In addition to any other penalty authorized by this section, any person, partnership, or corporation convicted of violating any of the provisions of this article shall be required to bear the expense of such restoration. Procedures are in place to penalize those without proper permits: Westlake Ordinances 42-37 Included as part of the Ordinances, Class C MISD, fines not to exceed $2000 per incident per day Repetitive loss properties are a serious concern from a mitigation standpoint. A repetitive loss property is considered so when there are two or more flood insurance claims that were paid more than $1,000 for each loss. The losses must be within 10 years of each other and must be at least 10 days apart. A property is considered a severe repetitive loss property when there are at least four losses (each exceeding $5,000), or when there are two or more losses where the building payments exceed the property value. Tarrant county Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-43 Section 4 Table 4-9 Repetitive Loss Properties in Tarrant County and Participating Jurisdictions Arlington Single Family C Arlington Single Family A04 Arlington Resident X Arlington Non -Resident A04 Arlington Non -Resident X Arlington Single Family B Arlington Non -Resident X Arlington Non -Resident AE Arlington Resident X Arlington Non -Resident AE Arlington Non -Resident AE Arlington Resident X Arlington Resident AE Arlington Single Family X Arlington Resident AE Arlington Non -Resident X Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Assmd Condo X Arlington Non -Resident AE Arlington Other Resident AE Arlington 2-4 Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE 4-44 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Arlington Single Family AE Arlington 2-4 Family AE Arlington 2-4 Family AE Arlington 2-4 Family AE Arlington 2-4 Family AE Arlington Resident X Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family C Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family A Arlington 2-4 Family C Arlington Resident B Arlington Resident A Arlington Non -Resident B Arlington Single Family C Arlington Single Family C Arlington Non -Resident B Arlington Non -Resident B Arlington Non -Resident B Arlington Resident X Arlington Non -Resident B Arlington Resident X Arlington Single Family X Arlington Resident C Arlington Resident AE Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-45 Section 4 Arlington Resident AE Arlington Resident AE Arlington Single Family x Arlington Single Family X Arlington Non -Resident A06 Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family A06 Arlington Resident X Arlington Single Family AE (Floodway) Arlington Resident AE Arlington Resident X Arlington Resident AE Arlington Single Family AE (Floodway) Arlington Resident C Arlington Resident A Arlington Single Family C 4-46 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Arlington Single Family x Arlington Resident X Arlington Single Family A04 Arlington Single Family AE Arlington Single Family X Arlington Single Family C Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Azle Residential Zone A No base flood elevation Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Azle Residential Unincorporated County area Bedford Residential Zone X Bedford Residential Zone X, AE Bedford Residential No Flood Zone Bedford Residential Zone X Bedford Residential Zone X Colleyville Residential 500 year Colleyville Residential Floodway Colleyville Residential 100 year Colleyville Residential 100 year Colleyville Residential Floodway Crowley Unknown Unincorporated Tarrant County Crowley Unknown Unincorporated Tarrant County Euless Residential AE Euless Residential NIA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-47 Section 4 Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Euless Residential AE Fort Worth RESIDENTIAL X (UNSHADED) Fort Worth RESIDENTIAL X (UNSHADED) Haltom City Commercial AE (riverine) Haltom City Commercial AE (riverine) Haltom City Commercial AE (riverine) Haltom City Residential AE Haltom City Residential AE Haltom City Residential AE Haltom City Residential AE Haltom City Residential A Haltom City Residential A Haltom City Residential X Haltom City Commercial X Haltom City Commercial AE (riverine) 4-48 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT I J'�* tMebaelludl' Commercial, Industrial) I Location in Flood Plain (Floodway, SFHA, 500 year) Haltom City Commercial AE (riverine) Haltom City Commercial AE Floodway in drainage ditch across west side of lot; house in Hurst Residential SFHA Hurst Residential Lot and House in SFHA Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Hurst Residential Floodway in drainage ditch across west side of lot; house in SFHA Hurst Residential Floodway in drainage ditch across west side of lot; house in SFHA Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Hurst Residential Small portion o lot in SFHA; House not in SFHA. Hurst FEMA Buyout 2000 N/A - no structures - Keller Residential Zone AE Keller Residential Zone AE Keller Residential Shaded Zone X Keller Residential Zone X Kennedale Residential Zone X Kennedale Residential AE North Richland Hills Residential Zone X North Richland Hills Residential AE North Richland Hills Residential AE North Richland Hills Residential Zone X North Richland Hills Residential Zone X North Richland Hills Residential Zone X North Richland Hills Commercial AE / Floodway North Richland Hills Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-49 Section 4 Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Richland Hills Saginaw Uninc. Unincorporated Tarrant County Unincorporated Tarrant County Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga Watauga 4-50 2015 Residential Park Land (previous residential) Park Land (previous residential) Park Land (previous residential) Park Land (previous residential) Park Land (previous residential) Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Park Land (previous residential) Commercial - Government Bldg. Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Residential Floodway SFHA / Floodway SFHA / Floodway SFHA / Floodway SFHA / Floodway SFHA / Floodway SFHA Floodway Floodway Floodway Floodway SFHA SFHA SFHA / Floodway Floodway AE (pool el) AE AE SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA SFHA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Watauga Residential SFHA Watauga Residential SFHA Watauga Residential SFHA Watauga Residential SFHA Watauga Residential SFHA The City of Arlington calculated potential losses based on the HAZUS model for flooding. The flood model was run using two scenarios: the 100 -year and 500 -year recurrence intervals. The potential damages of these storm events for the city are shown in the table below. Table 4-10 Potential Losses from Flooding People Displaced 4,319 5,102 Housing Units 1,080 1,328 Residential $145.3 million $182.8 million Commercial $26.2 million $34.0 million Other Facility $11.5 million $15.6 million Total $183.0 million $232.4 million Land Use and Development Trends Portions of the Tarrant County Subdivision Regulations and Land Use Regulations regulate not only how land in designated floodplain areas may be used or altered, but the location and types of structures that are permitted in those areas. There are no zoning requirements in the unincorporated areas of Tarrant County. Floodplain maps for Tarrant County and its jurisdictions have undergone the update process in recent years. The current effective map date for each jurisdiction may be found above in Table 4- 7. Hazard Summary The risk for flooding in Tarrant County is moderate, due largely in part to previous mitigation measures. The Tarrant County LMAPC recognized the dangers posed by flooding and has identified specific mitigation actions that have been taken and would be considered in the future. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-51 Section 4 4.1.3 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds Hazard Definition Severe thunderstorms include thunderstorms and winds associated with the thunderstorms. Thunderstorm winds are generally short in duration, involving straight-line winds and/or gusts in excess of 50 mph. Thunderstorm winds tend to affect areas of Tarrant County with significant tree stands as well as areas with exposed property and infrastructure and aboveground utilities. Thunderstorm winds can cause power outages, transportation and economic disruptions, and significant property damage, and pose a high risk for injuries and loss of life. Thunderstorm winds are measured according to the Beaufort Wind Scale, provided below. Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions can expect winds from the lower range of the wind scale to a force of 12 or wind speeds over 71 knots. Table 4-11 Beaufort Wind Scale" Sea like a mirror. 0 0-1 0-1 Calm Calm; smoke rises vertically. Ripples with the appearance of scales are formed, but 1 1-3 1-3 Light Air without foam crests. Direction of wind shown by smoke drift, but not by wind vanes. Small wavelets, still short, but more pronounced. Crests 2 4-7 4-6 Light Breeze have a glassy appearance and do not break. Wind felt on face; leaves rustle; ordinary vanes moved by wind. Large wavelets. Crests begin to break. Foam of glassy 3 8-12 7-10 Gentle Breeze appearance. Perhaps scattered white horses. Leaves and small twigs in constant motion; wind extends light flag. Small waves, becoming larger; fairly frequent white 4 13-18 11-16 Moderate horses. Breeze Raises dust and loose paper; small branches are moved. Moderate waves, taking a more pronounced long form; 5 19-24 17-21 Fresh Breeze many white horses are formed. Small trees in leaf begin to sway; crested wavelets form on inland waters. Large waves begin to form; the white foam crests are 6 25-31 22-27 Strong Breeze more extensive everywhere. Large branches in motion; whistling heard in telegraph wires; umbrellas used with difficulty. " Source: National Weather Service, http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ 4-52 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Sea heaps up and white foam from breaking waves begins to be blown in streaks along the direction of the 7 32-38 28-33 Near Gale wind. Whole trees in motion; inconvenience felt when walking against the wind. Moderately high waves of greater length; edges of crests begin to break into spindrift. The foam is blown in well - 8 39-46 34-40 Gale marked streaks along the direction of the wind. Breaks twigs off trees; generally impedes progress. High waves. Dense streaks of foam along the direction of the wind. Crests of waves begin to topple, tumble and roll 9 47-54 41-47 Severe Gale over. Spray may affect visibility Slight structural damage occurs (chimney pots and slates removed) Very high waves with long overhanging crests. The resulting foam, in great patches, is blown in dense white streaks along the direction of the wind. On the whole, the 10 55-63 48-55 Storm surface of the sea takes on a white appearance. The tumbling of the sea becomes heavy and shock -like. Visibility affected. Seldom experienced inland; trees uprooted; considerable structural damage occurs. Exceptionally high waves (small and medium-size ships might be for a time lost to view behind the waves). The sea is completely covered with long white patches of 11 64-72 56-63 Violent Storm foam lying along the direction of the wind. Everywhere the edges of the wave crests are blown into froth. Visibility affected. Very rarely experienced; accompanied by widespread damage. The air is filled with foam and spray. Sea completely 12 72-83 64-71 Hurricane white with driving spray; visibility very seriously affected. See Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Hazard Identification The most prevalent natural hazard event occurring in Tarrant County is severe thunderstorms and the winds from these thunderstorms. During the spring and summer months, Tarrant County typically experiences multiple thunderstorms, some with significant winds. Over the past 50 years, 306 severe thunderstorm or high wind events occurred within Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions. A review of historical weather data indicates there is a very significant chance of severe summer thunderstorm winds affecting Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions each year. Severe summer thunderstorm winds occur more frequently than any other natural hazard incident within Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions. Several severe thunderstorms of note have occurred in Tarrant County. The City of Colleyville reported a storm on June 2, 2004 with 70 mph winds, which knocked down fencing and caused power outages throughout the City. A severe thunderstorm in June 206 knocked down several Tarrant county Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-53 Section 4 large tree branches near the intersection of State Highway 114 and FM 1709 in Southlake, causing traffic issues. A high wind event, or derecho, struck North Texas during the evening hours of May 2, 2007. Damaging winds marched across much of North Texas, with several reports of 80 mph winds from the Metroplex eastward and recorded wind speed in Arlington was 60 mph. In Arlington, over 23,000 people lost power as power lines succumbed to the fierce winds. Numerous trees were downed, roofs and metal buildings sustained damage, and several trailers were rolled. A small line of thunderstorms, oriented west to east, developed out ahead of the thunderstorm complex approaching Dallas/Arlington/Fort Worth. These small thunderstorms quickly became mini -super cells, or rotating storms capable of producing tornadoes. Several reports of funnel clouds as well as a few reports of brief, weak tornadoes were reported near Cleburne and in northern portions of the Tarrant County. However, no damage was reported with these tornadoes. Straight-line winds caused damage in the City of Hurst on April 10, 2008. City parks, residences, and many trees were damaged and some homes lost power for up to two weeks. To mitigate further damage, the City of Hurst hired a private utility to trim trees in power line right of ways. Within the City of Euless, 79 structures were damaged due to the straight-line winds. A major wind event occurred in Southlake in June 2009, downing tree limbs and causing power outages. The Streets Department responded to over 20 calls for down tree limbs and power was lost to 7 of Southlake's 13 sewage lift stations. The City of Grapevine reported $75,000 in damage from high winds blowing tractor trailers off highways and power outages that lasted up to 9 days. The same storm severely impacted the City of Fort Worth as the Fort Worth Fire Department responded to a total of 7 structure fires resulting from the storm and costing approximately $1 million in damage. A 2011 severe thunderstorm caused strong winds, hail, and possible tornado damage to homes in the City of Watauga. This same storm produced damaging hail and heavy rainfall that localized flooding in the City of Fort Worth. The economic impact to the City of Fort Worth for the two- day storm was approximately $350,000; the most costly day being May 24, 2011 with $200,000 in damage on that day alone. Tarrant County records show that since 1996 alone, damage from high winds and severe thunderstorms has cost Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions approximately $60,000,000. A list of high -wind events that have impacted participating jurisdictions since 2005 is provided in the table below. Table 4-12 Severe Thunderstorm and High Winds12 15:1 Thunderstor MANSFIELD 4/25/2005 5 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 10.00K O.00K 12:1 Thunderstor FT WORTH 6/1/2005 9 CST m Wind 52 kts. MS 0 0 O.00K O.00K 12 Source: National Climatic Data Center: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html 4-54 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT 12:2 Thunderstor KELLER 6/1/2005 2 CST m Wind 58 kts. MS 0 0 O.00K O.00K Thunderstor KELLER 7/7/2005 8:45 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 5.00K O.00K 12:5 Thunderstor FT WORTH 8/5/2005 0 CST m Wind 52 kts. ES 0 0 20.00K O.00K 13:4 Thunderstor FT WORTH 8/5/2005 5 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 3.00K O.00K 16:5 Thunderstor ARLINGTON 8/6/2005 0 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 3.00K O.00K TARRANT 14:0 (ZONE) 2/16/2006 0 CST Strong Wind 40 kts. ES 0 0 1.00K O.00K TARRANT 17:0 ZONE 4/7/2006 0 CST Strong Wind 44 kts. MS 0 0 20.00K O.00K 23:4 Thunderstor KELLER 4/19/2006 2 CST m Wind 67 kts. MS 0 0 10.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 5/3/2006 1:55 CST High Wind 60 kts. ES 0 0 200.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 5/3/2006 1:57 CST High Wind 60 kts. MS 0 0 O.00K O.00K Thunderstor BENBROOK 5/5/2006 2:10 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 O.00K O.00K 15:2 Thunderstor COUNTYWIDE 7/5/2006 5 CST m Wind 52 kts. ES 0 0 20.00K O.00K 17:1 Thunderstor SOUTHLAKE 8/12/2006 5 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 O.00K O.00K NORTH 17:4 Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 8/12/2006 5 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 10.00K O.00K 17:1 Thunderstor HASLET 8/22/2006 5 CST m Wind 65 kts. ES 0 0 10.00K O.00K NORTH 18:0 Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 8/23/2006 9 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 O.00K O.00K CENTRAL 15:0 Thunderstor PORTION 8/27/2006 0 CST m Wind 50 kts. ES 0 0 5.00K O.00K 15:1 Thunderstor FT WORTH 8/27/2006 3 CST m Wind 54 kts. MS 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT 11/15/200 ST- CST- Z( ONE) (ZONE) 6 9:00 6 Strong Wind 47 kts. MG 0 1 35.00K O.00K TARRANT 10:0 ST- CST- Z( ONE) (ZONE) 1/11/2007 0 6 Strong Wind 35 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K TARRANT 12:0 CST - ZONE 2/24/2007 0 6 High Wind 50 kts. MG 0 2 225.00K O.00K 19:3 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 4/3/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K JOHNSONS 17:2 CST- Thunderstor STATION 4/13/2007 9 6 m Wind 61 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 13:0 CST- Thunderstor AZLE 4/24/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor PEDEN 4/24/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-55 Section 4 20:1 CST- Thunderstor RIVER OAKS 4/24/2007 2 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 17:0 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 5/2/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 17:1 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 5/2/2007 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 200.00K O.00K 17:2 CST- Thunderstor BENBROOK 5/2/2007 0 6 m Wind 65 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 17:4 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 5/2/2007 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K JOHNSONS 17:5 CST- Thunderstor STATION 5/2/2007 1 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 50.00K O.00K 17:5 CST- Thunderstor BEDFORD 5/2/2007 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 5/2/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 18:3 CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 5/2/2007 0 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 40.00K O.00K 17:0 CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 5/10/2007 0 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 30.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor HURST 6/3/2007 7:00 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor KELLER 6/3/2007 7:15 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor BEDFORD 6/3/2007 7:20 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 18:4 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 6/4/2007 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 16:0 CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 8/29/2007 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 10/14/200 21:0 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 7 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 10/15/200 CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 7 6:18 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 35.00K O.00K 10/15/200 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 7 6:30 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT 10:3 ST- CST- Z( ONE) (ZONE) 1/29/2008 0 6 High Wind 36 kts. MS 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor WESTWORTH 4/10/2008 2:16 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW 4/10/2008 2:17 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW 4/10/2008 2:20 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 650.00K O.00K (FTW)MEACHAM CST- Thunderstor ARPT FT 4/10/2008 2:21 6 m Wind 60 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 4/10/2008 2:25 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 50.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor EULESS 4/10/2008 2:35 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K 4-56 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 4/10/2008 2:40 6 m Wind 65 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K SANSOME PARK 18:4 CST- Thunderstor VLG 4/17/2008 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K FT WORTH LUCK 19:2 CST- Thunderstor ARPT 4/17/2008 2 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 19:2 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 4/17/2008 4 6 m Wind 56 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 19:2 CST- Thunderstor HALTOM CITY 4/17/2008 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K 19:2 CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 4/17/2008 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 30.00K O.00K 20:0 CST- Thunderstor KENNEDALE 4/23/2008 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K TARRANT 22:4 CST - ZONE 4/23/2008 2 6 High Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 10:4 CST- Thunderstor HURST 6/17/2008 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K 10:4 CST- Thunderstor POLTECHNIEC 6/17/2008 3 6 m Wind 61 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 11:0 CST- Thunderstor HANDLEY 6/17/2008 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 3.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor AZLE 6/19/2008 6:04 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 35.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 6/19/2008 6:20 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 15.00K O.00K NORTH 19:3 CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 6/25/2008 8 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 3.00K O.00K 18:1 CST- Thunderstor BEDFORD 8/23/2008 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 35.00K O.00K 12/27/200 CST- Thunderstor POLTECHNIEC 8 8:30 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor HICKS 2/912009 3:10 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor HASLET 2/9/2009 3:20 6 m Wind 62 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 21:1 CST- Thunderstor EULESS 2/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ST- CST- Z( ONE) (ZONE) 4/2/2009 8:00 6 Strong Wind 43 kts. MG 0 0 15.00K O.00K 13:3 CST- Thunderstor BENBROOK 5/2/2009 6 6 m Wind 56 kts. MG 0 0 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 13:4 CST- Thunderstor RUSSELL ARP 5/2/2009 6 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 23:5 CST- Thunderstor AZLE 5/26/2009 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 6.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor KELLER 5/27/2009 0:08 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 6.00K O.00K 17:2 CST- Thunderstor AZLE 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. MG 0 0 7.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-57 Section 4 EAGLE MTN 17:2 CST- Thunderstor ACRES 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 3.000M O.00K 17:3 CST- Thunderstor LAKE WORTH 6/10/2009 7 6 m Wind 65 kts. MG 0 0 8.00K O.00K FT WORTH BLUE 17:4 CST- Thunderstor MND AR 6/10/2009 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. MG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 17:4 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 6/10/2009 1 6 m Wind 51 kts. MG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 17:4 CST- Thunderstor SOUTH LAKE 6/10/2009 1 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K KELLER GOODE 17:5 CST- Thunderstor ARPT 6/10/2009 0 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 TOOK O.00K 17:5 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 70 kts. EG 0 0 12.00K O.00K FT WORTH OAK 17:5 CST- Thunderstor GRVE AR 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. MG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor TATE SPGS 6/10/2009 0 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 6.00K O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor EULESS 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 40.00K O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor EULESS 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 60.00K O.00K 18:1 CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 6/10/2009 0 6 m Wind 55 kts. MG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 18:1 CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 6/10/2009 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 1.50K O.00K CST- Thunderstor ED PIT 6/11/2009 2:23 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 4.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 6/11/2009 8:30 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN CST- Thunderstor LAKE 6/11/2009 9:51 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 15:0 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 7/19/2009 1 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K (FWH)CARSWEL 16:1 CST- Thunderstor L AFB FT 7/19/2009 5 6 m Wind 53 kts. MG 0 0 3.00K O.00K NORTH CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 7/30/2009 4:15 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 15.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 8/21/2009 6:30 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 18:3 CST- Thunderstor WESTLAND 9/21/2009 6 6 m Wind 60 kts. MG 0 0 1.00K O.00K FT WORTH OAK 16:5 CST- Thunderstor GRVE AR 10/1/2009 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 10/25/200 20:5 CST- Thunderstor WHEATLAND 9 3 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K FT WORTH 11:0 CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW ARP 5/14/2010 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 3.00K O.00K 16:4 CST- Thunderstor SEMINARY HILL 5/30/2010 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 45.00K O.00K 4-58 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT (FTW)MEACHAM 18:5 CST- Thunderstor ARPT FT 6/2/2010 3 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 15:2 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT 7/6/2010 2 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 15:3 CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 7/6/2010 0 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 5 50.00K O.00K 10/23/201 11:4 CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 0 8 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K 10/23/201 11:5 CST- Thunderstor POLTECHNIEC 0 5 6 m Wind 73 kts. EG 0 0 750.00K O.00K 10/23/201 12:5 CST- Thunderstor RICHLAND HILLS 0 5 6 m Wind 35 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT 16:0 CST - ZONE 4/3/2011 0 6 Strong Wind 35 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor CROWLEY 4/4/2011 4:40 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 22:5 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 4/10/2011 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor HASLET 4/11/2011 0:00 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 4/11/2011 0:11 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor KENNEDALE 4/11/2011 0:25 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 4/11/2011 0:32 6 m Wind 53 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT 17:0 CST - ZONE 4/14/2011 0 6 Strong Wind 30 kts. EG 1 0 O.00K O.00K 21:4 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 4/23/2011 5 6 m Wind 59 kts. MG 0 0 6.00K O.00K 22:1 CST- Thunderstor BEDFORD 4/23/2011 4 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 6.00K O.00K 17:5 CST- Thunderstor AZLE 4/24/2011 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor BENBROOK 5/1/2011 8:05 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor BENBROOK 5/1/2011 8:16 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 13:0 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 5/11/2011 2 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 13:0 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 5/11/2011 4 6 m Wind 50 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 18:4 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 5/22/2011 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 18:2 CST- Thunderstor BRIAR 5/24/2011 0 6 m Wind 74 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K FT WORTH 18:5 CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW ARP 5/24/2011 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 TOOK O.00K FT WORTH 18:5 CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW ARP 5/24/2011 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 30.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-59 Section 4 18:5 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 5/24/2011 5 6 m Wind 70 kts. EG 0 0 55.00K O.00K 18:5 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 5/24/2011 6 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 18:5 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 5/24/2011 7 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 3.00K O.00K 19:0 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 5/24/2011 6 6 m Wind 58 kts. MG 0 0 50.00K O.00K 19:1 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 5/24/2011 1 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 200.00K O.00K PLEASANT 19:1 CST- Thunderstor GLADE 5/24/2011 7 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 12.00K O.00K 19:4 CST- Thunderstor HANDLEY 5/24/2011 5 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 6.00K O.00K 20:3 CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 5/24/2011 4 6 m Wind 61 kts. MG 0 0 12.00K O.00K 21:2 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/18/2011 7 6 m Wind 61 kts. MG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 20:4 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 7 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 20:5 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 7 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 20:5 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 7 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 20:5 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 8 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 21:0 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 8 6 m Wind 50 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 21:1 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 5 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 4.00K O.00K 21:5 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT CO. 6/21/2011 4 6 m Wind 50 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 19:5 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 9/29/2011 5 6 m Wind 51 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K (FTW)MEACHAM 20:0 CST- Thunderstor ARPT FT 9/29/2011 9 6 m Wind 53 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 20:1 CST- Thunderstor RIVER OAKS 9/29/2011 2 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 50.00K O.00K BENBROOK 20:3 CST- Thunderstor LAKE 9/29/2011 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 30.00K O.00K FT WORTH 10/17/201 20:0 CST- Thunderstor MEECHAM ARP 1 0 6 m Wind 53 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 10/17/201 20:0 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 1 5 6 m Wind 55 kts. MG 0 0 3.00K O.00K 12:4 CST- Thunderstor ARLINGTON 4/3/2012 9 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 25.00K O.00K FT WORTH LUCK 19:2 CST- Thunderstor ARPT 5/4/2012 2 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 17:5 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 5/11/2012 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K 4-60 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT KELLER ALTA 18:0 CST- Thunderstor VISTA AR 5/11/2012 1 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 2.00K O.00K 13:1 CST- Thunderstor CENTER PT 6/6/2012 5 6 m Wind 65 kts. EG 0 0 50.00K O.00K 15:1 CST- Thunderstor SEMINARY HILL 6/6/2012 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 15:1 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 6/6/2012 5 6 m Wind 61 kts. EG 0 0 100.00K O.00K 15:3 CST- Thunderstor KENNEDALE 6/6/2012 8 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 16:2 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 7/20/2012 7 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 80.00K O.00K 16:5 CST- Thunderstor EULESS 7/20/2012 5 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN 17:4 CST- Thunderstor LAKE 8/12/2012 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 21 O.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN 17:4 CST- Thunderstor LAKE 8/12/2012 6 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 17:5 CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW 8/12/2012 6 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K (FTW)MEACHAM 18:0 CST- Thunderstor ARPT FT 8/12/2012 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K (FTW)MEACHAM 18:0 CST- Thunderstor ARPT FT 8/12/2012 1 6 m Wind 66 kts. MG 0 0 1.00OM O.00K 18:0 CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW 8/12/2012 2 6 m Wind 58 kts. MG 0 0 15.00K O.00K WESTOVER 18:0 CST- Thunderstor HILLS 8/12/2012 8 6 m Wind 58 kts. MG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 18:1 CST- Thunderstor HODGE 8/12/2012 0 6 m Wind 55 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K 18:1 CST- Thunderstor WATAUGA 8/12/2012 5 6 m Wind 63 kts. MG 0 0 10.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN CST- Thunderstor LAKE 2/10/2013 2:15 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor SAGINAW 2/10/2013 2:24 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K (FWH)CARSWEL CST- Thunderstor L AFB FT 2/10/2013 2:25 6 m Wind 39 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor LAKE WORTH 2/10/2013 2:25 6 m Wind 56 kts. MG 0 0 8.00K O.00K CST- Thunderstor POLTECHNIEC 2/10/2013 2:49 6 m Wind 57 kts. EG 0 0 8.00K O.00K TARRANT CST- ST- Z( ONE) (ZONE) 2/26/2013 0:30 6 Strong Wind 32 kts. MG 0 0 30.00K O.00K 19:3 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 5/15/2013 1 6 m Wind 51 kts. MG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 22:3 CST- Thunderstor KENNEDALE 5/15/2013 0 6 m Wind 60 kts. EG 0 0 100.00K O.00K 12:5 CST- Thunderstor HASLET 5/21/2013 5 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-61 Section 4 FT WORTH 7/11/2013 5 6 m Wind 43 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K 19:1 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 8/9/2013 1 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 15:5 CST- Thunderstor SOUTH LAKE 8/13/2013 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 10/26/201 19:1 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 3 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K Totals: 1 8 8.674M O.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. In evaluating assets that are vulnerable to severe thunderstorms, it was determined that all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial property is vulnerable to severe thunderstorms. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a severe thunderstorm and no way to predict where a storm will occur. People are vulnerable to severe thunderstorms through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, roofs blown off structures, etc. Severe thunderstorms occur frequently within Tarrant County. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high for a severe thunderstorm. High winds can destroy trees and flooding from severe thunderstorms may destroy forestry and re -direct river flow. The risk and vulnerability to severe thunderstorms and high winds for each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. 4-62 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 13:0 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 5/21/2013 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 O.00K O.00K 16:5 CST- Thunderstor TARRANT 5/29/2013 7 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 30.00K O.00K 16:5 CST- Thunderstor EULESS 5/29/2013 8 6 m Wind 56 kts. EG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 17:0 CST- Thunderstor GRAND PRAIRIE 5/29/2013 4 6 m Wind 48 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K GREATER SW 17:1 CST- Thunderstor INTL ARPT 5/29/2013 1 6 m Wind 50 kts. MG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 17:1 CST- Thunderstor MANSFIELD 5/29/2013 9 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K 15:4 CST- Thunderstor FT WORTH 7/11/2013 5 6 m Wind 43 kts. EG 0 0 20.00K O.00K 19:1 CST- Thunderstor GRAPEVINE 8/9/2013 1 6 m Wind 52 kts. MG 0 0 10.00K O.00K 15:5 CST- Thunderstor SOUTH LAKE 8/13/2013 0 6 m Wind 50 kts. EG 0 0 1.00K O.00K 10/26/201 19:1 CST- Thunderstor KELLER 3 0 6 m Wind 52 kts. EG 0 0 5.00K O.00K Totals: 1 8 8.674M O.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. In evaluating assets that are vulnerable to severe thunderstorms, it was determined that all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial property is vulnerable to severe thunderstorms. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a severe thunderstorm and no way to predict where a storm will occur. People are vulnerable to severe thunderstorms through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, roofs blown off structures, etc. Severe thunderstorms occur frequently within Tarrant County. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high for a severe thunderstorm. High winds can destroy trees and flooding from severe thunderstorms may destroy forestry and re -direct river flow. The risk and vulnerability to severe thunderstorms and high winds for each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. 4-62 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT IIIIIIIIIIIIIL'A I 1111:4 r. 1 $1111 VM .. . City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Critical Asset Vulnerability Dallas Cowboys Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of severe thunderstorms and high winds. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While severe Vulnerable Populations thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Arlington. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While severe Vulnerable Populations thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Azle. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Bedford. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-63 Section 4 Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Blue Mound. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Colleyville. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Crowley 4� � Am& Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts to the city of Crowley. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport M The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during severe thunderstorms and Vulnerable Populations high winds incident. Should the airport be impacted by severe thunderstorms and high winds, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in serious environmental impacts. Damage to fuel storage tanks could impact soil, and water systems. L— City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities and public schools. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Euless. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. 4-64 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Forest Hill. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Fort Worth City of Grapevine The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water Critical Asset Vulnerability storage facilities, water treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While Environmental severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with Vulnerability mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Fort Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Grapevine. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Haltom City. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-65 Section 4 . , Critical Asset Vulnerability City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated Vulnerable Populations distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. Environmental There are multiple train tracks and distribution centers located in the city. Hazardous materials Environmental spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms and high winds could Vulnerability result in environmental impacts to the city of Haslet. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Hurst Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with Environmental mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or Vulnerability relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Hurst. Such impacts could 4-66 include contamination of soil, and water systems. 2015 City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While severe Vulnerable Populations thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Keller. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Kennedale The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Kennedale. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Lake Worth 4-66 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Lake Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the Town of Lakeside. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of North Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8% of individuals in Richland Hills live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Saginaw Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-67 Section 4 J .. The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Saginaw. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Southlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe Critical Asset Vulnerability thunderstorms and high winds. This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to Tarrant County. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake Critical Asset Vulnerability The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a 4-68 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT fire station valued at $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the Town of Westlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects Critical Asset Vulnerability of severe thunderstorms and high winds. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While severe thunderstorms and high winds pose a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after severe thunderstorms and high winds has occurred. Environmental Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by severe thunderstorms Vulnerability and high winds could result in environmental impacts to the city of Westworth Village. Such impacts could include contamination of soil and water systems. Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of severe thunderstorms and high winds for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should severe thunderstorms and high winds impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds Highly Likely 3-6 hours Community -wide Moderate * For the purposes of the hazard Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term ,.warning". Multijurisdictional Concerns Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions can be affected by severe thunderstorm and high winds. As a result, any mitigation steps taken related to severe thunderstorm winds should be undertaken on a countywide basis. Land Use and Development Trends New technology allows for high wind -resistant windows, either by directly installing windows capable of withstanding high winds or applying a film that protects the window. This reduces property damage by reducing the number of broken windows and reduces injuries and deaths by Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-69 Section 4 reducing broken glass. Although Tarrant County currently has no regulatory capabilities regarding this technology, it is advised that new developments include high wind -resistant windows. Hazard Summary Overall, severe thunderstorms and high winds pose one of the greatest threats to Tarrant County in terms of property damage as well as injuries and loss of life. Severe thunderstorms and high winds are the most frequently occurring natural hazard in Tarrant County and have the greatest chance of affecting Tarrant County each year. Based on the frequency of this hazard as well as its ability to negatively affect Tarrant County, the mitigation measures identified in this plan should be aggressively pursued. 4.1.4 Hail Hazard Definition Hail is a form of precipitation composed of spherical lumps of ice. Known as hailstones, these ice balls typically range from 1/10 of an inch to 2 inches in diameter on average, with much larger hailstones forming in severe thunderstorms. The size of hailstones is a direct function of the severity and size of the storm. Hailstones are classified by size according to the Tornado and Storm Research Organization (TORRO) Hail Storm Intensity Scale, provided in Table 4-13. Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions can expect hail from an intensity of HO to the highest intensity of H10. Table 4-13 TORRO Hail Storm Intensity Scale HO Hard Hail 5 0-20 No damage H1 Potentially Damaging 5-15 >20 Slight general damage to plants, crops H2 Significant 10-20 >100 Significant damage to fruit, crops, vegetation H3 Severe 20-30 >300 Severe damage to fruit and crops, damage to glass and plastic structures, paint and wood scored H4 Severe 25-40 >500 Widespread glass damage, vehicle bodywork damage H5 Destructive 30-50 >800 Wholesale destruction of glass, damage to tiled roofs, significant risk of injuries H6 Destructive 40-60 Bodywork of grounded aircraft dented, brick walls pitted H7 Destructive 50-75 Severe roof damage, risk of serious injuries H8 Destructive 60-90 (Severest recorded in the British Isles) Severe damage to aircraft bodywork H9 Super Hailstorms 75-100 Extensive structural damage. Risk of severe or even fatal injuries to persons caught in the open H10 Super Hailstorms >100 Extensive structural damage. Risk of severe or even fatal injuries to persons caught in the open 4-70 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Hazard Identification Tarrant County has experienced 95 costly hail events in the past 20 years. These storms have injured and killed people and caused over $450 million in property damagel3. Hailstorms can cover a wide geographic area; therefore, all of Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions are at risk for being struck by a hailstorm. Statistically, Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions will experience a hailstorm at least once a year. Generally, there is a warning time of 3-6 hours with a hailstorm, and many severe thunderstorms have the potential to produce hail. The amount of damage that is caused by hail varies depending on its size, but certain property is more vulnerable than others. For example, vehicles that sit outdoors during a hailstorm may result in broken windows and dents in the car frame. Every jurisdiction in Tarrant County has experienced the impacts of hail. Severe hail events that have occurred in the North Central Texas region include hailstorms with 5 -inch diameters on April 27, 1968 and June 22, 1955. A hailstorm that occurred on October 21, 1996 with 4.5 -inch hailstones caused property damage. A hailstorm with hailstones measuring 1.75 -inches caused approximately $250,000 in property damage in the region on October 10, 2001. On April 28, 1992, a severe thunderstorm outbreak rumbled across southern Oklahoma and through North Central Texas, producing a swath of hail damage in one of the costliest severe weather events ever for the region. Hail up to 4.5 inches in diameter was recorded during the event, which lasted several hours and ultimately resulted in losses of over $750 million. On May 5, 1995, a devastating supercell produced softball -sized hail in Tarrant County, accompanied by flash flooding and high winds. Over 100 people, most of whom were attending the outdoor Mayfest celebration in downtown Fort Worth, were injured. Insured damage reached nearly $1.1 billion and reported cleanup costs ranged around $220 million, making it one of the insurance industry's most expensive thunderstorms in history. On April 5, 2003, a severe thunderstorm rolled across the north central portions of the North Central Texas region. Hail accumulated in a series of eastward moving thunderstorms, originating in Tarrant County and training due east over one of the most densely populated and highly valued areas of the DFW Metroplex. 5,500 cars and 3,500 homes were damaged by hail in the City of Fort Worth on April 13, 2007. A strong surface low and dry line interacted with a very unstable atmosphere over North Texas. Large hail, damaging winds, and possible tornadoes were reported, causing $3 million in damage. A list of the hail events that have occurred in Tarrant County since 2002 is provided in the table below. Table 4-14 Hail Events14 FT WORTH 3/30/2002 2:10 CST Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K 13 Source: SHELDUS la Source: National Climatic Data Center, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-71 Section 4 FT WORTH 4/16/2002 17:00 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 4/16/2002 17:52 CST Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K SAGINAW 4/5/2003 19:33 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K SAGINAW 4/5/2003 19:40 CST Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K EAGLE MTN LAKE 4/5/2003 19:43 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/5/2003 19:50 CST Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/5/2003 20:00 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K KELLER 4/5/2003 20:01 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/5/2003 20:01 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K KELLER 4/5/2003 20:05 CST Hail 3.00 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 4/5/2003 20:15 CST Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 5/1/2003 14:16 CST Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K RICHLAND HILLS 5/1/2003 14:26 CST Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K NORTH RICHLAND HILLS 5/1/2003 14:37 CST Hail 3.50 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K HALTOM CITY 5/2/2003 20:32 CST Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 7/22/2003 18:01 CST Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 7/22/2003 18:12 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/11/2003 18:44 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K DALWORTHINGTON 8/11/2003 18:47 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K RENDON 8/11/2003 19:00 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K PANTEGO 4/30/2004 20:02 CST Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K AZLE 6/1/2004 17:20 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/25/2005 15:00 CST Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K CROWLEY 4/3/2007 18:45 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K CROWLEY 4/3/2007 18:53 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 8.00K O.00K BENBROOK 4/3/2007 18:58 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 15.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 4/3/2007 19:15 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K 4-72 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT AZLE 4/13/2007 16:47 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 15.00K O.00K SAGINAW 4/13/2007 17:03 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 2.000M O.00K FT WORTH 4/13/2007 17:06 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 3.000M O.00K SAGINAW 4/13/2007 17:10 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 3.000M O.00K HURST 4/13/2007 17:15 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 40.00K O.00K COLLEYVILLE 4/13/2007 17:32 CST -6 Hail 3.00 in. 0 0 10.000M O.00K ARLINGTON 5/3/2007 17:30 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 10/14/2007 20:52 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K CROWLEY 3/31/2008 14:00 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K BENBROOK 4/9/2008 1:15 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.00K O.00K RIVER OAKS 4/17/2008 19:04 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.000M O.00K FT WORTH 4/17/2008 19:07 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K HASLET 3/30/2009 21:21 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 250.00K O.00K KELLER ALTA VISTA AR 3/30/2009 21:25 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 1.00OM O.00K KELLER 3/30/2009 21:26 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 1.00OM O.00K KELLER ALTA VISTA AR 3/30/2009 21:26 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 5.000M O.00K KELLER ALTA VISTA AR 3/30/2009 21:30 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 2.000M O.00K HASLET 3/30/2009 21:30 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 1.00OM O.00K KELLER 3/30/2009 21:31 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 25.000M O.00K KELLER 3/30/2009 21:32 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 20.00K O.00K KELLER 3/30/2009 21:33 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 3.000M O.00K KELLER ALTA VISTA AR 3/30/2009 21:33 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.000M O.00K KELLER GOODE ARPT 3/30/2009 21:36 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 5.000M O.00K SOUTH LAKE 3/30/2009 21:42 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.000M O.00K GRAPEVINE 3/30/2009 21:44 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.000M O.00K SOUTH LAKE 3/30/2009 21:45 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 35.000M O.00K HANDLEY 5/26/2009 19:00 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-73 3 Section 4 AVONDALE 612/2010 16:50 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K WATAUGA 414/2011 2:40 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 30.00K O.00K LAKE WORTH 4110/2011 21:12 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 4119/2011 16:14 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K KELLER 4119/2011 16:21 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K BEDFORD 4119/2011 16:33 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 60.00K O.00K SEMINARY HILL 4119/2011 16:42 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 40.00K O.00K MARA 4119/2011 16:56 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K CROWLEY 4119/2011 17:19 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 25.00K O.00K CROWLEY 4119/2011 17:30 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH SYCAMORE AR 4124/2011 20:22 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K EVERMAN 4124/2011 20:24 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K EAGLE 4125/2011 2:27 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 4.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 4125/2011 3:52 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K WEBB 511/2011 23:23 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K BENBROOK 512/2011 0:22 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 TOOK O.00K RIVER OAKS 512/2011 0:31 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 5123/2011 9:44 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K HASLET 5124/2011 18:30 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 12.00K O.00K AVONDALE 512412011 18:40 CST -6 Hail 4.50 in. 0 0 75.00K O.00K AVONDALE 5124/2011 18:50 CST -6 Hail 4.50 in. 0 0 75.00K O.00K KELLER ALTA VISTA AR 5124/2011 18:50 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K KELLER 5124/2011 18:55 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 25.00K O.00K KELLER 512412011 18:55 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 25.00K O.00K KELLER 5124/2011 18:56 CST -6 Hail 4.25 in. 0 0 300.00K O.00K SMITHFIELD 5/24/2011 18:58 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 12.00K O.00K KELLER 5124/2011 19:00 CST -6 Hail 2.50 in. 0 0 50.00K O.00K 4-74 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 GRAPEVINE EULESS BEDFORD WHITE STATION v POLTECHNIEC EULESS ARLINGTON AVONDALE TARRANT CO. TARRANT CO. EULESS GREATER SW INTL ARPT PLEASANT GLADE EAGLE HASLET HICKS SOUTH LAKE Totals: RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT 5/24/2011 19:02 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 320.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 19:10 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 5.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 19:13 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 30.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 19:19 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 30.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 19:55 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 300.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 19:57 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 60.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 20:02 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 200.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 20:02 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 40.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 20:15 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 40.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 20:19 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 60.00K O.00K 5/24/2011 20:45 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 5.00K O.00K 6/20/2011 22:02 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K 6/20/2011 22:17 CST -6 Hail 2.00 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K 4/3/2012 12:50 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 500.00K O.00K 4/3/2012 12:54 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 12.000M O.00K 4/3/2012 13:00 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 10.00OM O.00K 4/3/2012 13:02 CST -6 Hail 2.75 in. 0 0 10.000M O.00K 5/11/2012 17:48 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 O.00K O.00K 5/11/2012 17:55 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 15.00K O.00K 3/23/2013 6:30 CST -6 Hail 1.50 in. 0 0 5.00K O.00K 5/15/2013 21:41 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 10.00K O.00K 10/26/2013 19:09 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 15.00K O.00K 10/26/2013 19:27 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 25.00K O.00K 10/26/2013 19:35 CST -6 Hail 1.75 in. 0 0 500.00K O.00K 0 0 156.818M O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-75 Section 4 Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to hailstorms. Outdoor facilities, such as public parks, are more vulnerable to hail damage than other facilities. Additionally, vehicles parked outdoors are particularly vulnerable to hail damage and could increase the economic impact of a storm. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a hailstorm incident and no way to predict where and when a hailstorm will occur. People are vulnerable to the effects of hailstorms, including power outages, effects on transportation routes, damage to homes and cars, etc. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are significant should a hailstorm occur. Crops and vegetation may be destroyed. The risk and vulnerability to hail for each participating jurisdiction is detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Stadium worth Critical Asset Vulnerability $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of hail. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While hail Vulnerable Populations poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Arlington. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This Critical Asset Vulnerability includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Vulnerable Populations In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Azle. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Bedford 4-76 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While hail Vulnerable Populations poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Bedford. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability hail. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Blue Mound. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. �m City of Colleyville Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Colleyville. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. ity of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Crowley. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. iDallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of hail. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-77 Section 4 Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the Vulnerable Populations airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during hail incident. Should the airport be impacted by hail, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts. Damage to fuel storage tanks could impact soil, and water systems. City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city facilities and public schools. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While hail Vulnerable Populations poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Euless. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Forest Hill. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water treatment Critical Asset Vulnerability facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Fort Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or o older. In addition, approximately 7.9 of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. /o 4-78 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Grapevine. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Haltom City. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. There are multiple train tracks and distribution centers located in the city. Hazardous materials Environmental Vulnerability spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in environmental impacts to the city of Haslet. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This Critical Asset Vulnerability includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Hurst. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This Critical Asset Vulnerability includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-79 9 Section 4 Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Keller. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Kennedale Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Kennedale. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability hail. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Lake Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Town of Lakeside Critical Asset Vulnerability The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Lakeside. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. A City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of hail. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of North Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. 4-80 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability hail. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Saginaw The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Saginaw. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Southlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County AN Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This Critical Asset Vulnerability includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to Tarrant County. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-81 Section 4 Highly Likely 3 -6 hours Community -wide Moderate 4-82 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake 411111111111116 The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Westlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Westworth Village Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of hail. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While hail poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for these populations to evacuate ahead of such a threat or relocate after a damaging hail storm has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by hail could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Westworth Village. Such impacts could include contamination of soil and water systems. Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of hail for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should hail impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Hail Highly Likely 3 -6 hours Community -wide Moderate 4-82 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ' For the purposes of the hazard Hail, "forecast warning" is defined as the amount of time necessary to determine whether severe weather has the potential to impact a jurisdiction. This should not be confused with the National Weather Service's definition or use of the term "warning". Multijurisdictional Concerns Tarrant County and all participating jurisdictions are vulnerable to hailstorms and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. The probability of hailstorms occurring in the future is relatively high based on previous data. Hailstorms affect Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions equally and uniformly. Land Use and Development Trends Future development throughout Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions will be vulnerable to potential damage of property from hailstorms because no property is immune to a hailstorm's effects. Hazard Summary The severity of hailstorms is measured by duration, size of the hail itself, and geographic extent. All of these factors are directly related to the weather phenomena that create hailstorms and thunderstorms. There is wide potential variation in these severity components. The size of the hail is a direct function of the severity and size of the storm. The duration of each storm varies but rarely lasts longer than a couple of hours. Hailstorms rarely result in the loss of human life, but they cause nearly $1 billion in property, livestock, and crop damage in the United States each year. Once a hailstone reaches the size of about 1.5 inches in diameter, damage to cars, windows, and siding will occur. Although typically not life-threatening, severe hailstorms have the potential to cause significant property damage, particularly to automobiles and some building types. 4.1.5 Lightning Hazard Definition Lightning typically occurs as a byproduct of severe thunderstorms. Lightning strikes proceed from cloud to cloud, cloud to ground, or, where high structures are involved, from ground to cloud. Lightning strikes the ground in the United States nearly every day as a result of moist, warm climates. There are roughly 5 to 10 times as many cloud flashes as there is cloud to ground flashes, but there are still 20,000,000 clouds to ground flashes every year. The NWS estimates that during the past 30 years, lightning killed an average of 58 people each year and injured approximately 300 people each year. Lightning strikes in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions are most prevalent in May and August. The National Weather Service utilizes the Lightning Activity Level as a scale to describe lightning activity. Based on the LAL, Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions can expect to see lightning activity from a LAL 1 to LAL 6. Table 4-15 Lightning Activity Scale 15 15 Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), http://www.nws.noaa. gov/forecasts/wfo/definitions/defineLAL.html. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-83 Section 4 Lightning, as with many natural hazards, can strike anywhere and at any time. Data from SHELDUS reported 100 incidents of lightning strikes in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions in the past 50 years. Much of the property damage associated with lightning strikes in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions is the result of fires in commercial and residential buildings started by lightning strikes. Many jurisdictions in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions report structural fires and damage as a result of lightning strikes, although they are not found in the SHELDUS report. The following instances also occurred in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions. ■ January 1995: A house chimney, wooden mantel, and ceiling were damaged in Arlington, totaling $3,000. ■ July 1997: Two men were injured when lightning struck a pole near them in Arlington. ■ February 1998: Lightning strikes in the City of Arlington caused fires in 6 homes, with damage totaling $100,000. ■ September 2001: A lightning strike in Southlake started a fire that damaged one home and caused $20,000 in damage. ■ June 2003: 5 structure fires were caused by lighting in the City of Colleyville. ■ June 2004: The City of Colleyville reported a 2 -alarm house fire as the result of a lightning strike. ■ August 2005: In Arlington, a 3,300 square foot house was struck by lightning and burned to the ground, resulting in a $325,000 loss. ■ May 2013: A Kennedale home was struck by lightning that caused $150,000 in damage. There is a 100% chance of lightning occurring any given year in all participating jurisdictions. Lightning events that have occurred in the planning area since 1996 are listed in the table below. 4-84 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 .. Lem LAL 1 No thunderstorms LAL 2 Isolated thunderstorms. Light rain will occasionally reach the ground. Lightning is very infrequent, 1 to 5 clouds to ground strikes in a five-minute period. LAL 3 Widely scattered thunderstorms. Light to moderate rain will reach the ground. Lightning is infrequent, 6 to 10 cloud to ground strikes in a 5 -minute period. LAL 4 Scattered thunderstorms. Moderate rain is commonly produced Lightning is frequent, 11 to 15 cloud to ground strikes in a 5 -minute period. LAL 5 Numerous thunderstorms. Rainfall is moderate to heavy. Lightning is frequent and intense, greater than 15 cloud to ground strikes in a 5 -minute period. Dry lightning (same as LAL 3 but without rain). This type of lightning has the potential for LAL 6 extreme fire activity and is normally highlighted in fire weather forecasts with a Red Flag Warning. Hazard Identification Lightning, as with many natural hazards, can strike anywhere and at any time. Data from SHELDUS reported 100 incidents of lightning strikes in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions in the past 50 years. Much of the property damage associated with lightning strikes in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions is the result of fires in commercial and residential buildings started by lightning strikes. Many jurisdictions in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions report structural fires and damage as a result of lightning strikes, although they are not found in the SHELDUS report. The following instances also occurred in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions. ■ January 1995: A house chimney, wooden mantel, and ceiling were damaged in Arlington, totaling $3,000. ■ July 1997: Two men were injured when lightning struck a pole near them in Arlington. ■ February 1998: Lightning strikes in the City of Arlington caused fires in 6 homes, with damage totaling $100,000. ■ September 2001: A lightning strike in Southlake started a fire that damaged one home and caused $20,000 in damage. ■ June 2003: 5 structure fires were caused by lighting in the City of Colleyville. ■ June 2004: The City of Colleyville reported a 2 -alarm house fire as the result of a lightning strike. ■ August 2005: In Arlington, a 3,300 square foot house was struck by lightning and burned to the ground, resulting in a $325,000 loss. ■ May 2013: A Kennedale home was struck by lightning that caused $150,000 in damage. There is a 100% chance of lightning occurring any given year in all participating jurisdictions. Lightning events that have occurred in the planning area since 1996 are listed in the table below. 4-84 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Table 4-1616 Lightning Strikes in Tarrant County FT WORTH 4/22/1996 6:50 CST Lightning 0 0 100.00K O.00K MANSFIELD 8/9/1996 13:00 CST Lightning 0 0 O.00K O.00K EULESS 8/31/1996 16:00 CST Lightning 0 0 40.00K O.00K FT WORTH 4/20/1997 20:30 CST Lightning 0 0 25.00K O.00K HURST 5/15/1997 8:00 CST Lightning 0 0 75.00K O.00K HURST 6/22/1997 14:55 CST Lightning 0 1 O.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 7/5/1997 9:00 CST Lightning 0 2 O.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 9/3/1997 19:45 CST Lightning 0 0 30.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 2/25/1998 20:00 CST Lightning 0 0 100.00K O.00K HALTOM CITY 4/20/1998 0:30 CST Lightning 0 0 270.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 5/27/1998 0:46 CST Lightning 0 0 35.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 5/26/1999 5:05 CST Lightning 0 0 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 3/10/2000 10:15 CST Lightning 0 0 35.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 5/28/2001 1:15 CST Lightning 0 0 20.00K O.00K CROWLEY 6/14/2001 19:45 CST Lightning 0 0 15.00K O.00K BEDFORD 8/6/2001 19:00 CST Lightning 1 0 O.00K O.00K AZLE 8/10/2001 13:15 CST Lightning 0 1 O.00K O.00K BEDFORD 8/17/2001 7:00 CST Lightning 0 1 O.00K O.00K SOUTH LAKE 9/18/2001 18:00 CST Lightning 0 0 20.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 5/6/2002 3:00 CST Lightning 0 0 50.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/10/2002 11:20 CST Lightning 0 0 280.00K O.00K BEDFORD 4/23/2003 20:25 CST Lightning 0 0 20.00K O.00K FT WORTH 5/16/2003 3:00 CST Lightning 0 0 90.00K O.00K HALTOM CITY 6/11/2003 22:00 CST Lightning 0 0 60.00K O.00K COLLEYVILLE 6/13/2003 3:30 CST Lightning 0 0 450.00K O.00K 16 Source: National Climatic Data Center, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-85 Section 4 GRAPEVINE 6/13/2003 4:00 CST Lightning 0 0 96.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/11/2003 23:30 CST Lightning 0 0 550.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/12/2003 20:00 CST Lightning 0 0 400.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/12/2003 20:40 CST Lightning 0 0 10.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/12/2003 21:45 CST Lightning 0 0 300.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/12/2003 22:00 CST Lightning 0 0 45.00K O.00K KELLER 8/13/2003 15:30 CST Lightning 0 0 5.00K O.00K COLLEYVILLE 8/26/2003 16:00 CST Lightning 0 0 300.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 7/7/2005 9:00 CST Lightning 0 0 1.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 8/5/2005 14:30 CST Lightning 0 0 325.00K O.00K WATAUGA 8/6/2005 17:00 CST Lightning 0 0 3.00K O.00K WATAUGA 8/7/2005 17:00 CST Lightning 0 0 0.50K O.00K ARLINGTON 10/31/2005 11:00 CST Lightning 0 0 O.00K O.00K FT WORTH 2/25/2006 4:44 CST Lightning 0 0 160.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 5/5/2006 3:11 CST Lightning 0 1 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 5/5/2006 4:30 CST Lightning 0 0 580.00K O.00K FT WORTH 8/27/2006 18:30 CST Lightning 0 0 3.00K O.00K GRAPEVINE 5/2/2007 18:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 5.00K O.00K FT WORTH 10/14/2007 21:10 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 10.00K O.00K FT WORTH 2/5/2008 5:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 12.00K O.00K ARLINGTON 4/27/2009 5:23 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 30.00K O.00K FT WORTH SAGINAW ARP 6/10/2009 17:20 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 500.00K O.00K LAKE WORTH 6/10/2009 17:20 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 10.00K O.00K FT WORTH 6/10/2009 17:30 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 1.00OM O.00K TARRANT 6/10/2009 20:05 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 150.00K O.00K KELLER 6/11/2009 1:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 1.00K O.00K FT WORTH BLUE MND AR 8/21/2009 6:05 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 6.00K O.00K 4-86 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT HURST 8/27/2009 18:30 CST -6 Lightning 1 0 O.00K O.00K SOUTH LAKE 9/1/2010 17:29 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 500.00K O.00K LAKE WORTH 9/2/2010 3:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 200.00K O.00K EULESS 9/2/2010 4:07 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 100.00K O.00K KELLER GOODE ARPT 11/2/2010 10:50 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 1.00OM O.00K GRAPEVINE 5/11/2011 13:15 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 7.00K O.00K FT WORTH 9/16/2011 16:26 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 8.00K O.00K WEBB 1/25/2012 5:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 10.00K O.00K KELLER GOODE ARPT 4/8/2012 11:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 12.00K O.00K POLTECHNIEC 4/8/2012 13:15 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 2.00K O.00K PANTEGO 6/6/2012 18:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 30.00K O.00K BENBROOK LAKE 8/18/2012 14:30 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 15.00K O.00K NORTH RICHLAND HILLS 6/6/2013 2:30 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 50.00K O.00K KELLER 8/11/2013 20:00 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 250.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 9/1/2013 21:45 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 20.00K O.00K TARRANT CO. 9/2/2013 0:45 CST -6 Lightning 0 0 35.00K O.00K Totals: 2 6 8.466M O.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. In evaluating assets that are vulnerable to lightning incidents, the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan Committee determined that all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial property are vulnerable to lightning incidents. ■ People RiskNulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County, because there is no way to determine the impact or magnitude of a lightning incident and no way to predict where a lightning incident will occur. People are vulnerable to lightning incidents through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, being struck by lightning, etc. A significant chance of a lightning incident exists in any given year in Tarrant County. ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. In more rural areas, lightning strikes pose danger by causing wildfires. Due to its urban environment, the environmental risk of lightning strikes is low in Tarrant County. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-87 Section 4 The risk and vulnerability to lightning strikes for each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Critical Asset Vulnerability Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of lightning. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Arlington. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While lightning Vulnerable Populations poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Azle. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Bedford. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, waterways, and reservoirs. City of Blue Mound 4-88 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Blue Mound. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Colleyville. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. A���!City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts to the city of Crowley. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport _ The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of lightning. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the Vulnerable Populations airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during lightning incidents. Should the airport be impacted by lightning, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability serious environmental impacts. Damage to fuel storage tanks could impact soil, and water systems. or City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city facilities and public schools. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 5.8% of the population o in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.7 /o of Euless families live below the poverty line. While Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-89 Section 4 lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Euless. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Forest Hill. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Fort Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Grapevine. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it 4-90 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT �'Alllll:jr.161111% Alam" difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Haltom City. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. There are multiple train tracks and distribution centers located in the city. Hazardous materials Environmental Vulnerability spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in environmental impacts to the city of Haslet. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Hurst. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Keller. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Kennedale Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Kennedale. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-91 Section 4 City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Lake Worth. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the Town of Lakeside. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of lightning. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of North Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Richland Hills. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Saginaw 4-92 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT �'A11111:4r.161111% Alam" The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Saginaw. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability lightning. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Southlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, and water systems. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to Tarrant County. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in Environmental Vulnerability environmental impacts to the city of Watauga. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. Town of Westlake Critical Asset Vulnerability The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-93 Section 4 Vulnerable Populations Environmental Vulnerability Critical Asset Vulnerability Vulnerable Populations Environmental Vulnerability Vulnerability $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in environmental impacts to the Town of Westlake. Such impacts could include contamination of soil, water ways, and water systems. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of lightning. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below the poverty line. While lightning poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or relocate after a lightning caused fire or electrical damage has occurred. Hazardous materials spills and leaks as a result of damage caused by lightning could result in environmental impacts to the city of Westworth Village. Such impacts could include contamination of soil and water systems. Multijurisdictional Concerns Strikes Highly Likely None -Minimal Localized Minor The entire planning area is vulnerable to lightning strikes, specifically given that fact that lightning can strike at any time without warning. As a result, any mitigation steps taken related to lightning should be undertaken on a countywide basis. Land Use and Development Trends Tarrant County does not currently have land use or development trends related to lightning. Hazard Summary Lightning strikes, although rare in occurrence, have a high danger potential associated with them. Lightning, as with some of the other natural hazards typical to Tarrant County, can strike anywhere and at any time. The unpredictability of lightning along with its potential to be deadly and destructive is all the more reason to explore mitigation actions. 4-94 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT 4.1.6 Winter Storms Hazard Definition Severe winter storms bring the threat of snow, freezing rain, and ice storms to Tarrant County. A heavy accumulation of ice, especially when accompanied by high winds, can destroy trees and power lines. Sidewalks, streets, and highways can become extremely hazardous to pedestrians and motorists. Severe winter storms originate as mid -latitude depressions of cyclonic weather systems and can cause snowstorms, blizzards, and ice storms. Winter storms can paralyze a county or community by shutting down normal day-to-day operations and can produce an accumulation of snow and ice on trees and utility lines, resulting in loss of electricity and blocked transportation routes. These storms can also lead to frozen water pipes, which when erupted, can lead to extensive property damage and the depletion of natural resources. Severe winter storms produce additional complications for the elderly and children due to vulnerabilities to extreme cold temperatures. There are two measurements used to classify and define winter storms: ice accumulation and snowfall. Extreme cold events are covered in Section 4.1.9 of this plan. Ice accumulation is measured using the Sperry -Piltz Ice Accumulation Index, or the SPIA Index, as shown in the figure below. Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions may expect an ice damage index from 0 to 5, providing a wide range of damage. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-95 Section 4 Figure 4-6" Sperry -Piltz Ice Accumulation Index The Sperry -Piltz Ice Accumulation Index, or "SPIA Index" — Copyright, February, 2009 ICE DAMAGE DAMAGE AND IMPACT INDEX DESCRIPT10NS Minimal risk of damage to exposed utility systems; no alerts or advisories needed for crews, fcyy outages. Some isolated fir localized utility interruptions are 1 possible, typically lasting only a fevv hours. Roads and bridges may become slick and hazardous. Scattered utility interruptions expected, typically lasting 12 to 24 hours. Roads and travel conditions may be extremely harlydous due to ice accumn€ttion. ."`linllrous ntititk interruptions N%ith some 3 dams -e to main feeder lines and equipment expected. 't -rev limb dama;;e is excessive. Outages lasting 1 — 5 days. Prolonged &. widespread Wilily interruptions 'ith extensive damage to main distribution feeder lines & some high voltage transmission tines/structures. Outages lasting 5 — lU days. Catastrophic damage to entire exposed utility including both distribution transmission networks. Outages could last several weeks in some areas. Sheltersneeded- (Categories of damage are based upon combinations ut' precipitation totals. temperatums and %vind speedsMirections.) Snowfall is measured using the Regional Snowfall Index (RSI). The RSI is produced by the National Climatic Data Center and ranks snowstorm impacts on a scale of 1 to 5, similar to the Fujita scale for tornadoes or the Saffir-Simpson scale for hurricanes. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions can expect to see snowfall between a range of 1 to 4 on the RSI. Figure 4-71$ Regional Snowfall Index 1 1-3 Notable 2 3-6 Significant 3 6-10 Major 4 10-18 Crippling 5 18.0+ Extreme l� Source: SPIA Index, http://www.spia-index.com/. 18 Source: NOAA, http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/snow-and-ice/rsi/. 4-96 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Hazard Identification Numerous sources were used in identifying the severe winter storm hazards that have occurred in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions (both primary and secondary). Sources included the National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA), National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), the National Weather Service (NWS), and the Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database (SHELDUS). Research from the NCDC indicates that winter storm occurrences recorded for Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions have produced injuries, fatalities, or significant property or crop damage. Statistically, Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions can expect a winter storm every three years, equating to a 33% chance of a winter storm in any given year. One of the biggest winter storms seen in Tarrant County occurred on January 15-16, 1964, when accumulations of snow between 8-12 inches were reported in the Dallas Fort Worth area. Another winter storm of note occurred on December 22-24, 1998, when a combination of freezing drizzle, freezing rain, sleet, and snow moved over all of North Texas. The result was more than 2000 traffic accidents and 6 deaths. Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport was forced to cancel over 400 flights, impacting the national air travel system as a whole. Arlington reported that two people died from hypothermia and many were injured from falling on the ice. Another devastating winter storm occurred a few years later, when on February 24-25, 2003, up to five inches of sleet and snow fell in the area, including one inch of ice accumulation. Area schools were closed for several days while county and local government personnel worked round the clock to clear the streets. There was a significant economic loss due to lost revenue from stranded truckers, canceled flights, closed businesses, and emergency expenditures. Although these storms were large disasters, the February 11-12, 2010, storm was record-breaking. Snow began to fall across North Texas beginning in the early hours of February 11 and continued for 24 hours. Climate data records for snow were eclipsed at DFW International Airport, totaling the largest snowfall in Tarrant County history. A total of 12.5 inches fell across the region, with the highest snowfall total of 14.4 inches being reported in northwest Tarrant County. Some jurisdictions, such as Southlake, were fortunate to experience minimal impact despite the snow totals. Others, however, were not as fortunate. Extreme low temperatures combined with high winds caused a water main pipe to burst inside Westlake Academy, causing nearly $700,000 in damage. Grapevine reported $500,000 in losses from the storm due to widespread power outages, treacherous travel conditions, and ice conditions of up to two inches. The storm caused 20,000 Arlington citizens to be without power. In Fort Worth, on the morning of February 12, the roof of Rahr & Sons Brewing Company, a microbrewery south of downtown Fort Worth, collapsed, damaging the building and coolant lines to the storage tanks. The total economic impact of this storm totaled approximately $20 million region wide. The table below lists winter storm events that have occurred in the planning area since 1996. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-97 Section 4 Table 4-17 Winter Storm Events19 TARRANT (ZONE) 11/24/1996 14:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/6/1997 12:00 CST Heavy Snow 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/12/1997 20:00 CST Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/14/1997 23:00 CST Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/22/1998 0:00 CST Ice Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/25/2000 0:00 CST Winter Storm 2 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/12/2000 18:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/25/2000 0:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/31/2000 0:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/1/2001 0:00 CST Heavy Snow 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 11/28/2001 8:13 CST Ice Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/5/2002 9:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 3/2/2002 2:15 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/24/2003 11:20 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/14/2004 1:00 CST Heavy Snow 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/22/2004 0:01 CST Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/7/2005 7:00 CST Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/18/2006 3:30 CST Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 11/30/2006 6:00 CST -6 Winter Storm 0 0 20.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/13/2007 11:00 CST -6 Ice Storm 0 0 50.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/17/2007 3:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 20.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/1/2007 1:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 3/6/2008 11:00 CST -6 Winter Storm 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/15/2008 18:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/23/2008 6:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/5/2009 8:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 35.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/27/2009 8:00 CST -6 Ice Storm 0 0 300.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/24/2009 10:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 120.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/7/2010 3:00 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 600.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/7/2010 3:00 CST -6 Frost/freeze 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/11/2010 2:45 CST -6 Heavy Snow 0 0 20.000M O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 3/20/2010 16:45 CST -6 Winter Weather 0 0 80.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/1/2011 0:00 CST -6 Ice Storm 0 0 500.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/3/2011 23:00 CST -6 Heavy Snow 0 0 50.00K O.00K 'y Source: Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States, http://webra.cas.sc.edu/hvriapps/sheldus_setup/sheldus results.aspx. 4-98 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TARRANT (ZONE) 11/25/2013 5:26 CST -6 Winter Storm 0 0 6.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/5/2013 14:00 CST -6 Winter Storm 0 0 10.00OM O.00K Totals: 2 0 31.781 M O.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. In evaluating assets that may potentially be impacted by the effects of severe winter storms, all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to the effects of a winter storm. Critical functions that rely on power are most vulnerable to winter storms. Loss of power occurs frequently as a result of heavy ice and snow on power lines. Additionally, cold temperatures and wind chills brought on by winter storms may cause water pipes to burst or freeze. A list of jurisdiction critical infrastructure may be found in Appendix G and all is considered vulnerable to winter storms. Additionally, the impact of snow and ice on roadways may prevent personnel who monitor and control critical infrastructure from accessing facilities, impacting their ability to keep these facilities functioning during winter weather. ■ People RiskNulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of the planning area because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a winter storm and no way to predict where a storm will occur. People are vulnerable to winter storms through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, water freezing, etc. The impact of a winter storm is larger in mild climates due to less familiarity and experience driving in and handling snow and ice, such as in Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions. ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. Risks to the environment are low for a winter storm. Winter thaw can cause flooding, impacting the environment and possibly creating contamination of potable water for public consumption. The risks and vulnerability to severe winter storms for each participating jurisdictions are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Critical Asset Vulnerability Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of winter storms. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-99 Section 4 City of Bedford WA I 1111:4 r. 1 UI I 191111 IOXTA III IN NO MIIII Critical Asset Vulnerability As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Critical Asset Vulnerability In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While winter storms Vulnerable Populations poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. 4-100 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. 0 City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-101 The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of winter storms. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Vulnerable populations within the airport would consist of those individuals working in the Vulnerable Populations airport as well as airline customers who happen to be at the airport during winter storms incidents. Should the airport be impacted by winter storms, efforts must be aimed at safeguarding these individuals from harm and restoring flight systems as quickly as possible. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city facilities and public schools. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-101 Section 4 Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. 4-102 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ,- City of Keller The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While Vulnerable Populations winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Kennedale Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-103 The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-103 Section 4 Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Saginaw The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. dEM6 City of Southlake 4 The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter Critical Asset Vulnerability storms. This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. 4-104 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Wataug Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. Town of Westlake Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of severe winter storms for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should winter storms impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Severe Winter Storms Likely More than 12 hours Countywide Moderate Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-105 The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability winter storms. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. Vulnerable Populations While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. City of Westworth Village Critical Asset Vulnerability The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of winter storms. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While winter storms poses a serious threat to any population, issues with mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter ahead of such a threat or to relocate to adequate shelter once a winter storm occurs. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a winter storm. Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of severe winter storms for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should winter storms impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Severe Winter Storms Likely More than 12 hours Countywide Moderate Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-105 Section 4 Multijurisdictional Concerns Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions can be affected by a winter storm. As a result, any mitigation steps taken related to severe winter storms should be undertaken on a countywide basis. Land Use and Development Trends Tarrant County currently has no land use or development trends related to winter storms. Hazard Summary Severe winter storms, unlike other natural hazards, typically afford communities some advance warning. The NWS issues winter storm watches, warnings, and advisories as these storms make their way through Tarrant County. Due to the frequency of winter storms in Tarrant County, most buildings and infrastructure are typically designed to sustain severe winter conditions. However, aging facilities and particularly heavy snowfalls bring the possibility of building collapse and infrastructure damage. Additionally, winter weather always brings a possibility for dangerous driving conditions, particularly in a community such as Tarrant County in which winter weather is not a regular occurrence. 4.1.7 Drought Hazard Definition By definition, a drought is a prolonged period of moisture deficiency. The severity of drought may be exacerbated by other factors, such as prolonged high winds and low humidity. There are several types of drought. A meteorological drought is defined on the degree of dryness, dependent on a lack of expected precipitation. A hydrological drought is related to the effects of decreased precipitation on reservoir, lake, and groundwater levels. An agricultural drought is solely defined on the demands of plant life relative to soil moisture deficiencies. These types of drought conditions affect the cultivation of crops as well as water availability and water quality. Agricultural drought conditions make natural fuels (grass, brush, trees, and dead vegetation) more fire -prone, thus making it a significant factor in wildfire production. A water management drought occurs when the demand for water exceeds the supply as a result of weather-related supply shortfall. The severity of a drought depends on the duration, intensity, and geographic extent of the water shortage as well as the demands on the areas water supply. The United States Department of Agriculture rates droughts from DO -D4, as shown in Figure 4-8, depending on the severity of the drought, the amount of time it will take for vegetation to return to normal levels, and the possible effects of the drought on vegetation and water supply. Drought differs from other natural hazards in multiple ways. First, drought is not as obvious as other hazards; it does not have the property destruction of a tornado or hurricane. Second, there is a lack of an exact and universally accepted definition of drought. Finally, the beginning and end of a drought is difficult to determine. In addition, droughts are often spread over a larger geographic area than other natural hazards. This considered, the economic effects of a drought can be just as devastating as any other natural hazards. 4-106 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Figure 4-8 Drought Severity Index ' NDM - National Drought Mitigation Center Figure 4-9 shows the Texas Drought Monitor, a map showing weekly drought conditions. Upon development of this plan, Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions are experiencing conditions that range from severe drought in the southeast portion of the County to exceptional drought in the northwest portion of the County. This is an alarming example of the extent to which Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions may experience drought, from Minor Drought conditions (DO) to Exceptional Drought conditions (D4). Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-107 Drought Monitoring Indices Di DotIrJllt f�ettllli Period Description of Possll}le Impacts Stalldaidize[I NDMC' Palmel severity (veal s) Precipitation Drought Drought hl[lex (SPI) CiTtegoly In(lex Going into drought; short-term dryness slowing Minor 3 to 4 growth of crops or pastures; fire risk above average. -0.5 to -0.7 D0 -1.0 to -1.9 Drought Coming out of drought; some lingering water deficits; pastures or crops not fully recovered. Some damage to crops or pastures, fire risk high; Moderate streams, reservoirs, or wells low, some water Drought ' to 9 shortages developing or imminent, voluntary water -0.0 to -1.2 D1 -2.0 to -2.9 use restrictions requested. Severe Crop or pasture losses likely; fire riskvery high; water Drought 10 to 1 shortages common; water restrictions imposed. 1.3 to 1.5 D2 3.0 to 3.9 Extreme-1wrMajor Drought Exceptional Drought 44+ crop and pasture losses, extreme fire danger'. widespread water shortages o� restrictions. IF, Exceptional and widespread crop and pasture losses'. exceptional fire risk; shortages of water in reservoirs, streams, and wells creating water emergencies. 6 to -1 .9 less than -2 (��*O D4 to -4.9 -5.0 or less ' NDM - National Drought Mitigation Center Figure 4-9 shows the Texas Drought Monitor, a map showing weekly drought conditions. Upon development of this plan, Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions are experiencing conditions that range from severe drought in the southeast portion of the County to exceptional drought in the northwest portion of the County. This is an alarming example of the extent to which Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions may experience drought, from Minor Drought conditions (DO) to Exceptional Drought conditions (D4). Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-107 Section 4 Figure 4-9 Texas Drought Monitor (as of May 2014)20 U.S. Drought Monitor May 27, 2014 Texas (Released Thursday, May. 29, 2014) Valid 8 a.m. EDT Hazard Identification Drought Conditions (Percent Area) !tensity DO Ab no ttn ally Dry D3Ext,-Drought D1 Moderate Drought D4 E-ptional Drought ® D2S-em Drought The Drought Uonitor focuses on broad -scale condbons. Local condRM6 may vary. See accompanying text summary for forecast statements. Author: Micheei Brewer N=/NOAA USDA r http :Hd ro u g h tmo n it o r. u n I. ed u! In an urban environment such as Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, the impacts of drought are not widely understood. Many people associate drought damage with dried crops, and given that few areas within Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions are used for agriculture, this misperception may be widespread. Some may then be surprised to learn that drought has had significant economic impacts in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, according the NCDC and SHELDUS data. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions experienced drought conditions from 2005 to 2007 that are its costliest in recent history. Dry weather increases water costs, causes heat waves, and can impact infrastructure if serious. Between 2005 and 2007, drought conditions cost Tarrant County, the participating jurisdictions, and businesses a combined total of $60 million. The majority of the State of Texas, including Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, is currently under Federal Drought Declarations. In fact, for the 235 counties in Texas under Federal 20 Source: national Drought Mitigations Center, http://droughtmonitor.unl. edu/MapsAndData/MapsandDataS ervices/Map S ervice. aspx. 4-108 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 None 10.72 DO -D4 89.28 D1 -D4 71.16 D2 -D4 49.16 Im 32.81 MIM 10.76 Current Last Week 52012094 9 82 90.18 72.31 56.11 40.35 25.05 3 Months Ago 738 92.62 67.88 33.55 9.45 0.93 2252094 Start of Calends Year 28.48 71.52 43.84 21.15 5.82 0.79 921912093 Start of Water Yes 6.62 93.38 70.95 25.08 4.01 U. 12 , V12093 One Year Ago 3.49 96.51 88.27 60.34 32.45 16.02 528209 !tensity DO Ab no ttn ally Dry D3Ext,-Drought D1 Moderate Drought D4 E-ptional Drought ® D2S-em Drought The Drought Uonitor focuses on broad -scale condbons. Local condRM6 may vary. See accompanying text summary for forecast statements. Author: Micheei Brewer N=/NOAA USDA r http :Hd ro u g h tmo n it o r. u n I. ed u! In an urban environment such as Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, the impacts of drought are not widely understood. Many people associate drought damage with dried crops, and given that few areas within Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions are used for agriculture, this misperception may be widespread. Some may then be surprised to learn that drought has had significant economic impacts in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, according the NCDC and SHELDUS data. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions experienced drought conditions from 2005 to 2007 that are its costliest in recent history. Dry weather increases water costs, causes heat waves, and can impact infrastructure if serious. Between 2005 and 2007, drought conditions cost Tarrant County, the participating jurisdictions, and businesses a combined total of $60 million. The majority of the State of Texas, including Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions, is currently under Federal Drought Declarations. In fact, for the 235 counties in Texas under Federal 20 Source: national Drought Mitigations Center, http://droughtmonitor.unl. edu/MapsAndData/MapsandDataS ervices/Map S ervice. aspx. 4-108 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Drought Declaration, the current drought is drier than any other period in Texas except for the 195O's drought. Unfortunately, relief is not in sight as of the publishing of this LMAP. Limited August rainfall and late summer heat have intensified the drought across the North Central Texas region, with all counties in at least severe drought (132) status and some in extreme drought (133). Reservoirs are continuing to decline and jurisdictions have lost as much as 20 percent of their capacity in the last 12 months. Fire danger has increased, with many jurisdictions having burn bans in place. For much of Tarrant County, 17 -month deficits of rainfall in excess of 20 inches persist. In the City of Fort Worth, hand watering is permitted between 10 am and 6 pm, twice -per -week landscape watering is allowed outside of these hours. The Tarrant Regional Water District is considering introducing Stage 2 water restrictions in October, which would limit outdoor watering to once a week. Stage 2 is enacted when water supplies fall below 60 percent. Overall, the region is suffering from persistent drought and more and more water conservation efforts are being sought. There is serious concern that if drought conditions continue, water supply issues will become a serious threat to region residents. The table below provides the drought events that occurred between 1996 and 2013 in Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions. Table 4-18 Tarrant County Drought History Ir_1Ill :L1011I ZONE 6/1/1996 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 7/1/1996 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/1/1996 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 7/1/1998 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/1/2000 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 9/1/2000 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 6/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 7/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 9/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 10/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 11/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 12/1/2005 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 1/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-109 Section 4 TARRANT ZONE 2/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 3/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 4/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 5/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 6/6/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 7/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 9/1/2006 0:00 CST Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 10/1/2006 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 500.00K 500.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 11/1/2006 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 800.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 7/23/2008 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 50.00K TARRANT ZONE 8/1/2008 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 5.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 4/17/2011 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 5.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/1/2011 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 20.00K TARRANT ZONE 9/1/2011 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 25.00K TARRANT ZONE 10/1/2011 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 7.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 8/7/2012 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 11/20/2012 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT ZONE 12/1/2012 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 1/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 2/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT ZONE 3/19/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 1.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 4/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 5/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 3.00K TARRANT ZONE 6/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 3.00K 4-110 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TARRANT ZONE 711/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K TARRANT ZONE 8/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 5.00K 5.00K TARRANT Z( ONE) 9/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 3.00K (ZONE) 10/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 3.00K TARRANT ZONE 11/1/2013 0:00 CST -6 Drought 0 0 O.00K 2.00K Totals: 0 0 505.00K 1.444M Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. Drought conditions typically pose little or no threat to structures; however, fires can occur as a result of dry weather. Drought may result in a large crop loss, resulting in a large economic loss, although this is not a large concern for the urban area of Tarrant County. Wildfire because of drought was considered, and it was determined that since previous instances of wildfire in Tarrant County have been relatively minimal, it does not bear a significant threat to the community. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a drought incident. People are vulnerable to the effects of drought, including reduction to the available water supply (both public and private wells), wildfires, and structural fires. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high for a drought incident. Environmental concerns would be loss of vegetation and risk of erosion in areas that are affected by drought and reduced availability of water supply (both public and private wells). The risks and vulnerability to drought for each participating jurisdictions are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public Critical Asset Vulnerability schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of drought. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Vulnerable Populations As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-111 Section 4 City of Blue Mound ,I ulnerability .�, , Critical Asset Vulnerability drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Azle Vulnerable Populations The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Environmental Vulnerability As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Vulnerable Populations In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult Critical Asset Vulnerability for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Bedford Vulnerable Populations The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Environmental Vulnerability Bedford. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While 4-112 drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make 2015 it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Crowley 4-112 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ,I ulnerability to The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of drought. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Vulnerable Populations Water shortages and damage to facilities could impact those individuals working at or traveling through airport facilities. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation, runways, and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Euless The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes city facilities and public schools. Effects can include water shortages and damage Critical Asset Vulnerability to foundations from shrinking soil. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Forest Hill The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 9.1 % of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, water Critical Asset Vulnerability treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-113 Section 4 City of Haltom City The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Haslet ,I ulnerability .�, , drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make Critical Asset Vulnerability it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Grapevine Vulnerable Populations The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, Environmental Vulnerability valued at 33.4 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Haltom City The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an elementary Critical Asset Vulnerability school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Keller Critical Asset Vulnerability The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 4-114 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT 84.1 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Kennedale City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of drought. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-115 The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years Vulnerable Populations or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years Vulnerable Populations or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of drought. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-115 Section 4 Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Richland Hills Tarrant County The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 Vulnerable Populations years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Saginaw 4-116 The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. ICity of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 million, Critical Asset Vulnerability and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. Critical Asset Vulnerability This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 Vulnerable Populations years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Watauga 4-116 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ,I ulnerability to The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability drought. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. Vulnerability ht Likely More than 12 hours Countywide Minor Multijurisdictional Concerns Drought will impact the entire planning area, including Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions; therefore, multijurisdictional concerns do not exist. Land Use and Development Trends Future development considerations for Tarrant County regarding drought center on water conservation. The majority of impact from drought is citizens and businesses being placed on water Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-117 Town of Westlake The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of drought. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at Critical Asset Vulnerability $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects Critical Asset Vulnerability of drought. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Effects can include water shortages and damage to foundations from shrinking soil. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While drought poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of a drought. Vulnerability ht Likely More than 12 hours Countywide Minor Multijurisdictional Concerns Drought will impact the entire planning area, including Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions; therefore, multijurisdictional concerns do not exist. Land Use and Development Trends Future development considerations for Tarrant County regarding drought center on water conservation. The majority of impact from drought is citizens and businesses being placed on water Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-117 Section 4 restrictions to ensure that jurisdiction water systems can provide the potable water necessary. Tarrant County and its jurisdictions will consider the effect any new developments will have on water systems to ensure that potable water is accessible and available during periods of drought. Hazard Summary Droughts do not have the immediate effects of other natural hazards, but sustained drought can cause severe economic stress in Tarrant County and the entire state. The potential negative effects of sustained drought are numerous. In addition to an increased threat of wildfires, drought can affect municipal and industrial water supplies, stream water quality, water recreation facilities, hydropower generation, and agricultural and forest resources. 4.1.8 Wildfires Hazard Definition A wildfire is defined as area sweeping and destructive conflagration, especially in a wilderness or a rural area. Wildfires in Texas can be defined as being a wildland, interface, or intermix fire. Wildfires can be a result of naturally occurring influences such as lightning, extreme drought, and heat as well as human influences such as a discarded cigarette butt, improperly extinguished campfire, or a stray spark from nearby railroad tracks. The potential for threat of wildfires is dependent upon topography and slope, surface fuel characteristics, recent climate conditions, current meteorological conditions, and fire behavior. Three methods for determining wildfire potential are provided below: the Keetch-Byram Drought Index, the Wildland Urban Interface and Fire Intensity Scales. The Keetch-Byram Drought Index relates current weather conditions to potential or expected fire conditions. Fire behavior typically associated with these indices is provided in the table below. Table 4-19 Keetch-Byram Drought Index 0-200 Soil and fuel moisture are high. Most fuels will not readily ignite or burn. However, with sufficient sunlight and wind, cured grasses and some light surface fuels will burn in spots and patches. Fires more readily burn and will carry across an area with no gaps. Heavier fuels will still not readily 200-400 ignite and burn. Also, expect smoldering and the resulting smoke to carry into and possibly through the night. Fire intensity begins to significantly increase. Fires will readily burn in all directions exposing mineral 400-600 soils in some locations. Larger fuels may burn or smolder for several days creating possible smoke and control problems. Fires will burn to mineral soil. Stumps will burn to the end of underground roots and spotting will be a 600-800 major problem. Fires will burn through the night and heavier fuels will actively burn and contribute to fire intensity. The Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Response Index is a rating of the potential impact of a wildfire on people and their homes. The WUI reflects housing density data combined with Flame Length data and response functions, all calculated to determine where the greatest potential impact to homes and people is likely to occur as a result of wildfire. 4-118 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Fire intensity scale maps are included for each jurisdiction in Appendix F. Fire Intensity Scales specifically identify the areas where significant fuel hazards and associated dangerous fire behavior potential exist. It is similar to the Richter scale for earthquakes, but allow for jurisdictions to gauge the potential for wildfire and identify their largest vulnerabilities. Fire intensity scales are based on five classes of wildfire. The minimum wildfire class, Class 1, represents minimum wildfire intensities and the maximum class, Class 5, represents very high wildfire intensities. The following descriptions identify class intensity. Class 1, Very Low: Very small, discontinuous flames, usually less than 1 foot in length; very low rate of spread; no spotting. Fires are typically easy to suppress by firefighters with basic training and non- specialized equipment. 2. Class 2, Low: Small flames, usually less than two feet long; small amount of very short range spotting possible. Fires are easy to suppress by trained firefighters with protective equipment and specialized tools. 3. Class 3, Moderate: Flames up to 8 feet in length; short-range spotting is possible. Trained firefighters will find these fires difficult to suppress without support from aircraft or engines, but dozer and plows are generally effective. Increasing potential for harm or damage to life and property. 4. Class 4, High: Large flames, up to 30 feet in length; short-range spotting common; medium range spotting possible. Direct attack by trained firefighters, engines, and dozers is generally ineffective, indirect attack may be effective. Significant potential for harm or damage to life and property. Class 5, Very High: Very large flames up to 150 feet in length; profuse short-range spotting, frequent long-range spotting; strong fire -induced winds. Indirect attack marginally effective at the head of the fire. Great potential for harm or damage to life and property. The planning area has the possibility of experiencing wildfires ranging from Class 1 to Class 5. Hazard Identification The urban nature of Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions naturally mitigates against wildfires. There have been 8 wildfires in Tarrant County in the past 5 years, although many of them occurred in 2011. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions may experience wildfires every 3 years, equating to a 33% chance of a fire occurring in Tarrant County or the participating jurisdictions in a given year. Many of the wildfire events reported by jurisdictions for the compilation of this plan occurred at DFW International Airport. Six wildfires have occurred at DFW International Airport since 2010, most of them burning only two acres or so. Although these wildfires did not burn many acres or cause much structural damage, the smoke from the fires were costly. Smoke over the DFW International Airport runways delayed flights out of and into the airport, creating a chain effect that impacted the entire national airspace system. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-119 Section 4 The City of Keller has only experienced small grass fires due to its shrinking urban-wildland interface within the City limits. However, it does have the potential for wildfire associated with drought, the railroad running north -south between the City and the City of Fort Worth, and the large lots and undeveloped land in the northern portion of the community. The fires that have been experienced have occurred during drought conditions within the community as noted in years 1996-98, 2000, 2005, and 2008. Grapevine had a wildfire in 2006 that burned 20 acres and caused $30,000 in estimated economic losses. Another Grapevine wildfire spread to the DFW International Airport in 2010, burning 100 acres and causing $20,000 in losses. An arsonist ignited multiple grass fires in northeast Johnson County and southeast Tarrant County. Pantego firefighters were covering the Kennedale fire station while Kennedale's firefighters were fighting wildfires involving structures in unincorporated Tarrant County. A fire ignited on JR Hawkins Road in Kennedale spread to adjacent storage buildings and spread north toward a row of houses on Swiney Hyett Road in Kennedale. Mutual -aid fire crews protected all of the threatened houses and extinguished the fire without a serious injury despite a temperature of 108 degrees. Contents losses totaled $5,000. Wildfires that have impacted Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions since 2005 are listed in the table below. Table 4-20 Wildfires in Tarrant County TARRANT (ZONE) 12/27/2005 18:00 CST Wildfire 0 0 1.000M O.00K ZONE 1/29/2008 12:00 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 5.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 3/4/2009 16:30 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 200.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 7/28/2011 16:00 CST -6 Wildfire 0 1 1.000M O.00K TARRANT ZONE 8/17/2011 13:30 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 O.00K 1.00K (ZONE) 8/18/2011 15:30 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 700.00K O.00K TARRANT ZONE 9/9/2011 11:00 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 50.00K O.00K TARRANT (ZONE) 9/9/2011 12:00 CST -6 Wildfire 0 0 7.001K O.00K Totals: 0 1 2.962M 1.001K Potential for future wildfires exists in the planning area. Figure 4-10 is a map of the Wildland Urban Interface for Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions. Figure 4-11 is a map of the fire intensity scale for Tarrant County. Specific jurisdiction information may be found in Appendix F. 4-120 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Figure 4-10 Tarrant County WUI Response Index Section 4 Figure 4-11 Tarrant County Fire Intensity Scale 4-122 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. Assets most exposed to wildfires are located in Grapevine. Although Grapevine is 95 percent developed, there are large tracts of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property, heavily vegetated parklands, and large open tracts of airport "buffer" zones around DFW that are and will remain undeveloped for perpetuity. It is in these areas that tend to have wildfires that rapidly spread, are difficult to get to and extinguish and that butt up against the urban interface. DFW International Airport is also at risk to wildfires. There is little risk to the infrastructure located in other more urban parts of Tarrant County from wildfires. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County, because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a wildfire incident and no way to predict where a wildfire incident will occur. Much of the risk to people from wildfires in Tarrant County is the result of smoke impacting those with respiratory diseases when smoke from wildfires in other areas of the state moves over the County. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high for a wildfire incident, although there is a low frequency of occurrence. Environmental concerns would be loss of vegetation and risk of erosion in areas that are affected by wildfires. The risk and vulnerability for wildfires for each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. "W��City of Azle Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Bedford AL Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-123 Section 4 Vulnerability to Wildfires Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Blue Mound Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Colleyville Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Critical Asset Vulnerability Wildfires could damage airport facilities and impede airport operations. Vulnerable Populations NA Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the airport are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Euless Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Forest Hill Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Fort Worth 4-124 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Vulnerability to Wildfires Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Grapevine Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Haslet Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Hurst Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Keller Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Kennedale Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-125 Section 4 Vulnerability to Wildfires City of Lake Worth Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Town of Lakeside Critical Asset Vulnerability Town facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of North Richland Hills Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Richland Hills Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Saginaw Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Southlake Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Tarrant County Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. 4-126 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Westworth Village Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Vulnerability Wildfires Multijurisdictional Concerns Likely 6-12 hours Localized Minor The entire planning area is vulnerable to wildfires and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. More rural areas of Tarrant County are more prone to wildfires than urban areas. This is obvious from the WUI index provided in Figure 4-10. Haslet, Lakeside, Azle, Saginaw, Blue Mound, Keller, Southlake, Grapevine, Crowley, and Kennedale are most vulnerable to wildfires in Tarrant County. The smoke from the fires may also affect the urban areas as well as the travel on highways and roads throughout Tarrant County. Land Use and Development Trends Participating jurisdictions will continue to monitor development in their areas to ensure that the addition of wildfire fuels are monitored and mitigated against. Participating jurisdictions in the planning area have burn ordinances in effect to guard against wildfires during times of drought. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-127 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Vulnerability to Wildfires Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Town of Westlake Critical Asset Vulnerability Town facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the town could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. City of Westworth Village Critical Asset Vulnerability City facilities located in or adjacent to woody or grassy areas could be susceptible from damage due to wildfires. Vulnerable Populations Individuals living in woody or grassy areas of the city could be vulnerable from wildfires. Environmental Vulnerability Woody or grassy areas of the city are vulnerable to damage to vegetation and soil erosion as a result of wildfire. Vulnerability Wildfires Multijurisdictional Concerns Likely 6-12 hours Localized Minor The entire planning area is vulnerable to wildfires and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. More rural areas of Tarrant County are more prone to wildfires than urban areas. This is obvious from the WUI index provided in Figure 4-10. Haslet, Lakeside, Azle, Saginaw, Blue Mound, Keller, Southlake, Grapevine, Crowley, and Kennedale are most vulnerable to wildfires in Tarrant County. The smoke from the fires may also affect the urban areas as well as the travel on highways and roads throughout Tarrant County. Land Use and Development Trends Participating jurisdictions will continue to monitor development in their areas to ensure that the addition of wildfire fuels are monitored and mitigated against. Participating jurisdictions in the planning area have burn ordinances in effect to guard against wildfires during times of drought. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-127 Section 4 Hazard Summary Wildfires have the potential to cause extensive property damage and affect many lives in the Tarrant County area, particularly due to smoke in the area from wildfires in other areas of the state. DFW International Airport is most vulnerable to wildfires due to the fields located in the airport as well as the risk of sparks from equipment. 4.1.9 Extreme Temperatures Hazard Definition Extreme temperatures include both cold and hot events, which can have a significant impact on human health, commercial/agricultural businesses, and primary and secondary effects on infrastructure (for example, burst pipes and power failure). What constitutes "extreme cold" or "extreme heat" can vary across different areas of the country based on what the population is accustomed to in their respective climates. What constitutes extreme cold and its effects can also vary across the state of Texas. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions typically do not experience extreme cold, but history has shown that Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions are not immune to extreme cold temperatures. The National Weather Service utilizes temperatures and wind speeds to identify how cold temperatures will impact and endanger people. Figure 4-12 illustrates the time it takes for frostbite to set in dependent on wind chill. The planning area may expect cold temperatures that drop below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Figure 4-1221 Wind Chill Chart Wind Chill Chart y �, 21 Source: NOAH, http://www.crh.noaa. ovg /ima e�s/gpx/windchill. 4-128 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Temperatures that hover 10 degrees or more above the average high temperature for a region and last for several weeks are defined as extreme heat by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heat is measured by the National Weather Service using the Heat Index found in Figure 4-13. Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions may expect heat ranging up to and possibly above 116 degrees Fahrenheit. Figure 4-13 National Weather Service Heat Index22 NOAA's National Weather Service Likelihood of Heat Disorders with Prolonged Exposure or Strenuous Activity ❑ Caution ❑ Extreme Caution ® Danger E Extreme Danger 22 Source: NOAA, http://nws.noaa.fzov/os/heat/index.shtml. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-129 Heat Index Temperature (°F) 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 40 80 81 83 85 88 91 94 97 101 105 109 114 119 124 45 80 82 84 87 89 93 96 100 104 109 114 119 124 50 81 83 85 88 91 95 99 103 108 113 118 124 55 81 84 86 89 93 97 101 106 112 117 124 60 82 84 88 91 95 100 105 110 116 123 65 82 85 89 93 98 103 108 114 121 = 70 83 86 90 95 100 105 112 119 2 75 84 88 92 97 103 109 116 124 80 84 89 94 100 106 113 121 85 85 90 96 102 110 117 90 86 91 98 105 113 122 95 86 93 100 108 117 100 87 95 103 112 121 Likelihood of Heat Disorders with Prolonged Exposure or Strenuous Activity ❑ Caution ❑ Extreme Caution ® Danger E Extreme Danger 22 Source: NOAA, http://nws.noaa.fzov/os/heat/index.shtml. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-129 Section 4 Figure 4-14 Extreme Heat in Texas Legend cuunties Extreme Heat 10ayss: 1380-2003 0 3 •l Hazard Identification The geographic location of Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions make it less vulnerable to extreme temperatures than other areas of the country. The average high temperature in July and August, Tarrant County and the participating jurisdiction's hottest months, is 94.5 and 94.8 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. The average low temperature in July and August is 74.7 and 74.9 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. Temperatures are likely reach 100 degrees Fahrenheit or more in the summer every year. The record for heat in Tarrant County was set in 1954 with a temperature of 111 degrees Fahrenheit. The citizens of Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions are more accustomed to heat than cold temperatures, due to the climate. Texas is known less for extreme cold temperatures than extreme heat. In the winter months, the temperature drops to average low temperatures of 35.4 degrees Fahrenheit and an average high temperature of 56.5 degrees Fahrenheit. Local residents are not accustomed to cold weather; therefore, cold temperatures are more difficult to tolerate. The record cold temperature in the area was set in 1989 when a cold front dropped the temperature to -6 degrees Fahrenheit. Infrastructure in the area was not equipped to handle the cold and as a result, $25 million of damage was incurred via demands for power and frozen pipes. This was only a few years after the December 1983 cold wave that caused a record 295 consecutive hours below freezing, causing $1.5 million in damages in Tarrant County alone. More recently, a January 2007 cold wave caused freezing temperatures at DFW International Airport for four consecutive days. Extreme weather events that have occurred in Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions since 1996 are listed in the table below. 4-130 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Table 4-21 Extreme Weather Events TARRANT Cold/wind (ZONE) 1/8/1996 9:00 CST Chill 1 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT Cold/wind ZONE 4/12/1997 4:00 CST Chill 0 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT Cold/wind ZONE 12/23/2004 8:00 CST Chill 1 0 O.00K O.00K TARRANT Excessive (ZONE) 8/10/2007 8:00 CST -6 Heat 1 1 0 OOK 0 OOK TARRANT Excessive ZONE 8/1/2011 6:00 CST -6 Heat 0 63 O.00K O.00K Totals: 3 64 O.00K O.00K Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. It was determined that all critical facilities in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions as well as all public, private, and commercial property are vulnerable to being affected by extreme temperatures; however, the risk is very low. Extreme cold may freeze water pipes, causing significant issues for a facility. Extreme heat may affect power supply to a facility. ■ People RiskNulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of an extreme temperature incident and no way to predict where and when an extreme temperature incident will occur. People are vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures, including power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, etc. Those with existing medical conditions are affected by extreme temperatures, and the elderly population may be at higher risk. ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. Risks to the environment are high should an extreme temperature incident occur, and the frequency of extreme temperatures in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions is high. Environmental concerns include interruption of water supply (such as water pipes freezing, frozen tree branches, etc.) and secondary events such as fires and hazmat accidents. Extreme heat may be a significant factor in causing droughts. The risk and vulnerability to extreme temperatures in each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-131 Section 4 KNIMIN r. 119 - City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, Critical Asset Vulnerability public schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of extreme temperatures. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. As of 2010, 8% of the population in Arlington consists of individuals who were 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16% of Arlington families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. As of 2010, 12.8% of the population in Azle consists of individuals who were 65 years or older. Vulnerable Populations In addition, approximately 6.9% of Azle families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. # City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is Critical Asset Vulnerability home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. As of 2010, 8.7% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who were 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.7% of Bedford families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Blue Mound The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 7.2% of the population in Bedford consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.9 % of Blue Mound families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Colleyville 4-132 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at 36 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 5.3% of the population in Colleyville consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 1.2 % of Colleyville families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Crowley City of Euless The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city facilities and public schools. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Forest Hill The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 9.1% of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-133 The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 8.3% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 4.3 % of Crowley families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations Water shortages and damage to facilities could impact those individuals working at or traveling through airport facilities. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Euless The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city facilities and public schools. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 5.8% of the population in Crowley consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 5.7 % of Euless families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Forest Hill The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 9.1% of the population in Forest Hill consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.0 % of Forest Hill families live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-133 Section 4 Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Haltom City The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an Critical Asset Vulnerability elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. 4-134 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 1:4 r. 119 - City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage Critical Asset Vulnerability facilities, water treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 8.2% of the population in Fort Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older and approximately 18.7 % of individuals in Fort Worth live below the poverty line. In Vulnerable Populations addition, there is a homeless population in in Fort Worth estimated at 2,000 individuals. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, and water treatment facilities, valued at 33.4 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 7.9% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 7.9 % of individuals in Grapevine live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Haltom City The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 10.0% of the population in Grapevine consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 16.7 % of individuals in Haltom City live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an Critical Asset Vulnerability elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations A breakdown of vulnerable populations was not available for the city of Haslet as of the writing of this document. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. 4-134 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 12.4% of the population in Hurst consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 6.6 % of individuals in Hurst live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Keller City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-135 The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued at approximately 84.1 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 8.6% of the population in Keller consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.9 % of individuals in Keller live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Kennedale The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 10.5% of the population in Kennedale consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Kennedale live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 4.1 million, schools valued at 58.4 million, and two nursing home facilities valued at 2.3 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 16.1 % of the population in Lake Worth consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.4 % of individuals in Lake Worth live below the poverty Vulnerable Populations line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations Approximately 18.4% of the population in Lakeside consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 3.0 % of individuals in Lakeside live below the poverty line. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-135 Section 4 City of Richland Hills 1:4 r. 119 1 - Critical Asset Vulnerability While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Environmental Vulnerability Approximately 12.3% of the population in North Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.5 % of individuals in North Richland Hills live Vulnerable Populations below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, Critical Asset Vulnerability issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 18.4% of the population in Richland Hills consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 7.8 % of individuals in Richland Hills live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Saginaw The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes a city building and a county fire alarm center. The city is also home to several food processing and industrial facilities. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 6.8% of the population in Saginaw consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 4.2 % of individuals in Saginaw live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at Critical Asset Vulnerability 10.3 million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 5.9% of the population in Southlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 3.3 % of individuals in Southlake live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. 4-136 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme Critical Asset Vulnerability temperatures. This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 9.9% of the population in Tarrant County consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 14.7 % of individuals in Tarrant County live below the Vulnerable Populations poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects Critical Asset Vulnerability of extreme temperatures. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-137 City of Watauga The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability extreme temperatures. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 7.4% of the population in Watauga consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 8.1 % of individuals in Watauga live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Town of Westlake The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of extreme temperatures. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station Critical Asset Vulnerability valued at $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the city, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 11.6% of the population in Westlake consists of individuals who are 65 years or Vulnerable Populations older. In addition, approximately 2.7 % of individuals in Westlake live below the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects Critical Asset Vulnerability of extreme temperatures. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Effects can include water shortages, burst pipes, and damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Approximately 11.5% of the population in Westworth Village consists of individuals who are 65 years or older. In addition, approximately 9.1 % of individuals in Westworth Village live below Vulnerable Populations the poverty line. While extreme temperatures poses a serious threat to any population, issues with housing and mobility could make it difficult for those individuals to seek shelter in response to such a threat. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of extreme temperatures. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-137 Section 4 Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of extreme temperatures for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should extreme temperatures impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Extreme Temperatures Likely Multijurisdictional Concerns More than 12 hours Countywide Minor Tarrant County and all participating jurisdictions are vulnerable to extreme temperatures and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. The probability of extreme temperatures occurring in the future is likely based on previous data. Extreme temperatures affect Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions equally and uniformly. The entire county is at risk of extreme temperature events. Land Use and Development Trends Future development throughout Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions may be vulnerable to potential damage from extreme temperature because no property or facility is immune to extreme temperature effects. Hazard Summary Extreme temperatures have occurred across the entire Tarrant County area. Extreme temperature effects are seen in different regions and vary depending on normal meteorological conditions such as extreme heat or extreme cold. Extreme temperatures are possible throughout the planning area, with the northern portion of the state being vulnerable to extreme cold temperatures during the winter months. 4.1.10 Expansive Soils Hazard Definition Expansive soils are soils that expand when water is added and shrink when they dry out. This continuous change in soil volume can cause homes built on the soil to move unevenly and crack. Each year in the United States, expansive soils cause $2.3 billion in damage to houses, other buildings, roads, pipelines, and other structures. This is more than twice the damage from floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes combined. Hazard Identification Many of the soils found in the central and eastern portions of the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) region are clay -rich, fine-grained soils. These soils contain a class of clay minerals called smectites, which have the property of exaggerated bulk volume changes in 4-138 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT the presence or absence of water. These smectitic soils in the NCTCOG region originate primarily from the calcareous Cretaceous—aged marls and clay rock formations, notably of the Austin and Taylor Groups. Extreme wetting and drying cycles on this soil accentuate the shrinking and swelling effects, and as a result, these soils are commonly called vertisols due to their distinctive vertical shrink -swell features, clay -like texture, and common large, vertical cracks when dry. One of the best known and classic of these vertisols is the Houston Black, a Blackland Prairie soil that stretches over 2 million acres of land between Dallas and Houston. This soil has been nominated by the Professional Soil Scientists of Texas to be named the State Soil of Texas due to its unique and common influence on the lives of Texans. Shrinking and swelling of these vertisols can come at a high economic price. Some of the most expansive of soils may gain or lose up to 75% of its original soil volume, causing radical gain and loss of a structure foundation's continuity. In addition, soil expansion and loss is rarely uniform across large areas; some areas with locally higher clay content may expand much more than a nearby siltier or sandier soil unit. Other problems are caused by high plasticity soils. When soil has dried and cracked, water can travel along the cracks for several feet in all directions. If the soil around a structure's foundation is dried and cracked, then water placed next to the foundation will run through the cracks and accumulate at the bottom of the grade beam (the thick portion of the foundation that is under the exterior walls). In some cases, an accumulation of water in the soil at the base of a foundation can cause the soil to lose some of its load-bearing capacity. If the soil loses enough load-bearing capacity, the structure will sink into the ground. In addition, water that collects under the foundation, regardless of origin, is a major problem. "Upheaval" relates to the situation in which the internal and, on rare occasion, external areas of the foundation raises above the "as -built" position. In high plasticity soils, this phenomenon results, almost without exception, from the introduction of moisture underneath the foundation. Once the slab heaves, the reinforcing steel is stressed into what amounts to a permanent elongation. Expansive soils are one of the nation's most prevalent causes of damage to buildings and construction. Annual losses are estimated in the range of $2 billion to $7 billion. However, because the hazard develops gradually and seldom presents a threat to life, expansive soils hazards have received limited attention, despite their costly effects. The losses include severe structural damage; cracked driveways, sidewalks, and basement floors; heaving of roads and highway structures; condemnation of buildings; and disruption of pipelines and sewer lines. The destructive forces may be upward, horizontal, or both Design and construction of structures without attention paid to the existence and behavior of expansive soils can worsen a readily manageable situation. Where expansive soils are not recognized, improper building or structure design, faulty construction, inappropriate landscaping, and long-term maintenance practices unsuited to the specific soil conditions can become a continuing and costly problem. Design problems might include improper foundation loading, improper depth or diameter of drilled pier, insufficient reinforcing steel, and insufficient attention to surface and underground water. Construction problems related to expansive soils include lack of reinforcing steel, insufficient or improperly placed reinforcing steel, mushroom -topped drilled piers, and inadequate void space between soils and grade beams. Allowing clays to dry excessively before pouring concrete and permitting the ponding of water near a foundation during and after construction also are Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-139 Section 4 contributing factors in expansive soil- related construction problems. Building without allowance for basement or ground floor movement in known expansive soils areas is a very common source of property damage. Improper landscaping problems include inadequately managing surface drainage and planting vegetation next to the foundation so irrigation water enters the soil. Expansive soils are a profound nationwide problem, as shown by Jones and Holtz (1973)23: "Each year, shrinking or swelling inflicts at least $2.3 billion in damage to houses, buildings, roads, and pipelines -more than twice the damage from floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes. Over 250,000 new homes are built on expansive soils each year. Of those, 60 percent will experience only minor damage during their useful lives, but 10 percent will experience significant damage, some beyond repair. Flooding affects 1 person in 10; expansive soils affect 1 person in 5. Swelling clays are one of the most significant, widespread, costly, and least publicized geologic hazards." Although several visual methods for identification of potentially expansive clays exist, only a competent, professional soil engineer and engineering geologist should be relied upon to identify this potential hazard. Some warning signs for swell might include: a) soft, puff, "popcorn" appearance of the surface soil when dry; b) surface soil that is very sticky when wet; c) open cracks (desiccation polygons) in dry surface soils; d) lack of vegetation due to heavy clay soils; e) soils that are very plastic and weak when wet but are "rock -hard" when dry. Engineering soil tests include index tests and design tests. Rapid, simple index tests are used to determine whether more complex design tests are necessary. Some index properties that may aid in the identification of probable areas of expansive clay include Atterberg limits, plasticity index, grain size determination, activity ratio, dry unit weight, and moisture content (Asphalt Institute, 1964). The primary design tests for expansive soils are the consolidation swell test for buildings, and the California Bearing Ratio swell test for roads (Asphalt Institute, 1964). Index properties are used to define a "weighted index", identifying the lessening of expansion with increasing depth in soil. Special foundation designs are considered essential when the expansion index is 20 or greater. The scale utilized for expansive soils is therefore rated based on the potential for expansive soils in the following ratings: Figure 4-15 Expansive Index 0-20 Very Low 21 -50 Low 51 -90 Medium 91-130 High >130 Very High 23 "Jones, D.E. Jr., and Holtz, W. G., "Expansive Soils — The Hidden Disaster, " Civil Engineering, Aug. 1973, Vol. 43, Nov. 8" 4-140 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Damage from expansive clays can affect, to some extent, virtually every type of structure in Texas. Some structures, such as skyscrapers in downtown Dallas, generally have well engineered foundations that are too heavily loaded for swelling damage to occur. At the opposite extreme are public schools and single-family homes, which are generally constructed on a minimal budget and which may have under -designed lightly loaded foundations that are particularly subject to damage from soil movements. Homeowners and public agencies that assume they cannot afford more costly foundations and floor systems often incur the largest percentage of damage and costly repairs from expansive soil. No figures are available for the total damage to homes and infrastructure in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdiction from expansive clays or soils. Reports detailing previous occurrences of expansive soil damage have been completed by the participating jurisdictions, but they have identified the conduct of expansive soils studies and development of plans in their mitigation actions. The extent of expansive soils in the County are known to range between very low and low, as defined in the above expansive index. The participating jurisdictions have identified the gathering of more information regarding expansive soils in their mitigation strategies. The location and extent of expansive soils in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions are shown in the map below. The information used to develop this map is from 2009 but will be updated when new information is obtained. Specific information for each participating jurisdiction was not available but the jurisdictions have identified the conduct of expansive soils studies and development of plans as mitigation actions. The following two maps depict the extent of expansive soils in Tarrant County and the participating jurisdictions. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-141 Section 4 MOL 4-14Z 121 a ":v- ---- ---------, Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation 114. Action Plan Expansive Soils Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 #a - --�me ;A ace --- IdP 1-laslet .. Q 4 S.outhlake 13 Q e Keller ab i C1 Azle Saginaw �Itie 141 u rrti kesi �d t L � Wes rth i a e i Fort Worth EJ 4� Crowley Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ----- Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Plan Grapevim Expansive Soils �No Richland 1II oil Plasticity Index Bedford Euless urs G-10 Low Soil Expansivlty alterr, 11-20 land 21-30 .}1-4LO 4 1 41-50 High Sail Expansivity Lakes (,hies - - - Tarrant County 2 0 b11 gest H- nneda - 4-14 Section 4 Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. All structures within the NCTCOG region are vulnerable to expansive soils, but those within the central and eastern portions of the region are most susceptible. Pipelines and pavements are vulnerable to expansive soils and should be check regularly for cracks and breaks. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine where expansive soils will occur. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are low for expansive soils. The risk and vulnerability to expansive soils in each participating jurisdiction are detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. City of Arlington The City of Arlington is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive soils. This includes city facilities worth approximately 8.5 million, the Dallas Cowboys Stadium worth $1.6 billion dollars, as well as many U.S. Government office facilities, public Critical Asset Vulnerability schools, a university, a large theme park, and privately -owned facilities that employ a significant number of residents. Power, water and sewer treatment systems could also be affected as a result of expansive soils. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Azle The City of Azle is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive Critical Asset Vulnerability soils. This includes city structures worth approximately 63.5 million, and public school facilities worth 96 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Bedford The City of Bedford is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities, schools, and hospitals. In addition, the city is home to employers including Walmart, Transamerica, and Heartland that employ residents of the City of Bedford. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. 4-144 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Blue Mound Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of expansive soils. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations NA Environmental Vulnerability The City of Blue Mound is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities valued at 250,000, a school, and water production facilities that serve the residents of Blue Mound. Effects can include damage to foundations Critical Asset Vulnerability from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and Vulnerable Populations businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Ow - City of Colleyville The City of Colleyville is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities valued at 11.7 million, and school facilities valued at Critical Asset Vulnerability 36 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and Vulnerable Populations businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Crowley � W The City of Crowley is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities valued at 10.2 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport The Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable Critical Asset Vulnerability to the effects of expansive soils. This includes airport towers, terminals, utilities plants, fuel facilities, water treatment facilities, storage facilities, as well as aircraft. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations NA Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Euless The City of Euless is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities and public schools. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Forest Hill The City of Forest Hill is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city facilities valued at $875,220. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-145 Section 4 Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Fort Worth The City of Fort Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water pumps stations, water storage facilities, Critical Asset Vulnerability water treatment facilities, convention facilities, and radio towers valued at $571 million. The City also has school facilities, hospitals, a naval air station, as well as employers that employ many of the residents of the city. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Grapevine The City of Grapevine is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This city facilities,ings, water storage treatment facilities, valued at 33.4cmal on. Effectses foundations fromshrinking or can i clude damage to fo can expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Haltom City The City of Haltom City is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings valued at 10.8 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Haslet The City of Haslet is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive soils. This includes a city building housing fire and emergency management, and an Critical Asset Vulnerability elementary school. The City also is home to an Amazon Incorporated distribution center that employs approximately 1500 people. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Hurst The City of Hurst is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings valued at 34.6 million and a children's medical center valued at 15 million. In addition, there is a Mall in Hurst whose property is valued at 155 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. 4-146 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT City of Keller City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-147 The City of Keller is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings valued at 46.7 million, and school facilities valued Critical Asset Vulnerability at approximately 84.1 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and Vulnerable Populations businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability City of Kennedale The City of Kennedale is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water storage tanks, and well pumps valued at 36 Critical Asset Vulnerability million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and Vulnerable Populations businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-147 City of Lake Worth The City of Lake Worth is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansiveings ll on, schools valued at 58.4 million, dat andtwonursing home facilities valued 2.3 million. Effec sc�an include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Town of Lakeside The Town of Lakeside is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes a city building, a water pump station, a waste water facility, and two gas wells. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of North Richland Hills The City of North Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the Critical Asset Vulnerability effects of expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Richland Hills The City of Richland Hills is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings, water storage facilities, sewage lift stations, pump stations and a hospital. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-147 Section 4 Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Saginaw The City of Saginaw is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability center. acand Ip ocessingncludes home to several food nldusttr al facilities. Effectsl can elude damageitoalso foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Southlake The City of Southlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive soils. This includes a city buildings valued at 15.2 million, a hospital valued at 10.3 Critical Asset Vulnerability million, and school facilities valued at 284 million. In addition, there are two nursing facilities valued at 16.3 million, as well as several major employers. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Tarrant County Tarrant County is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive Critical Asset Vulnerability soils. This includes county buildings valued at 628.2 million, school district facilities, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, and healthcare facilities. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Watauga The city of Watauga is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of Critical Asset Vulnerability expansive soils. This includes city buildings valued at 18.1 million. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Town of Westlake The Town of Westlake is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects of expansive soils. This includes a water pump station valued at 4 million, a fire station valued at Critical Asset Vulnerability $300,000, a charter school, and a university. There are also two large employers in the town, Fidelity Investments and the Solana Business Complex. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. 4-148 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. City of Westworth Village The city of Westworth Village is home to critical facilities that would be vulnerable to the effects Critical Asset Vulnerability of expansive soils. This includes two city facilities valued at 4.9 million, as well as a school. Effects can include damage to foundations from shrinking or expanding soil. Vulnerable Populations All homeowners and business owners are at potential risk from the damage to their homes and businesses caused by expansive soils. Environmental Vulnerability Severe damage to vegetation and roads can occur as a result of expansive soils. Vulnerability The following chart provides the potential impact of expansive soils for all participating jurisdictions. Potential losses should expansive soils impact each jurisdiction are provided in Appendix G where the value of each piece of critical infrastructure is detailed for building and contents losses. Soils Likely More than 12 hours Localized Negligible Multijurisdictional Concerns There are no multijurisdictional concerns as they relate to expansive soils. Land Use and Development Trends There are no regulations in place regarding land use and development on expansive soils. Slab foundations, commonly found in single-family dwellings, are particularly vulnerable to expansive soil damage. Builders should understand that expansive soils may result in damaged foundations and pavements and pipelines. Hazard Summary Expansive soils pose a threat to Tarrant County property owners. The most obvious manifestations of damage to buildings are sticking doors, uneven floors, and cracked foundations, floors, walls, ceilings, and windows. If damage is severe, the cost of repair may exceed the value of the building. Probably the greatest amount of small building damage has impacted those constructed when clays were dry, such as during a drought, followed by soaking rains that prompt swelling of clays. Other reported cases of damage involve volume increases due to moisture from broken or leaking water and sewer lines, watering of lawns and shrubbery, and modifications of the surface that produce ponding. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-149 Section 4 4.2 Technological Hazards Technological hazards are distinct from natural hazards primarily in that they originate from human activity. In contrast, while the risks presented by natural hazards may be increased or decreased as a result of human activity, they are not inherently human -caused. The term "technological hazards" refers to the origins of incidents that can arise from human activities, such as the manufacturing, transportation, storage, and use of hazardous materials. 4.2.1 Power Failure Hazard Definition A power outage is the loss of electrical supply to an area. Power failure can result from winter storms, high winds, tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, energy shortages, damage to a power line or other part of the distribution system, a short circuit, or the overloading of electricity mains. If lost entirely, a power loss is referred to as a blackout. A brownout occurs when some power is retained, but the voltage level is below the minimum level specified for the system. A power failure can last seconds, hours, and in some extreme cases, days. Power failures are particularly hazardous during winter months when they threaten the ability to heat a home or office, directly affecting the health of its inhabitants. Extreme temperatures in summer months can be difficult to manage if power outages affect air conditioning. Transportation routes are affected when traffic signals are disrupted by power outages. Additionally, when power is restored, surges can cause fires. Hazard Identification Oncor Electric Delivery (Oncor) is the primary electric company for Tarrant County and most of North Texas. In July 2013, North Texas experienced a wide stream power outage. Tarrant County had more than 1,800 customers without power due to a weather event. In August 2, 2012, approximately 5,400 customers lost power during rush hour in north Tarrant County. A damaged cable led to the outage at about 5:30 p.m., and by 7:00 p.m., only 3,600 customers were still without power. Also on August 12, 2012, Oncor reported more than 22,000 customers without power, down from a peak around 50,000. Most were in Tarrant County. This outage caused a local college to close campus. On July 7, 2012, homes across North Texas lost power due to downed power lines caused by heavy winds. According to Oncor, more than 5,500 customers were out of power in Tarrant County alone. On September 13, 2011, the City of River Oaks in Tarrant County was affected by powerful storms that caused downed trees and electric lines. Oncor reported that just under 2,000 customers in Fort Worth were without power. Those numbers went down to a county -wide combined 4,700 customers without power by noon the following day. 4-150 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT On May 16, 2010, severe storms caused fierce winds and heavy rain and caused thousands of power outages across the Metroplex. Oncor reported that there were 18,698 customers without power, most of them in Tarrant County. Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. All critical facilities are considered as having the possibility of being affected by a power outage. ■ People RiskNulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a power outage incident and no way to predict where and when an incident will occur. Effects of power outages include the loss of heat, loss of ability to refrigerate food, accidents that occur due to reduced visibility in the dark, loss of ability to use medical devices that require electricity (such as respirators, etc.). ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. Risks to the environment are low should a power outage occur. Vulnerability Power Failure Multijurisdictional Concerns Highly Likely None -Minimal Localized -Countywide Minor All of Tarrant County is vulnerable to a power failure. Land Use and Development Trends Tarrant County requires certain building codes to be in place to prevent fires in the case of power outages. Additionally, certain facilities are required to store backup generators and fuel. There are requirements for the placement of transmission lines, transformers, and power lines to safeguard the community from long-term power outages. Hazard Summary A power failure's greatest effect is disrupting the daily operations of business and government. The economic effects of a power failure affect the entire community. Preparing for power failure includes storing alternative electricity sources such as flashlights in the home and generators in office buildings. 4.2.2 Infectious Disease Outbreak Hazard Definition Infectious diseases are caused by organisms, typically bacteria, protozoan, fungi, or viruses that enter the body and grow there. Many of these diseases require continuous monitoring, as they Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-151 Section 4 present seasonal threats to the general population. An epidemic emerges when an infectious disease occurs suddenly in numbers that are in excess of normal expectancy. Infectious disease outbreaks put a strain on the healthcare system, may cause continuity issues for local businesses, and can affect the economy when worker absences decrease overall production. These outbreak incidents are a danger to emergency responders, healthcare providers, schools, and the public. This can include influenza (e.g., H1N1), pertussis, West Nile virus, and many other diseases. Hazard Identification Tarrant County has had several different disease -related outbreaks in recent history. In July of this 2013, 11 cases were reported of a Cyclospora outbreak. Cyclospora infection causes watery, and sometimes explosive, diarrhea. The one -celled parasite that causes Cyclospora infection can enter the body when the individual ingests contaminated food or water. In 10 out of the 11 cases, hospitalization was necessary. There was a 2012 West Nile Virus outbreak that is proving to be a costly disaster. Nearly half of the cases (48 percent) reported in Texas were reported in North Texas counties: 259 in Tarrant (14 percent), 396 in Dallas (21 percent), 183 in Denton (10 percent) and 64 in Collin (3 percent), according to the study. Those four counties had a combined incidence rate of 16 cases per 100,000 population. A conservative estimate of the costs of the outbreak statewide is $47 million spent in acute care and lost productivity time. Since the beginning of 2008, Tarrant County has experienced a significant increase in number of pertussis cases. In 2008, 130 cases (8.9 cases/100,000 population) of pertussis were reported from January through July, which represents a 165.3 percent increase from 2007 and a 364.3 percent increase in pertussis cases during the corresponding time frame from 2006 to 2008. There were 28 and 49 cases of pertussis reported from January through July of 2006 and 2007. In July 2008, clusters of laboratory -confirmed cryptosporidiosis cases and reports of gastrointestinal illness in persons who visited a lake were reported to Tarrant County Public Health. In response, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental health investigations were initiated. A matched case -control study determined that swallowing the lake water was associated with illness (adjusted odds ratio = 16.3; 95% confidence interval: 2.5 -infinity). The environmental health investigation narrowed down the potential sources of contamination. Laboratory testing detected Cryptosporidium hominis in case -patient stool specimens and Cryptosporidium species in lake water. It was only through the joint effort that epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental health investigators could determine that >1 human diarrheal fecal incidents in the lake likely led to contamination of the water. This same collaborative effort will be needed to develop and maintain an effective national Model Aquatic Health Code.24 Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. It was determined that all critical facilities as well as all public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by an infectious disease incident due to employees being ill and possibly being unable to maintain the facilities. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of an infectious disease incident and no way to predict which target group(s) will be the most " http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23210393 4-152 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT vulnerable to a virus or bacteria. In addition to sickness (morbidity) and death (mortality), 40 percent of the workforce could become ill. ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. Risks to the environment are low should an infectious disease incident occur. Vulnerability Infectious Disease Outbreak Multijurisdictional Concerns Highly Likely More than 12 hours Countywide Negligible -Major The more densely populated the area is, the greater threat of the spread of the infectious disease because there is more contact between potentially ill individuals. Therefore, Tarrant County is at greater risk than its surrounding counterparts are due to population. The impact of living in a more globalized world has shown itself through infectious disease. Our ability to quickly travel far distances promotes travel, specifically for business needs. As a result, disease from foreign countries that are unfamiliar to the United States can more easily be transferred here. Additionally, close encounters on mass transit systems, such as the ones in Fort Worth, Arlington, and the rest of the Metro area increase the amount of germ spread, increasing vulnerability for those jurisdictions connected to mass transit lines. Land Use and Development Trends There are no land use and development trends related to infectious disease outbreak. Hazard Summary Infectious disease outbreaks pose a threat to all of Tarrant County. Many infectious diseases do not pose a great economical threat, but there are infectious diseases (West Nile virus and influenza virus such as HIND, that threaten to destabilize the economy by decreasing work production and increasing strain on the health system. Fortunately, Tarrant County has a robust public health system in place to quickly identify infectious disease and mitigate its existence. 4.2.3 Hazardous Materials Release Hazard Definition Hazardous materials (Hazmat) are substances that are harmful to the health and safety of people and property. Hazmat releases often occur along roadways, highways, and railways. Facilities that produce, process, or store hazardous materials are at risk, as are facilities that treat or dispose of hazardous waste. Tarrant County is required by the State of Texas to regulate generators of hazardous waste. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-153 Section 4 Hazard Identification Tarrant County has experienced many hazmat releases and is likely to be impacted by them in the future. With several highways and trains carrying hazardous materials, the potential is always there for an accident. Although each jurisdiction may not experience a hazardous materials release every year, a jurisdiction in Tarrant County will experience a hazardous materials release every year, thus giving a 100% chance for a hazardous materials release in a given year in Tarrant County. The incidents listed below do not represent all hazardous materials releases that happened in Tarrant County. They are a representative sample based on information given during the planning process. Table 4-22 Significant Hazmat Releases in Tarrant County Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Arlington Colleyville Internationa I Airport Internationa I Airport 2/14/2010 1100 113th Oil Spill 2/13/2006 St/Avenue E East, Chemical Spill 12/16/2010 Arlington, TX Diesel Fuel Leak 7/17/2006 1206 W. Park Row Natural Gas Leak 7/13/2012 Dr Arlington, TX Chemical Spill 8/3/2006 900 N. Watson Diesel Fuel Leak 6/13/2012 Arlington, TX Sulfuric acid was 9/1/2006 1105 N. Watson Diesel Fuel Leak 8/8/2010 Arlington, TX Overheating 12/17/2006 3300 E. Park Row Refrigeration Leak g 8/26/2010 Dr Arlington, TX Fluid Leak 1/25/2007 2000 E 120 Arlington, TX Diesel Fuel Leak 2/6/2007 9226 Water Oak Oil Spill Dr Arlington, TX Unklnow Unknown 2/9/2008 1500 N SH 360 Diesel Fuel Leak Arlington, TX Bar rs 9/29/2008 2500 E. Mayfield Gasoline Spill 100 Gallons Rd, Arlington, TX n 9/29/2008 2500 E. Mayfield Diesel Spill Unklnow Unknown Rd, Arlington, TX 7600 10/13/2009 525 113th St Diesel Spill 2/14/2010 1001 E Abram St Oil Spill Arlington, TX l 12/16/2010 2933 E. 130 Diesel Fuel Leak Unknow Unknown Arlington, TX 50 Gallons 7/13/2012 1200 Gambrel Rd Chemical Spill #104 Arlington, TX Unknow Unknown 6/13/2012 Mapsco 40B Sulfuric acid was n spilled 8/8/2010 Terminal B Overheating 1000 lbs. Battery 8/26/2010 1930 W Airfield Dr Fluid Leak Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 100 Gallons n Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown l Cubic10000 t Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 50 Gallons n Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 100 Gallons n Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 1000 lbs. Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 100 Gallons Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown Bar rs Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 100 Gallons n Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 7600 Gallons Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 1200 Gallons Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 75 Gallons n Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 240 Gallons Unknown Unknow Unknown Unknown 100 Gallons n Unknown Unklnow Unknown Unknown 2000 Gallons 0 2 0 0 Unknown 0 0 0 0 Unknown 0 0 0 0 Unknown 4-154 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Internationa 8/31/2010 2311 N Service Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Rd Internationa 1/5/2011 2460 W Airfield Dr Biohazard 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Internationa 1/18/2011 W19th & W Battery Acid Spill 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Airfield Dr Internationa 3/24/2011 1639 W 23rd St Radioactive 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Material Internationa 4/13/2011 Terminal C Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Internationa 5/3/2011 1639 W 23rd St Flammable Liquid 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Internationa 6/4/2011 Terminal E, Entry Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport 7 Internationa I Airport 9119/2011 3075 N Airfield Dr. Flammable Liquid 0 0 0 0 Unknown Internationa 12/19/2011 2334 N Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport International Pkwy Internationa 2/3/2012 Terminal D Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport DFW Internationa 10/18/2012 Terminal E Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Internationa 6/20/2012 Terminal D Suspicious Powder 0 0 0 0 Unknown I Airport Internationa 5/1/2013 North Service Flammable Liquid 0 1 0 0 Unknown I Airport Road Forest Hill 4/22/2006 4400 Lon Natural Gas 1 0 0 0 0 Stephenson Release Grapevine 10/30/1998 Grapevine 60 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 0 0 Spill 100 Gallon Grapevine 4/30/1999 Grapevine Unknown 0 0 0 0 0 Petroleum Product Spill Grapevine 7/1/1999 Grapevine 50 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 0 0 Spill Grapevine 7/15/1999 Grapevine 3,400 Gallon Fuel 0 1 0 $20,000 $10,000 Oil spill Natural Gas line Grapevine 10/15/1999 Grapevine rupture, 100,000 0 0 0 0 0 cubic feet released Grapevine 1/25/2000 Grapevine 20 Gallon Azatrine 0 0 0 $1,000 $1,000 Spill Grapevine 4/23/2000 Grapevine 300 Gallon 0 0 0 0 0 Gasoline spill Natural Gas line Grapevine 5/24/2000 Grapevine rupture, 20,000 0 0 0 0 0 cubic feet released Grapevine 6/30/2000 Grapevine 100 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 0 0 spill Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-155 Section 4 Grapevine 4/5/2001 Grapevine 60 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 0 0 spill Grapevine 9/29/2001 Grapevine 2500 spill from 0 0 0 0 0 gasoline tank 1 Gallon Grapevine 9/28/2003 Grapevine Hydrochloric acid 0 0 0 $500 $1,000 spill Grapevine 3/22/2004 Grapevine 200 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 $1,500 $1,500 spill Grapevine 7/20/2004 Grapevine 100 Gallon 0 0 0 0 0 propane spill Grapevine 6/1/2005 Grapevine 100 Gallon sodium 0 0 0 $5,000 0 hydroxide spill Grapevine 2/23/2012 Grapevine 100 Gallon Diesel 0 0 0 $1,000 $500 spill Haltom City 8/2007 4601 Old Denton Structure fire with a 0 0 Yes $500,000 $40,000 material release. Small gasoline spills associated Keller Annual Keller with gas stations N/A N/A N/A N/A and automobile accidents Natural gas release Keller Annual Keller due to cut lines in N/A N/A N/A N/A construction areas Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. With multiple highway system, all critical facilities have the possibility of being affected by a hazmat release. ■ People RiskNulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a hazmat release and no way to predict where and when a hazmat release will occur. People are vulnerable to hazmat releases through effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, etc. ■ Environment RiskNulnerability. Risks to the environment are high should a hazmat release occur. Environmental concerns would be interruption of water supply and secondary events such as fires and hazmat accidents (such as gas pipelines rupturing, rupture of hazmat containers at facilities, etc.). When hazmat releases do occur, whether inside or outside facilities or along roadways, shutdowns, lost time, and expended man-hours are all factors mitigation planners must take into account. Tarrant County Emergency Management can provide a listing of facility locations throughout Tarrant County if requested. 4-156 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Vulnerability RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Hazardous Materials Release Multijurisdictional Concerns Highly Likely None -Minimal Localized -Community -wide Moderate All of Tarrant County is vulnerable to both fixed location and transportation -related hazmat releases. The highways are most vulnerable to releases are possible in all areas of Tarrant County. Land Use and Development Trends transportation -related release. Fixed location Future development throughout Tarrant County will be vulnerable to potential damage of property due to hazardous materials releases because no property is immune to the effects of a hazardous materials release. Hazard Summary Hazmat releases are a relatively common occurrence in Tarrant County. The number of incidents experienced in the past dictates that mitigation measures be considered. The types of hazardous materials passing through Tarrant County are varied. The presence of multiple highways with an unknown quantity of hazardous materials traveling through Tarrant County on a daily basis poses a challenge in the development of adequate mitigation measures. 4.2.4 Terrorism Hazard Definition Terrorism is defined in the Code of Federal Regulations as, "The unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives". Many people associate terrorism with large events like the Oklahoma City Federal Building bombing of 1995 or the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City. However, terrorism can come in the form of a school shooting or a car bomb. Cyber -terrorism is a large threat to the United States and its local communities. The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) has defined it as the "use of computer network tools to shut down critical national infrastructures or to coerce or intimidate a government or civilian population". The threat of cyber terror is that it can be utilized in any community, no matter the size, because of our reliance on computer programming for our most critical assets such as energy and government operations. An "active shooter" is an individual actively engaging in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area; in most cases, active shooters use firearm(s) and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Active shooter situations are unpredictable and evolve Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-15 Section 4 quickly. Typically, the immediate deployment of law enforcement is required to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to victims. They have increasingly been considered an act of terror as political, religious, and other ideologies are factoring into the reasoning behind the shootings. Hazard Identification Due to the potential for terrorism, Tarrant County jurisdictions are part of the Dallas/Fort Worth/ Arlington Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), which is a federally funded planning unit to prevent terrorist attacks in the top ten metropolitan statistical areas in the United States. Tarrant County is the home to several well-known and very populated buildings such as Tarrant County Courthouse, Rangers Ballpark, Cowboys Stadium, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Fort Worth Convention Center, Six Flags Theme Park, Texas Motor Speedway, Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, and several schools that include colleges and universities. Many of these venues can hold tens of thousands of people at one time making them all a target for possible terrorist attacks. Additionally, certain industrial and governmental facilities have been identified by Tarrant County and their respective jurisdictions as terrorist targets. These include the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Lockheed Martin, and Bell Helicopter plant. Though Tarrant County has not had any actual terrorist attacks, they have had several bomb threats. In September 2012, a Fort Worth woman was accused of making a bomb threat to an office at the University of Phoenix campus in the City of Hurst, although no device was found on campus after a thorough search by a northeast Tarrant County explosives team. Hurst police identified the woman, who wrote a note stating there was a bomb in the building that would explode at noon the upcoming Wednesday, as the receptionist at the campus. Authorities say the suspect will be charged with making a terroristic threat. On February 13, an Arlington woman who shut down Fort Worth freeways during NBA All-Star weekend was sentenced to 10 years in prison. The woman pleaded guilty for having pipe bombs in her vehicle. Her co-defendant was sentenced to 37 months in prison. The suspect sped away as police tried to pull her over, eventually stopping on a Loop 820 ramp and shutting down the highway for hours. The pipe bombs were safely detonated. In February 1994, a bomb threat was called into the Tarrant County Justice Center. Jury selection for a trial was expected to start, but proceedings were interrupted when a bomb threat forced the evacuation of the Tarrant County Justice Center. The threat involved an unrelated trial of anti- abortion protesters. There was no immediate report of any bomb being found. Terrorism is a constant threat for DFW International Airport. In the past few years, police and Transportation Security Administration officials have dealt with more than 35 suspicious bag or object calls in and around the airport. This results in disruption to the traffic attempting to access the airport, slows security processes for travelers, and may impact flight schedules. Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property RiskNulnerability. All assets within Tarrant County are vulnerable to being affected by a terrorist incident. Specifically, the large event spaces and urban environment make Tarrant County infrastructure targets. 4-158 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. In evaluating vulnerability of the population in Tarrant County, it was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the entire population of Tarrant County because there is no way to determine the impact/magnitude of a terrorist incident and no way to predict where and when a terrorist incident will occur. People are vulnerable to terrorist events through physical injury or disease, power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, effect of incident on mental state of the public, confidence of public in law enforcement support, contamination of the food supply, etc. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high should a terrorist incident occur but the frequency of terrorist events in Tarrant County are low. Environmental concerns would be interruption or contamination of water or food supplies, secondary events such as fires and hazmat accidents (such as gas pipelines rupturing, rupture of hazmat containers at facilities, etc.). Vulnerability Terrorism Unlikely None -Minimal Community -wide Negligible -Major Multijurisdictional Concerns All of the County is vulnerable to terrorist events, and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. Land Use and Development Trends Future development throughout Tarrant County will take into consideration possible terrorist incidents; particularly if new facilities are built that could be potential terrorist targets. Hazard Summary The incidents described above demonstrate the need to take terrorism seriously in Tarrant County. Tarrant County officials work with state and federal officials on domestic preparedness efforts, the details of which go beyond the scope of this plan. The community should always remain vigilant to the threat of an attack, whether it is via explosives, agriculture, or a cyber -attack. 4.2.5 Dam Failure Hazard Definition A dam failure may occur for multiple reasons such as an overtopping caused by floods that exceed the capacity of the dam, deliberate acts of sabotage, structural failure, movement of the foundation supporting the dam, soil erosion in embankment dams, and inadequate maintenance and upkeep. The Texas Department of Natural Resources follows the dam hazard classifications of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. They are classified as follows: Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-159 Section 4 ■ High - Any loss of life or serious hazard or damage to health, main highways, high-value industrial or commercial properties, major public utilities, or serious direct or indirect economic loss to the public. ■ Significant - Possible health hazard or probable loss of high-value property; damage to secondary highways, railroads, or other public utilities; or limited direct or indirect economic loss to the public other than that described in Class III. ■ Low - Property losses restricted mainly to rural buildings and local county and town roads, which are an essential part of the rural transportation system serving the area involved. Hazard Identification The jurisdictions in which dam failure is a threat include Arlington, Crowley, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Hurst, Keller, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Tarrant County, Watauga, and Westlake. Dam failure is not a threat to Azle, Bedford, Blue Mound, Colleyville, Euless, Forest Hill, Haslet, Kennedale, Lake Worth, Lakeside, North Texas Council of Governments, Saginaw, Southlake, and Westworth Village. Tarrant County does not have any recorded dam or levee failures. However, major dam or levee failures have occurred in the Texas, including 35 dam failures in Texas in the past 10 years. In the past, 10 dams collapsed near Woodville and 2 dams have failed in the Nueces River watershed. A major dam failure happened in 1900 near Austin, Texas (Travis County) known as the McDonald Dam (aka "The Great Granite Dam"). The destruction of the dam drained the Lake McDonald reservoir and left the City of Austin without electrical power for a number of months. The failure also killed several dozen people. The Dam at Nix Club Lake in Rusk County near Henderson, Texas failed On March 29, 1988. The cause of the dam failure was water over flowed the dam wall. One man drowned when he drove down a road that had been flooded when water backed up against a railroad trestle after the failure. On September 27, 1997, 10 dams, including the Charmaine, Galahad, Tristan, Urland dams near Woodville, Texas (Tyler County), failed due to an excess amount of rain in a short amount of time. The Callaway Dam and the McGuire Dam near Hearne, Texas (Robertson County) failed on May 13, 2004. McGuire Dam is located downstream of Callaway Dam. It was overtopped by at least 3 feet before failure and the Callaway Dam was overtopped by about 1.5 feet before it failed. On January 1, 2008, the Pure Oil (aka Rhine) Lake Dam failed in Van Zandt County in east Texas. County roads were closed and it was reported that the dam failed due to both the age and climate. Kaufman County residents were put on alert for a levee failure on December 8, 2009. Residents of Combine, 20 miles southeast of Dallas, were warned that the Trinity River levee was in danger of failure, an event that could lead to the possibility of a "life-threatening situation." It was recommended that residents make evacuation plans. The Bois D'Arc Island Levee was built in 1918, but necessary repairs have been lacking. Residential and commercial structures on the Triple R Ranch, Dawson Road, and Harlan Road were at risk when the levee breached. Flood conditions could have lasted for up to two weeks. Below is a list of dams located in Tarrant County and the identified affected participating jurisdictions that require an emergency action plan (EAP). Only dams that have been identified as being at a hazard rating of high or significant are required to have an EAP. Smaller dams or ones 4-160 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT that do not require an EAP exist in Tarrant County and the identified affected participating jurisdictions as well but do not pose the hazard that these do. Table 4-23 Tarrant County Dams SOMERSET LOST CREEK GOLF LTD CITY OF ARLINGTON CITY OF ARLINGTON CITY OF ARLINGTON TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT CESWF TIMBER LAKE RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION INC 8 Significant 130000 High 69.1 High 3.09 High 488 High 568 High 788000 High 37 Significant ALTON ISBELL 126 High DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT CITY OF FORT WORTH CITY OF FORT WORTH 45 High 680335 High 116000 High 327 High Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-161 LOST CREEK TR -SOUTH ALEDO _97.525706 32.715433 MARYS GOLF CLUB CREEK DAM LAKE VILLAGE ARLINGTON ARLINGTON -97.194032 32.718357 CREEK DAM ARLINGTON SOUTHWEST VILLAGE ARLINGTON NATURE -97.221121 32.661562 CREEK PRESERVE DAM ALAN SAXE TR -RUSH ARLINGTON POND _97.163902 32.635927 CREEK EAST OFF CH-TR- BALANCING BISBEE -97.205277 32.619965 VILLAGE RESERVOIR CREEK DAM WEST OFF CH-TR- BISBEE BALANCING -97.208157 32.619961 VILLAGE RESERVOIR CREEK DAM GRAPEVINE DENTON CARROLLTON _97.050003 32.966671 LAKE CREEK COULD NOT TR -BIG TIMBERLAKE BE PHASE 5 -971625 32.929167 BEAR DETERMINED CREEK DEER CREEK TR -DEER CROWLEY _97.355802 32.558972 ESTATES CREEK DAM DALLAS FORT WORTH TRIGG 32.853392 BEAR INTERNATION LAKE DAM 97.044283W N CREEK AL AIRPORT WEST EAGLE FORT WORTH MOUNTAIN #VALUE! 32.8739 FORK TRINITY DAM RIVER WEST LAKE FORK FORT WORTH WORTH -97.415045 32.791127 TRINITY DAM RIVER LAKE TR -CLEAR FORT WORTH _97.398171 32.726777 COMO DAM FORK SOMERSET LOST CREEK GOLF LTD CITY OF ARLINGTON CITY OF ARLINGTON CITY OF ARLINGTON TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT CESWF TIMBER LAKE RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION INC 8 Significant 130000 High 69.1 High 3.09 High 488 High 568 High 788000 High 37 Significant ALTON ISBELL 126 High DALLAS FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TARRANT REGIONAL WATER DISTRICT CITY OF FORT WORTH CITY OF FORT WORTH 45 High 680335 High 116000 High 327 High Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-161 Section 4 TRINITY RIVER CLEAR BENBROOK FORK OF FORT WORTH _97.449997 32.650002 CESWF 410000 High LAKE TRINITY RIVER TR -CLEAR LUTHER FORK CITY OF FORT FORT WORTH _97.426872 32.71222 295 High LAKE DAM TRINITY WORTH RIVER TARRANT MARINE MARINE REGIONAL FORT WORTH CREEK -97.392795 32.824122 16491 High CREEK WATER DAM DISTRICT TR -WEST WHITE FORK CITY OF FORT FORT WORTH _97.256171 32.765375 294 High LAKE DAM TRINITY WORTH RIVER WILLOW WILLOW CITY OF FORT FORT WORTH CREEK -97.389711 32.686695 76 High CREEK WORTH LAKE DAM TARRANT CEMENT CEMENT REGIONAL FORT WORTH CREEK -97.368087 32.829137 4200 High CREEK WATER DAM DISTRICT TR -LITTLE FORT WORTH EDEN LAKE -97.097113 32.864315 BEAR 68 High DAM CREEK UN TR - FORT WORTH BAL LAKE -97.430637 32.707033 TRINITY JEARL WALKER 31.128 High DAM RIVER ECHO LAKE TARRANT FORT WORTH DAM _97 313687 32.698002 SYCAMORE COUNTY 780 High CREEK RIDGLEA COUNTRY TR-MARYS MIKE WILLIAMS FORT WORTH CLUB -97.431853 32.696082 22.8 High CREEK ET AL ESTATES DAM TR -WEST FOSDIC FORK CITY OF FORT FORT WORTH -97.259485 32.756112 55 Significant LAKE DAM TRINITY WORTH RIVER FRENCH FRENCH CITY OF FORT FORT WORTH LAKE DAM -97.387637 32.639397 LAKE WORTH 67.4 Significant CREEK GLEN GARDEN TR- GLEN GARDEN FORT WORTH GOLF AND -97.289235 32.701381 SYCAMORE GOLF & 29 Significant COUNTRY CREEK COUNTRY CLUB CLUB DAM RIVERBEND WEST TARRANT FORT WORTH _97.231352 32.779875 350 Significant WEST LEVEE FORK REGIONAL 4-162 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TRINITY WATER RIVER DISTRICT FORT WORTH GREENBRIA _97.335008 32.669308 CITY OF FORT 11 Significant R DAM WORTH DALLAS FORT TR -BIG DFW391 WORTH GRAPEVINE _97.099541 32.927572 BEAR High DAM INTERNATIONAL CREEK AIRPORT BOARD TEXAS TR -BIG DEPARTMENT HALTOM CITY KNAPP -97264236 32.837317 FOSSIL OF 154 High LAKE DAM CREEK TRANSPORTATI ON CHISHOLM HURST PARK LAKE -97.172389 32.856578 CITY OF HURST 40.1 High DAM DALLAS FORT TRIGG TR -BEAR WORTH IRVING -97044118 32.853317 1803 Significant LAKE DAM CREEK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BOARD MCPHERSO TRI- MCPERSON KELLER N RANCH -97.279998 32.9622 HARRIET RANCH OWNERS 44 High DAM CREEK ASSOCIATION MEADOWS MEADOW LAKES NORTH TR - BIG LAKES COMMUNITY RICHLAND -97.251372 32.832691 FOSSIL 26 High WESTLAKE IMPROVEMENT HILLS DAM CREEK ASSOCIATION WOODLAN WOODLAND PANTEGO D WEST -97.16004 32.73137 TR -RUSH WEST LAKE 69 Significant CREEK LAKE DAM ASSOC MEADOWS TR -BIG RICHLAND LAKES RICHMOND RAY _97.247767 32.833216 FOSSIL 129 High HILLS EAST LAKE DEVELOPMENT CREEK DAM CAPP SMITH BUNKER CITY OF WATAUGA PARK -97.258768 32.875518 HILL 287 High WATAUGA RETENTION CREEK LAKE DAM FIDELITY TR- FMR TEXAS WESTLAKE NORTH -97.190734 32.984642 MARSHALL LIMITED 81 High LAKE DAM BRANCH PARTNERSHIP TR- HILLWOOD LAKE MB3 WESTLAKE -97216413 32.98627 MARSHALL PROPERTIES 15 High DAM BRANCH CORP TR- HILLWOOD WESTLAKE LAKE MB -97214466 32.983907 MARSHALL PROPERTIES 66 High 3A DAM BRANCH CORP PD31 EAST KIRKWOOD THE VAQUERO WESTLAKE LAKE DAM -97.189842 32.964417 100.2 High BRANCH CLUB INC 1 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan June 2015 4-163 Section 4 FMR TEXAS FIDELITY TR- LIMITED WESTLAKE SOUTH -97.1935 32.981869 MARSHALL PARTNERSHIP;F 58.3 High LAKE DAM BRANETT MR TEXAS LINITED PARTNERSHIP The extent of dam failure in the planning area has not yet been determined as a result of a lack of data regarding inundation levels. In the case of dams with a maximum storage capacity of 100,000 acre-feet or more, all census blocks within five miles are considered to be at risk to potential dam failure hazards. Those located within three miles of a dam with a maximum storage capacity of 10,000 to 100,000 acre-feet are at risk. Dams with a maximum storage capacity of less than 10,000 acre-feet are a potential threat to those within 1 mile of the dam. The participating jurisdictions in which dams are located, including Arlington, Crowley, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Hurst, Keller, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Tarrant County, Watauga, and Westlake, have identified dam inundation studies as a mitigation action for high hazard dams in their jurisdiction. Assets Exposed to Hazard ■ Property Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. ■ People Risk/Vulnerability. It was determined that risk/vulnerability includes the population of Tarrant County that is located in the dam failure inundation area. People are vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. ■ Environment Risk/Vulnerability. Risks to the environment are high should a dam failure occur, but the frequency of dam failures in Tarrant County is low. Environmental concerns would be interruption of water supply, water contamination, and loss of properties. The risk and vulnerability to dam failure for each participating jurisdiction identified as being at risk is detailed below. It should be noted that the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is an association of local governments that works to assist in planning and coordination efforts of 16 counties in North Central Texas. It is a government authority but does not hold or own any land or property, nor does it have any constituents. Therefore, there is minimal vulnerability to the NCTCOG. 4-164 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Vulnerability to Dam Failure City of Arlington Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Crowley Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. MDallas Fort Worth International Airport Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. q%WM& City of Fort Worth Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Grapevine Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Haltom City Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Hurst Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-165 Section 4 Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. AL City of Keller Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. JOUCity of North Richland Hills Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Richland Hills Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. Tarrant County Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. City of Watauga Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. 111111 Town of Westlake Critical Asset Vulnerability Critical facilities as well as public, private, and commercial properties are vulnerable to being affected by a dam failure if they are located in the inundation area. Vulnerable Populations Individuals in the inundation area vulnerable to the effects of dam failure through power outages, effects on transportation routes, establishment of shelters, flooding, etc. Environmental Vulnerability Environmental issues that might arise as a result of a dam failure include interruption of water supply, water contamination, and damage to properties. 4-166 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Vulnerability RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT Dam Failure Multijurisdictional Concerns Unlikely 3-6 hours Community -wide Major Areas located below and around the aforementioned dams are vulnerable to flooding and therefore should be included in any prospective mitigation projects. The jurisdictions in which dam failure is a threat include Arlington, Crowley, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Haltom City, Hurst, Keller, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Tarrant County, Watauga, and Westlake. Dam failure is not a threat to Azle, Bedford, Blue Mound, Colleyville, Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Euless, Forest Hill, Haslet„ Kennedale, Lake Worth, Lakeside, North Central Texas Council of Governments, Saginaw, Southlake, and Westworth Village. The probability of dam failure occurring in the future is unlikely based on previous data. Land Use and Development Trends In accordance with Title 30 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 299, Dams and Reservoirs, §299.61(b), owners of significant and high hazard dams were required to submit an Emergency Action Plan, which may be a draft version, to the executive director for review by January 1, 2011. If you have any questions about the preparation and submittal of Emergency Action Plans (EAPs), please contact the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Dam Safety Section at (512) 239- 0326 for assistance. The Guidelines for Developing Emergency Action Plans for Dams in Texas publication was revised in March 2012. The revised publication includes updates to the notification flowchart, EAP templates, inundation map guidance, and a glossary of dam safety terms. Hazard Summary Although Tarrant County has not experienced a dam failure, the possibility is always present. All dams should consistently be monitored for structural integrity. Towns and cities where dams are located should incorporate preparing and responding to a dam failure in their emergency management program. The potential damage caused by a dam failure is major; therefore, even though the probability of occurrence is unlikely, mitigation actions should always be considered to prevent a dam failure incident. 4.3 Vulnerability of Critical Facilities Requirement 44 CFR 201.6(c) (2) (ii)(A)(B) The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of the types and numbers of existing and future buildings, infrastructure, and critical facilities located in the identified hazard area. (B) An estimate of the potential dollar losses to vulnerable structures identified in ... this section and a description of the methodology used to prepare the estimate. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 4-167 Section 4 The Tarrant County LMAPC conducted a review of all critical infrastructures in Tarrant County. Critical infrastructure is a term used to describe assets that are essential for the functioning of Tarrant County and its jurisdictions. This includes but is not limited to those facilities that provide electricity, natural gas, oil products, telecommunications, potable water, public health, transportation systems, emergency response, and schools. Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions go to great lengths to ensure their critical facilities are protected from hazards. Plans have been developed to help prevent terrorist incidents from affecting facilities and infrastructure. Security measures are in place to protect critical facilities from infiltration. Mitigation measures are in place to reduce the impacts of flooding and high winds. However, all assets are vulnerable to being affected by natural or technological hazards. The Tarrant County LMAPC lists the critical facilities and infrastructure owned by both the County and participating jurisdictions in Appendix G. In addition to providing the location, type of facility, and value of the property, this list also identifies if the critical facility is located in a hazard area. 4-168 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Section 5 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 44 CFR Requirement §201.6(c)(3) The plan shall include the following: A mitigation strategy that provides the jurisdiction's blueprint for reducing the potential losses identified in the risk assessment, based on existing authorities, policies, programs, and resources, and its ability to expand on and improve these existing tools. §201.6(c)(3)(i) The hazard mitigation strategy shall include a description of mitigation goals to reduce or avoid long-term vulnerabilities to the identified hazards. §201.6(c)(3)(ii) The hazard mitigation strategy shall include a section that identifies and analyzes a comprehensive range of specific mitigation actions and projects being considered to reduce the effects of each hazard, with particular emphasis on new and existing buildings and infrastructure. All plans approved by FEMA after October 1, 2008, must also address the jurisdiction's participation in the NFIP, and continued compliance with NFIP requirements, as appropriate. §201.6(c)(3)(iii) The hazard mitigation strategy shall include an action plan, describing how the action identified in paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section will be prioritized, implemented, and administered by the local jurisdiction. Prioritization shall include a special emphasis on the extent to which benefits are maximized according to a cost benefit review of the proposed projects and their associated costs. §201.6(c)(3)(iv) For multijurisdictional plans, there must be identifiable action items specific to the jurisdiction requesting FEMA approval or credit of the plan. §201.6(c)(4)(ii) The plan shall include a process by which local governments incorporate the requirements of the mitigation plan into other planning mechanisms such as comprehensive or capital improvements, when appropriate. The foundation of the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan (LMAP) is the identification of strategies through which Tarrant County will implement hazard mitigation goals, objectives, and actions. For each identified hazard, goals and objectives are provided as part of the mitigation strategy. Mitigation actions for the participating cities and towns within Tarrant County are incorporated into Tarrant County's goals, objectives, and actions. Individual jurisdictions adopt specific goals and strategies based on the needs of the jurisdiction. The following mitigation goals, objectives, and action items have been ranked by the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Planning Committee (LMAPC) and participating jurisdictions. The Committee went through a ranking process to determine which strategies they would prioritize Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-1 Section 5 for completion. Each participating jurisdiction, including Tarrant County, recommended strategies that would benefit either the jurisdiction or the county as a whole. The jurisdictions conducted a cost benefit analysis to determine which strategies would most benefit their community. All project cost estimations were based on agency expertise by those submitting mitigation actions as well as previous project costs. Estimated costs were those calculated to apply for grant funding. However, many projects provided have not yet undergone the official benefit costs analysis provided by FEMA. In these cases, jurisdictions derived the benefit cost per project based on a study conducted by the Multi -hazard Mitigation Council (MMC)25. The key findings of the report included that a dollar spent on mitigation saves society an average of $4.00, with positive benefit - cost ratios for all hazard types studied. Therefore, to reflect the benefits of future projects each estimated project was multiplied by 4 to represent the benefit of each mitigation strategy. Utilizing this information in addition to their jurisdictions' priorities, they ranked their mitigation strategies and submitted them to the LMAPC. . Within each hazard category, the individual goals, objectives, and action items were ranked based on perceived need in the community. Therefore, the mitigation strategies below have been prioritized at both the individual jurisdiction level and the County level. 5.1 Mitigation Goals and Considerations 5.1.1 Goals that Address Multiple Hazards Tarrant County follows an all -hazards approach to community planning. Many mitigation projects can positively influence the outcomes of multiple types of natural disasters. Mitigation goals that address multiple hazards include improving emergency communications systems, including the installation or improvement of emergency notification systems and emergency response communications systems; enhancing emergency response equipment; and providing the training and technology to ensure responders have the tools necessary to mitigate risk. Goals that Address Multiple Hazards. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as follows: I. Enhance warning systems in Tarrant County jurisdictions to ensure timely and accurate information is disseminated in the event of an emergency. 2. Ensure communications systems allow Tarrant County jurisdiction first responders to communicate with each other and other responding agencies. 3. Evaluate whether municipal and Tarrant County emergency operations centers (EOC) are up- to-date with the latest technology required to ensure coordinated response operations. 4. Ensure that municipal and Tarrant County responders have the equipment needed for mobile response. 5. Improve Tarrant County first responder capabilities to prepare for and respond to disasters. " Multihazard Mitigation Council. (2005, December) Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: An Independent Study to Assess the Future Savings from Mitigation Activities. Retrieved August 28, 2013, from http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.nibs.org/resource/resmgr/MMC/hms vol2_chl-7.pdf 5-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 6. Update computer technology and software to provide the most coordinated, efficient response possible. 7. Conduct public education campaigns to ensure Tarrant County citizens have access to and are aware of emergency preparedness information. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Some projects cross jurisdictional boundaries. In these cases, the coordinating agency to ensure that projects are implemented is the higher Tarrant County authority. By working through Tarrant County, jurisdictions can better understand how improvements and changes to their own systems will affect their neighbors. Mitigation strategies that address multiple hazards improve the jurisdiction's overall emergency response capabilities, thus making the County stronger as a whole. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. Many projects identified specifically identify the need for increased public awareness. By enhancing jurisdiction websites and other communication methods, the public is not only better inF formed during an emergency but also about important planning, preparedness, and mitigation steps they can take. 5.1.2 Tornadoes and Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds Tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, and high winds have the potential to cause high winds, cause numerous injuries and deaths, and cause millions of dollars in property damage in Tarrant County. There is a great need to reduce the risk to lives and property due to these hazards. Identified mitigation actions in this section include the need for providing shelters at public facilities to ensure safety during storms and upgrading critical facilities to be more wind resistant. Tornadoes and Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Provide safe rooms and outdoor shelters to protect Tarrant County citizens against the effects of high winds. 2. Ensure participation in State and Federal funding programs to mitigate the effects of high winds. 3. Promote the construction of high winds -resistant facilities, including the installation of high winds -resistant windows. 4. Educate the public about the danger of high winds and effective preparedness measures. Multijurisdictional Considerations. All of Tarrant County should be considered when developing mitigation strategies related to high wind damage caused by tornadoes or severe thunderstorms. Due to the isolated nature of these hazards, mitigation improvements made in one jurisdiction will most likely have little effect on other jurisdictions. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County public safety community is taking an all -hazards approach to community awareness programs. Thunderstorm and tornado wind events are inclusive of this all -hazards program. All jurisdictions recommend having NOAA weather radios in public buildings, critical infrastructure, major businesses, nursing homes, and day care centers as a public information strategy. All jurisdictions participate in tornado drills as an exercise each year. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-3 Section 5 5.1.3 Flooding Flooding may occur in Tarrant County as the result of multiple hazards identified in Section 4. Overland and riverine flooding resulting from extensive rains from severe thunderstorms, hurricanes and tropical storms, and dam or levee failure can all cause flooding. The impacts of flooding in Tarrant County have been extensive and cost billions of dollars in damage. Through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and in coordination with other Federal programs, Tarrant County attempts to mitigate the costly effects of flooding. Mitigation activities identified include identifying and mitigating repetitive loss properties, ensuring that all communities within Tarrant County are current participants of the NFIP program, upgrading or replacing stormwater or wastewater infrastructure that is ill-equipped to handle large amounts of water, and ensuring rescue equipment is available when floodwaters overwhelm Tarrant County jurisdictions. Flooding Mitigation Strategy Ranking: The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as follows: Ensure the continued participation of Tarrant County and its jurisdictions in the NFIP and the continual review and update of flood insurance rate maps. 2. Reduce jurisdictional vulnerability to flooding by removing repetitive loss properties from identified flood zones. 3. Institute mitigation projects that reduce vulnerability to flooding through the construction or improvement of Tarrant County critical infrastructure or facilities. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Flooding events have affected all areas of Tarrant County. All of the cities and townships in Tarrant County participate in flood mitigation activities. Tarrant County is part of the NFIP. Tarrant County and the participating cities plan to continue participate in the NFIP by developing and implementing public awareness campaigns, identifying additional critical infrastructure in floodplains, promoting storm water management plans and/or activities, and continuing to update flood maps for all of Tarrant County. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are informed of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts taking place to mitigate flooding situations. 5.1.4 Power Failure Power outages are one of the most likely technological hazards to occur in Tarrant County. They may happen for a variety of reasons, including severe weather, accidents, or extreme temperatures. Mitigation activities against power failure remain the same, regardless of the cause. Mitigation activities in Tarrant County include a review of alternate power sources at critical facilities. Power Failure Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: Evaluate Tarrant County, NCTCOG, and jurisdiction critical facilities to ensure alternate power sources are available in the event of a power failure. 2. Develop a public education/preparedness campaign designed towards educating citizens and business community to develop emergency plans in the event of long term power outage. 5-4 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Multijurisdictional Considerations. All jurisdictions in Tarrant County can experience a power failure. The importance of having alternate power sources in critical facilities cannot be understated. All multijurisdictional considerations should be made to ensure critical facilities are functional during power failure. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to alleviate potential situations. 5.1.5 Hail Hail is one of the costliest disasters in Tarrant County. The impacts of hail include facility damage to roofs and windows, vehicle damage, and personal injury. As a result of these impacts, hail is a significant threat that must be mitigated to avoid the loss of property and its costly nature. Mitigation strategies against hail include educating the public about its impacts and enforcing hail - resistant construction practices. Hail Mitigation Strategy Ranking: The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Ensure Tarrant County and jurisdiction facilities institute hail -resistant construction practices. 2. Educate Tarrant County citizens regarding the danger hail poses and how to mitigate its effects. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Hail, like severe thunderstorms, is a threat for every jurisdiction in Tarrant County. Critical facilities that are exposed in these jurisdictions must be hardened against hail by re -enforcing windows, roof construction, and ensuring critical vehicles are in covered parking spots. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. Multiple strategies for ensuring public information needs regarding hail have been identified. This includes ensuring the appropriate print material is available, distributing information at community events, and disseminating information via internet and social media resources. 5.1.6 Wildfires All of Tarrant County is vulnerable to the effects of wildfires, either through the direct threat of fire or the impacts of smoke from neighboring wildfires. Certain areas of Tarrant County, especially those that are near the grass fields of Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, are more vulnerable to wildfires than others. The main areas where mitigation projects are needed for wildfire conditions include expanding and enhancing fire department response capabilities, enhancing wildfire equipment, and increasing the public awareness about wildfires. Wildfires Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals have been ranked in the following order: 1. Review and implement construction practices and systems at Tarrant County and participating jurisdiction facilities to reduce the impact of wildfires. 2. Increase planning efforts related to wildfires by enacting and enforcing wildfire resistant ordinances and ensuring response plans are in place. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-5 Section 5 3. Ensure Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions are Firewise Communities and the public is aware of wildfire risks in their communities. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and its surrounding jurisdictions are most vulnerable to wildfires, and therefore should coordinate wildfire mitigation actions. Planning that occurs at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport and its surrounding communities should be coordinated. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Action Planning Committee has identified and implemented public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to reduce the effects of potential wildfire situations. These include ordinances for the enforcement of outdoor burning bans. 5.1.7 Winter Storms Tarrant County does not experience severe winter storms frequently, but they do experience winter weather every year. High winds, cold temperatures, and ice storms affect the area, impacting traffic flow and creating dangerous conditions for Tarrant County citizens. Ensuring the required de-icing equipment and chemicals are available and educating the public about winter storm preparedness are essential mitigation strategies. Winter Storm Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals have been ranked in the following order: 1. Ensure Tarrant County and jurisdiction public works departments have adequate equipment and programs in place for winter weather operations. 2. Educate the public about the dangers of winter storms and effective preparedness measures. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Winter storms have affected all areas of Tarrant County. All of the cities in Tarrant County should participate in winter storm mitigation and preparedness activities. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified and implemented many public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to reduce the severity of winter storm situations. 5.1.8 Dam Failure There are 64 dams in Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions. Although the likelihood of them failing is small, it is a possibility that must be planned for. The implications of dam failure include flooding, structural damage, population displacement, and critical infrastructure damage. Mitigation strategies to decrease the impact of such issues include reviewing the structural stability of each dam, completing emergency action plans for high hazard dams, and ensuring the population in each inundation zone is prepared. Dam Failure Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The following goal has been identified for dam failure 5-6 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Reduce jurisdiction vulnerability to flooding by evaluating the structure of Tarrant County dams, reviewing and updating emergency action plans, and educating the public about dam safety and preparedness. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Only certain participating jurisdictions are threatened by dams and therefore only certain jurisdictions must mitigate against them. . Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee and participating jurisdictions have identified and implemented many public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to reduce the severity of dam failure. 5.1.9 Infectious Disease Outbreak Infectious disease incidents are identified as a hazard in Tarrant County. Infectious diseases are considered a threat to all residents and emergency response personnel in Tarrant County. The identified mitigation strategies for infectious disease response include ensuring that responders are trained and equipped to effectively and efficiently respond to the incident and working in partnership with residents in Tarrant County to plan an effective response strategy to infectious disease incidents. Infectious Disease Outbreak Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: Enhance community surveillance and detection in the event of a biological disease outbreak/pandemic incident. 2. Increase medical countermeasure readiness (mass prophylaxis) in the event of a biological disease outbreak/pandemic incident in Tarrant County. 3. Prepare and plan non -pharmaceutical interventions in the event of a biological disease outbreak/pandemic incident in Tarrant County. 4. Educate the public about the dangers of infectious disease outbreaks and effective preparedness measures. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Infectious disease incidents have occurred throughout Tarrant County. All jurisdictions are vulnerable to the impacts of infectious disease outbreaks. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of current information. 5.1.10 Drought Tarrant County's climate and an expanding population base create a unique situation regarding drought. Participating jurisdictions are grappling with how to address increasingly and conditions while increasing water supply to their growing populations. Drought mitigation strategies aim to address these issues through planning and the construction of additional water supply systems. Tarrant County and its participating jurisdictions consider drought mitigation a priority. Drought has increasingly impacted Tarrant County jurisdictions, causing water restrictions and impacting Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-7 Section 5 critical infrastructure. Unfortunately, the science of estimating drought -related costs is currently undeveloped, and therefore it takes years to estimate the amount of damage by dollars that drought causes in the United States. The prioritization of these mitigation strategies is based on cost, and based on this undeveloped process of estimating costs, drought is fairly low on this list. However, the Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee believes that drought will increasingly be the costliest disaster for their communities and the following mitigation strategies reflect this priority. Drought Mitigation Strategy Ranking: The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: Implement water conservation legislation and contingency plans to mitigate the effects of drought. 2. Mitigate the effects of drought by implementing water conservation practices with critical infrastructure. 3. Educate the public about water conservation techniques and their role in mitigating the effects of drought. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Coordinating efforts when mitigating drought is of the utmost importance in Tarrant County. The City of Fort Worth uses surface water from six sources. The West Fork system includes Lake Bridgeport, Eagle Mountain Lake, and Lake Worth. The East Texas reservoirs are Cedar Creek and Richland -Chambers. Benbrook Lake is another water source. The City of Fort Worth owns Lake Worth, and Benbrook Lake is the responsibility of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. The other four lakes are owned and operated by Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD); therefore, TRWD is responsible for providing a significant water supply to the City of Fort Worth. The City of Fort Worth buys the raw water from TRWD and treats it, then distributes it to Fort Worth citizens plus a long list of customer cities. TRWD is responsible for securing new water sources for Fort Worth and its other customers in Tarrant County. Current water resources are projected to meet projected growth through the year 2030. The City of Arlington also purchases raw water from TRWD, treats it, then distributes to Arlington residents in addition to a couple other cities. The City of Arlington gets the majority of its water from Cedar Creek and Richland -Chambers Reservoir. The Trinity River Authority pumps raw water from Lake Joe Pool up to its Tarrant Water Plant, treats it, then it gets distributed to several cities in the mid - cities region. (Hurst, Euless, Bedford). A few cities in Tarrant County use groundwater either partly or for their entire supply, but it is a drop in the bucket compared to the reservoir sources. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. Ensuring the public has access to information is crucial during period of drought. Informing citizens of water restrictions is one of the key ways to mitigate the effects of drought. 5.1.11 Terrorism Mitigating against terrorism requires advanced surveillance technology, coordinated law enforcement operations, and public vigilance. Terrorist threats come in multiple forms, including bomb threats and active shooter incidents. To mitigate these threats, Tarrant County jurisdictions have identified projects that provide for better surveillance, enhanced response field technology, and public education. 5-8 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Terrorism Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Ensure Tarrant County first responders have all equipment necessary to respond to terror incidents. 2. Ensure an ongoing training, exercise, and planning program is in place to mitigate the effects of terrorism. 3. Develop a standard operating procedure and provide training to Richland Hills officers in the event of an active shooter incident. 4. Implement systems to ensure the public is educated about the effects of terrorism and is ever vigilant. Multijurisdictional Considerations. All jurisdictions in Tarrant County can experience an act of terrorism. Critical infrastructure and entertainment venues in Fort Worth and Arlington have an increased likelihood of terrorism due to the urban nature and large crowds that frequent them. Additional security procedures are taken to ensure the safety of its citizens. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to alleviate potential situations. Public vigilance is of the utmost importance to ensure that public safety officials have the information needed to stop terrorist attacks. 5.1.12 Lightning Mitigating against lightning primarily involves ensuring that lightning strikes do not cause fires. Although it is difficult to prevent every occurrence, the installation of lightning rods on buildings and homes assists in the attempt. Additionally, public information ensures that people are educated about lightning safety, such as staying away from trees during severe thunderstorm and lightning storms. The jurisdictions participating in the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan submitted mitigation strategies that include installing lightning rods on critical infrastructure and conducting public education campaigns about lightning safety. Lightning Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Mitigate lightning risk to critical infrastructure and facilities. 2. Educate the public about effective preparedness measures to mitigate the effects of lightning. Multijurisdictional Considerations. All of Tarrant County should be considered when developing mitigation strategies related to lightning. Thunderstorms with associated lightning have caused significant damage in all areas of Tarrant County. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County public safety community is taking an all hazards approach to community awareness programs. Lightning events are included in this all hazards program. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-9 Section 5 5.1.13 Hazardous Materials Release A hazardous materials release is identified as a technological hazard in the Tarrant County community. Historical trends suggest that there will be multiple hazardous material incidents in Tarrant County during any given year. This includes both fixed facility and transportation -related incidents. The identified mitigation strategies for hazardous materials include ensuring that first responders are trained and equipped to effectively and efficiently respond to the incident and to work in partnership with industry to plan an effective response strategy to hazardous materials incidents. Hazardous Materials Release Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Ensure Tarrant County response personnel have the equipment and training necessary to respond to hazardous materials incidents. 2. Educate the public about the dangers of hazardous material releases and effective preparedness measures. 3. Identify shelters to be used in the event of a hazardous materials release evacuation in the Tarrant County. 4. Develop a plan for alternative access/egress from areas potentially impacted by railroad incidents in Tarrant County. 5. Incorporate Tier II software into Grapevine information technology systems. Multijurisdictional Considerations. Hazardous materials releases may occur due to a transportation accident or due to an incident at a factory or facility that manufactures, uses, or stores hazardous materials. Each jurisdiction is responsible for identifying areas and facilities most vulnerable to hazardous materials releases. Many jurisdictions within Tarrant County have trained first responders in hazardous materials response and also have the appropriate equipment. Those jurisdictions that do not have the needed training and equipment rely on mutual aid agreements with other jurisdictions for coordinated response. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to alleviate potential situations. 5.1.14 Extreme Temperatures Extreme temperatures are a concern for Tarrant County and participating jurisdictions, specifically for vulnerable populations such as those with serious medical conditions and the elderly. Mitigation strategies for extreme heat include comprehensive planning and public education. Extreme Temperatures Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Develop and implement extreme heat or extreme cold response plans for Tarrant County and its jurisdictions. 5-10 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2. Educate the public about the dangers of extreme heat and cold and effective preparedness measures. Multijurisdictional Considerations. All jurisdictions are equally affected by extreme heat. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to alleviate potential situations. 5.1.15 Expansive Soils Expansive soils poise a risk to both critical facilities and the homes and businesses of Tarrant County citizens. Expansive soils cause foundations to shift, cracking foundations and causing buildings to sink into the ground. Public education is essential to ensuring that contractors account for the event impacts of expansive soils when building new developments. Extreme Heat Mitigation Strategy Ranking. The mitigation goals provided in this section are ranked as followed: 1. Mitigate expansive soils by educating the public about and enforcing building codes that aim to reduce their effects. Multijurisdictional Considerations. All jurisdictions are equally affected by expansive soils. Public Information and Awareness Strategies. The Tarrant County Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee has identified public awareness campaigns to ensure that the citizens of Tarrant County are kept abreast of the hazards affecting them and the mitigation efforts to alleviate potential situations. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-11 Section 5 5.2 City of Arlington Mitigation Strategy Severe Continue to test Perform a sound Thunderstorms the emergency reflective study on the and High warning system emergency siren Winds, Multiple in the City of system. Upgrade and Tornadoes, Hazards (MH) Arlington expand the siren Hail, Lightning, -1 regularly and system. Winter Storms, upgrade Flooding, Dam equipment as Failure, appropriate. Develop a program to Wildfires distribute weather radios at a reduced rate. Severe Mitigate damage Thunderstorms to existing and High structures as a result of natural Provide awnings as a Winds, MH -4 hazards using cover for emergency Tornadoes, cost effective response vehicles Hail, Lightning, approaches in located outside. Winter Storms, the City of Flooding Arlington. Within 2 years Emergency Management 3-4 years 5 or more years Emergency Management Public Safety $100,000 for the sound reflective study plus $300,000 for 12 to 15 additional sirens (including installation) General Funds, Grants General Funds, Grants TBD Educate the Continue to promote Office of public Emergency Flooding (F) - public regarding Currently Management, Public General Flooding education/hazard $10,000 $40,000 Fund, 7 the natural mitigation programs, implementing Works and Grants hazards present including: Transportation/Citywide 5-12 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-13 in the City of • flood insurance Arlington. (NFIP) • flood hazard information • potential mitigation measures • "KnoWhat2Do" campaign • other information related to flood hazard Enact and Community Severe Severe enforce City of Review, update, and Development and Thunderstorms Thunderstorms Arlington ordinances to enforce City Planning, General (ST) - 3, and High minimize the ordinances, as 3-4 years Fund, Tornadoes T () Winds, impact of natural appropriate, to address Building Inspection, Grants 3 Tornadoes threats to people wind damage. Code Compliance or property. Continue to implement Maximize flood programs and take action to improve the insurance City's Community coverage of Rating System (CRS) 3 or more Public Works and To be F -1 Flooding property owners rating, including years Transportation determined, as a mitigation opportunities to reduce Department Grants measure in the flood insurance City of Arlington. premiums through NFIP activities. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-13 Section 5 F - 2 Flooding Dam Failure Dam Failure (DF) - 4 F - 5 Flooding $6,000,000 Identify the most Public Works and (assuming appropriate mitigation Within 2 years Transportation $75,000 per measure, structural or Department structure and non-structural, for each Continue to repetitive flood loss reduce repetitive structure. Establish a flooding losses priority system that in the City of ranks each repetitive Arlington. loss structure in order of priority for mitigation activity. Address each structure in the order in which it was ranked. Undertake a comprehensive facility Protect critical review of Lake facilities and Arlington Dam and services in the implement recommend City of Arlington improvements. from flooding. Address infrastructure in developing/updating roadways. Develop, review, update and enforce Incorporate City ordinances to hazard address activities that mitigation in impact flooding, long-range including: planning and • runoff associated development in with construction the City of projects, Arlington. • wet -flood proofing in existing commercial structures, and $6,000,000 HMGP, Public Works and (assuming storm water Within 2 years Transportation $75,000 per $24,000,000 utility fees Department structure and for the 250 /o 80 known match, structures) grants Public Works and Approximately 3-4 years Transportation $10,000 $40,000 TBD Department Public Works and 3-4 years Transportation Unknown TBD Department Public Works and General 3-4 years Transportation Fund, Department Grants 5-14 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES • compensation for partial rights, such as an easement, to prevent property from being developed contrary to a community's plan to maintain open spaces. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-15 Train first responders to Train officers who Terrorism (TR) Terrorism locate locate suspicious Complete Arlington Police General 2 suspicious devices. Department Funds devices in the City of Arlington. Preserve crime Train all officers on TR - 2 Terrorism scene integrity in importance of scene Complete Arlington Police General the City of management for further Department Funds Arlington. criminal investigation. Train on suspicious Establish suspicious Arlington Police General TR - 3 Terrorism activity reporting activity reporting Complete Department Funds in the City of procedures. Arlington. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-15 Section 5 Lightning (L) - Lightning 1 Prioritize hazard mitigation projects to best utilize available City of Arlington and non -City funding. Install lightning rods on existing and future communication infrastructure and other critical facilities, including City Hall, the elevated storage tanks, Emergency Management Operations Facility (Public Safety Building), fueling facilities for City vehicles, fire stations, police stations, power facilities, and the water treatment plants. The lightning rods will provide additional protection against damage to these facilities if struck by lightning. 3-4 years Emergency Management Enterprise Funds, Grants Ensure City of General Extreme Extreme Arlington has the 6 months - Increased Open cooling centers Arlington Office of Fund and Temperatures and provide public Emergency $10,000 Grants (ET) -1 Temperatures ability to open information. ongoing Management public safety (EMPG and cooling centers. UASI) 5-16 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-17 Develop extreme heat Identify extreme mitigation program to General Extreme heat mitigation ensure essential Arlington Office of Increased Fund and ET -1 Temperatures plans for critical functions continue in 1 year Emergency $20,000 public safety Grants infrastructure in the event of high Management (EMPG and City of Arlington. temperatures. UASI) Develop an extreme Increased Develop an heat outreach program public extreme heat that provides tips and Public Information knowledge of Extreme ET - 2 outreach Pertinent information 1 year- Office; Office of $30,000 various forms General Temperatures program for City for ensuring the health ongoing Emergency of assistance; Fund of Arlington and safety of citizens Management increased citizens. during extreme heat. public health and safety Increased public Provide extreme heat knowledge of information to Arlington 6 month- Public Information $15,000 various forms General citizens through a ongoing Office; Fire Department of assistance; Fund Distribute social media campaign. increased extreme heat public health ET - 2 Extreme information to and safety Temperatures City of Arlington Increased citizens. public Provide extreme heat knowledge of information through the 6 month- Public Information $15,000 various forms General Arlington website. ongoing Office; Fire Department of assistance; Fund increased public health and safety Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-17 Section 5 T -1 Tornado F - 3 Flooding Hail (H) - 2 Hail L-2 Lightning Support the Promote the safe room construction of rebate program to safe rooms in increase number of Annually OEM the City of participates in the City Arlington of Arlington Conduct Promote the safe room drainage rebate program to improvements to increase number of Annually OEM Little Creek participates in the City Court location in of Arlington Arlington public education Research existing program in the public information 6 months OEM Provide material on hall educational available. materials on the Provide public hazards education materials to 1 year associated with public. hail to the Promote the safe room citizens of rebate program to Arlington. increase number of Annually participants in the City $1,000 of Arlington. Enhance current public education Funds program in the City of Arlington Conduct public to include education campaign on information on the hazards associated surge protectors, with lighting hazards 1 years lightning rods, and protective safe rooms, $180,000 safety tips, measures. "Knowhat2Do" HMGP, campaign and other elements. OEM OEM OEM City General $50,000 $180,000 Fund, HMGP, City General $50,000 $180,000 Fund, HMGP, DHS Funds, $1,000 $3,000,000 City General Funds DHS Funds, $800 $4,000,000 City General Funds City General $50,000 $180,000 Fund, HMGP, DHS Funds, $800 $1,000,000 City General Funds 5-18 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide install 9,000 meters education and MIU's through an materials to Conduct public Winter Storms Arlington citizens education campaign on (WS) 2 Winter Storms on the hazards mitigating the hazards 6 months of winter storms associated with winter and effective storms. mitigation Conservation activities. 6 months Specialist/Leak Drought (D) - 2 Drought Wildfire (W) - 2 Wildfire Wildfire (W) - 3 Wildfire In 2015, AWU will OEM MITIGATION STRATEGIES City General $5,000 $80,000 Funds, EMPG,DHS City General Water Department $5,289,000 $12,000,000 and Capitol Project Funds Water Department $98,000 $1,000,000 City General Funds Water Department $100,000 $20,000,000 City General Funds Protect the City of Arlington Community critical facilities Ordinances will be Development and and vulnerable followed to maintain Continuously Planning, Building $150,000 $500,000 populations from minimum distances Inspection and Code the effects of from fuels. Compliance wildfire incidents Increase public awareness of Increase distribution of mitigating public information 6 months OEM/ Fire Department $25,000 $80,000 activities to about wildfires. prevent and City General Funds City General Fund; DHS; EMPG Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-19 install 9,000 meters Continue to and MIU's through an ongoing meter 2 years update and replacement program implement the and water line City of Arlington renewals. water Create Water conservation Conservation and drought 6 months Specialist/Leak contingency Detection Position. plans. Create a comprehensive water 1 year conservation program. OEM MITIGATION STRATEGIES City General $5,000 $80,000 Funds, EMPG,DHS City General Water Department $5,289,000 $12,000,000 and Capitol Project Funds Water Department $98,000 $1,000,000 City General Funds Water Department $100,000 $20,000,000 City General Funds Protect the City of Arlington Community critical facilities Ordinances will be Development and and vulnerable followed to maintain Continuously Planning, Building $150,000 $500,000 populations from minimum distances Inspection and Code the effects of from fuels. Compliance wildfire incidents Increase public awareness of Increase distribution of mitigating public information 6 months OEM/ Fire Department $25,000 $80,000 activities to about wildfires. prevent and City General Funds City General Fund; DHS; EMPG Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-19 Section 5 safeguard property from wildfires. Arlington. homeowner information brochures on the do's and don'ts of 1 year OEM maintaining constant moisture around residential foundations. 5.3 City of Azle Mitigation Strategy Winter Storms, High Winds, Enhance Implement OWS Project will MH -1 Tornadoes, Severe Storms, & warning upgrades to be Fire Power Failure systems to address potential implemente Department help warn areas where growth d as DHS and $100,000 City General Funds Streets $100,000,000 Maintenance Fund $800.00 $120,000 DHS Funds The impact of $10,000 warning our General population of Fund the 5-20 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Improve extreme Use multiple modes of Extreme heat public communication to ET - 2 Temperatures education distribute extreme heat 6 months OEM $500 distribution in the information to the City of Arlington. public. Continue to research and incorporate subgrade stabilization Public Works and methods on street On-going Transportation $4,000,000 projects such as street Mitigate against reclamation and Expansive Expansive expansive soil in repairs. Soils (ES) -1 Soils the City of Distribute broadly Arlington. homeowner information brochures on the do's and don'ts of 1 year OEM maintaining constant moisture around residential foundations. 5.3 City of Azle Mitigation Strategy Winter Storms, High Winds, Enhance Implement OWS Project will MH -1 Tornadoes, Severe Storms, & warning upgrades to be Fire Power Failure systems to address potential implemente Department help warn areas where growth d as DHS and $100,000 City General Funds Streets $100,000,000 Maintenance Fund $800.00 $120,000 DHS Funds The impact of $10,000 warning our General population of Fund the 5-20 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Winter Storms, High Winds, MH - 5 Tornadoes, Severe Storms, Flooding & Power Failure. the citizens has and will occur of Azle, that may impact the concerning ability of the system the potential to reach its of tornadic intended service activity. area. developmen t occurs. 1 year Fire $90,000 Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES impending Tornado is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. As our community grows so does our need to prepare for and respond effectively to emergency situations. There is a tremendous benefit to having staff that is experienced and able to effectively prepare for and guide our organization through a wide variety of emergency situations. General Fund Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-21 Our emergency management program is managed by a part time administrator Add a full and the fire chief. In time an effort to dedicate 40 hours of staff emergency time per week we manager/Gl will need to hire an S specialist. emergency manager that can commit 100% of their time to preparedness and response. developmen t occurs. 1 year Fire $90,000 Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES impending Tornado is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. As our community grows so does our need to prepare for and respond effectively to emergency situations. There is a tremendous benefit to having staff that is experienced and able to effectively prepare for and guide our organization through a wide variety of emergency situations. General Fund Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-21 Section 5 Initial training in ICS MH -5 MH -5 and NIMS training is beneficial only if Conduct we continue to annual ICS educate our Winter Storms, High Winds, and NIMS personnel. It is MH - 5 Tornadoes, Severe Storms & refresher important to ensure Power Failure training for that everyone in the all city city maintains employees. competency in their specific area of that our community responsibility during police and an emergency. MH -5 MH -5 1 year Fire $30,000 Department 1 year Fire $30,000 Department 6 mos. EM $15,000 The benefit of this program is hard to predict since the size and type of incidents that we will have are hard to predict. This program will enhance our effectiveness with any incident that we should be called to respond. The main benefit with this program will come through effectiveness in our response, accurate damage reporting and timely assessments. The benefit of having power during an emergency cannot be quantified in General Fund General Fund 5-22 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide damage Annually train our assessment police and fire training to all personnel on how Tornado, Flooding, Wildfire & emergency to accurately Infectious disease responders assess the effects within the that our community police and is exposed to after fire a large event. department. Review Task the Winter Storms, High Winds, current emergency Tornadoes, Severe Storms, monthly manager with Flooding, & Power Failure inspection of evaluating our past emergency maintenance and power testing program for 1 year Fire $30,000 Department 1 year Fire $30,000 Department 6 mos. EM $15,000 The benefit of this program is hard to predict since the size and type of incidents that we will have are hard to predict. This program will enhance our effectiveness with any incident that we should be called to respond. The main benefit with this program will come through effectiveness in our response, accurate damage reporting and timely assessments. The benefit of having power during an emergency cannot be quantified in General Fund General Fund 5-22 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MH -3 rM W-3 MITIGATION STRATEGIES generators all of our a dollar & implement emergency power value. The changes as generators. benefit will be needed. Development clear when vulnerable practices and we are able Wildfire populations to properly Building $150,000 y $500,000 utilize the to maintain Inspection and generators effects of minimum distances during an wildfire emergency. Compliance Ensure that all incidents. Evaluate all critical facilities i.e. critical water department, facilities EOC, Fire, Police TFS, our city and within the and administration community Winter Storms, High Winds, city and maintain the ability 2-5 year Fire come in the Tornadoes, Severe Storms, ensure that to operate during a project. Department $200,000 800000 Power Failure, & Flooding they have power failure. This proper back action item includes up operating the procurement and installation of power. new generators for critical facilities. Protect the City of Azle Implement Community critical facilities and defensive space Development vulnerable practices and and Planning, Continuousl Wildfire populations enforce ordinances Building $150,000 y $500,000 from the to maintain Inspection and effects of minimum distances Code wildfire from fuels. Compliance incidents. Implement Coordinate with The primary Wildfire FIREWISE TFS, our city and 3 years Fire $50,000 benefit will community community to Department come in the program. establish a form of life General Fund City General Funds General Fund/Grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-23 Section 5 FIREWISE and property community conservation program. This program will assist us with preplanning for a fire, during and after. 5-24 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 The benefit is not able to be quantified. However, the Establish and train benefit of our responders on being Train first the proper prepared to IDO - 2 Infectious Disease Outbreak responders distribution of 1 year Fire $20,000 provide General in POD medical Department medications Fund/Grants procedures. supplies/medication or medical s during an supplies to emergency. our community will be extremely valuable. Establish specific Implement procedures for Our continuity of dealing with long responders operation term employee will benefit by procedures absence due to getting to for essential IDO - 3 Infectious Disease Outbreak infectious disease 2 years Fire $25,000 actually General personnel within our city. The Department perform the Fund/Grants during a program will POD exercise long term address essential after their employee functions that need training. shortage. to continue during a pandemic. IDO - 2 Infectious Disease Outbreak Conduct a Conduct a multi- 1 year Fire $50,000 Our General POD agency, Department responders Fund/Grants 5-24 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 IDO-4 D-3 XM Infectious Disease Outbreak Drought Drought exercise multijurisdictional every other exercise with our year area responders specific to POD. Develop a This effort would be public to better inform our information population of campaign to actions they can educate the take to better city of Azle prepare and public about ultimately survive infectious the effects of a disease. pandemic. successful in Use of PSAs to Educate our educate our public public about about water water conservation. conservation Specific and the communication cities about our current policies. status and ways to prevent wasting water. 1 year 1 year Develop Three specific contingency areas will need plans in the contingency plans. city that #1 power and 3-5 year address drinking water plan, project. potential #2 Suppression impacts of plan and #3 drought. Medical plan. Fire Department EM EM MITIGATION STRATEGIES will benefit by getting to actually perform the POD exercise after their training. Difficult to predict but General $50,000 will be aimed Fund/Grants at saving lives. The impact is General $50,000 difficult to Fund/Grants measure. The impact of these three programs cannot be General quantified but Fund or $600,000 they need to bond be addressed if we are issuance. going to be successful in being Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-25 Section 5 TR- 1 TR- 1 TR -4 Terrorism Terrorism/Hazardous Materials Terrorism/Hazardous Materials prepared under drought conditions. We will see a significant impact to our preparedness for CBRNE incidents. 10 years Fire $80,000 Funding is General Department aimed at Fund/Grants back fill and the program tuition will be covered under a grant. We will benefit by raising the level of General 5-8 year EM $400,000 preparedness Fund/Grants of our organization as it relates to terrorism. This will benefit our 1-5 years EM $90,000 community by General preparing Fund/Grants them to take protective 5-26 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Send two Hazmat Train all Technicians per hazardous year to a CBRNE material specialty class. The technicians purpose is to on response increase their to CBRNE knowledge base on incidents these specific incidents. Hire a 3rd party contractor to conduct a risk assessment of all city infrastructure Protect Azle and property, utilities from including water terrorism. distribution system. The goal is to identify and recommend protective measures. Increase our Design and develop citizen and a brief 4 hour school training and districts awareness program awareness to administer at the of ISD's and to the prepared under drought conditions. We will see a significant impact to our preparedness for CBRNE incidents. 10 years Fire $80,000 Funding is General Department aimed at Fund/Grants back fill and the program tuition will be covered under a grant. We will benefit by raising the level of General 5-8 year EM $400,000 preparedness Fund/Grants of our organization as it relates to terrorism. This will benefit our 1-5 years EM $90,000 community by General preparing Fund/Grants them to take protective 5-26 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES hazardous public. The focus is measures materials & on what to do in the during a CBRNE event of a hazardous incidents hazardous materials or through the materials or CBRNE use of public CBRNE event. training emergency. sessions. neighboring Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-27 Benefit our community as well as our Train first Train three neighboring responders firefighters per year communities TR -1 Terrorism/Hazardous Materials hazardous to the hazardous continuing Fire $100,000 providing us General materials materials technician Department with the Fund/Grants mitigation. level. ability to mitigate hazardous materials emergencies. Provide Research existing DHS Funds, educational public information 6 months OEM $1,000 $3,000,000 City General materials on material on hail and Funds the hazards flooding available. H-2 Hail, Flooding associated with hail and Provide public DHS Funds, flooding to education materials 1 year OEM $800 $4,000,000 City General the citizens to public. Funds of Azle. Mitigate damage to Provide awnings as existing a cover for H-2 Hail structures emergency 5 or more Public Safety TBD as a result response vehicles years of hail using located outside. cost effective Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-27 Section 5 L-2 L-2 Lightning Lightning approaches in the City of Azle. Enhance current public education program in the City of Azle to include information on surge protectors, lightning rods, safe rooms, safety tips, "Knowhat2D o" campaign and other elements. Prioritize hazard mitigation projects to best utilize available City of Azle and non -City funding. Conduct public education campaign on the hazards associated with lighting hazards and protective measures. Install lightning rods on existing and future communication infrastructure and other critical facilities, including City Hall, the elevated storage tanks, Emergency Management Operations Facility (Public Safety Building), fueling facilities for City 1 year OEM 3-4 years Emergency Management DHS Funds, $800 $1,000,000 City General Funds Enterprise Funds, Grants 5-28 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET- 1 ET -2 ES -1 Extreme Temperatures Extreme Temperatures Expansive soils MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-29 vehicles, fire stations, police stations, power facilities, and the water treatment plants. The lightning rods will provide additional protection against damage to these facilities if struck by lightning. Identify Develop extreme extreme heat mitigation heat program, to ensure General mitigation essential functions Increased Fund and plans for continue in the 1 year OEM $20,000 public safety Grants critical event of high (EMPG and infrastructur temperatures. p UASI) e in City of Azle. Develop an Develop an extreme heat Increased extreme outreach program public heat that provides tips Public knowledge of outreach and pertinent 1 year- Information $30,000 various forms General program for information for ongoing Office; OEM of assistance; Fund City of ensuring the health increased Arlington and safety of public health citizens. citizens during and safety extreme heat. Annually The purpose of this Our monitor item is to track and community expansive monitor the impact long term 1- Building Official $25,000 will benefit by Grant soil that expansive soils 10 years identifying insurance has on our past claims. residents and expansive Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-29 Section 5 ES -1 ES -1 Expansive Soils Expansive Soils businesses. This information will be used to implement mitigation efforts in the future. 3-5 years as funding Building Official $125,000 is available. Public Works Ongoing and $4,000,000 Transportation soil claims and enacting new prevention measures. Our community can be impacted by saving the value of our property and prevent costly repairs to structures. $100,000,000 General Fund/Grants Streets Maintenance Fund 5-30 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a PSA Increase addressing citizen expansive soils in awareness our area. This can in regards to be given in the form expansive of a mailer, PSA or soils. town hall type meeting. 3-5 years as funding Building Official $125,000 is available. Public Works Ongoing and $4,000,000 Transportation soil claims and enacting new prevention measures. Our community can be impacted by saving the value of our property and prevent costly repairs to structures. $100,000,000 General Fund/Grants Streets Maintenance Fund 5-30 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Continue to research and Mitigate incorporate against subgrade expansive stabilization soil in the methods on street City of Azle. projects such as street reclamation and repairs. 3-5 years as funding Building Official $125,000 is available. Public Works Ongoing and $4,000,000 Transportation soil claims and enacting new prevention measures. Our community can be impacted by saving the value of our property and prevent costly repairs to structures. $100,000,000 General Fund/Grants Streets Maintenance Fund 5-30 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5.4 City of Bedford Mitigation Strategy Severe Thunderstorms Mitigate the effects of and High Winds, severe weather by Purchase and institute a MH -1 Tornadoes, Hail, increasing the awareness reverse notification Lightning, Winter through the ability of system. Storms, Flooding, mass notification in the Dam Failure, City of Bedford. Wildfires Bedford in the event of an Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Improve the technology in Storms, Flooding, our EOC to better serve MH -3 Dam Failure, the citizens of the City of Remodel EOC. Wildfires, Bedford in the event of an Extreme Temperatures, emergency. Hazardous Materials Spills, Infectious Disease Outbreak 24 months 24 months Severe Ensure outdoors spaces Evaluate current ST -1, T - Thunderstorms in the City of Bedford shelters in outdoor 2015 1, L -1 and High winds, have adequate shelter for spaces in the City of high -wind events such as Bedford. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Grants, Emergency $40,000/year $50,000 General Management Fund, County Funds, Grants, Emergency $50,000 $750,000 General Management Fund, County Funds Emergency Management $2,000 NA Budget Office, Risk Management Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-31 Section 5 ST -1,T- 1 Tornadoes, severe thunderstorms or Determine the size and Emergency Lightning tornadoes. space needs for Management shelters in outdoor 2015 Office, Risk $5,000 spaces in the City of Management Bedford. Install outdoor storm shelters at Boys Ranch Park & Activity Center 2801 Forest Ridge Dr., Brook Hollow Park 1 600 Block of Rankin, Monterrey Park 11000 Block of Monterrey, Central Park / Pool Risk 1200 Central Drive, 2020 Management $2,000,000 Stormie Jones Park 1 2500 Block of Brasher, Bedford Trails / Harris Ryals Park / Linear Park, Meadow Park Athletic Complex 13200 Meadow Park, Carousel Park 11100 Simpson Terrace Evaluate the current Emergency conditions of critical Management facilities to determine 2016 Office, Risk 45,000 Severe Ensure critical facilities in which ones, if any, need safe rooms installed. Management Thunderstorms the city of Bedford have Determine the size and and High winds, adequate safe rooms to space needed to shelter Emergency Tornadoes protect against high -wind the population of the 2016 Management $5,000 events and tornadoes. critical facility. Office Install safe rooms as Emergency needed in critical 2020 Management $1,500,000 facilities. Office lI NA Budget None NA None NA None NA None 5-32 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Engineering $5,000 NA Budget Building $5,000 NA Budget Development Risk $5,000 NA Budget Management Risk $1,000,000 NA Management Engineering $5,000 NA TCEMO $20,000 NA Budget Budget Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-33 Review current jurisdictional ordinances Ongoing Ensure the City of and building codes Severe Bedford ordinances and related to high winds. ST - 3, T - Thunderstorms building codes reflect the Develop or update 3 and High winds, need for high -wind ordinances and building Tornadoes resistant windows in new codes to recommend developments and new developments or Ongoing facilities. facilities are built with high -wind resistant windows as needed. Evaluate the need for high -wind resistant 2018 Severe Ensure the city of windows in critical ST - 3, T - Thunderstorms Bedford critical facilities, facilities. 3 and High winds, including schools, have Install high -wind Tornadoes high -wind resistant resistant windows as windows in place. necessary in critical 2020 facilities, including schools. Evaluate the hazards posed by high -wind 2018 events in the city of Develop a severe Bedford. Severe thunderstorm and Develop a severe ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms tornado preparedness weather preparedness 4 and High winds, education program for the education program that Tornadoes city of Bedford citizens. provides tips and Ongoing pertinent information for protecting property against high -wind damage. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Engineering $5,000 NA Budget Building $5,000 NA Budget Development Risk $5,000 NA Budget Management Risk $1,000,000 NA Management Engineering $5,000 NA TCEMO $20,000 NA Budget Budget Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-33 Section 5 5-34 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide severe weather preparedness information to Bedford Public citizens through a social Ongoing Information $5,000 NA Budget media campaign, Office Severe Distribute severe weather including severe ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms preparedness information thunderstorms and 4 and High winds, to the City of Bedford tornadoes. Tornadoes citizens. Ensure the Bedford city website is updated Public during tornado season Ongoing Information $0 NA Budget to educate citizens on Office severe weather preparedness. Add one 10'x 10' CBC to the four existing CBCs along Sulphur Branch at Circle Lane. Add one 10'x 10' This will increase the concrete box culvert existing conditions to City Budget, F - 3 Flooding (CBC) to the four existing 100 -year flood level of 2 years Public Works $500,000 $2,000,000 CIP Funds, CBCs along Sulphur protection in order to HMGP, PDM Branch at Circle Lane in protect the traffic flow the City of Bedford. on streets as well as keep roadways open to allow for emergency vehicles and to protect public safety. 5-34 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 F-3 F-3 F-3 F-3 Flooding Flooding Flooding Flooding MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Budget, 1 year Public Works $1,200,000 $4,800,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $355,000 $1,420,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $285,000 $1,140,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $325,000 $1,300,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-35 Add one 10'x 10' CBC to the three existing 10' x 8' CBCs. This will Add one 10'x 10' CBS increase the existing (concrete box culvert) to conditions to 100 -year the three existing 10' x 8' flood level of protection CBCs along Sulphur in order to protect the Branch at Bedford Road traffic flow on streets, as in the City of Bedford. well as keep roadways open to allow for emergency vehicles and to protect public safety. Conduct structure improvements to Conduct structure improve channel improvements to Sulphur degradation caused by Branch Tributary at erosion include such Shirley Way in the City of actions as replacing rip - Bedford. rap section with gabion basket and regarding steep slopes. Conduct structure improvements to Conduct structure improve channel improvements to Sulphur degradation caused by Branch Tributary at erosion include such Schumac Lane in the City actions as installing of Bedford. concrete retaining walls and reconstructing channel slopes. Conduct structure Conduct structure improvements to Sulphur improvements to Branch Tributary at improve channel Donna Lane in the City of degradation caused by Bedford. erosion. Include such actions as installing MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Budget, 1 year Public Works $1,200,000 $4,800,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $355,000 $1,420,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $285,000 $1,140,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM City Budget, 1 year Public Works $325,000 $1,300,000 CIP Funds, HMGP,PDM Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-35 Section 5 F - 3 Flooding F - 3 Flooding Power Failure, Extreme Temperatures PF -1, WS Winter Storms, -1, ET -1 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes concrete retaining walls and reconstructing channel slopes. Public Works $280,000 Public Works $500,000 City Budget, $1,120,000 CIP Funds, HMGP, PDM City Budget, $2,000,000 CIP Funds, HMGP, PDM Risk $0 NA Budget Management Facility Maintenance $50,000/year NA Budget Facility Maintenance $50,000/year NA Budget 5-36 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Conduct structure improvements to Conduct structure improve channel improvements to Sulphur degradation caused by Branch Tributary at Briar erosion. Include such 1 year Drive in the City of actions as installing Bedford. concrete retaining walls and reconstructing channel slopes. Conduct structure improvements to Conduct structure improve channel improvements to Sulphur degradation caused by Branch Tributary at erosion. Include such 1 year Brookhollow Park in the actions as installing City of Bedford. concrete retaining walls and reconstructing channel slopes. Identify appropriate size and type of generator Ongoing for critical facilities. Ensure the City of Purchase/order Bedford's facilities have generator for critical Ongoing alternate power supply. facilities. Deliver and install critical facility Ongoing generators. Public Works $280,000 Public Works $500,000 City Budget, $1,120,000 CIP Funds, HMGP, PDM City Budget, $2,000,000 CIP Funds, HMGP, PDM Risk $0 NA Budget Management Facility Maintenance $50,000/year NA Budget Facility Maintenance $50,000/year NA Budget 5-36 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-37 Power Failure, Evaluate emergency EMO/Risk Winter Storms, Ensure the city of lighting systems in Ongoing Management NA NA Budget PF -1 Severe Bedford's critical facilities critical facilities. Thunderstorms have emergency lighting Install emergency Facility and High Winds, systems in place. lighting systems in Ongoing Management NA NA Budget Tornadoes critical facilities. Evaluate which critical facilities need hail 2016 Risk $2,000 NA Budget Ensure the City of resistant roofing and Management H -1 Hail Bedford critical facilities windows installed. have hail -resistant roofing Install hail -resistant and windows installed. roofing and windows in 2018 Facility $2,000,000 NA None identified critical Maintenance facilities. Evaluate the need for covered parking for city 2016 Risk $2,000 NA Budget Provide hail -resistant vehicles to protect them Management H -1 Hail parking areas for against hail. Bedford's city vehicles. Install covered parking areas as needed to 2018 Facility $500,000 NA None protect city vehicles Maintenance against hail. Evaluate the hazards Ongoing EMO/Public $0 NA Budget posed by hail in the city. Health Develop a hail Develop hail preparedness education preparedness education H - 2 Hail program Y for the Cit of program that provides EMO/Public Bedford citizens. tips and pertinent Ongoing Health $2,000 NA Budget information for ensuring the protection of property against hail. Distribute hail Provide hail preparedness information preparedness Public H - 2 Hail to the City of Bedford information to citizens Ongoing Information $2,000 NA Budget citizens. through a social media Office campaign. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-37 Section 5 5-38 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide hail Public preparedness information through the Ongoing Information $0 NA Budget city website. Office Evaluate the city of Public Works I Bedford's water system Ongoing Trinity River $10,000 NA Budget Ensure the City of to ensure capacity for Authority Bedford's water systems W 1 Wildfire fighting wildfires. are adequate for fighting Install or upgrade Public Works I wildfires. needed equipment to Ongoing Trinity River Unknown NA Budget ensure water systems Authority are adequate. Mitigate wildfires by Prevent wildfires from Code W -1 Wildfire instituting landscaping spreading to critical facilities by landscaping Ongoing Enforcement / $50,000 NA Budget practices at the City of plants and brush away Parks Bedford's critical facilities. from buildings. Department Review city ordinances Enact building permit and laws to ensure process that Building & W-2 Wildfire mitigation practices are in encourages wildfire Ongoing Fire $20,000 NA Budget effect in the city of resistant construction. Departments Bedford. Review current wildfire Ongoing Northeast Tarrant response plans and Regional Plan County Fire Unknown NA Budget Ensure that adequate procedures. Departments Bedford fire department Develop or update W-2 Wildfire wildfire response plans wildfire response plans Annually Regional Plan Unknown NA Budget and procedures are in and procedures. place. Provide wildfire Texas response training to fire Annually Forestry Unknown NA State Budget personnel. Service 5-38 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-39 Develop a wildfire preparedness education Provide information to the program that provides W 3 Wildfire city of Bedford citizens tips and pertinent Annually Tarrant Unknown NA County regarding the hazards information for ensuring County EMO Budget posed by wildfires. the protection of property against wildfires. Determine the process Work with the Texas State of for becoming a Firewise Department of Texas, State & W-3 Wildfire Community in the city of Emergency Annually Tarrant Unknown NA County Bedford. Management to become County EMO Budget a Firewise Community. Conduct an assessment State I of winter weather Annually County / City Unknown NA Budgets response capabilities. Public Works Acquire equipment State / Evaluate winter weather needed as determined Annually County / City Unknown NA Unknown WS -1 Winter Storms response capabilities in by assessment. Public Works the City of Bedford. State / Provide safety training County / City to first responders on Annually Public Works $10,000 NA Budget winter weather hazards. & Fire Department Conduct an assessment City EMO / of winter weather plans Annually Public Works / $5,000 NA Budget Evaluate winter weather in place for jurisdiction Fire WS -1 Winter Storms planning capabilities in public works. the City of Bedford. Develop or update City EMO / winter weather 2018 Public Works / $10,000 NA Budget preparedness plan. Fire Develop a winter weather Evaluate the hazardsposed City EMO I WS -2 Winter Storms preparedness program winter by severe w Annually Public Works / $5,000 NA Budget for Bedford citizens. weather in the city of Fire / Police Bedford. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-39 Section 5 NA Budget NA Budget NA Budget NA Budget NA None HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds 5-40 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a winter weather preparedness City EMO / education program that Public provides tips and Annually Information $10,000 pertinent information for Department. I avoiding hypothermia TCEMO and icy conditions. Provide winter weather Public Information preparedness Department & information to Bedford Annually Emergency $5,000 Distribute winter weather citizens through a social media campaign. Management WS - 2 Winter Storms preparedness information Office to City of Bedford Ensure the Bedford city Public residents. website is updated Information during winter months to Annually Department & $5,000 educate citizens on Emergency winter weather Management preparedness. Office Train first responders in Fire/Tarrant point of distribution Ongoing County Public $5,000 Infectious Prepare City of Bedford (POD) procedures. Health IDO - 2 Disease Outbreak first responders for mass Conduct a POD Public prophylaxis distribution. exercise to test plans 2017 Health/Tarrant $10,000 and procedures. County Public Health Provide physical security at the Hurst, Euless, and Develop plans for IDO - 2 Infectious Bedford (HEB) POD site security needs within Completed HEB Disease Outbreak while treating up to the POD site. 200,000 people within a 48-hour timeframe. NA Budget NA Budget NA Budget NA Budget NA None HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds 5-40 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease $49,000 $200,000 Control Public Health Preparedness Funds HEB FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA Ensure continuity p EMO/Risk plans and procedures 2017 $0 procedures are in place Management IDO - 3 Infectious tore are for a long-term for city employees and Disease Outbreak p p g facilities. employee shortage at Provide COOP training City of Bedford facilities. for jurisdiction 2017 EMO/HR $5,000 employees. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA NA Budget NA Budget 5-41 Calculate police personnel requirements and availability and then Completed HEB prepare a viable plan with schedules and assignments. Estimate fuel needs for police and ICS vehicles, 31 -Dec -13 HEB and generators. Plan for law enforcement personnel Completed HEB needs for traffic control. Coordinate the effective Plan for portable, Infectious traffic flow leading into, physical barrier needs Completed HEB IDO - 2 Disease Outbreak out of, and within the (cones, barricades, Hurst, Euless, and etc.). Bedford POD site. Determine points of ingress/egress to POD Completed HEB site for management purposes. Complete and disseminate the Hurst, Infectious Euless, and Bedford POD Prepare and IDO - 2 Disease Outbreak site to local agencies, disseminate POD plan. Completed Bedford school and hospital district, and Tarrant County officials. Review continuity of 0 orations (COOP) MITIGATION STRATEGIES HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease $49,000 $200,000 Control Public Health Preparedness Funds HEB FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA Ensure continuity p EMO/Risk plans and procedures 2017 $0 procedures are in place Management IDO - 3 Infectious tore are for a long-term for city employees and Disease Outbreak p p g facilities. employee shortage at Provide COOP training City of Bedford facilities. for jurisdiction 2017 EMO/HR $5,000 employees. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA NA Budget NA Budget 5-41 Section 5 5-42 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a public Educate the public on Tarrant Infectious information campaign to pandemics, including County Public IDO - 4 Disease Outbreak educate the City of isolation, quarantine, 6 months Information NA NA NA Bedford public about triage, and medical Office infectious diseases. care. Review current legislation for water Code Review the City of conservation On Going Enforcement 0 NA Budget Bedford's water enforcement in the City enforcement legislation of Bedford. D -1 Drought and update as necessary Develop or update to mitigate the effects of water conservation drought. enforcement legislation On Going Code 0 NA Budget to ensure effective Enforcement practices during periods of drought. Develop contingency Review current 2015 Trinity River 0 NA Budget plans for the City of contingency plans. Authority Bedford to ensure D -1 Drought adequate power and Develop or update water supply during potable water 2015 Public Works $2,000,000 NA None prolonged periods of contingency plans. drought. Develop or update power supply 2018 Public Works $400,000 NA None contingency plans. Upgrading irrigation Upgrade water and systems, installing irrigation systems to better water fixtures at Reduce D-2 Drought conserve water in the critical facilities, replace 2020 Public Works $6,000,000 usage by None City of Bedford. aging/leak delivery 15% systems, upgrade domestic meters. 5-42 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 D-2 D-3 D-3 Drought Drought Drought TR -2 Terrorism MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-43 (Insert specific projects to be accomplished to Tarrant County, Tarrant Upgrade water and mitigate drought. For County, irrigation systems to example, upgrading Annually $1,000 $2,000 Individual conserve water in the irrigation systems, All Jurisdiction City of Bedford. installing better water Participating Budgets fixtures at critical Jurisdictions facilities, etc.). Evaluate the hazards Public Works posed by drought in the 2015 & Fire & $5,000 NA Budget City of Bedford. Public Health Develop a drought Develop a drought awareness education awareness education program that provides program for the City of tips and pertinent Public Bedford citizens. information for ensuring 2014 Information $2,000 NA Budget the protection of Office property and the environment against drought. Provide drought awareness information Public to the City of Bedford 2015 Information $20,000 NA None Distribute drought citizens through a Office awareness information to social media campaign. the City of Bedford Provide drought citizens. awareness information 2015 Information $0 NA Budget through the Bedford's Services city website. Ensure officers provide for the safety of the public Control ingress/egress Completed Bedford $4,500 $18,000 Bedford in the immediate vicinity to the area. Police of the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-43 Section 5 TR -2 Terrorism TR - 3 Terrorism TR - 3 Terrorism investigation/incident in Evacuate area Bedford the City of Bedford. residents/businesses as Completed Police and necessary. Fire Site security/hazard Bedford mitigation during Completed Police and investigation. Fire Plan and implement site Bedford security/hazard Completed Police and mitigation during the Fire investigation. Provide for the safety of Develop and utilize a emergency responders in call list for specialized the City of Bedford during personnel to assist in Bedford investigations. high-risk Completed Police and incidents/investigations Fire involving hazardous chemicals and/or bomb - making components. Calculate police personnel requirements and availability and then Completed Bedford Provide security and prepare a viable plan traffic control for the City with schedules and of Bedford annual July assignments. 4th "4 -Fest" event. Determine points of ingress/egress to event Completed Bedford site for management purposes. Calculate police Provide security and personnel requirements traffic control for the City and availability and then Completed Bedford of Bedford annual Blues prepare a viable plan Fest event. with schedules and assignments. $1,000 $8,000 Bedford Bedford Bedford $4,000 Area Agencies and ATF $32,000 Bedford $11,000 $44,000 Bedford 5-44 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 TR -4 Terrorism L-1 L-1 L-2 Lightning Lightning Lightning MITIGATION STRATEGIES Bedford - Police $1,000 $5,000 Town Budget Risk Management, $5,000 NA None Engineering Facility $200,000 $2,000,000 None Maintenance Risk Management, Determine points of NA None Engineering ingress/egress to event Completed Facility Maintenance site for management $30,000,000 None Emergency purposes. Increase citizen domestic $2,000 NA Budget and international Increase public terrorism awareness, terrorism awareness 12 months preparedness, and through public speaking NA Budget response in the City of engagements. Bedford for public events. Evaluate the need for lightning protection on communications 2018 Protect communication infrastructure in the city infrastructure in the City of Bedford. of Bedford from lightning. Install lightning rods on existing and future 2020 communication infrastructure. Evaluate the need for lightning protection for 2018 Ensure the City of the city of Bedford Bedford critical facilities critical facilities. are protected against Install lightning rods and lightning. other protective 2020 equipment on critical facilities. Evaluate the hazards posed by lightning in the Ongoing Develop a lightning city of Bedford. outreach program for the Develop a lightening City of Bedford citizens. outreach program for 2018 the City of Bedford citizens. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Bedford - Police $1,000 $5,000 Town Budget Risk Management, $5,000 NA None Engineering Facility $200,000 $2,000,000 None Maintenance Risk Management, $5,000 NA None Engineering Facility Maintenance $300,000 $30,000,000 None Emergency Management $2,000 NA Budget Office Emergency Management $5,000 NA Budget Office, Public Health Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-45 Section 5 5-46 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide lightning mitigation information to Public Bedford citizens through On Going Information $10,000 NA Budget Distribute lightning a social media Office L - 2 Lightning mitigation information to campaign. the City of Bedford Provide lightning citizens. mitigation information at Public outdoor spaces On Going Information 0 NA Budget throughout the City of Office Bedford. Evaluate the hazmat Provide the City of gear currently provided Ongoing Fire $2,000 NA Budget Hazardous Bedford fire personnel by the city of Bedford HM -1 Materials with the necessary gear Fire Department. to respond to hazmat Acquire the gear releases. needed as identified in Ongoing Fire $20,000 NA Budget the evaluation. Evaluate the hazmat Ensure the City of equipment currently Bedford fire department owned by the city of Ongoing Fire $2,000 NA Budget HM -1 Hazardous has the equipment Bedford Fire Materials necessary to respond to Department. hazmat releases. Acquire the equipment Budget, needed as identified in Ongoing Fire Ongoing NA Bonds the evaluation. Evaluate hazardous materials that are used Ongoing EMO $2,000 NA Budget or transported in the city Develop a hazardous of Bedford. Hazardous materials awareness Develop a hazardous HM -2 Materials education program for the materials awareness City of Bedford citizens. education program that TCEMO, provides tips and Ongoing Public Health $2,000 NA Budget pertinent information for ensuring the protection of property and people 5-46 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES from hazardous materials. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-47 Provide hazardous materials awareness Public information to Bedford's Ongoing Information $2,000 NA Budget Distribute hazardous citizens through a social Office Hazardous HM -2 materials awareness media campaign. Materials information to the City of Provide hazardous Bedford citizens. materials awareness Public information through the Ongoing Information $0 NA Budget Bedford's city website. Office Partner with the Red Cross to locate shelter Annually TCEMO $0 NA Budget Improve the evacuation locations within the city HM -3 Hazardous of the City of Bedford of Bedford. Materials citizens during a Secure agreements with hazardous event. the Red Cross and the Annually TCEMO $0 NA Budget school district for shelters. Review current plans Emergency and procedures related 2015 Management $0 NA Budget to extreme heat. Ensure the City of Develop or update ET -1 Extreme Bedford has an extreme extreme heat plans and Temperatures heat plan in place. ensure they provide Emergency procedures for opening 2015 Management. $2,000 NA Budget cooling centers and providing public information. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-47 Section 5 ET- 1 ET -2 ET -2 ES -1 EMO I Parks I $2,000 NA Budget PW EMO I Parks I $2,000 NA Budget PW EMO/Tarrant County Public $0 NA Budget Health EMO/Tarrant County Public $10,000 NA Budget Health Public Information $3,000 NA Budget Office ;11.1711;'. Information $0 NA Budget Office Building $5,000 NIA Budget Department 5-48 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Evaluate the need for extreme heat plans for critical infrastructure to ensure essential 2016 Identify extreme heat functions continue in the Extreme plans for critical event of high Temperatures infrastructure in the City temperatures. of Bedford. Develop or update plans and procedures for critical infrastructure 2016 when high temperatures are present. Evaluate the hazards posed by extreme heat 2016 in the City of Bedford. Develop an extreme heat Develop an extreme Extreme preparedness education heat preparedness Temperatures program for City of education program that Bedford citizens. p s and tip 2016 pertinent information for ensuring the health and safety of citizens during extreme heat. Provide extreme heat preparedness information to the City of Ongoing Distribute extreme heat Bedford citizens through Extreme preparedness information a social media Temperatures to City of Bedford campaign. citizens. Provide extreme heat preparedness Ongoing information through the Bedford's city website. Expansive Soils Mitigate expansive soils Improve construction Ongoing in the City of Bedford. techniques through EMO I Parks I $2,000 NA Budget PW EMO I Parks I $2,000 NA Budget PW EMO/Tarrant County Public $0 NA Budget Health EMO/Tarrant County Public $10,000 NA Budget Health Public Information $3,000 NA Budget Office ;11.1711;'. Information $0 NA Budget Office Building $5,000 NIA Budget Department 5-48 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 building code enhancements. Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and business owners about mitigation techniques. 5.5 City of Blue Mound Mitigation Strategy MH -7 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Wildfires, Extreme Temperatures, Hazardous Materials Spills, Infectious Disease Outbreak Provide hazard awareness, preparedness, and training information to citizens of Blue Mound. Develop/maintain a web site for citizen information: shelter locations, shelter -in- place, safe room information, and links to awareness web sites. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Ongoing Building $5,000 N/A Budget Department 2 years City Hall $1,500 $6,000 City Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-49 Section 5 Severe Ensure Blue Mound Review current ordinances and building ST - 3, T -3 and High codes reflect the need for jurisdictional ordinances Ongoing Tornadoes in new developments and and building codes facilities. Severe Ensure outdoors spaces in related to high winds. Jurisdiction Thunderstorms Blue Mound have adequate Develop or update Budgets ST -1, T -1 and High shelter for high -wind events ordinances and building Tarrant Winds, such as severe codes to recommend County, Tornadoes thunderstorms or tornadoes. new developments or Ongoing Jurisdictions facilities are built with Jurisdiction high -wind resistant Budgets Tarrant windows as needed. County, All $5,000 Evaluate the current HMGP Participating conditions of critical Jurisdictions facilities to determine Annually Tarrant which ones, if any, need Tarrant County, All safe rooms installed. County, Severe Ensure critical facilities in $5,000 Individual Thunderstorms Blue Mound have adequate Determine the size and Jurisdiction ST -1, T -1 and High safe rooms to protect against space needed to shelter Annually Winds, high -wind events and the population of the Tarrant Tornadoes tornadoes. critical facility. County, Participating $5,000 Install safe rooms as Individual Jurisdictions needed in critical Annually facilities. Budgets Severe Ensure Blue Mound Thunderstorms ordinances and building ST - 3, T -3 and High codes reflect the need for Winds, high -wind resistant windows Tornadoes in new developments and $500 facilities. Review current jurisdictional ordinances Annually and building codes related to high winds. Develop or update ordinances and building codes to recommend Annually new developments or facilities are built with Engineering $5,000 NA Budget Building $5,000 NA Budget Development Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ County, Participating $500 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ County, Participating $500 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, All $5,000 $5,000 HMGP Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $5,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $5,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets 5-50 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES high -wind resistant windows as needed. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-51 Evaluate the need for Tarrant Tarrant County, high -wind resistant Annually County, All $ $ Individual Severe Ensure Blue Mound critical windows in critical Participating _ Jurisdiction Thunderstorms facilities, including schools, facilities. Jurisdictions Budgets ST - 3, T -3 and High Winds, have high -wind resistant Install high -wind Tarrant Tornadoes windows in place. resistant windows as County, All necessary in critical Annually Participating $10,000 $10,000 HMGP facilities, including Jurisdictions schools. Tarrant Tarrant Evaluate the hazards County, All $ $ County, posed by high -wind Annually Participating Individual events in Blue Mound. Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Severe Develop a severe Budgets ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms thunderstorm and tornado Develop a severe 4 and High preparedness education weather preparedness Tarrant Winds, program for Blue Mound education program that Tarrant County, Tornadoes citizens. provides tips and Annually County, All $ $ Individual pertinent information for Participating - _ Jurisdiction protecting property Jurisdictions Budgets against high -wind damage. Provide severe weather Severe preparedness Tarrant ST 4, T Thunderstorms Distribute severe weather information to Blue Mound through Tarrant County, All $ $ County, - - and High preparedness information to citizens Annually Individual 4 Winds, Blue Mound citizens. a social media Participating - - Jurisdiction Tornadoes campaign, including Jurisdictions Budgets severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-51 Section 5 Hazard Action/Project Projected Time Department Estimated Estimated Funding Addressed Objective Description to Completion or Agency Cost Responsible Ensure the Blue Mound Tarrant website is updated Tarrant County, during tornado season Annually County, All $ $ Individual to educate citizens on Participating - - Jurisdiction severe weather Jurisdictions Budgets preparedness. Decrease flood insurance premiums in Blue Mound by Tarrant Tarrant participating in the Federal Work with city officials to County, All County, F -1 Flooding Emergency Management become a member of Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Agency's (FEMA) the CRS program. Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Community Rating System Budgets (CRS) program. Review repetitive loss Tarrant Review and remove properties and work with County, F - 2 Flooding repetitive loss properties in homeowners to remove Individual Blue Mound. them using FEMA Jurisdiction funding. Budgets Power Failure, Have automatic emergency Winter Storms, power generators for both Identify appropriate size Severe stations in the event that the and type of generator FEMA, City PF -1 Thunderstorms main power supply is for Police and fire 2 years City Hall $20,000 $80,000 Budget and High disrupted in the City of Blue station. Winds, Mound. Tornadoes Evaluate which critical Tarrant Tarrant facilities need hail- County All $ County resistant roofing and Annually Participating $5,000 Individual Ensure Blue Mound critical windows installed. Jurisdictions Jurisdiction H -1 Hail facilities have hail -resistant Budgets roofing and windows Install hail -resistant Tarrant Tarrant installed. County roofing and windows in Annually County All $10,000 $10,000 Individual identified critical Participating Jurisdiction facilities. Jurisdictions Budgets 5-52 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 o H-1 W-1 Hail Hail Hail Wildfire Evaluate the need for covered parking for city Annually Provide hail -resistant parking vehicles to protect them areas for Blue Mound's city against hail. vehicles. Install covered parking areas as needed to Annually protect city vehicles against hail. Evaluate the hazards Annually posed by hail in the city. Develop a hail preparedness Develop hail education program for Blue preparedness education Mound citizens. program that provides tips and pertinent Annually information for ensuring the protection of property against hail. Provide hail preparedness information to citizens Annually Distribute hail preparedness through a social media information to Blue Mound campaign. citizens. Provide hail preparedness Annually information through the city website. Ensure Blue Mound water Evaluate the Blue systems are adequate for Mound water system to Annually fighting wildfires. ensure capacity for fighting wildfires. Tarrant County All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions MITIGATION STRATEGIES $ $5,000 $ $5,000 $500 $500 $500 $500 Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-53 Section 5 W-1 Wildfire W-2 Wildfire W-2 Wildfire Review current wildfire response plans and Annually procedures. Ensure adequate Blue Develop or update W-2 Wildfire Mound wildfire response wildfire response plans Annually plans and procedures are in and procedures. place. Provide wildfire W-2 Wildfire response training to fire Annually personnel. Develop a wildfire Provide information to Blue preparedness education W-3 Wildfire Mound citizens regarding the Program that provides Annually hazards posed by wildfires. tips and pertinent information for ensuring the protection of Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets 5-54 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Install or upgrade needed equipment to Annually ensure water systems are adequate. Mitigate wildfires by Prevent wildfires from instituting landscaping spreading to critical practices at Blue Mound facilities by landscaping Annually critical facilities. plants and brush away from buildings. Review city ordinances and Enact building permit laws to ensure mitigation process that Annually practices are in effect in Blue encourages wildfire Mound. resistant construction. Review current wildfire response plans and Annually procedures. Ensure adequate Blue Develop or update W-2 Wildfire Mound wildfire response wildfire response plans Annually plans and procedures are in and procedures. place. Provide wildfire W-2 Wildfire response training to fire Annually personnel. Develop a wildfire Provide information to Blue preparedness education W-3 Wildfire Mound citizens regarding the Program that provides Annually hazards posed by wildfires. tips and pertinent information for ensuring the protection of Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets 5-54 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 W-3 Wildfire WS -1 WS -1 Determine the process for becoming a Firewise Community in Blue Mound property against wildfires. Work with the Texas Department of Emergency Annually Management to become a Firewise Community. Conduct an assessment of winter weather Annually response capabilities. Evaluate winter weather Acquire equipment Winter Storm response capabilities in Blue needed as determined Annually Mound. by assessment. Evaluate winter weather Winter Storm planning capabilities in Blue Mound Provide safety training to first responders on Annually winter weather hazards. Conduct an assessment of winter weather plans Annually in place for jurisdiction public works. Develop or update winter weather Annually preparedness plan. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating - Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-55 Section 5 WS - 2 Winter Storm WS - 2 Winter Storm IDO - 2 Infectious Disease Outbreak Prepare Blue Mound first responders for mass prophylaxis distribution. Conduct a POD exercise to test plans and procedures. Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Evaluate the hazards County, All $ $ County, posed by severe winter Annually Jurisdictions weather in the city of Budgets Blue Mound. Develop a winter weather Develop a winter preparedness program for weather preparedness Blue Mound citizens. education program that provides tips and Annually pertinent information for avoiding hypothermia and icy conditions. Provide winter weather preparedness information to Blue Annually Mound citizens through Distribute winter weather a social media preparedness information to campaign. Blue Mound residents. Ensure the Blue Mound website is updated during winter months to Annually educate citizens on winter weather preparedness. Train first responders in point of distribution (POD) procedures. Prepare Blue Mound first responders for mass prophylaxis distribution. Conduct a POD exercise to test plans and procedures. Tarrant County, All $ Participating - Jurisdictions Tarrant County, All $ Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, All Participating Jurisdictions Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County, Individual Jurisdiction Budget 5-56 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 IDO - 3 IDO-4 M Dim MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant Review continuity of Tarrant operations (COOP) County, All $ plans and procedures Infectious Ensure continuity procedures for city employees and Disease are in place to prepare for a facilities. Outbreak long-term employee shortage at Blue Mound facilities. Provide COOP training for jurisdiction Budgets employees. Develop a public information Educate the public on Infectious campaign to educate Blue pandemics, including Disease Mound public about isolation, quarantine, Outbreak infectious diseases. triage, and medical Individual care. Review current legislation for water Budgets conservation Tarrant Review Blue Mound's water enforcement in Blue Tarrant enforcement legislation and Mound. Drought update as necessary to Develop or update water Annually mitigate the effects of conservation - drought. enforcement legislation Jurisdictions to ensure effective Jurisdiction practices during periods of drought. Develop contingency plans Review current for Blue Mound to ensure contingency plans. Drought adequate power and water County, supply during prolonged Develop or update $2,000 periods of drought. potable water Jurisdictions contingency plans. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Annually Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-57 Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Annually Participating - - Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Annually Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, All Annually Participating - - Participating Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Annually Participating $2,000 $10,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Annually Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-57 Section 5 D-3 D-3 W Drought Drought Lightning 5-58 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop or update power supply contingency plans. Tarrant Tarrant Evaluate the hazards County, All County, posed by drought in Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Blue Mound. Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Develop a drought Develop a drought awareness education awareness education program for Blue Mound program that provides Tarrant Tarrant citizens. tips and pertinent County, All County, information for ensuring Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual the protection of Jurisdictions Jurisdiction property and the Budgets environment against drought. Provide drought Tarrant Tarrant awareness information County, All County, to Blue Mound citizens Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Distribute drought awareness through a social media Jurisdictions Jurisdiction information to Blue Mound campaign. Budgets citizens. Provide drought Tarrant awareness information Annually County, All $1,000 $5,000 through the Blue Mound Participating website. Jurisdictions Evaluate the need for Tarrant lightning protection on County, All $ $ communications Annually Participating - _ HMGP Protect communication infrastructure in Blue Jurisdictions infrastructure in Blue Mound Mound. from lightning Install lightning rods on Tarrant existing and future Annually County, All $15,000 $15,000 HMGP communication Participating infrastructure. Jurisdictions 5-58 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 L-1 L-2 L-2 ET- 1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County, All $15,000 $15,000 HMGP Participating Tarrant Evaluate the need for $ County, Tarrant _ Individual lightning protection for Annually Participating Ensure Blue Mound critical Blue Mound critical Tarrant Lightning facilities are protected facilities. $ County,Individual Participating against lightning. Install lightning rods and Jurisdiction Tarrant Budgets other protective Annually Participating Individual equipment on critical facilities. Evaluate the hazards posed by lightning in Annually Blue Mound. Develop a lightning Develop a lightning Lightning preparedness education preparedness education program for Blue Mound program that provides citizens. tips and pertinent information for Annually protecting property against lightning damage. Provide lightning preparedness information to Blue Annually Mound citizens through Distribute lightning a social media Lightning preparedness information to campaign. Blue Mound citizens. Provide lightning awareness information Annually at outdoor spaces throughout Blue Mound. Extreme Ensure the Blue Mound has Review current plans Temperatures an extreme heat plan in and procedures related Annually place. to extreme heat. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County, All $15,000 $15,000 HMGP Participating Tarrant Jurisdictions $ County, Tarrant _ Individual County, All $15,000 $15,000 HMGP Participating Budgets Jurisdictions Tarrant Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County,Individual Participating - Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Tarrant Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating - _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $ $ County, Participating _ Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All $1,000 $5,000 County, Participating Individual Jurisdictions Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-59 Section 5 ET -1 ET -2 Jurisdiction Budgets 5-60 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop or update extreme heat plans and Tarrant Tarrant ensure they provide County, All County, procedures for opening Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual cooling centers and Jurisdictions Jurisdiction providing public Budgets information. Evaluate the need for extreme heat plans for Tarrant Tarrant critical infrastructure to County, All County, ensure essential Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Identify extreme heat plans functions continue in the Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Extreme for critical infrastructure in event of high Budgets Temperatures Blue Mound. temperatures. Develop or update plans Tarrant Tarrant and procedures for County, All County, critical infrastructure Annually Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual when high temperatures Jurisdictions Jurisdiction are present. Budgets Develop an extreme heat Evaluate the hazards Tarrant Tarrant County, preparedness education posed by extreme heat Annually County, All $1,000 $5,000 Individual program for Blue Mound in Blue Mound. Participating Jurisdiction citizens. Jurisdictions Budgets Extreme Develop an extreme Temperatures heat preparedness Tarrant education program that Tarrant County, provides tips and Annually County, All $1,000 $5,000 Individual pertinent information for Participating Jurisdiction ensuring the health and Jurisdictions Budgets safety of citizens during extreme heat. 5-60 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET -2 ES -1 MH -3 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant Provide extreme heat Tarrant County, All preparedness County, Participating $1,000 information to the Blue Annually Jurisdictions Mound citizens through Jurisdiction Extreme Distribute extreme heat a social media Budgets Temperatures preparedness information to campaign. Tarrant County, All Blue Mound citizens. Provide extreme heat County, Participating $1,000 preparedness Annually Jurisdictions information through the Jurisdiction Blue Mound's website. Budgets Tarrant Improve construction Tarrant County, All techniques through Annually Participating $1,000 building code Individual Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in enhancements. Jurisdiction Soils the Blue Mound. Educate construction Budgets Tarrant contractors, Tarrant County, All homeowners, and Annually Participating $1,000 business owners about Individual Jurisdictions mitigation techniques. Jurisdiction Power Failure, Purchase and install Budgets Winter Storms, automatic emergency Severe power generators for Thunderstorms and High Ensure consistent power critical infrastructure in 6 months Winds, supply during outages. the event that the main Tornadoes power supply is Extreme disrupted in the City of Temperatures Blue Mound. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Tarrant Tarrant County, All County, Participating $1,000 $5,000 Individual Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Budgets Public Works, Local funds, Fire $300,000 $1,200,000 HMGP, Department PDM Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-61 Section 5 5.6 City of Colleyville Mitigation Strategy MH -2 MH -2 MH -6 Severe $400 Identify the need for an 4 months Thunderstorms $3,000 amateur radio club. City, Grant and High Develop and maintain $16,000 Grant Winds, volunteer base to support Train people to be City Tornadoes, and operate HAM radios for HAM/RACES 4 months Hail, Lightning, communications in the City members. Winter Storms, of Colleyville EOC. Flooding, Dam $5,000 $20,000 City Failure, Upgrade radios in 4 months Wildfires EOC. Severe Purchase extra mobile Thunderstorms radios to have on hand 5 months and High in the EOC. Winds, Purchase needed Purchase some Tornadoes, communications equipment earpieces for the radios 5 months Hail, Lightning, for the City of Colleyville to have in the EOC. Winter Storms, EOC. Update the radio room 5 months Flooding, Dam in the EOC. Failure, Wildfires Purchase satellite 15 months phones for the EOC. Severe Thunderstorms Identify software that and High will merge tasks 7 months Winds, between both building Tornadoes, Establish a standard and fire departments. Hail, Lightning, business database in the Winter Storms, City of Colleyville. Merge data previously Flooding, Dam housed in separate Failure, databases into one 8 months Wildfires, database. Extreme Police Police $1,500 $14,000 Local $1,500 $6,000 Police/OEM $2,000 $8,000 OEM $37,000 $148,000 FEMA, Budget Grants, Budget Grants, City OEM $400 $1,600 City OEM $3,000 $12,000 City, Grant OEM $4,000 $16,000 Grant Colleyville City Building $100,000 $400,000 Budget Department Colleyville Fire Department, and $5,000 $20,000 City Building Budget Departments 5-62 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MH -6 MH -7 Temperatures, Hazardous Materials Train end users on the Spills, proper methods to 9 months Infectious utilize new software. Disease Outbreak Severe Survey the eight Thunderstorms departments and and High ascertain need and 7 months Winds, want as well as Tornadoes, determine the number Hail, Lightning, of users needed. Winter Storms, Implement a multijurisdictional Automatic Determine vendor for 1 Flooding, Dam Vehicle Location (AVL) purchase. year y Failure, Wildfires, system for both police and Extreme fire from Colleyville, Keller, Southlake, and Westlake Purchase hardware for 16 months Temperatures, (NETCOM). all jurisdictions. Hazardous Materials Spills, Purchase software for Infectious dispatch center and 2 years Disease each unit. Outbreak Severe Complete a Thunderstorms Maintain a database for memoranda of and High people with special needs agreement (MOA) with Winds, for Colleyville emergency Ft. Worth for the 4 months Tornadoes, Special Needs Hail, Lightning, response. Assistance Program Winter Storms, (SNAP). MITIGATION STRATEGIES Colleyville Fire Department and $5,000 $20,000 City Building Budget Departments North East Tarrant County Communications (NETCOM) NETCOM with a representative - from all cities Individual NETCOM $90,000 $360,000 City Budgets Individual NETCOM $10,000 $40,000 City Budgets City Manager $200 $800 Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-63 Section 5 Flooding, Dam Grant, $2,100 FEMA, City Failure, Grant, $240,000 FEMA, City Wildfires, Educate the citizens 1 year OEM $1,000 Extreme about the program. streets for General Temperatures, Fund, enable Grants stores to Hazardous emergency equipment to Materials calls. Spills, Enter the information Infectious into the Computer 1 year NETCOM $1,000 Disease Aided Dispatch (CAD) Outbreak system. Power Failure, Hire a consultant to Winter Storms, Ensure that the City of evaluate the power 5 months Engineering $700 Severe Colleyville is able to operate needs to the building. PF -1 Thunderstorms when there is a loss of and High power to the building. Purchase and install 5 months Engineering $60,000 Winds, generator. Tornadoes Have the needed equipment Add one snow plow to clear snow and ice from and one spreader to WS -1 Winter Storm roads as a result of a winter clear roads from ice Feb -15 storm in Colleyville. and snow, to the City of Colleyville's fleet. M Public Works $10,000 Develop contingency plan to Create plans for As funding is Drought ensure that the citizens of alternate potable water available Public Works Staff time sources. $4,000 Budget $4,000 Budget General Fund 5-64 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Grant, $2,100 FEMA, City Grant, $240,000 FEMA, City It is hard to place a dollar amount on opening of streets for General traffic; It will Fund, enable Grants stores to open, and emergency equipment to respond to calls. General Fund 5-64 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 D-3 TR- 1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Drought Terrorism Colleyville have access to potable water. Develop a drought awareness program for the citizens of Colleyville. Research and make educational material about Educate the citizens of drought, a flyer, public Colleyville on negative As funding is Public Works $2,000+staffs service announcements, and effects of drought. available time social media. Once the education materials are made, distribute the materials to the citizens of Colleyville. Evaluate the needs and Colleyville equipment now in place 5 months Police and at the Colleyville Police Emergency Department. Management Commission a study to Research vendors for evaluate additional resources identified in Colleyville equipment needed to protect the evaluation and 7 months Police and $1,000.00 $1,000.00 the Citizens of Colleyville prepare request for Emergency from a terror incident bids. Management resulting in the use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) agents. Colleyville Process bids and issue Police and purchase orders for 9 months Emergency $20,000.00 $20,000.00 resources as needed. Management General Fund In -House Resources City Current Year Budget or Available Grant Funding City Current Year Budget or Available Grant Funding Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-65 Section 5 TR- 1 Terrorism TR -2 Terrorism HM -3 Hazardous Materials Deploy equipment and g months City of Colleyville resources. Emergency Management and Police Department personnel will implement deployment of additional Train all Police equipment. City current year budget or $1,000.00 available grant funding City current year budget or $3,000.00 available grant funding Colleyville Police Department personnel 10 months per year in the use of and care Year Colleyville for new equipment. Police $2,000.00 Provide adequate per year Training Division training to ensure all City new officers are Continual proficient in the use of $3,000.00 Implement ongoing training with the new anti - Available on all new equipment in the terrorism equipment. City of Colleyville. Provide adequate City $1,000.00 maintenance to insure per year FEMA continued use of the Continual new anti -terrorism $2,000.00 Budgetor equipment. FEMA Partner with the Red Cross to locate shelter 5 months Improve the evacuation of locations within the City of Colleyville citizens City. during a hazardous Secure agreements materials incident. with Red Cross and the 5 months school district for shelters. City current year budget or $1,000.00 available grant funding City current year budget or $3,000.00 available grant funding Colleyville Police $1,000.00 Department per year Training Division Year Colleyville Budgetor Police $2,000.00 Department per year Training Division Funding OEM $200 OEM $200 $800 Budget $800 Budget 5-66 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 City Current Year $1,000.00 Budgetor Available Grant Funding City Current Year $3,000.00 Budgetor Available Grant Funding City $1,000.00 Budgetor per year FEMA Grant City $2,000.00 Budgetor per year FEMA Grant $800 Budget $800 Budget 5-66 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop and enforce city When new construction ordinances that will limit is initiated in the City of ES -1 Expansive development on soils known Colleyville the As funding is Soils to have problems with construction will adhere available expansion in the City of to current building Colleyville. standards. Educate homeowners on Use booklets free of ES -1 Expansive how to care for the soil their cost to homeowners to As funding is Soils homes are built on, in the advise them how to available. City of Colleyville. water their foundation. Tornado, Start a social media outlet Severe T - 4, ST - 4 Thunderstorms for Emergency Management and High to notify citizens of the Winds potential for tornadic activity. Tornado, mapping; Severe Upgrade the Code Red T - 5, ST - 5 Thunderstorms phone notification system and High platform. Winds Construct a new bridge on F - 3 Flooding Jackson Road that is higher and can withstand flood waters. Start a twitter page that can be linked into an automatic weather alert One year. about the threat of tornadoes. Purchase and institute Code Red phone 1-2 years as notifications for tornado funding allows warnings. Engineering Engineering EM EM Construct the bridge on 10-15 years as Jackson Road to funding is Public Works withstand high flood available. waters. MITIGATION STRATEGIES $30,000 for Having soil samples codes on and building on mapping; expansive soils will General other cost to reduce dollar Fund be loss from determined foundation by personnel problems in costs. later years. The amount of money spent on the education General $2,000 materials Fund and would be low Grants compared to the cost of repairing foundations. Staff time General Fund $2,500 General Fund Certificate of $2,000,000 obligation Bonds, grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-67 Section 5 5-68 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Add gates to the roads Enhance our high-water so that when water is 5-10 years as FEMA warning system, by adding over the flood funding F - 3 Flooding automatic gates on the elevations the gates Engineering becomes 100,000 40,000,000 o other ther streets that normally flood. would slowly close to available grants prevent traffic from traveling the road. Plant vegetation on City properties that requires little Plant drought resistant water to withstand periods of plants on City property 1-2 years as General D-2 Drought drought., and provide to lessen the need to funding allows Parks $50,000 Fund material to the public on how use water on to grow drought resistant landscape. plants. Institute water saving measures to lessen the demand of potable water. Increase the Develop a contingency plan water storage capability D -1 Drought for the delivery of Potable through both above 3-10 year Public Works Staff hours, Unknown General water during times of severe ground storage and project unknowns Fund drought. portable tanks. Have contracts with private companies to supply potable water if needed. Increase shelter space at the Construct storm Thunderstorms T -1, ST 1 city parks for people to seek shelters at City 2020 Parks $100,000 Budget, NA & High Wind protection when severe baseball and soccer Grants thunderstorm is in the area. fields. 5-68 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2017 Emergency $80,000 Management 2020 Facility $100,000 NA Maintenance 2018 Facility $200,000 NA Maintenance 2019 Emergency $1,500 NA Management 2016 Emergency $25,000 NA Management 2017 Parks $50,000 NA Budget, Grants Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget, Grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-69 Evaluate each building owned by the City of Colleyville to locate Provide safe locations inside shelter locations. If T -1, ST -1 Thunderstorms city facilities for people to there is no safe location & High Wind seek shelter during severe within the building storms. install a safe room. Educate occupants of the building where to seek shelter. Install covered parking H -1 Hail Provide hail resistant parking at city locations to for city owned vehicles protect emergency and public works vehicles. Install hail resistant Install hail resistant roofing roofing on City of H -1 Hail on City of Colleyville Colleyville facilities buildings. when the current roof needs replaced. Distribute educational Increase awareness to the materials on hail - citizens on how the can resistant roofing and H - 2 Hail protect themselves and their windows. Use other property from the effects of forms of media to teach hail. people how to protect themselves from hail. Protect the public safety Install lightning safety L -1 Lightning communication site from equipment at the Public lightning Safety Communications Site. Install lightning detection equipment at L -1 Lightning Install lightning detection all city parks so that equipment at all parks people using the park will be notified when lightning is in the area. MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2017 Emergency $80,000 Management 2020 Facility $100,000 NA Maintenance 2018 Facility $200,000 NA Maintenance 2019 Emergency $1,500 NA Management 2016 Emergency $25,000 NA Management 2017 Parks $50,000 NA Budget, Grants Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget, Grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-69 Section 5 L-2 WS -1 WS -2 ►M 2015 Emergency Staff Time NA Management 2015 Public Works $15,000 NA 2015 PIOIEmergency Staff NA Management 2015 Risk $1,000 NA Management 2015 Code Cost of Staff NA Enforcement Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget 5-70 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Reach out to community groups and Provide a lightning provide a one-hour Lightning preparedness education education program on program for the City of the dangers of lightning Colleyville. and how to protect themselves from lightning. Remove tree limbs Develop an annual tree near power lines that Winter Storms trimming program to protect could cause the power power lines during ice line to be damaged storms. during wind and ice storms. Utilize the city web site, Provide information to the emails, Code Red, and citizens of Colleyville about social media to keep Winter Storms road conditions and school the people of Colleyville and city office closings informed on how a winter storm is impacting city services. Provide training to all employees that work outside on the dangers Conduct an assessment of of winter weather and Winter Storms the winter weather protocols ways that they need to for city departments protect themselves from the effects of the cold, wet, dark, and icy conditions. Use our high weed and Reduce the amount of fuel grass ordinance to Wildfire available for the spread of a reduce the fuel load in Wildfire. the community. By keeping the grasses low to the ground the 2015 Emergency Staff Time NA Management 2015 Public Works $15,000 NA 2015 PIOIEmergency Staff NA Management 2015 Risk $1,000 NA Management 2015 Code Cost of Staff NA Enforcement Budget Budget Budget Budget Budget 5-70 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 W-3 rfim W-1 ET -1 growth and spread of a wildfire will be diminished. MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2017 Public Works $25,000 NA 2015 Fire Department $2,500 NA 2015 Fire Department Unknown NA 2016 Parks $1,500 NA Budget Budget Budget Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-71 Plan an annual Develop a tree trimming program to trim trees program to raise the canopy that will help with the Wildfire of trees off the ground and spread of a wildfire. reduce the fuel for spreading Use the website to wildfires educate people on how to protect their homes using tree trimming. Review the SOP on wildfire response. Ensure the Fire Department Ensure that all equipment and Wildfire wildfire plan and equipment protective gear is are current. ready. Provide annual training to first responders Upgrade the City of Upgrade the water Colleyville water system so it systems supply lines. Wildfire is adequate to fight a large Update mutual aid wildfire agreements with other cities for tanker trucks. Work with churches and other volunteer Develop an extreme organizations to open Extreme temperature plan for the City cooling centers. This Temps. of Colleyville. will help the citizens of Colleyville be able to stay safe from the effects of heat. MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2017 Public Works $25,000 NA 2015 Fire Department $2,500 NA 2015 Fire Department Unknown NA 2016 Parks $1,500 NA Budget Budget Budget Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-71 Section 5 Budget Budget Budget Budget 5-72 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide safety Distribute extreme information to citizens Extreme temperature using pamphlets. The Emergency ET - 2 Temps. preparedness/mitigation pamphlets will provide 2017 Management $2,000 NA literature at community safety information and events. include websites to find more information. Provide training to all Update the extreme employees that work ET - 2 Extreme temperature protocols for outside on hot days, to 2015 Emergency Staff time NA Temps. city departments. protect themselves Management from the effects extreme temperatures. Improve construction methods through Manage expansive soils in updated building codes. ES -1 Expansive the City of Colleyville Educate building 2018 Building $5,500 NA Solis through education and contractors and Department building codes. building owners on expansive soil mitigation techniques. Provide information to builders that will be building on those sites of ways to improve the Identify areas of our city that soil before construction ES -1 Expansive have a history of soil related starts. Educate the 2018 Building $2,000 NA Solis damage to structures. occupants of buildings Department in the areas that are on expansive soils how to care for the soil to prevent damage to their structure. Budget Budget Budget Budget 5-72 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5.7 City of Crowley Mitigation Strategy MH -4 MH -4 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires, Extreme Temperatures, Hazardous Materials Spills, Infectious Disease Outbreak MITIGATION STRATEGIES Provide Mobile Command Research types of Post for City of Crowley command post along Crowley Police multi departmental with communication 6 months Department $100,000 $400,000 FEMA operations during natural systems. disasters. Provide an emergency response trailer with Identify suitable trailer Crowley Police necessary equipment for for responding needs. 3 months Department $44,250 $200,000 FEMA responding to disaster sites in the City of Crowley. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-73 Section 5 MH -4 MH -5 Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Tornadoes, Provide barricades, signs, Hail, Lightning, generators, portable Winter Storms, lighting, hydration supplies, Flooding, Dam and fuel to disaster Research equipment Failure, locations. These items will needed and purchase Wildfires, be preloaded for quick equipment. Extreme Temperatures, response in the City of Hazardous Crowley. Materials Spills, Infectious Disease Outbreak Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Develop ILA and Tornadoes, planning. Hail, Lightning, Form a multijurisdictional Winter Storms, tactical unit with Forest Hill, Flooding, Dam Kennedale, and Crowley. Failure, Wildfires, Acquire appropriate Extreme equipment. Temperatures, 3 months Crowley Police $18,000 $72,000 Department Forest Hill Police Department (FHPD), 3 months Kennedale Police - Department, Crowley Police Department FEMA Forest Hill, Kennedale, Crowley 8 months FHPD $25,000 $50,000 Forest Hill 5-74 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Hazardous Materials Spills, Infectious Disease Train law enforcement 1 year FHPD Outbreak, officers and implement. Terrorism Evaluate current Complete Emergency shelters in outdoor study to Management spaces in Crowley determine Team, Fire cost Department Severe Ensure outdoors spaces in Determine the size and Complete Emergency Thunderstorms Crowley have adequate space needs for shelters study to Management SV -1, T -1 and High shelter for high -wind events in outdoor spaces in determine Team, Fire Winds, such as severe Crowley. cost Department Tornadoes thunderstorms or tornadoes. Install outdoor storm Complete Emergency shelters at various study to Management locations in the City. determine Team, Fire cost Department Evaluate the current Complete Emergency conditions of critical study to Management facilities to determine determine Team, Fire which ones, if any, need cost Department Severe Ensure critical facilities in safe rooms installed. Thunderstorms Crowley have adequate Determine the size and Complete Emergency SV -1, T -1 and High safe rooms to protect space needed to shelter study to Management Winds, against high -wind events the population of the determine Team, Fire Tornadoes and tornadoes. critical facility. cost Department Install safe rooms as Complete Emergency needed in critical study to Management facilities. determine Team, Fire cost Department Severe Develop a severe Evaluate the hazards Emergency SV - 3, T -3 Thunderstorms thunderstorm and tornado posed by high -wind 2 years post Management and High public education program events in Crowley. study Team, Fire for Crowley citizens. Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES $50,000 $50,000 Forest Hill TBD TBD HMGPIPDM TBD TBD TBD TBD HMGPIPDM TBD TBD HMGPIPDM TBD TBD TBD TBD HMGPIPDM TBD TBD HMGPIPDM Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-75 Section 5 Winds, Develop a severe Tornadoes weather public education program that Emergency provides tips and 2 years post Management pertinent information for study Team, Fire protecting property Department against high -wind damage. Provide severe weather mitigation information to Crowley citizens through City Secretary's a social media Continual Office Severe campaign, including Thunderstorms Distribute severe weather severe thunderstormsand tornadoes. SV - 3, T -3 and High mitigation information to Ensure the City of Winds, Crowley citizens. Crowley website is Tornadoes updated during tornado City Secretary's season to educate Continual Office citizens on severe weather mitigation actions. Identify appropriate Crowley Police types of self-contained Continual Department Decrease flood insurance light/generators premiums in Crowley by Identify movable participating in the Federal generators for multiple Continual Crowley Police F -1 Flooding Emergency Management locations within disaster Department Agency's (FEMA) area Community Rating System Research types of (CRS) program. command post along Continual Crowley Police with communication Department systems TBD TBD HMGP/PDM General Fund General Fund $25,000 $1,000,000 FEMA $31,498 $125,992 FEMA $100,000 $400,000 FEMA 5-76 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 F-2 PF -1 PF -1 PF -1 H-1 Ensure the City of Crowley Hail critical facilities have hail - resistant roofing and windows installed. Evaluate which critical facilities need hail- Continual resistant roofing and windows installed. Install hail -resistant roofing and windows in Continual identified critical facilities. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County, Public Works Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Could find a set cost after FEMA, City Building appropriate $150,000 State size and type is determined Crowley Police $25,000 $100,000 FEMA Department Crowley Police $31,498 $120,000 FEMA Department Emergency Management $100,000 $400,000 HMGP/PDM Team/Fire Department Emergency Management $300,000 $1,200,000 HMGP/PDM Team/Fire Department Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-77 Review repetitive loss Review and remove properties and work with Flooding repetitive loss properties in homeowners to remove the City of Crowley. them using FEMA funding. Power Failure, Winter Storms, Severe Have automatic emergency Identify and purchase Thunderstorms power for the Crowley appropriate size and and High Recreation Center in the type of generator for the 1 year Winds, event the main power Crowley Recreation Tornadoes, supply is disrupted. Center. Extreme Heat Power Failure, Winter Storms, Have emergency lighting for Severe catastrophic mass casualty Identify appropriate Thunderstorms incidents at the City of types of self-contained 3 months and High Crowley Police Station. light/generators. Winds, Tornadoes Power Failure, Winter Storms, Severe Ensure access to portable Identify movable Thunderstorms generators in case of generators for multiple 3 months and High emergencies in the City of locations within disaster Winds, Crowley. area. Tornadoes Ensure the City of Crowley Hail critical facilities have hail - resistant roofing and windows installed. Evaluate which critical facilities need hail- Continual resistant roofing and windows installed. Install hail -resistant roofing and windows in Continual identified critical facilities. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County, Public Works Individual Jurisdiction Budgets Could find a set cost after FEMA, City Building appropriate $150,000 State size and type is determined Crowley Police $25,000 $100,000 FEMA Department Crowley Police $31,498 $120,000 FEMA Department Emergency Management $100,000 $400,000 HMGP/PDM Team/Fire Department Emergency Management $300,000 $1,200,000 HMGP/PDM Team/Fire Department Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-77 Section 5 H -1 Hail H - 2 Hail H - 2 Hail ►E Wildfire Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department City Secretary's Office City Secretary's Office $10,000 $ 40,000 HMGP/PDM $200,000 $800,000 HMGP/PDM TBD TBD HMGP/PDM TBD Fire Department $50,000 TBD HMGP/PDM General Fund General Fund The primary benefit will come in the General form of life Fund/Grants and property conservation 5-78 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Evaluate the need for covered parking for city Continual vehicles to protect them Provide hail -resistant against hail. parking areas for Crowley's city vehicles. Install covered parking areas as needed to Continual protect city vehicles against hail. Evaluate the hazards Study + 2 posed by hail in the city. years Develop a hail mitigation Develop hail outreach outreach program for the program that provides City of Crowley citizens. tips and pertinent information for ensuring Study + 2 the protection of years property against hail, through mitigation activities. Provide hail mitigation information to citizens Continual Distribute hail mitigation through a social media information to the City of campaign. Crowley citizens. Provide hail mitigation information through the Continual city website. Coordinate with TFS, our city and community Implement FIREWISE to establish a 3 years community program. FIREWISE community program. This program will assist us with Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department Emergency Management Team/Fire Department City Secretary's Office City Secretary's Office $10,000 $ 40,000 HMGP/PDM $200,000 $800,000 HMGP/PDM TBD TBD HMGP/PDM TBD Fire Department $50,000 TBD HMGP/PDM General Fund General Fund The primary benefit will come in the General form of life Fund/Grants and property conservation 5-78 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 W-1 WS -1 ffi MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fire Department, $30,000 $120,000 General Public Works Fund Public Works $300,000 $1,200,000 HMGP/PDM Fire Department $300 $1,200 General Fund Emergency Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM Team/Public Works Public Works $250,000 $1,000,000 HMGP/PDM Fire preplanning for a fire, Department/Police Fund during and after. Emergency Evaluate the Crowley Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM water system to ensure Continual Emergency capacity for fighting Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM wildfires. Ensure Crowley water Install or upgrade Wildfire systems are adequate for needed equipment to Continual fighting wildfires. ensure water systems are adequate. Provide wildfire response training to fire Continual personnel. Conduct an assessment 2 yrs. post of winter weather study response capabilities. Evaluate winter weather Acquire equipment Winter Storm response capabilities in the needed as determined 2 yrs. post City of Crowley. by assessment. (need study sanding equipment). Provide safety training to first responders on Continual winter weather hazards. Conduct an assessment of winter weather plans Continual Evaluate winter weather in place forjurisdiction Winter Storm planning capabilities in the public works. City of Crowley. Develop or update winter weather Continual preparedness plan. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fire Department, $30,000 $120,000 General Public Works Fund Public Works $300,000 $1,200,000 HMGP/PDM Fire Department $300 $1,200 General Fund Emergency Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM Team/Public Works Public Works $250,000 $1,000,000 HMGP/PDM Fire General Department/Police Fund Department Emergency Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM Team Emergency Management TBD TBD HMGP/PDM Team, Public Works Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-79 Section 5 WS -2 WS -2 IDO-2 IDO-3 5-00 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Evaluate the hazards posed by severe winter Ongoing Public Works General weather in the City of Fund Crowley. Develop a winter weather Develop a winter Winter Storm outreach program City of weather outreach Crowley citizens. program that provides Public Works/City General tips and pertinent Ongoing Secretary's Office Fund information for avoiding hypothermia and icy conditions. Provide winter weather mitigation information to City Secretary's General Crowley citizens through Ongoing Office Fund a social media Distribute winter weather campaign. Winter Storm information to the City of Ensure the Crowley city Crowley residents. website is updated during winter months to Ongoing City Secretary's General educate citizens on Office Fund winter weather mitigation activities. Train first responders in Infectious Prepare City of Crowley first Point of distribution Tarrant County Disease responders for mass (POD) procedures. Outbreak prophylaxis distribution. Conduct a POD exercise to test plans Tarrant County and procedures. Review continuity of Ensure continuity operations (COOP) Infectious procedures are in place to Plans and procedures Tarrant County Disease prepare for a long-term for city employees and Outbreak employee shortage at City facilities. of Crowley facilities. Provide COOP training for jurisdiction Tarrant County employees. 5-00 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-81 Infectious Develop a public Educate the public on Tarrant County IDO - 4 Disease information campaign to pandemics, including Fire Department, Outbreak educate Crowley public isolation, quarantine, Crowley City about infectious diseases. triage, and medical care. Secretary's Office Review current legislation/Ordinance for Ongoing Public Works and $10,000 $40,000 General Review Crowley water water conservation Code Compliance Fund enforcement enforcement in Crowley. D -1 Drought legislation/Ordinance and Develop or update water update as necessary to conservation mitigate the effects of enforcement Public Works and General drought. legislation/Ordinance to Ongoing City Council $20,000 $80,000 Fund ensure effective practices during periods of drought. Review current Continual Public Works $10,000 $40,000 General contingency plans. Fund Develop contingency plans Develop or update for Crowley to ensure potable water Continual Public Works $10,000 $40,000 HMGP D -1 Drought adequate power and water contingency plans. supply during prolonged periods of drought. Develop or update power supply Continual Public Works $600,000 $2.4 M HMGP contingency plans. Upgrade water and Maintaining current irrigation systems to irrigation systems at City General D-2 Drought conserve water in the City facilities; keeping Continual Public Works $500 $2,000 Fund of Crowley. watering schedules to a minimum. Develop a drought Evaluate the hazards D - 3 Drought awareness education posed by drought in Continual Public Works $100,000 $400,000 HMGP/PDM Crowley. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-81 Section 5 D-3 L-2 L-2 Drought Lightning Lightning program for Crowley Develop a drought citizens. awareness education program that provides tips and pertinent Public Works and information for ensuring Continual Utility Billing $100,000 $400,000 HMGP/PDM the protection of property and the environment against drought. Provide drought awareness information General to Crowley. citizens Continual Public Works. Fund Distribute drought through a social media awareness information to campaign Crowley citizens. Provide drought awareness information Continual Public Works, City General through the City of Secretary's Office Fund Crowley website Evaluate the hazards Emergency posed by lightning in 2 years post Management $100,000 $400,000 HMGP, Crowley. study Team, Fire PDM Department Develop a lightning Develop a lightning outreach program for City of outreach program that Emergency Crowley citizens. provides tips and 2 years post Management. HMGP, pertinent information for study Team, Fire $300,000 $1,200,000 PDM protecting property Department against lightning damage. Provide lightning Distribute lightning mitigation information to City Secretary's General preparedness information to Crowley citizens through Office Fund City of Crowley citizens. a social media campaign. 5-82 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES General Fund $625,000 $625,000 FEMA, State General Fund General Fund Local funds, $10,000 $40,000 HMGP, PDM, FMA Local funds, TBD TBD HMGP, PDM, FMA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-83 Provide lightning awareness information City Secretary's at outdoor spaces Office throughout Crowley. Provide mobile auxiliary power, lights, and breathing air for hazardous material Identify appropriate size release, structure fires, and and type of the sub -grade rescues for the following: truck, PF -1 Power Failure Crowley Fire Department. generator, command 1 year Crowley Fire This type of unit could be a lights, SCBA Department power source for mobile compressor, fill station; command units and 150' fill line with reel. emergency power emergency shelters for the surrounding areas. Improve construction techniques through Public Works building code Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in enhancements. ES -1 Soils Crowley. Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and Public Works business owners about mitigation techniques. Participate in FEMA's Participate in FEMA's Community Rating System Community Rating Flooding, Dam F -1 to lower flood insurance System to lower flood 1 year Public Works Failure premiums for residents with insurance premiums for flood insurance residents with flood insurance Flooding, Dam Develop a buyout program Develop a buyout As funding is F - 2 Failure for properties in the program for properties in available Public Works floodplain the floodplain MITIGATION STRATEGIES General Fund $625,000 $625,000 FEMA, State General Fund General Fund Local funds, $10,000 $40,000 HMGP, PDM, FMA Local funds, TBD TBD HMGP, PDM, FMA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-83 Section 5 5-84 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Ensure outdoors spaces Severe Ensure outdoors spaces in in Crowley have ST -1, T Thunderstorms, Crowley have adequate adequate shelter for funding is Emergency Local funds, 1 High Winds, shelter for high -wind events high -wind events such available available Management TBD TBD HMGP, Lightning, and such as severe as severe PDM Tornadoes thunderstorms or tornadoes. thunderstorms or tornadoes. Severe Distribute severe ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms, Distribute severe weather weather mitigation As funding is Emergency Local funds, 4 High Winds, mitigation information to information to Crowley available Management TBD TBD HMGP, Lightning, and Crowley citizens. citizens. PDM Tornadoes Equip city vehicles and Equip city vehicles and equipment with digital equipment with digital thermometers to identify thermometers to identify Local funds, WS -1 Winter Storms pavemenVasphalt pavement/asphalt As funding is Emergency TBD TBD HMGP, temperatures to determine temperatures to available Management PDM freeze levels for bridges and determine freeze levels for bridges and overpasses. overpasses. Power Failure, Ensure access to portable Ensure access to Local funds, WS 1 Extreme Heat, generators in case of portable generators in As funding is Emergency TBD TBD HMGP, and Winter emergencies in the City of case of emergencies in available Management PDM Storm Crowley. the City of Crowley. Develop a community Develop a community wildfire protection plan wildfire protection plan Local funds, W-2 Wildfire (CWPP) to identify areas at (CWPP) to identify As funding is Emergency TBD TBD HMGP, risk for wildfire and identify areas at risk for wildfire available Management PDM additional wildland and identify additional resources. wildland resources. Develop a wildfire mitigation Develop a wildfire Local funds, W-3 Wildfire outreach program City of mitigation outreach As funding is Emergency TBD TBD HMGP, Crowley citizens. program City of Crowley available Management PDM citizens. 5-84 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop an extreme heat Develop an extreme ET - 2 Extreme outreach program for City of heat outreach program As funding is Emergency Temperature Crowley citizens. for City of Crowley available Management citizens. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Local funds, TBD TBD HMGP, PDM Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-85 Section 5 5.8 Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Mitigation Strategy 5-86 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Department of Review Protective Services Department capabilities of 3 months (DPS) — Office of $ 2,000 $ 10,000 Budget current systems. Emergency Management (OEM) Severe Thunderstorms Conduct study and High for expansion Winds, and replacement Department Tornadoes, of current 12 months DPS — OEM $ 15,000 $ 100,000 Budget Hail, Lightning, systems and/or Winter Storms, Update Dallas -Fort procurement of Flooding, Dam Worth (DFW) new systems. Failure, International Airport Procure any Capital MH -1 Wildfires, warning system to updates and/or 36 months DPS — OEM $ 150,000 $ 1,800,000 Budget Extreme all -hazards threats new systems. Temperatures, for all airport Create strategy Hazardous property. to integrate Department Materials policies for all 40 months DPS — OEM $ 10,000 $ 55,000 Budget Spills, warning Infectious systems. Disease Implement Outbreak, system for Terrorism airport -wide warnings, to 48 months DPS — OEM $ 5,000 $ 25,000 Department include Budget education regarding the new system. 5-86 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-87 Severe Thunderstorms and High Update current Winds, DFW Department Tornadoes, International 6 months Airport Operations $ 8,000 $ 52,000 Budget Hail, Lightning, Airport C3 Winter Storms, Utilize enhanced Portal. Flooding, Dam systems to notify Failure, airport employees MH -6 Wildfires, and stakeholders Extreme regarding incidents at Temperatures, DFW International Expand Hazardous Airport. subscribers to Materials program to 12 months Airport Operations $ 2,000 $ 15,000 Department Spills, warehouse and Budget Infectious rental car Disease districts. Outbreak, Terrorism Severe Install blast Film Thunderstorms Harden DFW on all terminal ST - 3, T - and High International Airport glass outer -walls 5 years DPS & ADE $ 1,500,000 $ 25,000,000 Grant Funds 3 Winds, facilities to withstand (complete as Tornadoes high winds and hail. renovations are completed). Dallas Fort Worth International Airport will continue to Work with Tarrant support surrounding surrounding city Tarrant County, all County, F - 2 Flooding communities that participate in the officials who are Continual Eligible Participating $10,000 $ 40,000 Individual Federal Emergency members of the Jurisdictions Jurisdiction Management CRS program. Budgets Agency's (FEMA) Community Rating Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-87 Section 5 F-3 F-3 F-3 Flooding Flooding Flooding System (CRS) program. $ 750,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds $ 7,500,000 $ 10,000,000 Capital Funds $ 1,250,000 $ 25,000,000 Capital Funds $ 800,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds $ 9,000,000 $ 12,000,000 Capital Funds $ 15,000,000 $ 27,000,000 Capital Funds $ 750,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds 5-00 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Conduct design 6 months ADE phase. Widen and raise Mid- Begin Cities Road to construction of g months ADE prevent flooding at South lanes and Dallas Fort Worth new bridge. International Airport. Demolish North bridge and begin construction of 12 months ADE new lanes and bridge. Conduct design 6 months ADE phase. Widen and raise Begin Glade Road to construction of 9 months ADE prevent flooding at South lanes and Dallas Fort Worth new bridge. International Airport. Demolish North bridge and begin construction of 12 months ADE North lanes and bridge. Widen and retool Conduct design West Airfield Drive to phase. 6 months ADE prevent flooding at $ 750,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds $ 7,500,000 $ 10,000,000 Capital Funds $ 1,250,000 $ 25,000,000 Capital Funds $ 800,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds $ 9,000,000 $ 12,000,000 Capital Funds $ 15,000,000 $ 27,000,000 Capital Funds $ 750,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds 5-00 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-09 Dallas Fort Worth Begin International Airport. construction of 9 months ADE $ 7,500,000 $ 10,000,000 Capital East lanes and Funds new bridge. Begin construction of 12 months ADE $ 12,500,000 $ 25,000,000 Capital West lanes and Funds bridge. Conduct comprehensive Mitigate dam failure review of Environmental Airport DF -4 Dam Failure at Dallas Fort Worth emergency Continual Affairs No additional cost Budget International Airport. action plans for dams at DFW Airport. Mitigate levee failure Conduct a DF -4 Dam Failure at Dallas Fort Worth breach analysis 12 months Environmental No additional cost Airport International Airport. of levees at Affairs Budget DFW Airport. Identify Department of appropriate size Public Safety, Airport and type of 6 months Energy, No additional cost NA Budget Power Failure, Ensure Dallas Fort generator for Transportation, and Winter Storms, Worth International critical facilities. Asset Management PF -1 Severe Thunderstorms Airport critical Purchase/order Energy, Dependent on Capital and High facilities have generator for 12 months Transportation, and evaluation NA Funds Winds, alternate power critical facilities. Asset Management Tornadoes supply. Deliver and Energy, install critical 3 months Transportation, and Dependent on NA Airport facility Asset Management evaluation Budget generators. Power Failure, Ensure Dallas Fort Evaluate Department of Winter Storms, Worth International emergency Public Safety, Airport PF -1 Severe Airport critical lighting systems 6 months Energy, No additional cost NA Budget Thunderstorms facilities have in critical Transportation, and and High facilities. Asset Management Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-09 Section 5 W-2 WS -1 Winds, emergency lighting Install Tornadoes systems in place. emergency Energy, Dependent on Capital lighting systems 12 months Transportation, and evaluation NA Funds in critical Asset Management facilities. Compile data from past 3 months DPS — Fire $ 2,500 $ Department 150,000 Personnel from Fire incidents. Prevention Budget Prevention will utilize existing systems to Update current Wildfire maintain grass fire databases to 6 months DPS — Fire $ $ 30,000 Department data for Dallas Fort access new Prevention Budget Worth International data. Airport. Update databases as Ongoing DPS — Fire $ $ 70,000 Department new incidents Prevention Budget transpire. Conduct an Department of assessment of Public Safety, winter weather Continual Operations & No additional cost Airport Energy, Budget response capabilities. Transportation and Asset Management Evaluate winter Acquire Department of weather response equipment Public Safety, Winter Storm capabilities at Dallas needed as 12 months Operations & Dependent on Fort Worth determined by Energy, evaluation International Airport. assessment. Transportation and Asset Management Provide safety training to first Department of Airport responders on 6 months Public Safety No additional cost Budget winter weather hazards. 5-90 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 WS -1 WS -2 WS -2 Winter Storm Winter Storm Winter Storm MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-91 Conduct an Department of assessment of Public Safety, winter weather Continual Operations & No additional cost Airport Evaluate winter plans in place Energy, Budget weather planning forjurisdiction Transportation and capabilities at Dallas Public works. Asset Management Fort Worth Department of International Airport. Develop or Public Safety, update winter Continual Operations & No additional cost Airport weather Energy, Budget mitigation plan. Transportation and Asset Management Evaluate the hazards posed Continual Department of No additional costs Airport by severe winter Public Safety Budget weather at DFW. Develop a winter Develop a winter weather mitigation weather public program at Dallas education Fort Worth program that Department of International Airport. Provides tips and pertinent Continual Public Safety & Risk No additional costs Airport Budget information for Management avoiding hypothermia and icy conditions. Provide winter Distribute winter weather weather mitigation mitigation information to Dallas information to Department of Airport Fort Worth DFW employees 6 months Public Safety No additional costs Budget International Airport and tenants employees and through a social tenants. media campaign. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-91 Section 5 D-2 Drought TR- 1 Terrorism TR- 1 Terrorism 5-92 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Ensure the DFW website is updated during Department of winter months to Public Safety & Airport educate citizens 6 months Internal No additional costs Budget on winter Communications weather mitigation activities. Install Purple Pipe Identify areas for installation. 3 months ADE $ 250,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital Funds (recycled water) Capital throughout Dallas Install piping. 8 months ADE $ 12,500,000 $ 50,000,000 Funds Fort Worth International Airport Integrate Capital for irrigation. irrigation into 5 months ADE $ 1,500,000 $ 10,000,000 Funds piping. Study new and Department Provide glass legacy glass 3 months DPS — Police $ 1,000 $ 8,000 Budget throughout Dallas within terminals. Fort Worth Procure blast Capital International Airport film for all 12 months DPS — Police $ 225,000 $ 2,300,000 Budget terminal areas with terminal glass. anti -explosive Apply film to all Capital properties. glass within the 15 months DPS — Police $ 50,000 $ 1,500,000 Budget terminal area. Review areas Department that do not have 3 months DPS — OEM $ 1,000 $ 5,000 Budget Provide shelter signage. signage within Dallas Procure 6 months DPS — OEM $ 3,000 $ 25,000 Department Fort Worth additional signs. Budget International Airport Post additional terminals. signage 12 months DPS —OEM $ 1,000 $ 35,000 Department throughout Budget airport terminals. 5-92 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 L-1 L-1 L-2 Lightning Lightning Lightning MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-93 Evaluate the need for Department of lightning protection on 6 months Public Safety, $ 25,000 $ Airport 125,000 Protect communications Information Budget communication infrastructure at Technology Services infrastructure at DFW Airport. Dallas Fort Worth Install lightning International Airport rods on existing Department of from lightning. and future 18-24 Public Safety, Dependent on Capital communication months Energy, Transportation and findings Funds infrastructure, as Asset Mgt. needed. Evaluate the need for lightning 6 months Department of No additional costs Airport protection for Public Safety Budget DFW Airport critical facilities. Ensure Dallas Fort Install lightning Worth International rods and other Airport critical protective 18-24 Department of Dependent on Capital facilities are equipment on months Public Safety findings Funds protected against critical facilities. lightning. Integrate Airport lightning detection 24-36 Department of $ 1,200,000 $ Capital 4,000,000 systems months Public Safety Funds throughout the entire Airport. Develop a lightning Evaluate the outreach program for hazards posed 6 months Department of No additional costs Airport Dallas Fort Worth by lightning Public Safety Budget International Airport DFW Airport. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-93 Section 5 L-2 HM -1 employees and Develop a tenants. lightning outreach program that provides tips Department of and pertinent 12 months Public Safety information for protecting property against lightning damage. Provide lightning mitigation information 12 months Department of Distribute lightning through the Public Safety mitigation information DFW Airport Lightning to Dallas Fort Worth intranet site. International Airport Provide lightning employees and awareness tenants. information at 18 months Department of outdoor spaces Public Safety throughout DFW Airport. Evaluate the hazmat gear currently Provide Dallas Fort provided by Continual Department of Worth International DFW Airport Public Safety Hazardous Airport fire personnel Department of Materials with the necessary Public Safety gear to respond to Fire Services. hazmat releases. Acquire the gear needed as Continual Department of identified in the Public Safety evaluation. $ 25,000 $ No additional costs $ 150,000 $ No Additional Cost Dependentupon evaluation 475,000 Airport Budget Airport Budget 500,000 Airport Budget Airport Budget Airport Budget 5-94 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HM -1 HM -2 HM -2 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-95 Evaluate the Ensure Dallas Fort hazmat equipment Continual Department of No additional cost Airport Worth International currently owned Public Safety Budget Hazardous Airport fire by DFW Airport. Materials department has the Acquire the equipment necessary equipment to respond to hazmat needed as Continual Department of Dependent upon Airport releases. identified in the Public Safety evaluation Budget evaluation. Evaluate hazardous Department of materials that Continual Public Safety, No additional cost Airport are used or Environmental Budget transported in Affairs Department DFW Airport. Maintain a hazardous Develop a hazardous materials Hazardous materials awareness awareness Materials education program education for Airport employees program that Department of and tenants. provides tips Public Safety, Airport and pertinent Continual Environmental No additional cost Budget information for Affairs Department ensuring the protection of property and people from hazardous materials. Distribute hazardous Provide Department of Hazardous materials awareness hazardous Public Safety, Airport Materials information to Dallas materials Continual Environmental No additional cost Budget Fort Worth awareness Affairs Department International Airport information to Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-95 Section 5 HM -3 HM -4 Department of Public Safety, No additional cost Airport Environmental Budget Affairs Department Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget 5-96 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 employees and Airport tenants. employees and tenants. Provide hazardous materials awareness Continual information through the DFW Airport intranet site. Partner with the Red Cross to Improve the locate shelter Continual Hazardous evacuation of Airport locations off the Materials employees and Airport. tenants during a Secure hazardous event. agreements with Continual the Red Cross for shelters. Partner with surrounding communities to identify materials Identify potential commonly Continual hazard areas carried by the surrounding Dallas railroad that Hazardous Fort Worth travels through Materials International Airport the community. associated with a Partner with railroad incident. surrounding communities to develop hazard Continual incident overlay for the small, medium, and Department of Public Safety, No additional cost Airport Environmental Budget Affairs Department Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget Department of No additional cost Airport Public Safety Budget 5-96 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Ensure Dallas Fort ET -1 Extreme Worth International Temperatures Airport can open cooling centers. worst-case incidents based upon materials commonly carried on the railway. Partner with surrounding communities to identify the roadway infrastructure, residences, commercial buildings, and open land/park areas located within the hazard incident overlay. Review current plans and procedures related to extreme heat. Open cooling centers and provide public information. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Continual Department of No additional cost Public Safety 6 months Office of Emergency No additional cost Management 12 months Office of Emergency 300 man hours Management Identify extreme heat Evaluate the Office of Emergency Extreme plans for critical need for Management/Energy ET -1 Temperatures infrastructure at extreme heat 6 months Transportation and No additional costs Dallas Fort Worth plans for critical Asset Management International Airport. infrastructure to Airport Budget Airport Budget Reduction in Airport liability and Budget property insurance Airport Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-97 Section 5 ET -2 Extreme Temperatures Develop an extreme heat outreach program for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Employees and Customers. ensure essential functions continue in the event of high temperatures. Develop or update plans and procedures for critical infrastructure when high temperatures are present. Evaluate the hazards posed by extreme heat at DFW International Airport. Develop an extreme heat outreach program that provides tips and pertinent information for ensuring the health and safety of employees working outside during extreme heat. Office of Emergency 12-18 ManagemenVEnergy 500 man hours Airport months Transportation and Budget Asset Management 3-6 months Office of Emergency No additional cost Airport Management Budget Office of Emergency 12 months Management I 300 man hours Airport Internal Budget Communications 5-98 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-99 Actively pursue and evaluate updated building 12-18 Airport Development Dependent on Airport codes, primarily months and Engineering No additional costs code regulations Budget Mitigate expansive through the ES -1 Expansive soils at Dallas Fort International Code Council. Soils Worth International Educate Airport. construction contractors and 12-18 Airport Development No additional costs Dependent on Airport tenants about months and Engineering code regulations Budget mitigation techniques. Harden DFW Harden DFW facilities to T-3 facilities to withstand withstand the 5 years DPS & ADE $ 1,500,000 $ 25,000,000 Grant Funds the typical tornado typical tornado threat in North Texas threat in North Texas. Enhance the Enhance the DFW DFW warning warning system to system to better Tornado better warn warn 4 years DPS -OEM $ 200,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital stakeholders and the stakeholders Budget traveling public of and the traveling T 5 tornadic threats. public of tornadic threats. Update and Integrate Update and mass notification into Integrate mass current DFW Airport notification into 18 months DPS -OEM & $ 15,000 $ 2,000,000 Department platforms for current DFW Operations Budget Airport platforms warning. for warning. Severe Harden DFW Harden DFW ST - 3 Thunderstorms facilities to withstand facilities to 5 years DPS & ADE $ 1,500,000 $ 25,000,000 Grant Funds the typical windstorm withstand the Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-99 Section 5 ST -5 H-1 and High threat in North typical Winds Texas. windstorm threat in North Texas. Enhance the Enhance the DFW DFW warning warning system to system to better better warn warn Capital stakeholders and the stakeholders 4 years DPS -OEM $ 200,000 $ 1,500,000 Budget traveling public of and the traveling high wind and storm public of high threats. wind and storm threats. Update and Integrate Update and mass notification into Integrate mass current DFW Airport notification into 18 months DPS -OEM & $ 15,000 $ 2,000,000 Department platforms for current DFW Operations Budget Airport platforms warning. for warning. Harden DFW Harden DFW facilities to withstand facilities to the typical the hail withstand the typical the hail 5 years DPS & ADE $ 1,500,000 $ 25,000,000 Grant Funds threat in North threat in North Texas. Texas. Hail Enhance the Enhance the DFW DFW warning warning system to system to better better warn warn 4 years DPS -OEM $ 200,000 $ 1,500,000 Capital stakeholders and the stakeholders Budget traveling public of and the traveling hail threats. public of hail threats. 5-100 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 D-2 W-1 Drought Wildfire MITIGATION STRATEGIES Update and Update and Integrate mass Integrate mass notification into notification into DPS -OEM & current DFW Airport current DFW 18 months Operations platforms for warning Airport platforms for warning purposes. purposes. Construct Purple Construct Purple Pipe (recycled water) Pipe (recycled for landscaping and water) for 24 months ADE irrigation. landscaping and irrigation. Educate airport Educate airport staff staff and and stakeholders on stakeholders on 12 months Environmental water conservation water Affairs techniques. conservation techniques. Plan for Plan for delivering delivering potable water to potable water to critical facilities in the critical facilities 12 months Procurement event of a water in the event of a emergency. water emergency. Collect and analyze Collect and wildfire data to analyze wildfire determine high data to 12 months DPS -Fire hazard areas. determine high hazard areas. Train Airport fire Train Airport fire fighters on wildland fighters on fire mitigation wildland fire 12 months DPS -Fire strategies specific to mitigation wildland urban strategies interface at airports. specific to $ 15,000 $ 2,000,000 Department Budget $ 250,000 $ 5,000,000 Capital Budget $ 15,000 $ 250,000 Departmental Budget $ 10,000 $ 50,000 Departmental Budget $ 15,000 $ 50,000 Departmental Budget $ 25,000 $ 150,000 Departmental Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-101 Section 5 DF -1 IDO-4 wildland urban interface at airports. Energy Transportation & $ 250,000 $ Asset Management Environmental Affair No additional cost & DPS -OEM Environmental Affair No additional cost & DPS -OEM DPS -OEM & $ 15,000 $ Operations DPS -OEM $ DPS -OEM & HR $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 1,500,000 Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Departmental Budget 500,000 Departmental Budget 250,000 Departmental Budget 350,000 Departmental Budget 5-102 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Reduce fuels in high Reduce fuels in hazard areas on high hazard 24 months airport property. areas on airport property. Review and revise Review and Trigg Lake AEP. revise Trigg Continual Lake AEP. Conduct levee Conduct levee breach analysis on breach analysis Continual airport property. on airport Dam Failure property. Improve warning Improve warning systems ability to systems ability warn of dam failure to warn of dam incidents both on failure incidents 12 months airport and down both on airport stream and down stream Enhance and Enhance and expand expand DFW DFW Airport POD Airport POD plan to incorporate plan to additional critical incorporate Infectious private sector additional critical Disease stakeholders private sector Outbreak stakeholders Conduct staffing Conduct staffing analysis to ensure analysis to airport's operation in ensure airport's the event of operation in the workforce shortage event of from a pandemic workforce Energy Transportation & $ 250,000 $ Asset Management Environmental Affair No additional cost & DPS -OEM Environmental Affair No additional cost & DPS -OEM DPS -OEM & $ 15,000 $ Operations DPS -OEM $ DPS -OEM & HR $ 15,000 $ 15,000 $ 1,500,000 Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Departmental Budget 500,000 Departmental Budget 250,000 Departmental Budget 350,000 Departmental Budget 5-102 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 shortage from a pandemic MITIGATION STRATEGIES DPS -OEM & Risk $ 25Departmental Management ,000 $ 500,000 Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5 -1 03 Educate Educate partners and partners and stakeholders in stakeholders in disease prevention disease and hygiene prevention and practices hygiene practices MITIGATION STRATEGIES DPS -OEM & Risk $ 25Departmental Management ,000 $ 500,000 Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5 -1 03 Section 5 5.9 City of Euless Mitigation Strategy IDO - 2 Infectious Disease Outbreak Develop plans for Identify systems or security needs Completed HEB security at the Hurst, within the POD site. Euless, and Bedford methods for Calculate police Emergency personnel Severe requirements and obtaining current 1 month Management - City Budget plan with schedules and pending and assignments. Thunderstorms and Have accurate real weather conditions. High Winds, time information to Purchase/order Tornadoes, Hail, MH -6 assist in giving timely weather/lightning Emergency Lightning, Winter warnings to citizen monitoring/warning 1 month Management $60,000 $240,000 City Budget Storms, Flooding, population of the City system. Dam Failure, of Euless. Wildfires Deliver and install weather/lightning 1 month Emergency _ City Budget monitor/warning Management system. Power Failure, Ensure City of Euless Winter Storms, critical facilities have Install emergency PF -1 Severe Thunderstorms and generators as an lighting systems in Jan -16 Facilities $40,000 $75,000 City Budget High Winds, alternate power critical facilities. Tornadoes supply. IDO - 2 Infectious Disease Outbreak $49,000 $200,000 HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds 5-104 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop plans for Provide physical security needs Completed HEB security at the Hurst, within the POD site. Euless, and Bedford (HEB) POD site while Calculate police treating up to 200,000 personnel people within a 48- requirements and hour timeframe. availability and then Completed HEB prepare a viable plan with schedules and assignments. $49,000 $200,000 HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease Control Public Health Preparedness Funds 5-104 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES - - HEB, FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA - - HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA $5,000 $75,000 City Budget $10,000 $100,000 City Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-105 Estimate fuel needs for police and ICS 31 -Dec -13 HEB vehicles, and generators. Plan for law enforcement Completed HEB personnel needs for traffic control. Coordinate the Plan for portable, effective traffic flow physical barrier Infectious Disease IDO - 2 leading into, out of, needs (cones, Completed HEB Outbreak and within the Hurst, barricades, etc.). Euless, and Bedford POD site. Determine points of ingress/egress to POD site for Completed HEB management purposes. Complete and disseminate the Hurst, Euless, and Bedford Prepare and IDO - 2 Infectious Disease POD site to local disseminate POD Completed Bedford Outbreak agencies, school and plan. hospital district, and Tarrant County officials. Review continuity of operations (COOP) Ensure continuity plans and Jan -16 All procedures are in procedures for city IDO - 3 Infectious Disease place to prepare for a employees and Outbreak long-term employee facilities. shortage at City of Provide COOP Euless facilities. training for Jan -17 All jurisdiction employees. - - HEB, FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA - - HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA $5,000 $75,000 City Budget $10,000 $100,000 City Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-105 Section 5 5-106 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a public Educate the public Infectious Disease information campaign on pandemics, IDO - 4 Outbreak to educate Euless including isolation, Jan -15 Management Management $3,000 $50,000 City Budget public about infectious quarantine, triage, diseases. and medical care. Evaluate feasibility Upgrade water and of extending D-2 Drought irrigation systems to reclaimed water lines and usage to Jan -16 Public Works $5,000 $500,000 City Budget conserve water in the new or existing City of Euless subdivisions and business districts. Evaluate the Public Works, hazards posed by Jun -15 Emergency $1,000 $100,000 City Budget drought in Euless. Management Develop a drought Develop a drought awareness education program D - 3 Drought awareness education that provides tips program for Euless and pertinent Public Works, PIC, citizens. information for Jun -16 Emergency $5,000 $200,000 City Budget ensuring the Management protection of property and the environment against drought. Provide drought awareness information to Jun -14 PIO/Emergency $500 $5,000 City Budget Distribute drought Euless citizens Management g D - 3 Drought awareness information through a social to Euless citizens. media campaign. Provide drought PIO/Emergency awareness Jun -14 Management $500 $5,000 City Budget information through 5-106 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET- 1 ET- 1 ET -2 MITIGATION STRATEGIES All $1,000 $50,000 City Budget All $1,000 $50,000 City Budget PW/Facilities/Emergency Management $1,000 $50,000 City Budget PW/Facilities/Emergency $1,000 $50,000 City Budget Management FD/PIO/Emergency $3,000 $50,000 City Budget Management Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-107 the City of Euless website. Review current mitigation plans and Jul -14 Ensure the City of procedures related Euless has an to extreme heat. Extreme extreme heat Temperatures mitigation plan in Open cooling place. centers and provide Jul -14 public information. Ensure essential functions continue in the event of high Jul -14 temperatures, by Identify extreme heat implementing Extreme mitigation plans for mitigation activities. Temperatures critical infrastructure in Develop or update the City of Euless. mitigation procedures for critical infrastructure Jul -14 when high temperatures are present. Develop an extreme heat outreach program that Develop an extreme provides tips and Extreme heat outreach pertinent Jul -15 Temperatures program for Euless information for citizens. ensuring the health and safety of citizens during extreme heat. All $1,000 $50,000 City Budget All $1,000 $50,000 City Budget PW/Facilities/Emergency Management $1,000 $50,000 City Budget PW/Facilities/Emergency $1,000 $50,000 City Budget Management FD/PIO/Emergency $3,000 $50,000 City Budget Management Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-107 Section 5 5-100 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide extreme heat mitigation information to the Jul -15 FD/PIO/Emergency $3,000 $50,000 City Budget Distribute extreme Euless citizens Management Extreme heat mitigation through a social ET - 2 Temperatures information to Euless media campaign. citizens. Provide extreme heat mitigation information through Jul -15 FD/PIO/Emergency $500 $10,000 City Budget the City of Euless's Management website. Improve construction Planning and techniques through Jan -17 Development $5,000 $50,000 City Budget building code enhancements. ES -1 Expansive Soils Mitigate expansive Educate soils in Euless. construction contractors, Planning and homeowners, and Jan -17 Development $5,000 $50,000 City Budget business owners about mitigation techniques. Work with Remove repetitive homeowners to City Engineering, Public City Budget, F-2 Flooding loss properties in purchase and Continual Works $750,000 $1,500,000 HMGP Euless remove repetitive loss properties Develop and print Emergency preparedness 2 years Management, PIO $3,000 $15,000 City Budget Provide flood materials F - 3 Flooding awareness education Obtaining lightning Emergency to citizens of Euless sensing equipment 5 years Management, Parks and $50,000 $300,000 City Budget for city parks not Recreation currently covered 5-100 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-109 Protect Critical Install lightning rods L-1 Lightning Facilities against and other protective 5 years Emergency $200,000 $700,000 City Budget lightning equipment on Management, Facilities critical facilities Develop winter storm Winter Storm, ad extreme Open public Emergency WS-1,EH-1 Extreme temperature mitigation warming or cooling 5 years Management $2,000 $10,000 City Budget Temperatures plans for City of centers. Euless. Provide winter storm Develop and print Emergency WS-2,EH-2 Winter Storm education to citizens public outreach 5 years Management, PIO $3,000 $15,000 City Budget of Euless. materials. Install landscaping D-2 Drought Reduce water usage rain collection 5 years Emergency $35,000 $250,000 City Budget by city facilities. systems at city Management, Facilities facilities. Mitigate damage to Provide awnings as existing structures as a cover for H-1 Hail a result of natural emergency 5 or more Public Safety TBD hazards using cost response vehicles years effective approaches located outside. in the City of Euless. Provide information to Develop a wildfire Emergency W-3 Wildfire Euless citizens regarding the hazards mitigation outreach 2 years Management, Fire $2,000 $10,000 City Budget posed by wildfires. program. Department, PIO Coordinate with TFS, our city and The primary community to benefit will W-1 Wildfire Implement FIREWISE establish a FIREWISE 3 years Fire Department $50,000 come in the General community program. community form of life Fund/Grants program. This and property program will assist conservation us with preplanning Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-109 Section 5 for a fire, during and after. 5-110 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 5.10 City of Forest Hill Mitigation Strategy Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-111 Forest Hill Police Department Severe (FHPD), Thunderstorms Develop ILA and Kennedale Forest Hill, and High planning. 3 months Police Kennedale, Winds, Form a multijurisdictional Department, Crowley MH - 5 Tornadoes, tactical unit with Forest Hill, Crowley Hail, Lightning, Kennedale, and Crowley. Police Winter Storms, Department Flooding, Wildfires Acquire appropriate 8 months FHPD $25,000 $50,000 Forest Hill equipment. Train law enforcement 1 year FHPD $50,000 $50,000 Forest Hill officers and implement. Severe Evaluate current Fire Thunderstorms Ensure outdoors spaces in shelters in outdoor 2 weeks Department, $1,000 City Budget ST -1, T — and High Forest Hill have adequate spaces in Forest Hill. Building 1, L-1 Winds, shelter for high -wind events Determine the size and Fire Lightning, such as severe space needs for shelters 2 weeks Department, $1,000 City Budget Tornadoes thunderstorms or tornadoes. in outdoor spaces in Building Forest Hill. Evaluate the current conditions of critical Fire facilities to determine 2 weeks Department $1,000 City Budget which ones, if any, need Severe Ensure critical facilities in safe rooms installed. ST -1, T - Thunderstorms Forest Hill have adequate Determine the size and 1 and High safe rooms to protect against space needed to shelter Fire Winds, high -wind events and the population of the 2 weeks Department $1,000 City Budget Tornadoes tornadoes. critical facility. Install safe rooms as Fire needed in critical 2 weeks Department $1,000 City Budget facilities. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-111 Section 5 Fire Department, $1,000.00 City Budget Building Fire Department, $5,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA Building FD, Building $1,000.00 City Budget FD, Building $5,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA Fire Department, $1,000 City Budget Building Fire Department, $5,000 $25,000 FEMA Building 5-112 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Review current jurisdictional ordinances 2 weeks Ensure Forest Hill and building codes Severe ordinances and building related to high winds. ST - 3, T - Thunderstorms codes reflect the need for Develop or update 3 and High high -wind resistant windows ordinances and building Winds, in new developments and codes to recommend Tornadoes facilities. new developments or 2 months facilities are built with high -wind resistant windows as needed. Evaluate the need for high -wind resistant 2 wks. Severe Ensure Forest Hill critical windows in critical ST - 3, T - Thunderstorms facilities, including schools, facilities. 3 and High have high -wind resistant Install high -wind Winds, windows in place. resistant windows as Tornadoes necessary in critical 2 months facilities, including schools. Evaluate the hazards posed by high -wind 2 weeks events in Forest Hill. Severe Develop a severe Develop a severe ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms thunderstorm and tornado weather outreach 4 and High outreach program for Forest program that provides Winds, Hill citizens. tips and pertinent 2 months Tornadoes information for protecting property against high -wind damage. Fire Department, $1,000.00 City Budget Building Fire Department, $5,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA Building FD, Building $1,000.00 City Budget FD, Building $5,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA Fire Department, $1,000 City Budget Building Fire Department, $5,000 $25,000 FEMA Building 5-112 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Provide severe weather mitigation information to Forest Hill citizens Fire through a social media 1 month Department, $2,000 $10,000 FEMA Severe campaign, including Court ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms Distribute severe weather severe thunderstorms 4 and High mitigation information to and tornadoes. Winds, Forest Hill citizens. Ensure the Forest Hill Tornadoes website is updated Fire during tornado season 2 weeks Department, $0 N/A N/A to educate citizens on Court severe weather mitigation activities. Decrease flood insurance premiums in Forest Hill by participating in the Federal Work with city officials to Fire F -1 Flooding Emergency Management become a member of 6 months Department, $5,000.00 $20,000.00 FEMA Agency's (FEMA) Community the CRS program. Public Works Rating System (CRS) program. Review repetitive loss Review and remove properties and work with Fire F - 2 Flooding repetitive loss properties in homeowners to remove 1 week Department, $0 $0 N/A Forest Hill. them using FEMA Building funding. Power Failure, Identify appropriate size Winter Storms, and type of generator for 2 months FD & PD $2,000.00 $20,000.00 FEMA Severe critical facilities. Thunderstorms Ensure Forest Hill critical PF -1 and High facilities have generator as Purchase/order Winds, Tornadoes, alternate power supply. generator for critical 2 months FD & PD $4,000.00 $40,000.00 FEMA and Extreme facilities. Temperature Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-113 Section 5 5-114 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Power Failure, Evaluate emergency Fire Winter Storms, lighting systems in 4 months Department, $4,000.00 City Budget Severe Ensure Forest Hill critical critical facilities. Building PF -1 Thunderstorms facilities have emergency Install emergency Fire and High lighting systems in place. lighting systems in 6 months Department, $10,000.00 FEMA Winds, Tornadoes critical facilities. Building Evaluate which critical Fire facilities need hail- 1 week Department, $0 $0 NA Ensure Forest Hills critical resistant roofing and Building H -1 Hail facilities have hail -resistant windows installed. roofing and windows Install hail -resistant installed. roofing and windows in NA NA NA NA NA identified critical facilities. Evaluate the need for Fire Department, covered parking for city 2 weeks Police $2,000 $50,000 City Budget Provide hail -resistant parking vehicles to protect them Department, H -1 Hail areas for Forest Hill's city against hail. Building vehicles. Install awnings as needed to protect city NA NA NA NA NA vehicles against hail. Evaluate the hazards 2 weeks Fire Department, $0 NA NA posed by hail in the city. Building Develop a hail outreach Develop hail outreach H - 2 Hail program for Forest Hill program that provides Fire citizens. tips and pertinent 4 weeks Department, $1,000 $50,000 FEMA information for ensuring Building the protection of property against hail. Distribute hail mitigation Provide hail mitigation Fire H - 2 Hail information to Forest Hill information to citizens 4 weeks Department, $1,000 $50,000 FEMA citizens. through a social media Court campaign. 5-114 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-115 Provide hail mitigation Fire information through the 4 weeks Department, $1,000 $25,000 FEMA city website. Court Evaluate the Forest Hill Fire water system to ensure 1 month Department, $1,000.00 $20,000.00 City Budget Ensure Forest Hill water capacity for fighting wildfires. Public Works W -1 Wildfire systems are adequate for Install or upgradeneeded fighting wildfires. equipment to Fire ensure water systems 3 months Department, $20,000.00 $100,000.00 FEMA are adequate. Public Works Mitigate wildfires by Prevent wildfires from Fire W -1 Wildfire instituting landscaping spreading to critical facilities by landscaping 6 months Department, $20,000.00 $100,000.00 Forestry practices at Forest Hill critical plants and brush away Building, Service facilities. from buildings. Public Works Review city ordinances and Enact building permit W-2 Wildfire laws to ensure mitigation process that encourages 6 months Building, Fire $4,000.00 $40,000.00 Forestry practices are in effect in wildfire resistant Department Service Forest Hill. construction. Review current wildfire Fire response plans and 1 month Department $1,000.00 $10,000.00 City Budget procedures. Ensure adequate Forest Hill Develop or update Fire Forestry W-2 Wildfire wildfire response plans and wildfire response plans 2 months Department $4,000.00 $$40,000.00 Service procedures are in place. and procedures. Provide wildfire Fire Forestry response training to fire 2 months Department, $2,000.00 $20,000.00 Service personnel. TCC Develop a wildfire outreach program that Provide information to Forest provides tips and Fire W-3 Wildfire Hill citizens regarding the pertinent information for 3 months Department, $10,000 $100,000 FEMA hazards posed by wildfires. ensuring the protection TCC of property against wildfires. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-115 Section 5 WS -1 WS -1 WS -1 Fire $20,000 $100,000 FEMA Department Fire City Budget Work with the Texas $1,000 Public Works Determine the process for Department of City Budget Wildfire becoming a Firewise Emergency 6 months Fire Community in Forest Hill. Management to become Public Works, $2,000 a Firewise Community. County Conduct an assessment Department, $1,000 of winter weather 2 months response capabilities. Acquire equipment Evaluate winter weather needed as determined 1 year Winter Storm response capabilities in by assessment. Forest Hill. Provide safety training to first responders on 6 months winter weather hazards. Conduct an assessment of winter weather plans 2 months Evaluate winter weather in place for jurisdiction Winter Storm mitigation capabilities in public works. Forest Hill. Develop or update winter weather 3 months mitigation plan. Evaluate the hazards posed by severe winter 2 months weather in Forest Hill. Develop a winter weather Develop a winter Winter Storm outreach program for Forest weather outreach Hill citizens. program that provides tips and pertinent 6 months information for avoiding hypothermia and icy conditions. Fire $20,000 $100,000 FEMA Department Fire City Budget Department, $1,000 Public Works FEMA Fire City Budget Department, $1,000 Public Works Fire Department, Public Works, $2,000 Tarrant County Fire Department, $1,000 Public Works Fire Department, $5,000 Public Works Fire Depa rtmen t $50,000 City Budget $300,000 FEMA $100,000 FEMA $50,000 City Budget $25,000 FEMA , Police $2,000.00 $20,000.00 City Budget Department Fire Department, $20,000.00 $100,000.00 FEMA Police Department 5-116 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES WS -1 IDO-2 IDO - 3 IDO-4 Alm Publish winter weather FEMA FEMA FEMA FEMA City Budget FEMA $40,000 FEMA NIA NIA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-117 mitigation information to Fire Forest Hill citizens 2 months Department, $2,000.00 through a social media Court Distribute winter weather campaign. Winter Storm mitigation information to Ensure the Forest Hill Forest Hill residents. website is updated Fire during winter months to 2 months Department, $2,000.00 educate citizens on Court winter weather mitigation activities. Train first responders in Fire Infectious Prepare Forest Hill first point of distribution 2 months Department $2,000 Disease responders for mass (POD) procedures. Outbreak prophylaxis distribution. Conduct a POD Tarrant exercise to test plans 2 months County Health $2,000 and procedures. Department Review continuity of operations (COOP) Fire Infectious Ensure continuity procedures plans and procedures 1 month Department $0 Disease are in place to prepare for a for city employees and Outbreak long-term employee shortage facilities. at Forest Hill facilities. Provide COOP training Tarrant for jurisdiction 2 months County Health $2,000 employees. Department Infectious Develop a public information Educate the public on Disease campaign to educate Forest pandemics, including Forest Hill Fire $4,000 Outbreak Hill public about infectious isolation, quarantine, Department diseases. triage, and medical care. Review Forest Hill water Review current enforcement legislation and legislation for water Drought update as necessary to conservation 2 weeks FD & PW $0 mitigate the effects of enforcement in Forest drought. Hill. FEMA FEMA FEMA FEMA City Budget FEMA $40,000 FEMA NIA NIA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-117 Section 5 D -1 Drought D-2 Drought D - 3 Drought D - 3 Drought FD & PW $200 $50,000 City Budget FD & PW Develop or update water N/A N/A conservation $0 N/A enforcement legislation 4 weeks $0 to ensure effective N/A FD & PW practices during periods City Budget of drought. $0 N/A Review current 2 weeks contingency plans. Develop contingency plans Develop or update for Forest Hill to ensure portable water 2 weeks adequate power and water contingency plans. supply during prolonged periods of drought. Develop or update power supply 2 weeks contingency plans. Upgrade water and irrigation Upgrade water and system to conserve water on irrigation system. 2 months Forest Hill. Evaluate the hazards posed by drought in 2 weeks Forest Hill. Develop a drought Develop a drought awareness education awareness education program that provides program for Forest Hill tips and pertinent citizens. information for ensuring 4 weeks the protection of property and the environment against drought. Provide drought Distribute drought awareness awareness information information to Forest Hill to Forest Hill citizens 4 weeks citizens. through a social media campaign. FD & PW $200 $50,000 City Budget FD & PW $0 N/A N/A FD & PW $0 N/A N/A FD & PW $0 N/A N/A FD & PW $1,000.00 City Budget FD $0 N/A N/A FD, PW, UB $2,000 $50,000 FEMA Court $1,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA 5-118 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES L-1 L-1 L-2 L-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-119 Provide drought awareness information 4 weeks Court $1,000.00 $25,000.00 FEMA through the Forest Hill website. Evaluate the need for lightning protection on Police communications 1 month Department $1,000 $50,000 City Budget Protect communication infrastructure in Forest Lightning infrastructure in Forest Hill Hill. from lightning. Install lightning rods on existing and future 2 months Police $10,000 $50,000 FEMA communication Department infrastructure. Evaluate the need for lightning protection for 1 month Police $1,000.00 $50,000.00 City Budget Ensure Forest Hill critical Forest Hill critical Department Lightning facilities are protected facilities. against lightning. Install lightning rods and other protective 2 months Police $10,000.00 $50,000.00 FEMA equipment on critical Department facilities. Evaluate the hazards Police posed by lightning in 2 months Department $15,000.00 $50,000.00 FEMA Forest Hill. Develop a lightning outreach Develop a lightning Lightning program for Forest Hill outreach program that Fire citizens. provides tips and Department, pertinent information for 2 months Police $4,000.00 $50,000.00 FEMA protecting property Department against lightning damage. Provide lightning Distribute lightning mitigation mitigation information to Fire Lightning information to Forest Hill Forest Hill citizens 1 month Department, $2,000.00 FEMA citizens. through a social media Court campaign. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-119 Section 5 HM -1 HM -1 HM -2 HM -2 5-120 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide lightning Fire awareness information 2 months Department, $3,000.00 FEMA at outdoor spaces Public Works throughout Forest Hill. Evaluate the hazmat Provide Forest Hill fire gear currently provided 2 weeks Fire $1,000 City Budget Hazardous personnel with the necessary by Forest Hill Fire Department Materials gear to respond to hazmat Department. Release releases. Acquire the gear needed Fire as identified in the 6 months Department $25,000 FEMA evaluation. Evaluate the hazmat Fire Hazardous Ensure Forest Hill fire equipment currently 2 weeks Department $1,000 City Budget Materials department has the owned by Forest Hill FD. Release equipment necessary to Acquire the equipment Fire respond to hazmat releases. needed as identified in 6 months Department $5,000 FEMA the evaluation. Evaluate hazardous Fire materials that are used 2 months Department, $2,000 City Budget or transported in Forest Public Works Hill. Develop a hazardous Develop a hazardous Hazardous materials awareness materials awareness Materials education program for Forest education program that Release Hill citizens. provides tips and Fire pertinent information for 2 months Department $5,000 $25,000 FEMA ensuring the protection of property and people from hazardous materials. Distribute hazardous Provide hazardous Hazardous materials mitigation materials mitigation Fire Materials information to Forest Hill information to Forest Hill 2 months Department, $5,000 $25,000 FEMA Release citizens. citizens through a social Court media campaign. 5-120 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fire Department, $2,000 $15,000 FEMA Court FHFD $0 NA NA FHFD $0 NA NA FD $0 NA NA FD $500 NA NA FD $0 NA NA FD $2,000 FEMA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-121 Provide hazardous materials m information 2 months through the Forest Hill website. Review current plans and procedures related 1 week to extreme heat. Extreme Ensure the City of Forest Hill ET -1 Temperatures p has an extreme heat plan in place. Open cooling centers and provide public 1 month information. Ensure essential functions continue in the event of high 2 weeks Identify extreme heat temperatures through Extreme mitigation plan for critical mitigation activities. ET -1 Temperatures infrastructure in the City of Develop or update Forest Hill. mitigation plan and procedures for critical 1 month infrastructure when high temperatures are present. Evaluate the hazards posed by extreme heat 2 weeks in Forest Hill. Develop an extreme heat Develop an extreme ET - 2 Extreme outreach program for Forest heat outreach program Temperatures Hill citizens. that provides tips and pertinent information for 2 months ensuring the health and safety of citizens during extreme heat. Fire Department, $2,000 $15,000 FEMA Court FHFD $0 NA NA FHFD $0 NA NA FD $0 NA NA FD $500 NA NA FD $0 NA NA FD $2,000 FEMA Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-121 Section 5 ET -2 ES -1 Extreme Distribute extreme heat Temperatures mitigation information to Forest Hill citizens. Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in Soils City of Forest Hill. Publish extreme heat mitigation information to the Forest Hill citizens 4 weeks through a social media campaign. Provide extreme heat mitigation information 4 weeks through the Forest Hill's website. Improve construction techniques through 6 months building code enhancements. Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and 6 months business owners about mitigation techniques. Forest Hill $1,000 $25,000 FEMA Court Forest Hill $1,000 $25,000 FEMA Court FHFD &FH $2,000 City Budget FHFD &FH $500 City Budget 5-122 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 5.11 City of Fort Worth Mitigation Strategy Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-123 Utilize GIS to identify Develop a program to identify manufactured and 4 months OEM, ITS $3,500 $150,000 City Budget Severe mobile and manufactured mobile homes in Fort T - 4, ST, - Thunderstorms home parks and work with Worth. 4 and High park managers to prepare Work with manufactured Winds, the residents for severe and mobile home park Tornadoes thunderstorms in the City of managers to enhance 8 months OEM $2,500 $150,000 City Budget Fort Worth. severe weather awareness. Severe Thunderstorms City and High Budget, Winds, Ensure City of Fort Worth Assist citizens with Private MH -7 Tornadoes, citizens have access to funding for of g p 6 months OEM $100,000 $2,000,000 Foundation Hail, Lightning, emergency communications. Weather Alert Radios Grants, Winter Storms, through rebate program. Corporate Flooding, Dam Grants Failure, Wildfires Severe Participate in the Conduct compliance Post ST -1, T - Thunderstorms Metropolitan safe rooms in inspection for the safe Disaster 1 and High the City of Fort Worth. room rebate programs Continual OEM $25,000 $5,000,000 Mitigation Winds, applications. Grants Tornadoes Severe Mandate storm -resistant Inspect new and Thunderstorms construction in the City of existing construction for Fort Worth ST - 3, T - and High Fort Worth. the proper installation of 6 months OEM, Planning $10,000 $500,000 City Budget 3 Winds, storm -resistant and Tornadoes construction such as Development "hurricane clips". Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-123 Section 5 F-3 F-3 DF -4 Flooding Flooding Dam Failure Improve the watershed on Complete construction Lebow Channel by of Dewey Street elimination of dangerous low Crossing Project 2 months water crossings, enlargement (increased capacity of of restrictive bridges and Dewey Street Bridge). culverts, channel enlargement, detention, acquisition of flood prone Complete properties, and stream reimbursement process 4 months restoration in the City of Fort and close the project. Worth. Survey creeks in Fort Worth and develop a database of locations 8 months subject to stream bank Prevent and decrease erosion. Determine erosion damage from stream bank control techniques to erosion in the City of Fort use on area creek 1 year Worth. banks. Implement erosion control techniques to 2 months use on area creek banks. Identify high hazard dams. Work with Texas Conduct breach analysis for Commission on all high hazard dams in the Environmental Quality Continual City of Fort Worth. (TCEQ) to identify high hazard dams in areas that may be annexed. FEMA Pre- T&PW Storm Disaster Water $2,275,000 $15,000,000 Hazard Management, Mitigation OEM Grant, City Budget T&PW Storm Water Management, $2,500 $15,000,000 City Budget OEM Transportation and Public $5,000 $500,000 City Budget Works, ITS, OEM Transportation, $10,000 Public Works Transportation, $250,000 Public Works T&PW Storm Water $5,000 Management $500,000 City Budget $500,000 City Budget $750,000 City Budget 5-124 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 DF -4 Dam Failure Conduct breach Tarrant analysis. • Breach $500,000 Regional analysis for French Lake Water completed in 2003. Lake District Worth completed in Tarrant 2009. • Breach 3 years analysis pending for Water Lake Como, Fosdic District Lake, Lake Greenbriar, Luther Lake, White Lake, and Willow Creek Lake. Develop emergency action plans for high hazard dams. • Emergency Action Plans for Lake Worth, Lake Como, Fosdic Lake, French Lake, 4 years Lake Greenbriar, Luther Lake, White Lake, and Willow Creek Lake completed in 2012 • No known pending as of July 2013 Conduct breach analysis. Tarrant Regional Water District 3 years Conduct breach analysis for is beginning work on levees in the City of Fort breach analysis. Worth. Develop emergency action plans (EAPs). EAPs to be developed 4 years in coordination with Fort Worth OEM. MITIGATION STRATEGIES T&PW Storm Water $300,000 $750,000 City Budget Management T&PW Storm $10,000 per g Water dam $750,000 City Budget Management Tarrant Tarrant Regional $350,000 $500,000 Regional Water District Water District Tarrant Tarrant Regional $75,000 $500,000 Regional Water District Water District Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-125 Section 5 5-126 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Determine citizen flood Provide flood preparedness preparedness actions. Fort Worth information to City of Fort Actions for flash flooding 3 months OEM $2,500 $100,000 City Budget Worth citizens that address (as opposed to riverine F - 5 Flooding local hazards. Citizens are flooding). more likely to read and follow Develop preparedness 6 months Fort Worth $500 $100,000 City Budget information that is specific to materials. OEM their area. Print preparedness 8 months Fort Worth $2,500 $100,000 City Budget materials. OEM Transportation Determine electrical and Public service requirements for 4 months Works, Parks $5,000 $500,000 City Budget essential operation of and community centers. Community Services Power Failure, Evaluate best method to Winter Storms, Provide generator backup provide generator Transportation Severe capability to City of Fort backup capability: and Public PF -1 Thunderstorms Worth community centers ' Install generators at facilities. • Retrofit 6 months Works, Parks and $10,000 $500,000 City Budget and High designated as shelter facilities with Community Winds, locations. connections for portable Services Tornadoes generators. Transportation and Public Implement generator 1 year Works, Parks $350,000 $500,000 City Budget backup capability. and Community Services Gather costs for installing Retrofit City buildings Transportation hail -resistant roofing and with hail -resistant and Public H -1 Hail window coverings with a roofing. 3 months Works $2,500 $100,000 City Budget focus on critical infrastructure Facilities in the City of Fort Worth. Division 5-126 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 H-2 H-2 W-1 MM WS -1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES OEM $500 Research existing hail - City Budget OEM $500 resistant roofing public 1 month City Budget education materials. Research costs/benefits Develop a public education of hail -resistant roofing 2 months campaign to encourage "hail- for private sector Hail resistant" roofing in new structures. construction and roof Develop public replacements in the City of education materials (if 4 months Fort Worth. existing materials are not sufficient). Print and begin distribution of public 5 months education materials. Conduct training on "hail- Conduct classes to the resistant" roofing in new general public, home Hail construction and roof builders and contractors 6 months replacements in the City of on hail resistant roofing Fort Worth. standards and grant programs. Increase public Ensure City of Fort Worth education on how to Wildfire water systems are adequate reduce the risks from 12 months for fighting wildfires. wildfires (construction, landscaping, etc.). Mitigate wildfires by Enact building permit Wildfire encouraging wildfire resistant process that 12 months construction practices in the encourages wildfire City of Fort Worth. resistant construction. Improve winter weather Winter Storms winter weather response Purchase additional 6 months capabilities in the City of Fort street sanding capacity. Worth. MITIGATION STRATEGIES OEM $500 $1,000,000 City Budget OEM $500 $1,000,000 City Budget OEM $2,500 $1,000,000 City Budget OEM $25,000 $1,000,000 City Budget OEM $2,500 $10,000 City Budget Fort Worth OEM, Fort $10,000 Worth Fire Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort Worth $25,000 Planning and Development Fort Worth OEM, Fort Worth $250,000 Transportation and Public Works Unknown City Funds Unknown City Funds Unknown City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-127 Section 5 ►11►E.�►i IDO-2 IDO-4 DIM AIM Fort Worth OEM $12,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $35,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $12,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $15,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM, Fort Worth Water $10,000 $100,000 City Funds Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort $40,000 Worth Water Department $100,000 City Funds 5-120 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Increase public Enhance winter weather education concerning Winter Storms preparedness program for winter storm 9 months Fort Worth citizens. preparedness and mitigation. Train staff in point of Infectious Prepare City of Fort Worth distribution (POD) 12 months Disease staff for mass prophylaxis procedures. Outbreak distribution. Conduct a POD exercise to test plans 18 months and procedures. Develop a public information Educate the public on Infectious campaign to educate Fort pandemics, including Disease Worth public about infectious isolation, quarantine, Outbreak diseases. triage, and medical care. Participate in the design Develop public education and implementation of program to mitigate the the Fort Worth specific Drought effects of drought in the City water conservation 6 months of Fort Worth. public education efforts to complement existing programs. Develop a contingency plan to identify potential impacts of drought on the community to Develop contingency plans to include utilities such as ensure adequate water power generation and Drought supply during prolonged drinking water; health & 8 months periods of drought in the City safety including pre - of Fort Worth. existing health conditions and special needs; and emergency response such as fire suppression operations. Fort Worth OEM $12,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $35,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $12,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM $15,000 Unknown City Funds Fort Worth OEM, Fort Worth Water $10,000 $100,000 City Funds Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort $40,000 Worth Water Department $100,000 City Funds 5-120 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 TR -1 Terrorism TR - 2 Terrorism L-1 L-1 HM -1 Lightning MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fort Worth OEM, Fort $5,000 Worth Police Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort Unknown Worth Police Department Fort Worth $25,000 OEM Fort Worth $15,000 OEM, Fort Worth Planning & Development Fort Worth $35,000 OEM, Fort Worth Transportation and Public Works Fort Worth Fire $5,000 Department Fort Worth Fire Unknown Department Unknown Evaluate the equipment Ensure all city critical Ensure Fort Worth Police currently in place at Fort 6 months Department has the Worth Police adequate lightning appropriate equipment to Department. mitigation in place. respond to terrorism Acquire the equipment incidents. identified in the 12 months assessment. gear currently used by 6 months Conduct full scale homeland Conduct a full scale Fort Worth Fire security scenario exercise for exercise to test terrorist 18 months Fort Worth. response plans and Acquire the gear procedures. needed as identified in 12 months Provide lightning 6 months Protect structures from mitigation materials with lightning in the City of Fort building permit packets. Worth. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fort Worth OEM, Fort $5,000 Worth Police Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort Unknown Worth Police Department Fort Worth $25,000 OEM Fort Worth $15,000 OEM, Fort Worth Planning & Development Fort Worth $35,000 OEM, Fort Worth Transportation and Public Works Fort Worth Fire $5,000 Department Fort Worth Fire Unknown Department Unknown City Funds Ensure all city critical Homeland infrastructure has 1 year Unknown Ensure Fort Worth critical adequate lightning Lightning facilities are protected mitigation in place. Unknown against lightning. Evaluate the hazmat Ensure City of Fort Worth gear currently used by 6 months Hazardous Fire Department has the Fort Worth Fire Materials equipment necessary to Department. Release respond to hazmat incidents. Acquire the gear needed as identified in 12 months the evaluation. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Fort Worth OEM, Fort $5,000 Worth Police Department Fort Worth OEM, Fort Unknown Worth Police Department Fort Worth $25,000 OEM Fort Worth $15,000 OEM, Fort Worth Planning & Development Fort Worth $35,000 OEM, Fort Worth Transportation and Public Works Fort Worth Fire $5,000 Department Fort Worth Fire Unknown Department Unknown City Funds Homeland Security Unknown Grant Funds Unknown City Funds Unknown City Funds $1,000,000 City Funds Unknown City Funds Unknown City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-129 Section 5 HM -2 ET- 1 ET -1 ES -1 5-130 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a hazardous materials awareness education program that Hazardous Develop a hazardous provides tips and 6 months Fort Worth $25,000 Unknown City Funds, materials awareness p eminent information for OEM, Materials education program for Fort protection of property Release Worth citizens. and people from hazardous materials. Fort Worth Fire LEPC Department Develop an extreme With Parks and temperature mitigation plan Community Services for City of Fort Worth Department and non - Extreme Citizens. profit organizations Fort Worth Temperatures provide cooling and 1 year OEM $5,000 Unknown City Funds warming stations, shelters, assistance with utilities and resources for populations at risk. Develop and extreme Develop an extreme temperature outreach temperature outreach program for City of Fort program that provides Extreme Worth citizens. tips and pertinent 2 months Fort Worth $2,000 Unknown City Funds Temperatures information for ensuring OEM the health and safety of citizens during extreme temperatures. Improve construction Fort Worth Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in techniques through 1 year OEM, Fort Worth $25,000 Unknown City Funds Soils the City of Fort Worth. building code Planning & enhancements. Development 5-130 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and business owners about mitigation techniques. 6 months Fort Worth OEM, Fort Worth Planning & Development MITIGATION STRATEGIES $10,000 Unknown City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-131 Section 5 5.12 City of Grapevine Mitigation Strategy Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Bonds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget 5-132 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Compile a Create and compile businesslentert database of Severe Thunderstorms ainment restaurantlbusinesseslent 6ertainmentlhotelsthat CVB $5,000 $15,000 and High Winds, database months Tornadoes, Hail, specific to need to warn patrons MH -6 Lightning, Winter emergency quickly of severe weather. Storms, Flooding, Dam warning for Failure, Wildfires severe weather Maintain/update database 1 year CVB $0 $10,000 in the City of annually. Grapevine. Install new Determine appropriate 1 year Police Departme $50,00 $150,000 Severe Thunderstorms security system system to meet needs. nt 0 and High Winds, in the City of MH -6 Tornadoes, Hail, Grapevine Purchase system. 2 years Pgrchasi $5,000 $15,000 Lightning, Winter police building Storms, Flooding, Dam at allow for Failure, Wildfires better access Facility controls. Install system. 3 years Services $5,000 $10,000 Severe Thunderstorms Improve IT system to Determine appropriate 1 IT Departme $50,00 $150,000 and High Winds, incorporate system to meet needs. month nt 0 Tornadoes, Hail, MH -6 laser fiche Purchasi Lightning, Winter system into 3 ng Storms, Flooding, Dam police/fire Purchase system. months Departure $5,000 $15,000 Failure, Wildfires server systems nt Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Bonds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget 5-132 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 in the City of Grapevine. Install system. 5 IT Determine appropriate 3 Close fiber loop system to meet needs. Severe Thunderstorms to City of months and High Winds, Grapevine apartment Tornadoes, Hail, MH 6 police and fire Purchase system. Lightning, Winter buildings nt Storms, Flooding, Dam allowing for Lightning, Winter Failure, Wildfires redundant 7 network. Install system. 5 IT Create and compile 3 months Departme $5,000 $15,000 months nt and High Winds, apartment month IT Departme 00000 $5,000,000 managers/man nt Lightning, Winter Purchasi 7 ng $10,00 $20,000 months Departme 0 e vine. Grape Maintain and update nt Police 1 year IT Departme $20,00 0 $35,000 nt database. y MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Budget City Bonds Departmental Budget City Bonds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-133 Compile Create and compile 3 Police Severe Thunderstorms database of all apartment management months Departme $5,000 $10,000 and High Winds, apartment database. nt Tornadoes, Hail, MH -6 managers/man Lightning, Winter agement in the Storms, Flooding, Dam City Failure, Wildfires e vine. Grape Maintain and update Annuall Police apartment management Departme $1,000 $2,000 database. y nt Severe Thunderstorms Compile Create and compile Police and High Winds, MH 6 database of all neighborhood association 3 Departure $5,000 $10,000 Tornadoes, Hail, neighborhoodlh database. months nt Lightning, Winter omeowner MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Budget City Bonds Departmental Budget City Bonds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-133 Section 5 Storms, Flooding, Dam associations in Failure, Wildfires Grapevine. Police Maintain and update Annuall Departme $1,000 $2,000 neighborhood database. y nt Develop a Identify vendor for bulk Emergen program for the purchase of weather 1 year cy $5,000 low cost radios with SAME Manage purchase of technology. ment National Emergen Oceanic and Make bulk purchase of 1 year cy $20,00 $50,000 Atmospheric radios. Manage 0 Severe Thunderstorms Administration ment and High Winds, ll- (NOAA) all- MH-6 Tornadoes, Hail, MH-6 hazard weather Lightning, Winter radios through Storms, Flooding, Dam utility bills Failure, Wildfires (similar to Distribute to citizens and sprinkler allow them to purchase at 1 year Utility $10,00 $150,000 system rain reduce cost through water Billing 0 sensor program bill payment. in place) for City of Grapevine residents. Install storm Determine appropriate size shelter for each fire 7 Facility $200,0 $350,000 shelter safe station. months Services 00 Severe Thunderstorms ST -1, rooms for fire Purchase/order storm T -1 and High Winds, department shelter for each fire 1 year Purchasi $10,00 $15,000 Tornadoes personnel and station. ng 0 visitors at all five fire stations Deliver and install storm 1 year Facility $10,00 $15,000 shelters. Services 0 Departmental Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget Quality of Life Funds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget 5-134 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-135 in the City of Grapevine. Install storm Determine appropriate Facility $1,500 Quality of Life shelter safe size shelter for each 1 year Services 000 $3,000,000 Funds Severe Thunderstorms rooms for City location. ST -1, and High Winds, g personnel and Purchase/order storm 2 Years Purchasi $10,00 $15,000 Departmental T -1 Tornadoes visitors at all shelter for each location. n g 0 Budget g critical facilities in the City of Deliver and install storm 3 years Facility $10,00 $15,000 Departmental Grapevine. shelters. Services 0 Budget Have automatic Identify the appropriate 6 Facility Departmental Power Failure, Winter emergency size and type for months Services $0 $100,000 Budget Storms, Severe power for the generator for City Hall. Thunderstorms and PF -1 Grapevine City Hall in the Purchase/order generator 7 Purchasi $175,0 $350,000 City Budget High Winds, for City Hall. months ng 00 Tornadoes, and event that the Flooding powermain tall City 1 year Facility $0 $100,000 Budpgemental supply s generator. Services disrupted. Have automatic Identify the appropriate Facility Departmental power size and type for 1 year Services $0 $100,000 Budget generation for generator for the CAC. Power Failure, Winter the Grapevine community Purchase/order generator 1 year Purchasi $17510 $350,000 City Budget Storms, Severe for the CAC. n g 00 PF -1 Thunderstorms and activities center High Winds, Tornadoes (CAC) in the event that the Deliver and install a CAC 2 years Facility $0 $100,000 Departmental main ower P generator. Services Budget supply is disrupted. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-135 Section 5 departments. and test plan in series of All tabletop and functional 2 years Departme $5,000 $15,000 exercises in offsite/remote nts office locations. Incorporate Download and install 1 GIS Hazardous Materials hazardous CAMEO related software. month HM 5 Release materials/Tier II Train GIS staff on use of data layer into CAMEO for GIS months GIS applications. $2,000 $2,000 $5,000 Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Department Budget 5-136 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Have automatic Identify the appropriate power size and type for 2 years Facility $0 $100,000 generation for generator for the Services Power Failure, Winter the Grapevine Municipal Service Center. PF -1 Storms, Severe municipal Purchase/order generator Purchasi $175,0 Thunderstorms and service center for the Municipal Service 2 years $350,000 High Winds, Tornadoes in the event Center. ng 00 that the main Deliver and install a supply is Municipal Service Center 3 years Facilitypower Services $0 $100,000 disrupted. Generator. Emergen Identify scope of work and 1 year cy bid/select consultant. Manage Hire consultant ment to work with emergency Work with selected $075,00 $150,000 management consultant and each All IDO - Infectious Disease office to department to develop 2 years Departme 3 Outbreak develop robust robust COOP plan for nts COOP plan for provisions of City services all City of during disease outbreak. Grapevine Deliver completed plan departments. and test plan in series of All tabletop and functional 2 years Departme $5,000 $15,000 exercises in offsite/remote nts office locations. Incorporate Download and install 1 GIS Hazardous Materials hazardous CAMEO related software. month HM 5 Release materials/Tier II Train GIS staff on use of data layer into CAMEO for GIS months GIS applications. $2,000 $2,000 $5,000 Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Departmental Budget City Budget Department Budget 5-136 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HM -5 Hazardous Materials Release ES -1 Expansive Soils MITIGATION STRATEGIES Grapevine GIS Import Tier II database mapping. from Tarrant County into 5 GIS layer for overlay into months GIS $5,000 City Budget City of Grapevine Base Maps. Incorporate Tier Import and convert Tier II 1 Police Department II information database into Excel month Dispatch $5,000 Budget into Grapevine format. Fire Pre- Planning/CAD Transcribe database into CRIMES/CAD data base 5 Police $5,000 Department Data. language. months Dispatch Budget Mitigate expansive soils in the City of Grapevine. Deter Improve construction mined Limiting development in identified techniques through Ongoin Building by areas of expansive soils will reduce General Fund building code g person exposure to the hazardous effects of enhancements. nel unstable soils. cost. Deter Educate construction contractors, homeowners, mined Limiting development in identified and business owners Ongoin Building by areas of expansive soils will reduce General Fund about mitigation g person exposure to the hazardous effects of techniques. nel unstable soils. cost. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-137 Section 5 T - 5 Tornado T -1 Tornado F - 3 Flooding F - 3 Flooding Compile a businesslentert ainment Create and compile database database of specific to restaurantlbusinesseslent 6 CVB $5,000 $15,000 emergency ertainmentlhotels that months warning for need to warn patrons severe weather quickly of severe weather. in the City of Grapevine. Install storm shelter safe rooms for fire department Determine appropriate 7 Facility $200,0 personnel and size shelter for each fire months Services 00 $350,000 visitors at all station. five fire stations in the City of Grapevine. Compile database of all Create and compile 3 Police neighborhoodlh neighborhood association months Departme $5,000 $10,000 omeowner database. nt associations. Compile database of all apartment Create and compile 3 Police managers/man apartment management months Departme $5,000 $10,000 agement in the database. nt City of Grapevine. Departmental Budget Quality of Life Funds Departmental Budget Departmental Budget 5-138 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Lobby legislators for grant funding for water conservation enforcement City$10,00 City during high hazard times 1 year Manager' 0 $15,000 Budgetary similar to the same type of s Office Funding grant programs for "click it or ticket". Legislation changes allow Code Enforce water for grant funding of water 2 years Enforcem $0 $10,000 conservation conservation ent measures enforcement. during periods D -1 Drought of extreme City facilities. temperatures and limited rainfall in the City of Grapevine. Attain grants for water conservation measures D -1 Drought during periods of extreme temperatures and limited rainfall. Install low -flow D-1 Drought fixtures at City facilities to conserve water. Install storm shelter safe rooms for fire Thunderstorms & High department ST -1 Wind personnel and visitors at all five fire stations in the City of Grapevine. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Lobby legislators for grant funding for water conservation enforcement City$10,00 City during high hazard times 1 year Manager' 0 $15,000 Budgetary similar to the same type of s Office Funding grant programs for "click it or ticket". Legislation changes allow Code for grant funding of water 2 years Enforcem $0 $10,000 Department conservation ent Budget enforcement. Install low -flow fixtures at LINK LINK LINK LINK City Budgetary City facilities. Funding Determine appropriate 7 Facility $200,0 Quality of Life size shelter for each fire months Services 00 $350,000 Funds station. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-139 Section 5 ST- 1 wo Thunderstorms & High Wind Hail Install storm shelter safe rooms for City personnel and visitors at all critical facilities in the City of Grapevine. Develop a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler system rain sensor program in place) for City of Grapevine residents. Determine appropriate size shelter for each Facility $1,500 location. Purchase/order 2 year Services 000 $3,000,000 storm shelter for each location. Identify vendor for bulk Emergen purchase of weather radios with SAME 1 year Manage $5,000 $5,000 technology. Make bulk ment purchase of radios Quality of Life Funds Departmental Budget 5-140 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 H -2 L-1 Hail Lightning Implement a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler system rain sensor program in place) for City of Grapevine residents. Develop a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler Distribute to citizens and allow them to purchase at 1 year Utility reduce cost through water Billing bill payment. Identify vendor for bulk Emergen purchase of weather radios with SAME 1M ear y Manage technology. Make bulk ment purchase of radios $10,00 $150,000 0 $5,000 $5,000 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-141 Section 5 L - 2 Lightning system rain sensor program in place)for City of Grapevine residents. Implement a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler system rain sensor program in place)for City of Grapevine residents. Distribute to citizens and allow them to purchase at reduce cost through water bill payment. 1 year Utility $10,00 Billing 0 $150,000 Departmental Budget 5-142 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 WS Winter Storms, 1, ET- Extreme Temperatures 1 WS - 2 Winter Storms Develop a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler system rain sensor program in place) for City of Grapevine residents. Implement a program for the low cost purchase of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAH) all - hazard weather radios through utility bills (similar to sprinkler Identify vendor for bulk purchase of weather radios with SAME technology. Make bulk purchase of radios Distribute to citizens and allow them to purchase at reduce cost through water bill payment. 1 year 1 year Emergen cy Manage ment Utility Billing $5,000 $5,000 $10,00 $150,000 0 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Departmental Budget Departmental Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-143 Section 5 system rain sensor program in place) for City of Grapevine residents. Compile database of all neighborhood/h Create and compile 3 Police Departmental W-2 Wildfire omeowner neighborhood association months Departme $5,000 $10,000 Budget associations for database. nt wildfire notifications Compile database of all apartment managers/man Create and compile 3 Police Departmental W-2 Wildfire agement in the apartment management months Departme $5,000 $10,000 Budget City of database. nt Grapevine for wildfire notifications Coordinate with TFS, our Implement city and community to FIREWISE W-2 Wildfire establish a FIREWISE community program. This 3 years Fire Departme $50,00 The primary benefit will come in the General community program will assist us with nt 0 form of life and property conservation. Fund/Grants program. preplanning for a fire, during and after. 5-144 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-145 Develop and Develop an extreme extreme temperature outreach temperature program that provides tips ET -1 Extreme Temperatures outreach program for and pertinent information 2 OEM $2,000 Unknown City Funds City of for ensuring the health months Grapevine and safety of employees employees that working outside during work outside. extreme temperatures. Attain grants for water conservation Legislation changes allow ET -1 Extreme Temperatures measures during periods for grant funding of water 2 years Code Enforcem $0 $10,000 Department of extreme conservation ent Budget temperatures enforcement. and limited rainfall. Identify Public inundation Complete inundation Works DF -1 Dam Failure areas for dams studies for dams located 1-2 and TBD TBD TBD located in the within the City of years Transport City of Grapevine. ation Grapevine Educate citizens regarding risk Develop and implement Emergen DF -1 Dam Failure for dam failure information medium to 1-2 cy TBD TBD TBD that are located inform citizens in years Manage in inundation inundation areas. ment areas. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-145 Section 5 5.13 Haltom City Mitigation Strategy MH -1 MH -6 F-2 PF -1 Severe Thunderstorms Implement OWS. and High Haltom City Winds, Enhance warning systems to Tornadoes, $1,000 $2,000 City Budget warn citizens about severe Hail, Lightning, weather in Haltom City. Implement Code Red Winter Storms, phone notification Flooding, Dam system. Failure, Wildfires Severe Thunderstorms Create and compile and High business database. Winds, Haltom City staff will keep an Tornadoes, up-to-date list of businesses Hail, Lightning, in the community. Winter Storms, Completed EM Continual EM Haltom City Planning $52,000 $200,000 General Fund $7,700 $32,000 General annually Fund $5,000 $10,000 City Budget Flooding, Dam Failure, Maintain/update a business database. Haltom City Planning $1,000 $2,000 City Budget Wildfires Annual repetitive losses due to flooding will Annual along General Flooding Enhance flood plain continue to be assessed and mapped. Thus with a five year Engineering Fund, $10,000,000 $40,000,000 regulations in Haltom City. make attempts to reassessment mitigate the effects schedule Haltom City within the city. Power Failure, Have automatic emergency Identify appropriate size Haltom City Winter Storms, power generators for all and type of generator Fire/Rescue FEMA $0 $100,000 Severe stations in the event that the for fire stations #3. and Public HMGP Thunderstorms Works 5-146 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 IDO-2 ET- 1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES and High main power supply is Purchase generators. Haltom City $50,000 $100,000 FEMA Winds, disrupted in Haltom City. Fire/Rescue HMGP Tornadoes, Extreme Evaluate power needs Building $1500 $120,000 FEMA Temperatures to maintain library. Maintenance , HMGP Advertise for bids for Building FEMA City Hall auxiliary Maintenance $500 $120,000 HMGP generator. Identify existing current city owned and Reduce the effects of and operated facilities that Grants and Infectious loss of life to various disease could be utilized as funding is Emergency other Disease populations that may be at distribution points for av available Management, Unknown Unknown outside Outbreak risk to infectious diseases in vulnerable populations Fire/Rescue funding Haltom City. to assist with sources appropriate delivery of preventive measures. Haltom City Water Conservation during Annual Identify areas where rainy seasons through Budget, Drought repetitive damages occur in Rain Sensors on Within 2 years Public Works Grant Haltom City during chronic Sprinkler Systems to of funding Funding, hazard events. mitigate the effects Citizens during periods of droughts. As the City Haltom City will currently has Reduce or eliminate loss of determine and create several Grants or life and property damage cooling centers to allow facilities that other Extreme resulting from severe citizens, especially As funding is Parks could be Unknown outside Temperatures weather events related to vulnerable populations, available Department utilized for funding extreme heat in the City of to seek refuge from cooling sources Haltom City. extreme temperatures. centers, the costs are minimal. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-147 Section 5 ES -1 T-5 Expansive Develop and enforce Haltom Soils City ordinances. Enhance warning systems to Tornado help warn the citizens of Haltom City, concerning the potential of tornadic activity. Limit development in areas of high hazard expansive soils through enforcement of building codes and standards. Implement OWS upgrades to address potential areas where growth has and will occur that may impact the ability of the system to reach its intended service area. As funding is available. Project will be implemented as development occurs. Building Inspection EM Determined by personnel costs. 52,000 Limiting development in identified areas of expansive soils will reduce exposure to the hazardous effects of unstable soils. The impact of warning our population of the impending Tornado is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. General Fund General Fund 5-140 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 T-5 Install a robust Code Completed with Update our Code Red phone Red phone system to annual updates Tornado notification system with a notify citizens of tornado as our EM more robust system. community warnings. grows. MITIGATION STRATEGIES The impact of warning our population of the impending Tornado is difficult to General 7700 measure with Fund the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. Certificate of Public Works 225000 400000 obligation Bond issues Engineering 10,000,000 40,000,000 FEMA HMGP Engineering 200000 Public Works Unknown 800000 General Fund The impact is difficult to measure Bond concerning issuance the overall impact of Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-149 Install high water Add high water warning warning systems along 3-5 years as F - 3 Flooding devices on our roadways creek beds to notify funding is that are prone to high water. officials of potential available. flooding. Enhance and enforce our Utilize FIRM maps to 5-10 years as funding F -1 Flooding flood plain regulations in identify at -risk becomes Haltom City. properties for flooding. available Improve our ability to inform our citizens of the risks Inspect the dam's 3-5 year DF -1 Dam Failure associated with living near a structural integrity. project. dam that is a barrier that impounds a body of water. Install above ground Plan for the delivery of storage and portable 3-10 year D-2 Drought Potable water during times of tanks to increase project severe drought. potable water storage capacity. MITIGATION STRATEGIES The impact of warning our population of the impending Tornado is difficult to General 7700 measure with Fund the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. Certificate of Public Works 225000 400000 obligation Bond issues Engineering 10,000,000 40,000,000 FEMA HMGP Engineering 200000 Public Works Unknown 800000 General Fund The impact is difficult to measure Bond concerning issuance the overall impact of Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-149 Section 5 ES -1 ET -2 doing nothing. 5-150 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Construct new By building Identify areas of our city that roadways using soil code adoption Determined Expansive have a history of soil related composition data to with an Inspections by personnel Unknown General soils damage to structures and decrease expansive soil appendix costs. Fund roadways. impacts. adopted by ordinance. The City currently has several facilities that During these times of could be Extreme Heat we will initiate Open cooling centers in utilized for Extreme PSAs to target the Haltom City to provide As funding is Parks cooling General Temperatures population that may be at the relief for citizens available Department centers, the Unknown Fund highest risk from the effects affected by the extreme costs are of extreme heat. heat. minimal. Mainly additional utility and personnel related costs. 5-150 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ST -5 ST -4 Enhance warning systems to help warn the citizens of Thunderstorms Haltom City, concerning the and High Wind potential of Severe Storms (Severe Thunderstorms, High Winds). Increase awareness through PSAs such as the Thunderstorms Knowhat2do program and and High Wind continue our efforts to increase the coverage of indoor warning devices, such as weather radios. By updating our Code Red notification system with a more robust process for notifying our citizens by way of smart phone applications, texting and other forms of social media. This will have the potential of reaching a more active and social community. This will allow for our whole community to be warned of this potential. This effort would be to better inform our population of actions they can take to better prepare and ultimately survive the effects of Severe Storms. Add weather radios for indoor warning devices to all homes and businesses. Completed with annual updates as our community grows. 3-5 year project EM EM MITIGATION STRATEGIES 7700 200,000 The impact of warning our population of the impending Severe Storm is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. The impact is difficult to measure. General Fund General Fund, Grants and donations. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-151 Section 5 H-1 H-2 Enhance warning systems to help warn the citizens of Hail Haltom City, concerning the potential of severe storms producing large hail. Increase awareness through PSAs such as the Knowhat2do program and Hail continue our efforts to increase the coverage of indoor warning devices, such as weather radios. By updating our Code Red notification system with a more robust process for notifying our citizens by way of smart phone applications, texting and other forms of social media in an effort to reach a more active and social community. This will further increase our ability to warn our whole community to the potential hazard of hail, associated with severe storms. This effort would be to better inform our population of actions they can take to better prepare and ultimately survive the effects of Hail associated with Severe Storms by adding Weather Radios for the home and or business. Completed with annual updates as our EM 7700 community grows. 3-5 year project EM 400,000 The impact of warning our population of the impending Severe Storm with the potential of Hail is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. The impact of warning our population of the impending Severe Storm with the potential of Hail is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. General Fund General Fund or bond issuance. 5-152 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES L-1 L-2 Enhance warning systems to help warn the citizens of Install lightning Lightning Haltom City, concerning the detection capabilities at 1-3 years EM 78000 potential of severe storms weather stations. producing cloud to ground and cloud -to -cloud lightning. Increase awareness through Distribute lightning PSAs such as the mitigation educational Knowhat2do program and materials to the public to 3--5 year Lightning continue our efforts to encourage installation of project EM 400,000 increase the coverage of lightning rods on indoor warning devices, such homes. as weather radios. The impact of warning our population concerning Lightning associated with a Severe Storm is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. The impact of warning our population of Lightning associated with Severe Storm is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. General Fund and or Bond issues. General Fund or bond issuance. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-153 Section 5 WS -1 WS -2 Enhance warning systems to help warn the citizens of Haltom City, concerning the Winter Storms potential of Winter Storms. These storms can impact our city in numerous ways from slick roads to loss of power from down power lines. Increase awareness through PSAs such as the Knowhat2do program and Winter Storms continue our efforts to increase the coverage of indoor warning devices, such as weather radios. By updating our Code Red notification system with a more robust process for notifying our citizens by way of smart phone applications, texting and other forms of social media. This will have the potential of reaching a more active and social community. This would also allow for our whole community to be warned of the potential hazard associated with Winter Storms. The impact of this action will reduce the amount of potential accidents and it would offer our citizen more of advanced warning to prepare for loss of power and heat. This effort would be to better inform our population of actions they can take to better prepare and ultimately survive the effects of Winter Storms. This action can and does reduce the amount of individuals who may be impacted from the extremes associated with Winter Storms by Annual project EM 7700 3--5 year project EM 400,000 The impact of warning our population of a Winter Storm is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. The impact of warning our population of a Winter Storm is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the General fund. General Fund or bond issuance. 5-154 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES NMI W-3 Reduce the amount of fuel Wildfire available for the spread of a wildfire. Increase awareness through PSAs such as the Knowhat2do program and Wildfire other Texas Forest Service programs concerning efforts to inform our community of the dangers of wildfires. adding Weather Radios for the home and or business. Aggressively enforce our high weed and grass ordinance to reduce the height of grasses and other Code Cost natural habitat that does As funding is Enforcement associated offer fuel for advancing available divisionwith wildfires. This . personnel. enforcement does offer a great deal of mitigation against the rapid growth of wildfires. Distribute PSAs and 3-5 years as program information on Fire wildfires to Haltom City funding is Department 145000 community. available. millions of dollars. Unknown The impact of protecting our population from Wildfires is difficult to measure with the impact to life and property. This number could be in the millions of dollars. General Fund General Fund, Bond Issuance. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-155 Section 5 5.14 City of Haslet Mitigation Strategy MH -3 MH -3 MH -3 Severe State and Thunderstorms Add additional radio 1 budget year Fire $80,000 $320,000 Federal and High Enhance the City of Haslet frequencies. Grant Winds, Tornadoes, emergency operations center Hail, Lightning, (EOC) by adding Winter Storms, communications capabilities Add video conferencing State and Flooding, ability. 1 budget year Fire $10,000 $40,000 Federal Wildfires Grant Increase both size and State and Severe quantity of real time 1 budget year Fire $10,000 $40,000 Federal Thunderstorms video monitors. Grant and High Winds, Tornadoes, Enhance City of Haslet audio Enhance internet 1 budget year Fire $3,000 $12,000 City Budget Hail, Lightning, and visual peripherals. access. Winter Storms, Flooding, Add additional work 1 budget year Fire $4,500 $18,000 City Budget Wildfires spaces. Severe Extend usage to Cit y Thunderstorms neighboring Continual Fire $1,200 $4,800 Budgets and High jurisdictions. Winds, Increase City of Haslet Tornadoes, emergency operations center Train neighboring Continual Fire $6,000 $24,000 City Hail, Lightning, (EOC) usage opportunities. officials on use. Budgets Winter Storms, Flooding, Mock or table top multi- City Wildfires agency EOC operations Continual Fire $5,000 $20,000 Budgets udgets 5-156 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MH -5 MH -5 MH -5 Severe Pre-incident/disaster Continual Thunderstorms $5,000 action planning. Regional and High Identify significant hazards Grants Winds, Tornadoes, T and developspecific to p Identify stakeholder Continual Hail, Lightning, hazard pre -incident planning entities. Local and Winter Storms, in the City of Haslet. $6,000 Regional Flooding, Wildfires Involve appropriate Continual entities in planning. Local and Severe $5,000 Establish resource Continual Thunderstorms requirements. Grants and High $1,500 $6,000 City Budget Winds, Determine adequate Identify available Local and Tornadoes, resources to respond to all resources. Continual Hail, Lightning, hazards in the City of Haslet. Grants Winter Storms, Local and Flooding, $2,000 Establish method of Continual Wildfires ascertaining. Grants Severe Thunderstorms Examine all incident Continual Fire $2,000 possibilities. Regional and High Grants Winds, Tornadoes, Develop contingency and Local and Hail, Lightning, after incident action in the Make contingencies Continual Winter Storms, City of Haslet. based upon possibilities. Grants Flooding, Dam Failure, Wildfires Establish after incident Continual review procedures. MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-157 Local and Fire $5,000 $20,000 Regional Grants Fire $1,500 $6,000 City Budget Local and Fire $2,000 $6,000 Regional Grants Local and Fire $5,000 $20,000 Regional Grants Fire $1,500 $6,000 City Budget Local and Fire $2,000 $8,000 Regional Grants Local and Fire $2,000 $8,000 Regional Grants Local and Fire $2,000 $8,000 Regional Grants Local and Fire $2,000 $8,000 Regional Grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-157 Section 5 Severe $500 $2,000 City Budget Thunderstorms Identify, train and equip Determine capable individuals. 30 days y and High capable citizens to form a $4,000 City Budget Winds, Community Emergency $4,000 City Budget MH 5 Tornadoes, Response Team (CERT) to $4,000 City Budget Hail, Lightning, assist in the event of a Train selected 60-90 days Winter Storms, disaster in the City of Haslet. individuals. Flooding, Wildfires Equip team. 30 days Severe Thunderstorms Mock drills Continual and High Winds, MH -5 Tornadoes, Continue to train CERT team members in City of Haslet. Frequent utilization Continual Hail, Lightning, Winter Storms, Flooding, Wildfires Repeat of initial training Continual Severe Thunderstorms and High Winds, Expand utilization of City of County and neighboring MH -5 Tornadoes, Haslet CERT team. jurisdiction involvement Continual Hail, Lightning, and deployment Winter Storms, Flooding, Wildfires Decrease flood insurance premiums in Haslet by Work with city officials to F-1 Flooding participating in the FEMA become a member of Annually Community Rating System the CRS program. program. Fire $250 $1,000 City Budget Fire $500 $2,000 City Budget Fire $1,000 $4,000 COG Grant Fire $1,000 $4,000 City Budget Fire $1,000 $4,000 City Budget Fire $1,000 $4,000 City Budget Fire $1,000 Tarrant Co, All $1,000 participating County $4,000 Grant or Assistance Tarrant County, $5,000 Individual Jurisdiction Budgets 5-158 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 F-2 ST -1, T-1 ST -2, T-2 H-1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-159 Review repetitive loss Tarrant Review and remove properties and work with Tarrant All County, Flooding repetitive loss properties in homeowners to remove Annually participating $0 $0 Individual Haslet them using FEMA Jurisdiction funding. Budgets Review current jurisdictional ordinances and building codes Severe Ensure outdoors spaces in related to high winds. Thunderstorms Haslet have adequate shelter Develop or update Building and High for high -wind events such as ordinances and building Annually Official $0 $0 City Budget Winds, severe thunderstorms or codes to recommend Tornadoes tornados. new developments or facilities are built with high -wind resistant windows as needed. Evaluate the current conditions of critical facilities to determine which ones, if any, need Severe Ensure critical facilities in safe rooms installed. Thunderstorms Haslet have adequate safe Determine the size and Emergency and High rooms to protect against space needed to shelter Annually Management $500 $$10,000 City Budget Winds, high -wind events and the population of the Tornadoes tornadoes. critical facility. Install safe rooms as needed in critical facilities. Develop an outreach Develop a hail outreach program that provides Hail program for citizens of tips and pertinent Annually Emergency $500 $10,000 City Budget Haslet. information for ensuring Management the protection of property against hail. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-159 Section 5 H-2 L-1 L-2 Hail Lightning Lightning Public Works $10,000 $20,000 City Budget Emergency Management Fire Department $10,000 $20,000 Hazard Mitigation Grant, City Budget City $1,000 $100,000 Budget, Local Grants 5-160 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide hail mitigation information to citizens through a social media campaign and publish the information on the City of Haslet's website. Evaluate which critical facilities need hail - Ensure the City of Haslet's resistant roofing and critical facilities have hail- windows installed. 24 months resistant roofing and Install hail -resistant windows installed roofing and windows in identified critical facilities. Evaluate the need for lightning protection on Protect communication communications infrastructure in Haslet from infrastructure in Haslet. 12 months lightning Install lightning rods on existing and future communication infrastructure. Develop a lightning outreach program that provides tips and pertinent information for protecting property Develop a lightning outreach against lightning program for residences and damage. 12 months businesses in the City of Provide lightning Haslet. preparedness mitigation information to citizens of Haslet through a social media campaign and publish information on City of Haslet's website. Public Works $10,000 $20,000 City Budget Emergency Management Fire Department $10,000 $20,000 Hazard Mitigation Grant, City Budget City $1,000 $100,000 Budget, Local Grants 5-160 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES WS -2 PIN D-2 Evaluate the hazards posed by severe winter weather in the City of City $10,000 Budget, local grants $0 City Budget $20,000 City Budget, HGMP Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-161 Haslet. Develop a winter weather outreach program that provides Develop a winter weather tips and pertinent Winter Storm outreach program and information for avoiding 12 months Emergency $500 distribute the information for hypothermia and icy Management the citizens of Haslet, conditions. Provide winter weather mitigation information to citizens of Haslet through a social media campaign and publish information on City of Haslet's website. Review current legislation for water conservation enforcement in the City Review City of Haslet's water of Haslet. enforcement legislation and Develop or update water Drought update as necessary to conservation Annually Public Works $0 mitigate the effects of enforcement legislation drought. to ensure effective practices during periods of drought. Develop contingency plans Review current for City of Haslet to ensure contingency plans. Drought adequate power and water Develop or update Annually Public Works $5,000 supply during prolonged potable water periods of drought. contingency plans. City $10,000 Budget, local grants $0 City Budget $20,000 City Budget, HGMP Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-161 Section 5 D-3 W-1 W-2 W-3 ET -1 Public Works $500 Develop or update $0 Public Works $0 power supply contingency plans. Provide drought awareness information Distribute drought awareness to citizens of Haslet Drought information to citizens of through a social media Annually Haslet campaign and publish the information of the City of Haslet's website. Review city ordinances and Enact building permit Wildfire laws to ensure mitigation process that encourages Annually practices are in effect in the wildfire resistant City of Haslet. construction. Evaluate the City of Haslet's water system to Ensure the City of Haslet ensure capacity for Wildfire water systems are adequate fighting wildfires. Install Annually for fighting wildfires. or upgrade needed equipment to ensure water systems are adequate. Mitigate wildfires by Prevent wildfires from instituting landscaping spreading to critical Wildfire practices at City of Haslet's facilities by landscaping Annually critical facilities. plants and brush away from buildings. Incorporation of power generator for use at Haslet Purchase Electrical Extreme Community Center. Generator to provide ide the id generator to power Temperatures, power necessary operate Haslet Community 12 months Winter Storm HVAC in the event of wide Center for shelter or spread power loss during warming/cooling center. extreme temperatures. Public Works $500 Public Works $0 Public Works $0 Public Works Emergency Management $0 $10,000 City Budget $0 City Budget $0 City Budget $0 City Budget $75,000 $100,000 City Budget 5-162 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET -2 ES -1 ES -2 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 12 months Emergency $500 Management Annually Building $1,000 Official 48 months Building $7,500 Official $10,000 City Budget, Local grants $10,000 City Budget $30,000 City Budget, PDM grant funding Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-163 Develop an extreme temperature outreach program that provides tips and pertinent Promote mitigation activities information for ensuring for residents and business in the health and safety for Extreme the community during the citizens of Haslet. Temperatures extreme weather events in Provide extreme heat City of Haslet. mitigation information to the citizens of Haslet through a social media campaign and publish the information of the City of Haslet's website. Improve construction techniques through building code Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in enhancements. Soils the City of Haslet. Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and business owners about mitigation techniques. Identify critical infrastructure Create and implement a Expansive that may be affected by plan to repair damage Soils expansive soils. that was caused by expansive soils. MITIGATION STRATEGIES 12 months Emergency $500 Management Annually Building $1,000 Official 48 months Building $7,500 Official $10,000 City Budget, Local grants $10,000 City Budget $30,000 City Budget, PDM grant funding Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-163 Section 5 5.15 City of Hurst Mitigation Strategy MH -6 Severe Identify companies who Jul -13 provide ALPR systems. Thunderstorms $5,000 Evaluate life expectancy Provide Automated License Severe Plate Readers (ALPR) to Determine most of 30+ year old OWS (8 6 months SV -1, T - Thunderstorms Replace eight outdoor locations). in the City of Hurst. 1 and High warning systems (OWS) in Purchase 8 OWS and Local, Grants Winds, the City of Hurst. control system. 1 year Tornadoes year year Fire $10,000 Install 8 OWS systems. 6 months Severe Thunderstorms Purchase/maintain Identify system 6 months and High community notification requirements. Governor, Winds, system that would allow for Criminal Tornadoes, more robust communications Purchase and install Justice Grant MH -1 Hail, Lightning, (voice and digital) that could system. 6 months Winter Storms, be used for warning after $200,000 Governor, Flooding, Dam events and for daily use for Criminal Failure, various departments in the Educate public on use. 1 year Wildfires City of Hurst. Office of the MH -6 Severe Identify companies who Jul -13 provide ALPR systems. Thunderstorms $5,000 and High Winds, Provide Automated License Tornadoes, Plate Readers (ALPR) to Determine most Hail, Lightning, increase detection of effective system. Winter Storms, violators and wanted persons Flooding, Dam in the City of Hurst. Failure $1,000 Jul -13 Wildfires Apply for and receive Sep 13 funding. Fire $5,000 $20,000 Local Fire $250,000 $1,000,000 Local, Grants Fire $50,000 $250,000 Local, Grants Fire $1,000 $1,000 Local, Grants Fire $30,000 per $90,000 per Local, Grants year year Fire $10,000 $40,000 Local, Grants Office of the Police $0 $200,000 Governor, Criminal Justice Grant Office of the Police $0 $200,000 Governor, Criminal Justice Grant Office of the Police $0 $200,000 Governor, Criminal Justice Grant 5-164 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES F-3 F-3 F-3 F-3 IDO-2 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-165 Purchase ALPR system Office of the and equip selected Jan -14 Police $40,000 $200,000 Governor, Criminal police vehicles. Justice Grant Open all passages under Open all waterways Texas Flooding Hwy 10 Bridge over the under bridge to allow 3 months Department $100,000 Unknown Unidentified Valley View Branch in the full flow. Transportation City of Hurst. Replace Trinity Railway Express (TRE) (DART Line) Improve the water flow Flooding culvert below the TxDOT rate through the TRE 1 year DART/TRE $2,000,000 Unknown Unidentified bridge to stop flooding the right of way. homes on Springlake Drive in Hurst. Create upstream detention Define the needed areas to slow the flow amount of detention and suitable areas to 2 years Hurst, TxDOT, $250,000 Unknown State, Grants Flooding downstream of the Lorean create the detention NTE Branch intersection with Highway 121 in the City of areas. Hurst. Build the detention 1 year Hurst, TxDOT, $1,500,000 Unknown State, Grants areas. NTE Create Walker Branch Create a plan for the 2 years Hurst, NRH, $500,000 Unknown Local, State, detention system above NE water detention. TxDOT Grants Flooding Mall on the Walker Branch in the City of Hurst. Build the detention 1 year Hurst, NRH, $1,500,000 Unknown Local, State, areas. TxDOT Grants Provide physical security at HEB, FEMA, the Hurst, Euless, and Center for Infectious Bedford (HEB) POD site Develop plans for Disease Disease while treating up to 200,000 security needs within Completed HEB Control Public Outbreak people within a 48-hour the POD site. Health timeframe. Preparedness Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-165 Section 5 HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease $49,000 $200,000 Control Public Health Preparedness Funds - - HEB, FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA - - HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA 25,000 Unknown Local 5-166 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Calculate police personnel requirements and availability and then Completed HEB prepare a viable plan with schedules and assignments. Estimate fuel needs for police and ICS vehicles, 31 -Dec -13 HEB and generators. Plan for law enforcement personnel Completed HEB needs for traffic control. Coordinate the effective Plan for portable, Infectious traffic flow leading into, out physical barrier needs IDO - 2 Disease of, and within the Hurst, (cones, barricades, Completed HEB Outbreak Euless, and Bedford POD etc.). site. Determine points of ingress/egress to POD Completed HEB site for management purposes. Complete and disseminate Infectious the Hurst, Euless, and IDO - 2 Disease Bedford POD site to local Prepare and Completed Bedford Outbreak agencies, school and disseminate POD plan. hospital district, and Tarrant County officials. Purchase and install a lighting detection Mitigate the potential for system that will allow L -1 Lightning lighting strikes on City Public Works and Public 2 years Public Works, Workers Safety Dispatchers to Fire , Police notify personnel of potential lighting in the area. HEB, FEMA, Center for Disease $49,000 $200,000 Control Public Health Preparedness Funds - - HEB, FEMA $35,000 $140,000 HEB, FEMA - - HEB, FEMA HEB, FEMA 25,000 Unknown Local 5-166 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES H-2 ET -2 ET -1 WS -2 Hail Mitigate the effects of hail Extreme Mitigate the effects of Temperatures extreme heat on citizens Develop educational materials for Citizens to use in making decisions 2 years on roofing materials for residences Educate citizens using the City Magazine, social media outlets and City website on the availability of shelters Ongoing and other resources (financial assistance, fans, etc.) to help prevent heat related injuries and deaths. Incorporation of power generator for use at (physical Purchase Electrical location?). Generator to generator to power Extreme provide the power necessary (physical location?) for 12 months Temperatures to operate HVAC in the event shelter or of wide spread power loss warming/cooling center. during extreme temperatures. Evaluate the hazards posed by severe winter weather in the City of Haslet. Develop a winter weather Develop a winter outreach program and weather outreach Winter Storm distribute the information for program that provides 12 months the citizens of Hurst. tips and pertinent information for avoiding hypothermia and icy conditions. Provide winter weather mitigation information to Emergency Mgmt, Public Works, Public Information Police, Fire, Public Works, Public Information, NGO Emergency Management Emergency Management 5,000 Unknown Local 10,000 Unknown Local, NGO, Electric Providers $75,000 $100,000 City Budget $500 $10,000 City Budget, local grants Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-167 Section 5 5-160 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 citizens of Hurst through a social media campaign and publish information on City of Hurst's website. Educate Homeowners on mitigation techniques Public Works, ES -1 Expansive Mitigate expansive soil for foundations. 1 year Public 10,000 100,000 Local Soils problems Develop materials for Information City Website, Social Media and City Website Review ES -1 Expansive Mitigate Expansive Soils Codes/Ordinances for Ongoing Public Works 5,000 Unknown Local Soils best practices for building techniques Pre -Fire plan all Urban Mitigate urban interface Interface Areas within Fire, Public W-2 Wildfire wildfires the City to allow for Ongoing Works 10,000 100,000 Local rapid response and incident control Distribute information through the City Magazine, Social Media W-3 Wildfire Mitigate urban interface and City Website Ongoing Fire, Public 10,000 100,000 Local wildfires educating citizens Information concerning safe ways to conduct outdoor burning Public education Public Works, D - 3 Drought Educate Citizens on water through City Magazine, Ongoing Public 10,000 Unknown Local conservation efforts Social Media and City Information Website. Reduce Costs to water City Use native and drought D-2 Drought Parks and City Facilities resistant plants to Ongoing Parks 100,000 Unknown Local reduce watering needs. 5-160 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Participate in the Federal Emergency Management Work with city officials City Planner DF -1 Dam Failure Agency's (FEMA) to become a member of Mar -14 City Planner $1,000 $2,000 Budget Community Rating System the CRS program. (CRS) program. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-169 Section 5 5.16 City of Keller Mitigation Strategy 5-170 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Conduct a study to determine if an additional outdoor 2 months Emergency $ 1,000 $ 4,000 City Funds Add an outdoor warning siren is Management Severe Thunderstorms warning siren in warranted for Big MH -1 and High Winds, the Big Bear Bear Creek Park. Tornadoes Creek Park area Purchase and Hazard in City of Keller. install an outdoor Emergency Mitigation warning siren in 12 months Management $ 35,000 $ 140,000 Grant, Big Bear Creek City Funds Park. Purchase and Hazard Severe Thunderstorms implement of a Purchase mass Mitigation and High Winds, mass public notification Grant, Tornadoes, Hail, MH 1 notification system for 12 months Emergency $ 25,000 $ 100,000 Lightning, Winter system for cell residents to sign Management Storms, Flooding, Dam phones and up for cell Failure, Wildfires texting in the City phone/text alerts. City Funds of Keller. Survey the eight Implement a departments and ascertain need North East multijurisdictional and want as well 7 months Tarrant County Severe Thunderstorms Automatic Vehicle as determine the Communications and High Winds, Location (AVL) number of users (NETCOM) MH -6 Tornadoes, Hail, system for both needed. Lightning, Winter police and fire NETCOM with a Storms, Flooding, Dam from Colleyville, Determine vendor 1 year representative - - Failure, Wildfires Keller, Southlake, for purchase. from all cities and Westlake (NETCOM). Purchase Individual hardware for all 16 months NETCOM $ 90,000 $ 360,000 City jurisdictions. Budgets 5-170 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Purchase Individual software for 2 years NETCOM $ 10,000 $ 40,000 City dispatch center and each unit. Budgets Severe Thunderstorms Assist City of Develop and fund Hazard and High Winds, Keller citizens rebate program Mitigation MH -7 Tornadoes, Hail, with funding for for residents 18 months Emergency $ 10,000 $ 40,000 Grant, Lightning, Winter purchase of purchasing Management Private Storms, Flooding, Dam Weather Alert weather alert Foundation, Failure, Wildfires Radios. radios. City Funds Robin Court Hazard Drainage 12 months Public Works $ 600,000 $ 2,400,000 Mitigation Improvements Grant, City Improve the Project Funds drainage system Conduct study to F - 3 Flooding of the City of reduce stream Hazard Keller. bank erosion Mitigation impacts along Big 3 years Public Works $ 100,000 $ 400,000 Grant, City Bear Creek, Little Funds Bear Creek, and Marshall Branch. Develop effective Hazard flood mitigation Develop Emergency Mitigation F - 5 Flooding public education informational 12 months Management $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant, City in the City of brochure Funds Keller. Prepare City of Train first Infectious Disease Keller first responders in Emergency IDO - 2 Outbreak responders for point of 3 months Management $ 1,500 $ 6,000 City Funds mass prophylaxis distribution (POD) distribution. procedures. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-171 Section 5 IDO-3 IDO-4 5-172 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Conduct a POD exercise to test 6 months Emergency $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds plans and Management procedures. Review continuity Ensure continuity of operations procedures are in (COOP) plans 12 months Emergency $ 6,000 $ 24,000 City Funds place to prepare and procedures Management Infectious Disease for a long-term for cit employees Outbreak employee and facilities. shortage at City Provide COOP of Keller facilities. training for 3 months Emergency $ 1,500 $ 6,000 City Funds jurisdiction Management employees. Develop a public Educate the information public on Infectious Disease campaign to pandemics, Emergency Outbreak educate City of including 12 months Management $ 6,000 $ 24,000 City Funds Keller public isolation, about infectious quarantine, triage, diseases. and medical care. Review City of Keller Ordinance No. 1454, City of 3 months Environmental $ 1,500 $ 6,000 City Funds Review City of Keller Water Services Keller Water Conservation Conservation Plan. Drought Plan and update Update water as necessary to conservation mitigate the enforcement to Environmental effects of drought. ensure effective 3 months Services $ 1,500 $ 6,000 City Funds practices during periods of drought. 5-172 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 as D-2 D-2 Drought Drought Drought Review Drought Review current contingency 6 months Environmental $ Contingency and plans. Services Emergency Water Management Plan for the City Develop or of Keller to update potable 12 months Environmental $ ensure adequate water contingency Services power and water plans. supply during Develop or prolonged periods update power Environmental of drought. supply 12 months Services $ contingency plans. Develop landscape and irrigation system review plans to Develop plan to be included in the institute approval process landscape and 6 months Environmental $ planned irrigation system Services developments to reviews for new increase developments. conservation efforts in the City of Keller. Review the drought Review and awareness revise the City of campaign to Keller's drought ensure it 3 months Environmental $ awareness addresses current Services education and future water program. conservation needs and revise as needed. MITIGATION STRATEGIES 3,000 $ 6,000 $ 6,000 $ 3,000 $ 1,500 $ 12,000 City Funds 24,000 City Funds 24,000 City Funds 12,000 City Funds 6,000 City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-173 Section 5 D-3 L-1 Drought Lightning 5-174 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide drought awareness information to City of Keller citizens 6 months Environmental $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds and business Services customers through a social media campaign. Distribute drought Implement the use of Public awareness Service information to the Announcement 6 months Environmental $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds citizen and videos on the City Services business water of Keller cable customers within access channel. the City of Keller. Develop water conservation packets for landscaping Environmental vendors to 12 months Services $ 4,000 $ 16,000 City Funds provide their customers with new system installations. Ensure city critical infrastructure has adequate Hazard lightning 12 months Emergency $ 5,000 $ 20,000 Mitigation Mitigate against mitigation in place Management Grant, City Lightning and upgrade Funds Damage in the protection as City of Keller. necessary. Provide lightning Hazard mitigation 6 months Community $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Mitigation information with Development Grant, City Funds 5-174 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HM -4 HM -4 MITIGATION STRATEGIES 500 $ 10,000 $ 5,000 $ $ 5,000 $ $ 10,000 $ 2,000 NIA 40,000 City Funds 20,000 City Funds 20,000 City Funds 40,000 City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-175 building permit packets. Identify materials commonly carried Fire by the railroad 3 months Department, that travels UPRR through the community. Develop hazard incident overlay for the small, medium, and Fire Identify potential worse -case 6 months Department, Hazardous Materials hazard areas in incidents based GIS Staff Release the City of Keller upon materials associated with a commonly carried railroad incident. on the railway. Identify the roadway infrastructure, residences, Fire commercial 6 months Department, buildings, and GIS Staff open land/park areas located within the hazard incident overlay. Identify Identify roadways evacuation routes within the hazard Fire for areas in the areas to be used 6 months Department, Hazardous Materials City of Keller as potential Public Works Release potentially egress points. affected by Develop map 6 months Fire Department, railroad incidents. indicating egress GIS Staff MITIGATION STRATEGIES 500 $ 10,000 $ 5,000 $ $ 5,000 $ $ 10,000 $ 2,000 NIA 40,000 City Funds 20,000 City Funds 20,000 City Funds 40,000 City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-175 Section 5 ET- 1 ET -2 5-176 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 routes out of the hazard area. Communicate egress/evacuation maps and information with residents and Fire businesses Department, located within the 6 months City $ 2,500 $ 10,000 City Funds hazard overlay Communications area through Specialist social media, online information, and brochures. Review current plans and Emergency procedures 6 months Management $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds related to extreme heat. Ensure the City of Develop or Keller has an update extreme Extreme Temperatures extreme heat plan heat plans and in place. ensure they provide 12 months Emergency $ 6,000 $ 24,000 City Funds procedures for Management opening cooling centers and providing public information. Develop an Evaluate the Extreme Temperatures extreme heat hazards posed by 6 months Emergency $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds outreach program extreme heat in Management for City of Keller the City of Keller. 5-176 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET -2 ET -1 ES -1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES citizens and Develop an visitors. extreme heat 12 months Emergency $ 6,000 $ 24,000 City Funds outreach Management program. Provide extreme heat mitigation information to the Emergency Distribute City of Keller 6 months Management $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds extreme heat citizens through a mitigation social media Extreme Temperatures information to campaign. City of Keller Provide extreme citizens. heat mitigation information 6 months Emergency $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds through the City Management of Keller's website. Incorporation of power generator for use at a Purchase facility. Generator Electrical to provide the generator to Extreme Temperatures power necessary to operate HVAC power a facility for 12 months Emergency Management $75,000 $100,000 City Budget in the event of shelter or wide spread warming/cooling power loss during center. extreme temperatures. Improve Mitigate against construction City Funds, Expansive Soils expansive soils in techniques 12 months Community $ 5,000 $ 20,000 Permit the City of Keller. through building Development Fees code enhancements. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-177 Section 5 Educate Hazard Mitigation $ 1,000 $ 4,000 Grant, City Funds, Permit Fees City Funds, $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant Source $ 100,000 $ 400,000 Budget, Grants City Fund, Hazard $ 100,000 $ 400,000 Mitigation Grant Funding 5-170 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 construction contractors, home Community owners, and 12 months Development business owners about mitigation techniques. Develop effective Develop hazard mitigation informational F - 3 Flooding public education brochure related 12 months Emergency in the City of to flooding and Management Keller related to provide to the flooding community Increase shelter Build a shelter space at the city location at the Thunderstorms & High parks for people baseball fields ST -1 Wind to seek protection and soccer fields 3 Years Parks when a storm where people can seek shelter from arrives severe storms. Evaluate each building owned by the City of Keller Ensure that city to locate shelter facilities have locations. If there Thunderstorms &High adequate safe is no safe location Emergency ST -1 Wind locations for within the building 3 Years Management people to take install a safe shelter room. Educate occupants of the building of the safe room locations Hazard Mitigation $ 1,000 $ 4,000 Grant, City Funds, Permit Fees City Funds, $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant Source $ 100,000 $ 400,000 Budget, Grants City Fund, Hazard $ 100,000 $ 400,000 Mitigation Grant Funding 5-170 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Funds, Hazard 2,500 $ 10,000 Mitigation Grant Funding 7,000 $ 13,000 $ 1,000 $ 28,000 City Funds 52,000 City Funds 4,000 City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-179 Develop and provide Increase educational awareness to the materials on what citizens on how type of roofs and the can protect windows stand up Emergency H - 2 Hail themselves and to hail the best. 12 months Management $ their property Use other forms from the effects of of media to teach hail. people how to protect themselves from hail. Purchase one (1) snow plow attachment for the public works department and 12 months Public Works $ outline its use Enhance the within the city's snow removal winter weather WS -1 Winter Storm capability for the protocol City of Keller Purchase one (1) sand spreading unit for the public works department 12 months Public Works $ and outline its use within the city's winter weather protocol Provide Utilize the city information to the web site, emails, WS - 2 Winter Storm citizens of Keller Code Red, and 6 months PIO/Emergency $ about road social media to Management conditions and keep the citizens and visitors of MITIGATION STRATEGIES City Funds, Hazard 2,500 $ 10,000 Mitigation Grant Funding 7,000 $ 13,000 $ 1,000 $ 28,000 City Funds 52,000 City Funds 4,000 City Funds Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-179 Section 5 WS -1 W-2 Winter Storm Wildfire school and city Keller informed on office closings how a winter storm is impacting city services. Public Works $ 1,000 $ 4,000 City Funds Risk Management $ 5,000 $ 20,000 City Funds Code Enforcement $ 2,500 $ 10,000 City Funds 5-180 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Update current city-wide winter weather protocol to ensure it meets 6 months identified hazards and infrastructure priorities of the Conduct an community assessment of Provide training to the winter all employees that weather protocols work outside on for city the dangers of departments winter weather and ways that they need to 12 months protect themselves from the effects of the cold, wet, dark, and icy conditions. Reduce fuel load Reduce the from high weed amount of fuel and grass through available for the the use and 6 months spread of a enforcement of Wildfire. current city ordinance. Public Works $ 1,000 $ 4,000 City Funds Risk Management $ 5,000 $ 20,000 City Funds Code Enforcement $ 2,500 $ 10,000 City Funds 5-180 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-181 Develop and distribute public education material to reduce 12 months Fire Department $ 2,500 $ 10,000 City Funds wildfire impact on residential properties Ensure the Fire Update current Department policies and wildfire plan and procedures 6 months Fire Department $ 1,000 $ 4,000 City Funds personnel related to wildfire W-3 Wildfire capabilities are response within current and the community. match identified Provide annual hazards of the training to first 12 months Fire Department $ 3,000 $ 12,000 City Funds community responders Ensure the City of Open cooling ET -1 Extreme Temperatures Keller has an extreme heat centers and 12 months Emergency $ 6,000 $ 24,000 City Funds mitigation plan in provide public Management place. information. Develop effective Develop hazard mitigation informational public education brochure related City Funds, Thunderstorms & High ST - 5 in the City of to thunderstorms 12 months Emergency $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant Wind Keller related to and high wind Management Source Thunderstorms incidents and and High Wind provide to the Incidents community Develop effective Develop City Funds, T-5 Tornado hazard mitigation informational 12 months Emergency $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant public education brochure related Management Source in the City of to tornados and Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-181 Section 5 WS -2 Winter Storm W-3 ET -2 Wildfire Extreme Temps Keller related to provide to the tornados community Develop effective Develop hazard mitigation informational City Funds, public education brochure related 12 months Emergency $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant in the City of to winter storms Management Source Keller related to and provide to the winter storms community Develop effective Develop hazard mitigation informational public education brochure related Emergency City Funds, in the City of to the threat of 12 months Management $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant Keller related to wildfire and Source wildfire threats provide to the community Develop effective Develop hazard mitigation informational public education brochure related Emergency City Funds, in the City of to extreme 12 months Management $ 2,500 $ 10,000 Grant Keller related to temperatures and Source extreme provide to the temperatures community 5-182 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5.17 MH -5 City of Kennedale Mitigation Strategy Severe Thunderstorms Develop ILA and and High planning. Winds, Form a multijurisdictional Tornadoes, tactical unit with Forest Hill, Hail, Lightning, Kennedale, and Crowley. Winter Storms, 3 months Flooding, Wildfires Acquire appropriate 8 months equipment. Train law enforcement 1 year officers and implement. Evaluate current shelters in outdoor spaces in Apr -14 Kennedale. Severe Ensure outdoors spaces in Kennedale have adequate Determine the size and ST -1, T - Thunderstorms and High shelter for high -wind events space needs for shelters Apr -14 1 such as severe in outdoor spaces in Winds, thunderstorms or Kennedale. Tornadoes tornadoes. Install outdoor storm shelters at Sonora Park, Town Center Park, Apr -14 Rodgers Farm Park and Kennedale Ball Fields. Severe Ensure critical facilities in Evaluate the current ST -1, T - Thunderstorms Kennedale have adequate conditions of critical 1 and High safe rooms to protect facilities to determine Apr -14 Winds, against high -wind events which ones, if any, need Tornadoes and tornadoes. safe rooms installed. Forest Hill Police Department (FHPD), Kennedale Police Department, Crowley Police Department FHPD FHPD Kennedale, Park Department Kennedale, Park Department Kennedale, Park Department Kennedale, Fire Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES Forest Hill, Kennedale, Crowley $25,000 $50,000 Forest Hill $50,000 $50,000 Forest Hill $100 $200 Kennedale Park Budget $100 $200 Kennedale Park Budget $100,000 $200,000 FEMA $300 $600 Kennedale Park Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-183 Section 5 ResponsibleHazard Action/Project Projected Department Estimated Estimated Funding Addressed Objective Description Time to or Agency Cost Benefit Sources Completion Determine the size and Kennedale space needed to shelter Apr -14 Building $300 $600 Kennedale the population of the Official Departments critical facility. Install safe rooms as Kennedale Kennedale needed in critical Apr -15 Building $200,000 $400,000 Departments facilities. Official Review current Kennedale Building jurisdictional ordinances April 2014 Building $300 $600 Official Severe Ensure City of Kennedale and building codes Official Budget Thunderstorms ordinances and building related to high winds ST - 3, T - and High codes reflect the need for Develop/update 3 Winds, high -wind resistant windows ordinances and building Tornadoes in new developments and codes to recommend Kennedale facilities. new t facilities are built Jan -15 Building $2,500 $2,500 City Attorney with high -wind resistant Official windows Evaluate the need for Kennedale Building high -wind resistant Severe Apr -14 Building $2,000 $4,000 Official Thunderstorms Ensure City of Kennedale windows in critical Official Budget ST - 3, T critical facilities have high- facilities. 3 and High wind resistant windows in Install high -wind Winds, place. resistant windows as Kennedale Kennedale Tornadoes necessary in critical May -15 ISD $100,000 $200,000 ISD Budget facilities. Determine a suitable site Contracted FEMA, and estimate cost for a Jan -17 Architect $10,000 $1,010,000 Kennedale tornado resistant EOC. Severe Ensure continuity of Request for proposals to Thunderstorms ST - 3, T - operations at Kennedale prepare a site and Included in and High Contracted FEMA, 3 City Hall during a natural or construct a tornado Oct -17 above $1,010,000 Winds, man-made disaster. resistant EOC in Architect estimate Kennedale Tornadoes Kennedale. Construct a tornado Jan -18 General $1,010,000 $1,010,000 FEMA, resistant EOC. Contractor Kennedale 5-104 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES ResponsibleHazard Action/Project Projected Department Estimated Estimated Funding Addressed Objective Description Time to or Agency Cost Benefit Sources Completion Evaluate the hazards Kennedale Fire posed by high -wind Apr -15 Fire $500 $1,000 Department Severe events in Kennedale. Department Budget Thunderstorms Develop a severe Develop a severe ST - 4, T - and High thunderstorm and tornado weather outreach 4 Winds, outreach program for program that provides Kennedale Fire Tornadoes Kennedale citizens. tips and pertinent Apr -14 Fire $300 $600 Department information for protecting Department Budget property against high - wind damage. Provide severe weather mitigation information to Kennedale citizens Kennedale Kennedale through a social media Mar -14 Fire $9,000 $9,000 City Budget Severe campaign, including Department ST - 4, T - Thunderstorms Distribute severe weather severe thunderstorms 4 and High mitigation information to and tornadoes. Winds, City of Kennedale citizens. Ensure the Kennedale Tornadoes website is updated during tornado season to Mar -14 Kennedale $300 $600 Kennedale educate citizens on City Secretary City Budget severe weather mitigation activities. Decrease flood insurance premiums in Kennedale by participating in the Federal Work with city officials to City Planner F -1 Flooding Emergency Management become a member of the Mar -14 City Planner $1,000 $2,000 Budget Agency's (FEMA) CRS program. Community Rating System (CRS) program. Review repetitive loss Review and remove properties and work with F - 2 Flooding repetitive loss properties in homeowners to remove 10/1/2019 City Manager $3,000,000 $6,000,000 FEMA the City of Kennedale. them using FEMA funding. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-185 Section 5 F-3 PF -1 H-2 $80,000 $200,000 FEMA $200,000 $5,000,000 FEMA $5,000,000 $10,000,000 FEMA $ $100,000 Kennedale $95,000 $100,000 FEMA, Kennedale $5,000 $100,000 FEMA, Kennedale $500 $1,000 2014-15 Budget $500 $1,000 2014-15 Budget 5-106 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Submit historic flood analysis reports to support a request for Submitted July City of flood mitigation analysis 2012 Kennedale by the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers. Submit engineering Acquire all private property reports to support flood Flooding located within the Village mitigation funding for the City Creek 100 year Floodway in purchase of land and Aug -16 Kennedale the City of Kennedale. structures located in the Village Creek 100 Year Floodway. Acquire all privately owned land and City of structures located in the Aug -22 Kennedale Village Creek 100 year floodway. Identify size and type of emergency generator Dec -13 Emergency Power Failure, needed to power City Manager Winter Storms, Ensure continuity of Hall. Severe Thunderstorms operations at Kennedale Purchase an emergency Emergency and High City Hall during a disruption generator for Kennedale Sep -16 Manager Winds, of the main power supply. City Hall. Tornadoes Deliver and installation of generator at Kennedale Dec -16 Contractor City Hall. Evaluate the hazards Nov -14 Building posed by hail in the City. Official Develop a hail outreach Hail program for City of Develop hail outreach Kennedale citizens. program that provides Dec -14 Fire tips and pertinent Department information for ensuring $80,000 $200,000 FEMA $200,000 $5,000,000 FEMA $5,000,000 $10,000,000 FEMA $ $100,000 Kennedale $95,000 $100,000 FEMA, Kennedale $5,000 $100,000 FEMA, Kennedale $500 $1,000 2014-15 Budget $500 $1,000 2014-15 Budget 5-106 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 MITIGATION STRATEGIES the protection of property against hail. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-187 Provide hail mitigation information to citizens Mar 14 City Secretary $100 $1,000 City Secretary Distribute hail mitigation through a social media 9 Budget 9 H - 2 Hail information to City of campaign. Kennedale citizens. Provide hail mitigation City Secretary information through the Mar -14 City Secretary $100 $1,000 Budget city website. Evaluate the need for Fire Department, covered parking for city 2 weeks Police $2,000 $50,000 City Budget Provide hail -resistant vehicles to protect them Department, H -1 Hail parking areas for City of against hail. Building Kennedale vehicles. Install awnings as needed to protect city NA NA NA NA NA vehicles against hail. Evaluate the Kennedale Kennedale water system to ensure Apr -14 Fire $300 $1,000 2013-14 Ensure Kennedale water capacity for fighting wildfires. Department Budget W -1 Wildfire systems are adequate for Install or upgradeneeded fighting wildfires. equipment to Kennedale 2015-16 ensure water systems Oct -1 5 Fire $300,000 $300,000 Budget are adequate. Department Prevent wildfires from Mitigate wildfires by spreading to critical Kennedale 2013-14 W -1 Wildfire instituting landscaping facilities by keeping May -14 Public Works $ 2,000 $10,000 Enforcement practices at Kennedale landscaping plants and Department Budget critical facilities. brush away from buildings. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-187 Section 5 ResponsibleHazard Action/Project Projected Department Estimated Estimated Funding Addressed Objective Description Time to or Agency Cost Benefit Sources Completion Prevent wildfires from Kennedale spreading to critical Code 2013-14 facilities by enforcing the May -14 Enforcement $ 2,000 $10,000 Enforcement Kennedale mowing Department Budget ordinance. Enact building permit Kennedale process that encourages Oct -14 Building $2,000 $ 2,000 2014-15 Review city ordinances and wildfire resistant Budget laws to ensure mitigation construction. Official W 2 Wildfire practices are in effect in Enforce Building codes Kennedale Kennedale. to ensure compliance 2014-15 with conditions of Sep 14 Building $ 2,000 $1,999 Budget Building permits. Official Review, develop, or Kennedale 2013-14 Fire Ensure adequate wildfire update wildfire response Apr -14 Fire $500 $2,000 Department response plans and plans and procedures. Department Budget W 2 Wildfire procedures are in place for Provide wildfire response Kennedale 2013-14 Fire Kennedale. training to Kennedale fire Apr -14 Fire $2,000 $2,000 Department personnel. Department Budget Develop a wildfire Kennedale 2013-14 Fire outreach program for May -14 Fire $ 500 $1,000 Department Kennedale's. Newsletter Department Budget Provide information to insert for water bills. W-3 Wildfire Kennedale citizens Use social media to regarding the hazards distribute tips and posed by wildfires. pertinent information for Kennedale 2013-14 Fire ensuring the protection May -14 Fire $500 $1,000 Department of citizens and their Department Budget property against wildfires. Work with the Texas Determine the process for Department of Kennedale 2013-14 Fire W-3 Wildfire becoming a Fire -wise Emergency Management Apr -14 Fire $500 $1,000 Department Community in Kennedale. to become a Fire -wise Department Budget Community. 5-100 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 WS -1 WS -1 WS -2 Conduct an assessment of winter weather Nov -14 response capabilities. Evaluate winter weather Acquire equipment Winter Storm response capabilities in the needed as determined Nov -14 City of Kennedale. by assessment. Provide safety training to first responders on Nov -14 winter weather hazards. Kennedale Conduct an assessment Evaluate winter weather of winter weather plans Nov -14 in place for jurisdiction Winter Storm mitigation capabilities in the public works. City of Kennedale. Develop or update winter Fire weather mitigation plan. Nov -14 Department Develop a winter Kennedale weather outreach Develop a winter weather program that provides Winter Storm outreach program for tips and pertinent Oct -14 Kennedale citizens. information for avoiding Fire hypothermia and icy Department conditions. Kennedale 2013-2014 Police Police and Department, $500 Kennedale Public Works Fire Budget Department Public Works Kennedale Budget Police 2014-15 Fire Department, $5,000 Kennedale Fire Department Kennedale Police Department, $3,000 Kennedale Fire Department Kennedale $500 Public Works Kennedale $500 Public Works Kennedale Fire $500 Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES 2013-2014 $2,000 Police and Fire Budgets 2013-2014 $5,000 Police and Fire Budgets Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5 -1 89 2013-2014 $6,000 Police and Fire Budgets $2,000 Public Works Budget $2,000 Public Works Budget $2,000 2014-15 Fire Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5 -1 89 Section 5 WS - 2 Winter Storm IDO-2 IDO-3 IDO-4 Infectious Disease Outbreak Infectious Disease Outbreak Infectious Disease Outbreak 5-190 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Provide winter weather mitigation information to Kennedale 2014-15 Fire Kennedale citizens Nov -14 Fire $500 $2,000 Budget Distribute winter weather through a social media Department mitigation information to the campaign. City of Kennedale Ensure the Kennedale residents. city website is updated Kennedale during winter months to 14 -Nov Fire $500 $2,000 2014-15 Fire educate citizens on Department Budget winter weather mitigation activities. Train first responders in Tarrant Tarrant point of distribution Dec -14 County Health $1,000 $1,000 County Health Prepare City of Kennedale (POD) procedures. Department Department first responders for mass prophylaxis distribution. Conduct a POD exercise Tarrant Tarrant to test plans and Dec -14 County Health $1,000 $1,000 County Health procedures. Department Department Review continuity of Kennedale operations (COOP) Human Human Ensure continuity plans and procedures for Mar -14 Resource $300 $600 Resource procedures are in place to city employees and Director Budget prepare for a long-term facilities. employee shortage at City Provide COOP training Kennedale Human of Kennedale facilities. forjurisdiction Apr -14 Human $1,000 $2,000 Resource employees. Resource Budget Director Educate the public on Tarrant Tarrant Develop a public pandemics, including Feb -14 County Health $3,000 $3,000 County Health information campaign to isolation, quarantine, Department Department educate City of Kennedale triage, and medical care. public about infectious Push information to Tarrant Tarrant diseases. social media. Feb -14 County $3,000 $3,000 County Health Department 5-190 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 DIM as Drought Drought D - 2 Drought D - 3 Drought Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Fire $2,000 Department Police $2,000 Department Public Works $1,000 MITIGATION STRATEGIES $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $2,000 $2,000 $1,000 Public Works Public Works Public Works Fire Budget Police Budget Public Works Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-191 Review current legislation for water conservation Mar -14 Review Kennedale water enforcement in enforcement legislation and Kennedale. update as necessary to Develop or update water mitigate the effects of conservation drought. enforcement legislation Mar 14 to ensure effective practices during periods of drought. Review current Mar -14 contingency plans. Develop contingency plans for Kennedale to ensure adequate power and water Develop or update supply during prolonged potable water Mar -14 periods of drought. contingency plans. Develop or update power supply contingency Mar -14 plans. Upgrade water and Upgrade fixtures at fire irrigation systems to station. Dec -14 conserve water at Kennedale Police and Fire Upgrade fixtures at stations. police station. Dec -14 Develop a drought Evaluate the hazards awareness education posed by drought in Apr -14 Kennedale. Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $100 Fire $2,000 Department Police $2,000 Department Public Works $1,000 MITIGATION STRATEGIES $100 Public Works $100 Public Works $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $2,000 $2,000 $1,000 Public Works Public Works Public Works Fire Budget Police Budget Public Works Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-191 Section 5 D - 3 Drought TR -1 Terrorism TR -1 Terrorism TR -2 Terrorism program for Kennedale Develop a drought Citizens. awareness education program that provides tips and pertinentApr-14 information for ensuring the protection of property and the environment against drought. Provide drought awareness information to Kennedale citizens 14 -Apr Distribute drought through a social media awareness information to campaign. Kennedale Citizens. Provide drought awareness information Apr -14 through the Kennedale website. Evaluate the equipment Provide the necessary currently in place at Apr -14 equipment to combat Kennedale police terrorism to Kennedale law department. enforcement. Acquire the equipment identified in the Apr -15 assessment. Assess security systems Ensure security and at critical facilities in Apr -14 surveillance equipment is in Kennedale. place at Kennedale critical Install the systems facilities. necessary to provide Apr -15 security at Kennedale critical facilities. Provide an anti -terrorism Train officers in the training program at detection of suspicious Oct -14 devices. Public Works $1,000 $1,000 Public Works Budget Public Works $100 $1,000 Public Works Budget Public Works $100 $1,000 Public Works Budget Kennedale Police Department Kennedale Police Department Kennedale Police Department Kennedale Police Department Kennedale Police Department $200 $4,000 2014 Budget $100,000 $100,000 HSGP $200 $4,000 2014-15 Budget $100,000 $100,000 HSGP $ 2,000 $4,000 2014-15 Budget 5-192 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 TR -4 Terrorism L -1 Lightning L -1 Lightning L - 2 Lightning Kennedale Police Conduct exercises to Department Department. test terrorist response Apr -15 Police plans and procedures. Department 2015-16 Increase terrorism Budget Police awareness fort the public Oct -14 Educate the Kennedale through public speaking community about terrorism events. Official through public education. Increase awareness of active shooter events by Oct -14 presenting in the school district. Evaluate the need for lightning protection on communications Nov -14 Protect communication infrastructure in infrastructure in Kennedale Kennedale. from lightning. Install lightning rods on existing and future Nov -15 communication infrastructure. Evaluate the need for lightning protection for Nov -14 Ensure Kennedale critical Kennedale critical facilities are protected facilities. against lightning. Install lightning rods and other protective Nov -15 equipment on critical facilities. Develop a lightning Evaluate the hazards outreach program for City of posed by lightning in Nov -14 Kennedale citizens. Kennedale. Kennedale Police $4,000 Department Budget Kennedale 2014-15 Police $1,000 Department 2015-16 Kennedale Budget Police $1,000 Department Budget Kennedale Building $1,000 Official Kennedale Building $10,000 Official Kennedale Building $1,000 Official Public Works $30,000 Kennedale Fire $500 Department MITIGATION STRATEGIES $4,000 2014-15 Budget $2,000 2014-15 Budget $2,000 2014-15 Budget $2,000 2014-15 Budget $20,000 2015-16 Budget $2,000 2014-15 Budget $60,000 2015-16 Budget $1,000 2014-15 Budget Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5 -1 93 Section 5 L-2 HM -1 HM -1 HM -2 5-194 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 Develop a lightning outreach program that provides tips and Kennedale 2014-15 pertinent information for Dec -14 Fire $500 $1,000 Budget protecting property Department against lightning damage. Provide lightning mitigation information to Kennedale 2014-15 Kennedale citizens Nov -14 Fire $ 500 $1,000 Budget Distribute lightning through a social media Department Lightning mitigation information to campaign. City of Kennedale citizens. Provide lightning Kennedale mitigation information at Dec -14 Fire $500 $1,000 2014-15 outdoor spaces Department Budget throughout Kennedale. Evaluate the hazmat Kennedale Provide Kennedale fire gear currently provided May -15 Fire $300 $300 Kennedale Hazardous personnel with the by Kennedale Fire Department Fire Budget Materials necessary gear to respond Department. Release to hazmat releases. Acquire the gear needed Kennedale as identified in the Dec -17 Fire $20,000 $40,000 HSGP evaluation. Department Ensure Kennedale fire Evaluate the hazmat Kennedale Kennedale Hazardous department has the equipment currently May -14 Fire $300 $300 Fire Budget Materials equipment necessary to owned by Kennedale. Department Release respond to hazmat Acquire the equipment Kennedale releases. needed as identified in Dec -17 Fire $40,000 $80,000 HSGP the evaluation. Department Hazardous Develop a hazardous Evaluate hazardous Kennedale Materials materials awareness materials that are used Nov -14 Fire $1,000 $10,000 Kennedale Release education program for or transported in Department Fire Budget Kennedale citizens. Kennedale. 5-194 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 HM -2 HM -3 HM -4 ET- 1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-195 Provide hazardous materials awareness Kennedale Kennedale information to Kennedale Nov -14 Fire $1,000 $10,000 Fire Budget citizens through a social Department media campaign Evaluate Public Kennedale Kennedale Distribute hazardous awareness of hazardous 14 -May Fire $300 $600 Fire Budget Hazardous materials awareness materials Department Materials Release information to Kennedale Provide hazardous Kennedale citizens. materials awareness Fire $300 $600 Kennedale information through the Department Fire Budget Kennedale website. Partner with the Red Kennedale Cross to locate shelter Apr -14 Fire $300 $600 Kennedale Hazardous Improve the evacuation of locations within Department Fire Budget Materials Kennedale citizens during a Kennedale. Release hazardous event. Secure agreements withthe Kennedale Red Cross and the Apr 14 Fire $300 $600 Kennedale school district for Department Fire Budget shelters. Identify materials Kennedale commonly carried by the May -14 Fire $300 $600 Kennedale railroad that travels Department Fire Budget Hazardous Identify potential hazard through the community. Materials areas in the City of Develop hazard incident Release Kennedale associated with overlay for the small, Kennedale a railroad incident. medium, and worst-case Dec -14 Fire $300 $600 Kennedale incidents based upon Department Fire Budget materials commonly carried on the railway. Extreme Ensure the City of Review current plans Temperatures Kennedale has an extreme and procedures related heat plan in place. to extreme heat. Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-195 Section 5 ET -1 ET -2 Extreme Identify extreme heat plans Temperatures for critical infrastructure in the City of Kennedale. Extreme Develop an extreme heat Temperatures outreach program for Kennedale citizens. Develop or update extreme heat plans and ensure they provide procedures for opening cooling centers and providing public information. Evaluate the need for extreme heat plans for critical infrastructure to ensure essential functions continue in the event of high temperatures. Develop or update plans and procedures for critical infrastructure when high temperatures are present. Evaluate the hazards posed by extreme heat in Kennedale. 1 -May -14 May -14 Fire Department, Police Department, Public Works, Parks Department, Library Department, Administration Fire Department, Police Department, Public Works, Parks Department, Library Department, Administration Fire Department $500 $1,000 $100 $1,000 $2,000 $500 Fire Department, Police Department, Public Works, Parks Department, Library Department, Administration Budgets Fire Department, Police Department, Public Works, Parks Department, Library Department, Administration Budgets 5-196 Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 ET -2 ES -1 ET- 1 ET- 1 MITIGATION STRATEGIES Human $100 $1,000 Resources City Secretary $100 $1,000 Building $1,000 $10,000 Official Building $1,000 $10,000 Official Library staff assisted by $5,000 $10,000 KPD, KFD, and KPW Library staff $5,000 $10,000 assisted by Human Resources Budget City Secretary Budget Building Official Budget Building Official Budget City of Kennedale Red Cross, Donations, City of Kennedale Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-197 Develop an extreme heat outreach program that provides tips and pertinent information for ensuring the health and safety of citizens during extreme heat. Provide extreme heat mitigation information to the Kennedale citizens May -14 Extreme Distribute extreme heat through a social media Temperatures mitigation information to campaign. Kennedale citizens. Provide extreme heat mitigation information May -14 through the Kennedale's website. Improve construction techniques through Oct -15 building code Expansive Mitigate expansive soils in enhancements. Soils Kennedale. Educate construction contractors, homeowners, and Oct -15 business owners about mitigation techniques. Extreme Heat Emergency: Extreme Provide a cooling station in Provide a cooling station Temperatures the Kennedale Community in the Kennedale Jun -15 Center Community Center Extreme Extreme Cold Jan -15 Temperatures Emergency: MITIGATION STRATEGIES Human $100 $1,000 Resources City Secretary $100 $1,000 Building $1,000 $10,000 Official Building $1,000 $10,000 Official Library staff assisted by $5,000 $10,000 KPD, KFD, and KPW Library staff $5,000 $10,000 assisted by Human Resources Budget City Secretary Budget Building Official Budget Building Official Budget City of Kennedale Red Cross, Donations, City of Kennedale Tarrant County Local Mitigation Action Plan I June 2015 5-197 Section 5 H-2 WS -2 Hail Winter Storm Provide a warming station in the Kennedale Community Center Use Emergency Notification System to inform public about approaching severe thunderstorms which have a history of producing hail Use Emergency Notification System to inform public about approaching winter storm which may cause hazardous driving conditions, expose people and animals outdoors to extreme cold, and freeze exterior wate