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Res 17-09 Approving a Public Art Plan for the Town of Westlake TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION 17-09 A RESOLUTION BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE, TEXAS, APPROVING A NEW PUBLIC ART PLAN FOR THE TOWN WHICH ESTABLISHES GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND A NEW FRAMEWORK FOR A TOWN- WIDE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM. WHEREAS, the Westlake Town Council (Town Council) has identified excellent quality of life as a strategic priority; and, WHEREAS, excellent quality of life emphasizes community aesthetics which includes public art; and, WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that the Town's quality of life revolving around aesthetics and public art would benefit from re-constituting the Town's public art program; and, WHEREAS, the Town's adopted 2008 Public Art Plan has proven to be a valuable foundation and tool for creating a new public art plan based on feedback and expertise available now; and WHEREAS, the Town Council retained the services of MESA Planning to prepare a new public art plan for the Town which included soliciting public input at a widely advertised public input session; and WHEREAS, the Town Council is desirous, after going through this extensive months' long process of input and preparation of a new updated plan, of adopting this new Public Art Plan which is described as Exhibit A to this resolution; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the passage of this Resolution is in the best interest of the citizens of Westlake. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS: SECTION l: THAT, all matters stated in the Recitals hereinabove are found to be true and correct and are incorporated herein by reference as if copied in their entirety. SECTION 2: THAT, the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas, hereby approves with this resolution the new Westlake Public Art Plan attached as Exhibit A to this resolution, with said new Public Art Plan to apply to Westlake on a Town-wide base and replacing the 2008 Public Art Plan. Resolution 17-09 Page 1 of 2 SECTION 3: If any portion of this Resolution shall, for any reason, be declared invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining provisions hereof and the Council hereby determines that it would have adopted this Resolution without the invalid provision. SECTION 4: That this resolution shall become effective from and after its date of passage. PASSED AND APPROVED ON THIS 27th DAY OF FEBRUARY 2017. ATTEST: u d L e Laura L. Wheat, Mayor 7/7 U7 711� Ke*­Ed w r s, Town Secretary Thomas E. Bryn , T wn Manager �N OF APPROVED AS TO F-@IRM: �m L. Vinton L w f T Attorney �"-X A S' Resolution 17-09 Page 2 of 2 WESTLAKE PUBLIC ART A STRATEGY FOR ART ROOTED IN THE SPIRIT OF PLACE AND EXECUTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE LARGER ARTS COMMUNITY --low 1. - ... ,. + PREPARED BY MESA-PLANNING RUSSELL TETHER FINE ART SUE CANTERBURY JANUARY 5, 2017 MESA + PLANNING Resolution 17-09 TABLE OF CONTENTS ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................................................................... 3 PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ...................................................................................................................... 18 STRATEGY ......................................................................................................................................................................... 31 NEXTSTEPS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 48 Resolution 17-09 1i .a. r y Resolution ASSESSMENT In the Summer of 2016,the Town of Westlake engaged MESA-Planning to prepare a strategy and plan for a "Westlake Public Arts Program"that was consistent with the vison of the newly adopted Comprehensive Plan (Forging Westlake, Comprehensive Plan Update, Town of Westlake, 2015) and builds upon earlier work present- ed in the 2008 Master Plan for Public Art in Westlake. As a starting point for this assignment,it is useful here to access the above referenced documents in terms of how they call for (or inform) a public Art program...and... assess the general relationship between Westlake and Public Art to date. Therefore,the following Assessment focuses on three areas of investigation as follows: Westlake and Legorretds Art: In 1989,the New York Times published an important article that placed Westlake apart from most other communities of the Dallas/ Fort Worth Metroplex. This article, entitled"ARCHITEC- TURE VIEW, I.B.M.s Urbane New Place in the Sun in Texas",was written by the famous architectural critic of the New Yorker Magazine, Paul Goldberger. Huffington Post has cited Mr. Goldberger as "arguably the leading figure in architectural criticism'; making it noteworthy that the little-known Town of Westlake would bring out such powerful commentary. In his lengthy article about the recently completed Solana project, Mr. Goldberger pays significant attention to Solanas monumental 100 ft. pylons. Citing the pylons, Paul Goldberger states: "Mr. Legorreta's pylons are not as pure as a piece of sculpture as they might first seem to be. For the Texas road- scape is filled with pylons, most of which support signs for car dealerships and fast food restaurants, and the motorist driving along Texas freeways is used to seeing a forest of tall,thin objects. What Mr. Legorreta has done is abstract these pylons,turn them into visual events themselves rather than supports for signs, and give them the vibrant palette of Mexico. In a single gesture he has given Solana a monumental civic sculpture, and identi- fiable landmark, and an object that relates to both the suburban sprawl of Texas and to the larger architectural traditions of the Southwest" While the brooding pylons that sat in a vast and undeveloped landscape are indeed sculptural,it can be said that much of the Solana is sculptural.Void of specific style reference and ornament the heavy stucco walls provide a plane into which door and window openings are cut to a depth that produces conspicuous shadow and renders a light-to-dark interplay as well as a manipulation of form that can only be appreciated if viewed as a sculptural intent. Ricardo Legorreta worked in the tradition, and philosophical perspective of his mentor,the famous Luis Barragan. A research paper written for Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico City states the following about Mr. Barragan (note how well it can also describe Solana): "Luis Barragan's Architecture has been recognized by r its aesthetical and philosophical values. However,his proposals have a deeply rooted regional and tradition- al knowledge. For Barragan,the existence of an in- ternational or even national architecture was absurd, ` because every region had to generate its architecture rooted in its time, culture,traditions, climate and materials. Barragaris approach to design comprehends all levels from the urban planning to interior details. ,. , A strong emphasis was given to the natural environ- Barragaris Casa Gilardi ment and the cultural context. There are several relevant issues related to passive design that we can identify in his work" The sentiments driving Barragan and Legoretta were simply the sentiments of the artist, making Solanas pres- ence in, and relation to,Westlake one of art-to-its-environment. It is interesting to compare the above descrip- tion of Barragan's philosophy to the goals and objectives that came out of Westlake's Public Art Workshop (Octo- Resolution 17-09 4 ber 20, 2016),the statements flowing from the citizenry of Westlake and the philosophic perspective flowing into the design of Solana suggest that the presence of this commercial village has had a profound influence over time. Therefore,it can be said that Westlake's venture into the relationship between place and Public art began with Solana and the legacy of legendary designers passed along through the edifice they created has given Westlake a unique understanding of the role of Public Art and a unique appreciation for what can be truly great. Previous Public Art Plans and Studies: There are 2 planning reports (other than the 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update) that discuss public Art. These are the 2008 report ("Creating Culture, Connecting Community A Master Plan for Public Art in Westlake"by the Westlake Public Art Society) and a consultant report ("EM.1938 Corridor Master Plan, Town of Westlake" by SRA and Townscape). The Public Art Society document (hereinafter PAS Report) is the most comprehensive of the two and the one that has created a legacy of organizational infrastructure that must be considered in this effort. The report was produced by the Westlake Public Arts Society,which is an outgrowth of the Town estab- lished Public Art Committee (established by resolution in 2007 with an appointment of members) and changed in 2008 to a membership based Public Art Society. The PAS Report starts with a brief recognition of the profound influence of Solana and describes the opportunity Westlake enjoys as a result of this history and present(2008) context as follows: "We have [an] opportunity now to establish Westlake as a Community of the Arts,not content with plain vanilla architecture,not content with uninspired public spaces, and not content to be ordinary in any way." This statement closely parallels the sentiment of the partic- ipants in Westlake's Comprehensive Plan Process who saw Westlake as more than a suburb,having unique identity and unique community. The PAS Report parallels the above description of Solands ftw T4 IL3The ILI Or wh In t lingering influence (Westlake and Legorettas Art) by stating x-ki'^'r&"'ns calk-., dtiyul A that Westlake "has established an identity as an artistic com- rJ3b1nh qq puhhL xl Pi fi Jhekr , munity by the example set by Solana': For the most part,the %ni ukc Wd' ,n " s PAS Report is about the Public Art Society itself,laying out a uh the T.Ao3 vision,guiding principles, a framework of activity areas where r44K" the Society will be active, and discussion of Society respon- sibilities in management and operation of an Arts Program. Basically,the PAS Report views the Public Arts Society as the ,roak n central focus of art related activities of the Town (composed of +' ++Wrahm Residents,Area Employees, Students,Visitors, and Prospective New Businesses) and those who would place Art (the Town "f`'" and Private Developers). In this central position,the Public Arts Society envisions outreach (to artist and institutions), education, initiating and selecting work,funding, and conser- vation/maintenance of works placed. Therefore,the plan is a working document for the Public Arts Society who will follow with more detail about the art itself. Page 11 PAS Report The Guiding Principles portion of this document contains a statement of Art Purpose (e.g. Provide an example to the children ...), Society Action (e.g. Ensure that the artistic experience is available...), desired characteristics of art (e.g. Encourage art that is interactive), and Programmatic Initiative (e.g. Provide that Public Art will be a Resolution 17-09 5 key component to all public improvement). Much of what is laid out as a guiding principal is closely parallel to inputs received from the October 20,2016 Public Art Workshop,meaning that the sentiments about art itself, laid out in 2008, are generally consistent with views held today. Also interesting is that the"Locations of Art" discussed on page 16 of the PAS Report generally parallels ME- SA-Planning's subdivision of Westlake into 4 primary art contexts. Mesa-Planning identifies 4 art settings (the Regional Commercial setting,the Open Space setting,the Town setting, and the Pastoral setting, see page 22). Similarly the PAS Report identifies major commercial development tracts (similar to MESA's Regional Commer- cial), Portals and Gateways (similar to MESA's Town), Trails and other Open Spaces (similar to MESA's Open Space), and discussion of placement in residential development (similar to MESA's Pastoral). Therefore,the Pub- lic Art Framework Plan produced as a result of the October 20,2016 Public Art Workshop is consistent with the PAS report view of likely art contexts. The PAS Report makes recommendation of various ordinances and policies needed to put the Public Art Pro- gram (administered by the Public Art Society) into action through enforcement and funding. These ordinances tend to organize around the notion of creating a place for the integration of art into the various financial ac- tivities and commitments of the Town. This section of the report also seeks to set the Public Art Society up as a 501C-3 in order to offer greater appeal to potential donors. The extent to which public funding sources can be engaged and the extent to which a 501 C-3 competes with other City sponsored donor targets (e.g.Westlake Academy) needs to be evaluated in light of a broader organizational infrastructure proposed by MESA-Planning. The primary relationship between the Public Art Society and Artist is established through an Artists Registry as the PAS report states: "The Registry will be a mechanism for gaining exposure for these artists with links to their websites,biographies, or examples of their work. Through the creation of this Registry,we hope to be able to build relationships with many different types of artists..."This registry would provide the Society with a network of artists to whom the Society can issue a"call to Artists" and solicit project proposals for projects identified by the Society in accor- dance with certain criteria (published within the report). The relationship created by the registry identifies a pool of talent available to the Society for projects. Therefore, a lot of burden is placed upon the Registry to be current, inclusive, and representative of emerging, as well as established,trends. On-going Community Participation in the Westlake Arts effort is a responsibility of the Society,which it accom- plishes through: • Public notice of Society meetings • Public posting of calls to artists (by the Society) • Annual membership drives • Promotion of Regional Art Events • Mailings, e-mail communications, and notices of Society events • Annual meeting on National Arts Advocacy Day • Periodic presentations at City Hall As a result of the Comprehensive Planning Workshop process,the above list of Public Participation initiatives must add processes by which the public is more of an advocate and has more influence in program guidance. Finally,the 2008 PAS Report lays out a three-pronged funding strategy which seeks to earmark a portion of pub- lic funds for Public Arts purposes. In addition,the funding strategy recommends that the Society raises funds internally through grants,membership sales, and donations.With the exceptions of donations,these proposals may not raise sufficient funds for a Town scale program. Therefore, some additional funding strategy is needed Resolution 17-09 6 to come in behind these sound recommendations with additional funding potential. The 2008 PAS Report, adopted by the Town,lays out many recommendations,policies, strategies, and criteria that the 2016-2017 Public Art Program must implement,refine, and/or otherwise build upon. Thanks to this comprehensive effort,the strategy recommended in this report stands on a solid foundation. In addition to the 2008 PAS Report, the Town of Westlake also adopted a Master Plan for FM 1938. The FM 1938 Report is basically a design plan for Davis Street as it traverses Westlake. The document establishes an Urban De- sign vernacular for street scape and street elements which speak to the "rural character"of Westlake. The Design Palette recommended consists of: • Native sandstone • Native fossilized limestone • Large river cobbles • Hand wrought iron • Color accents • Texas native trees, shrubs, and grasses in bold rhythmic patterns • Pure geometries -timeless classic forms • Westlake brand repeated in architecture and hardscape elements FM 1938 is a TxDOT highway and, as a result, imposes certain restraints upon use of the ROW that are guided by TxDOT standards. Therefore,the use of streetscape elements must allow compliance with such standards and also blend with the future streetscaping of non-TxDOT roadways. The concept depends on the use of repeated elements and thematic forms that create the desired continuity. Much of the palette items and their expression of rural character were derived from public participants in a 2009 Public Workshop Public Art is one of the final items considered in the FM 1938 Master plan as FM 1938 is viewed as an oppor- tunity for Public Art. Public Art is viewed as important to enhancing the visual interest of the corridor and the report states that such art should complement the design vocabulary in terms of color,form,materials, and char- acter. However, the purpose of this art needs to be further advanced and the means by which it will be selected and attained must seek to impose criteria of compatibility, as suggested. Therefore, such criteria for compatibili- ty must be brought to the process of producing the art work. Herein is an important aspect that the current effort must build upon. The 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update and its call for Public Art: MESA-Planning was engaged to advance Westlake's Public art initiative because the initiative itself is an aspect of Comprehensive Plan Implementation. To date there are 6 major Comprehensive Plan implementation initiatives being conducted. These include: 1. Transfer of Development Intensity ordinance: A proposed ordinance which endeavors to achieve future increase in development intensity(the magnitude of use permitted within a PD), accomplished through the severance of such intensity from one part of the Town (known as a Sending District) to another part of the Town (known as a Receiving District). Through such a process of"redistribution" of development intensity,properties may acquire increases in development intensity,more appropriate for the value prox- imities that the property possesses,without increasing overall vehicular trip volumes associated with the current level of Town wide entitlement...a prevailing concern of the Forging Westlake, Comprehensive Plan Update,Town of Westlake, 2015 Resolution 17-09 7 2. Development Policies Ordinance:A proposed ordinance which establishes procedures, criteria, and inclusions for the administration of zoning requests, concept plan review, development plan review, site plan review, and Transfer of Development Intensity. Through these policies,the Forging Westlake, Com- prehensive Plan Update,Town of Westlake, 2015 is fully integrated into the development review process and there is an overall uniformity in the application of city policy over time. 3. Building Quality Manual: A key component of value protection (as set forth in the Comprehensive Plan) that assures sustenance of Westlake's unique high end sub-market distinction. The Building Quality manual addresses Design, Materials,and Workmanship of the Town's built fabric. 4. Development Administration and Management staff and procedure:Administrative establishment of review procedures for consideration of zoning, concept plans,plats, development plans, site plans, and requests for Transfer of Development Intensity that assure consistency and uniformity in the application burden and review time frame faced by any applicant, as well as comprehensive consideration of the rele- vant issues. 5. On-going Development Design Review: The focused design review of proposed development within the Town intended to assure quality,promote continuity,perpetuate aspects of Township identity, and pre- serve natural/cultural character. 6. Westlake Public Art Plan and Strategy:An event oriented strategy that will bring the essence and charac- ter of Westlake to the artist as inspiration of the work to be placed within the fabric of the Town. Through the above described six initiatives,Westlake is putting its Comprehensive Plan into action and using the vision of the plan to give form to the future of the Town. The relevance of the Comprehensive Plan to this implementation effort can be seen in the following discussion of relevant plan components: Comprehensive Plan Goals and Objectives: The Forging Westlake, Comprehensive Plan Update,Town of Westlake, 2015 (hereinafter the Comprehensive Plan) was formulated in conjunction with a robust public participation process and fully engaged citizen steer- ing committee. Within this participatory structure,the first activity was to establish guiding goals and objectives around which the Public Arts initiative will be formulated. Comprehensive Plan Workshop 1 and a portion of Workshop 2 was devoted to dialogue about goals and objectives that would inform the future built-out Town- ship. Many of these goal and objective statements identify outcomes which are particularly well suited to public art and consistent with the type of sentiment reflected in the 2008 Public Arts Plan and the FM 1938 Master Plan. These statements include the following excerpts from the Goals section of the Comprehensive Plan docu- ment: • Visual Image (pg. 12) Goal Statement 1.1: "Create Development Standards defining features of development that promote and preserve the picturesque and pastoral qualities of Westlake..." A particular feature of development in this case is public art which can derive its form and features from the rural landscape that the development is replacing,thereby remembering the past for future generations. This was a sentiment brought out in the October 2016 Public Art Workshop (see Program Goals and Objectives). • Visual Image (pg.123) Goal Statement 2.6: "Promote non-residential office development that hosts a significant ground plane of pedestrian features and Resolution 17-09 8 visual amenities..." Public Art is an essential amenity of an urbanized condition such as the Regional Commercial sectors of Westlake. • Visual Image (pg.123) Goal Statement 2.11: "Promote the continued creation of environmental, cultural, educational, and visual assets for Westlake in all private and public development" Public Art is an essential cultural, educational, and visual asset. • Visual Image (pg.123) Goal Statement 2.13: "Promote a special freeway scape identity for Westlake where it lies on both sides of the freeway" When freeway non-residential forms tend to be similar,public art is essential to establishing a"difference" • Quality of Life (pg.123) Goal Statement 1.2: "Develop strategies that encourage and inspire commercial development to incorporate visual qualities re- flective of Westlake's rural-like-setting" Public Art has the unique ability to "remember the past" as well as interpret it by demonstrating its influence on the present. • Quality of Life (pg.123) Goal Statement 1.3: "Preserve Westlake's sense of slow paced life as it develops by promoting experiential and visual characteris- tics associated with the current non-encroachment condition" Public Art has the unique capability to be experienced and thereby a unique capability to accomplish the intent of this goal. • Urban Form (pg.124) Goal Statement 1.3: "Maintain Westlake's sense of separation from surrounding typical commercial and residential development" Public art can be a strong aspect of differentiation. • Accessibility(pg.124) Goal Statement 1.1: "Make pedestrian movement from neighborhoods to desired destinations within Westlake more convenient- ly accessible, easily identifiable... " The trail,trail markers,trail heads and other aspects of the trail system call for legibility which can be facili- tated by the artful handling and should be treated as art. • Vehicular Circulation/Traffic (pg.125) Goal Statement 1.9: "Manage traffic to prevent traffic congestion through the use of traffic calming measures where appropri- ate..." Public Art can be a traffic calming measure when properly designed and placed. • Education (pg.127) Goal Statement 1.1: "Create Improve and promote Westlake's growing reputation as a community of educational excellence and Resolution 17-09 9 educational opportunity" Public Art is an educational medium which can expand human understanding through experience and inter- pretation. • Education (pg.127) Goal Statement 1.2: "Expand educational opportunities to additional schools (such as preparatory schools and venues...)" Public Art is an educational venue and one where the artist (as well as the art) can teach. • Water Ways,Water Bodies, and Natural Systems (pg.127) Goal Statement 1.2: "Maximize the potential of present and future lakes and water courses to enhance the value of residential and non-residential property" Value is created by the water feature if the water feature influences and defines context of place. Here, Public Art derived from the presence of water is instrumental. • Parks and Recreation (pg.128) Goal Statement 1.2: "Provide recreational opportunities that are more undeveloped passive open spaces that serve less intense and contemplative activities...' Public Art can engage the viewer in ways that are more contemplative and less intense than developed recre- ational facilities. These Goals Statements from the 2015 Comprehensive Plan and the diagram below reveal the importance of Public Art as a means of achieving one of the central visions of Westlake citizen participants in the Comprehen- sive planning process...namely preservation of value. In this diagram, Public Art is one of a host of initiatives aimed at accomplishing this objective. Parallel objectives include: Education, Open Space and Parks, Quality of Design and Construction, Specialty Development, and Preservation (both natural and cultural). The common effect of all these initiatives,including Public Art,is to enhance "differentiation"wherein differentiation has then following components: identity, quality of life, community, and beauty. Therefore, Public Art builds upon the goals brought forward by Westlake's citizens during the Comprehensive Plan process AND is an instrumental strategic component in the larger strategy aimed at achieving the stated goals. estl:kles , Siub- Market L_ —A Resolution 17-09 10 The Framework Plan: Based upon the Goals and objectives produced by citizen participants in the Comprehensive Plan Public Work- shops,the consultant team constructed a diagrammatic expression of these statements in an array of linkages, pathways, districts,focal points, edges,portals, and landmarks...called the Framework Plan. The Framework plan is central to the Comprehensive Plan itself as it provides a spatial template influencing the formulation of the 8 plan elements (Land Use, Thoroughfares, Parks/Open Space/Trails,Urban Design Structure, Housing, Economic Development, Public Facilities, and Storm Water Conservation). The Framework Plan as the template for the Plan vision is also,therefore, a central influence on the placement and purpose of Public Art. As a spatial mosaic of cognitively meaningful features (such as focal points),this plan defines experiential contexts for art. The framework plan was derived from an analysis of views (the primary and defining feature of Westlake).View access and view type is associated with certain geographic areas of the Town which are,in turn, associated with certain land uses,making the "view" an important determinant of generally understood districts within the Townscape. The Framework Plan captures this importance by defining districts derived from views and knitting them to- gether with cognitive elements (such as links) and creating a single sense of"Township" out of multiple natural and land use settings. This Framework Plan is pictured below with the earlier described view analysis superim- posed over it. Note that it defines 5 district settings (called communities): Open Space, Pastoral Community, Town Community,Viewshed Community, and Regional Community. These 5 communities are, in essence, dis- tinctive settings which comprise the fabric of the Township. These settings can receive art in different ways and for different purposes, suggesting that the Public Art Program for Westlake must be like Westlake itself. multidi- mensional, multi-purposeful, and more complex than simply the placement of tasteful work. -� P=15ayllar" y� Traft�CAT" i Tarn IMM MOMW UMM �c} i TOM OW-01" ' l� ,, l ■CprYq�1' ■ Repay U--,-Cy Resolution 17-09 11 The Plan Elements: The above described Framework Plan was the template upon which the 8 plan elements of the Comprehensive Plan document were built. Each of these plan elements defines locations and zones and thereby, defines opportu- nities for Public Art. More specifically,the Plan Elements and their relevance to Public Art include: The Land Use Plan: The Land Use Plan presented in the 2015 Comprehensive Plan builds upon the Framework Plan and View Anal- ysis (described above),therefore,the built characteristics of Land Use should reflect the influence of the Com- munity Type (defined in the framework plan) and View Condition (defined in the View Analysis) as engaged by proposed development. Community Type expresses the desired built character of Land Use that should be mani- fest in the development of existing entitlements.View Condition expresses the magnitude (density and height) of Land Use that preserves vista. Therefore, the Land Use Plan in Westlake's Comprehensive Plan is appropriate for a Town that is 100% zoned because it focuses on built characteristics instead of zoning classification. Thereby, it manages build-out of zoning already established by guiding required plan review and/or potential amendment to the existing PD entitlement. To accomplish the above described purpose,the 2015 Comprehensive Plan Land Use Plan defines 8 Character District Types as follows: • Open Space Character District: This district contains much of the geological break between Westlakes's uplands and lowlands as well as much of the identifying landscapes, natural features, and waterways within it. Pastoral Character District: This district contains most of Westlake's residential development which con- sists of large homes situated on large landscaped lots. The overall character is one of a dominant landscape and houses arrayed within it. • Commercial Community 3 Character District: This district contains mostly lower density,lower height, campus style non-residential development that is appropriate for residential adjacency. It also can contain transitional housing that further defines the relationship to existing residential areas. • Commercial Community 2 Character District: This district establishes a transition from freeway and freeway related development to residential and lower density non-residential areas within the interior of Westlake. This community may have higher density but it also responds to location within characteristic view sheds with lower height. • Commercial Community 1 Character District: This district defines the freeway frontage in those areas lo- cated within the prevailing view shed. Therefore height is an issue as well as appropriate response to the high value freeway corridor. This area will be more urban than Commercial Community 1 or 2. Town Core Character District: This district is a context district that supports the Town Common Char- acter District. This means that it supports the viability of the Town Common through supporting hospitality, entertainment, and office uses. The Town Core District is also a transitional district that transitions from the Regional Commercial areas (north and west) to the Town Common and Community Commercial areas 1 and 2 (generally to the south and east). Portions of the Town Core District lie within different view settings which impacts the appropriateness of building intensity and height. • Town Common Character District: The Town Common District is intended to be the hub of"Town' Resolution 17-09 12 activities which converge upon a pedestrian friendly environment. The Westlake Academy borders the Town Common. In addition,the Town Common contains one of Westlake's most dramatic"landmark landforms" which overlooks the heart of the Regional Commercial District. The urban-ness of the Regional Commercial District transitions to the Town Common through the Town Center District. Regional Commercial Character District: This district is the most intense commercial district in West- lake. It is viewed as the primary Receiving District for the proposed movement of entitled square footage out of the Community Commercial Districts (making them more suitable for their residential adjacency). The Land Use Plan (pictured below) incorporates these 8 Character Districts and further breaks them down into 16 final zones depending on the relationship of the character district to a specific view condition. In this way the Framework Plan is fully implemented in the Land Use Plan. Because the Land Use plan is a mosaic of character settings with specific purpose and development pattern, it defines locations where art of certain types is more or less appropriate.Also, much of the specific character described (pastoral,campus, open space, urban) can be more clearly expressed by and through public art. THE LAND USE PLAN Kk ■ttrx m.....r.t4,rr...�If'Aw 1r.N ev. 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Resolution 17-09 13 The Thoroughfare Plan: The Thoroughfare Plan (pictured below),identifies connections (arrow heads) and linkages (dotted lines) needed to accommodate a portion of the total traffic potentially generated by the total entitlements that have been ap- proved by the Town of Westlake as of the date of the Comprehensive Plan. To accomplish this,the Thoroughfare Plan created a"thoroughfare system" comprised of 3 types of roadways: Regional Arterials,Town Arterials, and Pastoral Collectors. Each of these roadway types presents a distinctive streetscape and thereby presents a visually unique"public domain"within which Public Art can be a primary means of distinction and enhancement as well as a means of legibility and orientation. Therefore,implementing a visually distinctive system that communi- cates location within it, calls upon Public Art as an important visual feature. NE THOROUGHFARE PLAN � J L-FIT{ * {...}pP..�)yrr..nl 4-4 #i t , wW eaYVN.�uE .6 r­ v6w/ CnhrE� r x �4ir�er!IFOCoilwAr 4040 — No ### * t F *#r-. * p ITp•C�a. �# k � a "-ww AukCw�+w Fara AU r =Lex;}� Gimr,Sertlr{ ar { a 11rts i.arn ror f.ra.�M.u. T I � w�rd.aA+�•o-7a k f Jrmr.a k•Ic.6nre.It I+�•4 Fr1R•Frllrr..l�ir y rrdrra�l pa_... rf4Riw•tr� 1 ! OrAXATM R:FWrtroatl�+eY^+"4 G+r–ra+to++rc +Ppr;+�r nwrwdvo-w*,riM o-lFnM,n+d wraurr 4r�Mrn anaK ev Y+wu��nw47r r ss 0�c�aFNnP xr wY�r4+tl+arua w�arwM oe vaorvr an/mr frF.TwNc+r.it x+wo-s yp.+ro-ii mrr a+1rr MNn i hr}un Snwu artl s tii ru I w.Tan wnt+i Fxc�,1d� +4w i tr�c ti+wn+.x t+aero, i V+whe+t 41 u.n j4%N,Wn MkF W to bLA sit" U016POw dw 10901d- eawr Gxu, M kn 001r Md tarn nr{+4w1MDbM"MM Resolution 17-09 14 The Parks,Open Space,and Trails Plan: The Parks, Open Space, and Trails Plan (pictured below) subdivides the Open Space Character District (defined within the Land use plan) into 4 sub-zones: • Recreation Open Space • Connected Open Space • Natural preserve • Rural Ranch Landscape • Areas of Sensitivity The Parks, Open Space, and Trails Plan further locates key park types which include: • Mini/Urban Parks • Community park • Neighborhood park • Landmark landform • School park • Town Common As a result of the above referenced demarcations, another layer of settings and conditions is established which present unique opportunities for Public Art which can make the setting more: • Pleasurable • Comprehensible • Memorable • Educational • Distinct In addition,the Parks, Open Space and Trails plan contains a Trails component which lays out a network of Regional Trails, Town Trails,Neighborhood Trails,Nature Trails, Trail Interpretative Stations,Major and Minor trail intersections, and Trail Hubs. The legibility of this system and one's orientation within it will necessitate the incorporation of Public Art in the creation of signage,landmarks, and functioning features THE PAH K$ OPEN SPACE PLAN � ^ THE TRAILS PLAN 0° J10 : W �r Resolution 17-09 15 The Urban Design Structures Plan: The Urban Design Structures Plan (pictured below) established a design vocabulary for streets, intersections, trails and sidewalks, edges, arrival and focal points, active public spaces,major gathering spaces,minor gathering spaces,passive public spaces, conservation open spaces,public facilities, and on-site open spaces which is in- tended to create identity, continuity, orientation/legibility, and convey quality. The Town Design Structure plan is pictured below and shows the framework upon which the design vocabulary is executed. Each of these distinc- tive elements is further distinguished through the integration of Public Art. The diversity of design settings will necessitate that the design of elements within that setting be approached as"public art' THE TOWN DESIGN STRUCTURE PLAN 1 r r � The Facilities and Town Hall Plan: The Facilities and Town Hall Plan (pictured below) identifies the need for and suggested locations of primary Emergency facilities and Municipal Service Facilities. Each of these locations constitutes a significant public space. In the history of human settlement, such spaces have becomes the prime locations for public art, espe- cially art that commemorates history and expresses public value. Therefore,Westlake' s ascendency from rural hamlet to significant Town will be told in the Art its public spaces present THE FACILITIES&TOWN HALL PLAN Os mww v.wr mw. *e.w,W ioc.na.e• uu � .ewn H.n wunen o: �ami savai A C Resolution 17-09 16 The Storm Water and Water Conservation Plan: The Storm Water and Water Conservation Plan presents a best practices manual that will move Westlake in the direction of greater sustainability. However, it is clear within this plan that every naturalized drainage structure and other water saving/ enhancing measures are opportunities for such things to be done in artful ways. The Housing Plan: The Housing Plan seeks to create sustainable housing-submarketswithin Westlake,thereby,preserving the high value of existing sub-districts while also accommodating future shifts in Westlake's population. As presented in the 2008 Public Art Society Report,housing developments present an opportunity for distinctive public art that can further define distinctive housing settings and help mitigate increasing encroachment from Southlake and Keller sub-markets. The Economic Development Plan: The Economic Development Plan is a strategy for economic cluster formation around a Financial Services Indus- trial Cluster. The"higher end"nature of this cluster (populated by corporate headquarters and office campuses) is prime for the development of"corporate estates" Such a setting is a rare opportunity for public/private part- nership for the arts. In addition, art is a central expression of the wealth of this cluster and therefore, an import- ant feature of the corporate estate. The extent to which Westlake itself distinguishes its Township with important art and a commitment to the arts advances the"selection desirability" of Westlake as a location for Financial Services. Therefore, advancement along the "wheel of economic development" as presented in the Economic Development Plan is greatly facilitated by Public Art. Public Art is an important component of various Econom- ic Development Initiatives which include: • Identity • Amenity • Association • Education • Land use Context • Target Marketing Conclusions: The above assessment demonstrates that Public Art is part of the Character, Identity, Consciousness and Vision of Westlake, starting with its history of Solana and extending into the future envisioned through the 2015 Com- prehensive Plan. Therefore,the following text sets forth a strategy to fulfill this legacy as Westlake Builds its future. The assumptions of this assessment were ratified in an October 2016 Public Art Workshop with action oriented statements that become the basis of the strategy recommended herein. At this point, it is clear that this strategy is serving a mandate for action already put forward over the history of this Town and building upon significant Public Art related work already accomplished. Resolution 17-09 17 THE PUBLIC ART WORKSHOP AND PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES AOL 43- PASTORAL �rti+y COMhhUNITY y r T � - Resolution 17-09 18 THE PUBLIC ART, PUBLIC WORKSHOP On October 20, 2016 MESA-Planning conducted a public workshop at Westlake Academy for the purpose of ac- quiring citizen affirmation of a public art program and direction as to the nature of the program itself and what it should accomplish. In order to conclude with the affirmation and direction sought,it was necessary to organize the Public Art workshop as a continuation of earlier Comprehensive Planning Workshops and build from the basics of consensus attained therein. Therefore,the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Plan became the source from which the Workshop Framework was derived. k f' - i = J r - r As the previous Assessment of the Comprehensive Plan illustrates,the Plan document is brimming with oppor- tunity for art that remembers the past,protects/remembers/amplifies the natural and rural mosaic, and external- izes community. All three areas of accomplishment are tied to the unusual and dramatic landscape of the Town. Straddling the uplands extending north from Keller and the lowlands extending south from Trophy Club,West- lake hosts the geologic break occurring at the confluence. This break is characterized by landmark landforms that rise up south of 114 and north of Dove Road. This "land phenomenon" shapes and defines the cherished and characteristic views from and to the Town, defines basic areas of land use, and constitutes the primary expe- rience that is uniquely Westlake. Therefore, for Art to have any productive effect on advancement of the vision of the Comprehensive Plan, it must be responsive to, engage with, and derive from this unique and complex land- scape. In light of the above,it was necessary to orchestrate a Public Workshop that: 1. Talks about art in the context of the land,landscape, and the town fabric it creates Resolution 17-09 19 2. Talks about art in terms that are useful in guiding the program being formulated instead of talking about the art itself. Art in the Context of the Land, Landscape, and Town Fabric: The previous Comprehensive Plan Assessment summarizes the extent to which the Planning Framework Plan and Land Use Plan were shaped by a responsiveness to the "view settings"of the Town and explains how impo- sition of the view settings over the landscape defined a Planning Framework consisting of 5 community types (Open Space, Pastoral Community,Town Community,Viewshed Community, and Regional Community). The Map below illustrates the framework as it related to a superimposed View Analysis. -k 1}rz;byWU s TmM C&Vwg TQm Unb "*rw UF" .ZWW*"ram+ ckrlw i�a•M1 Seau ■TOMS CoYuft Note that the framework in response naturally subdivides with the 114 frontage comprising the lowlands (the area of most intense commercial development) and the areas "viewed-to'; the land mostly south of Dove Road comprising the Highlands (the area of most continuous residential development) and the area"viewed-from', and the transition between Upland and Lowland being the area of"Town' related residential/ non-residential de- velopment as well as open space which seeks to preserve the more sensitive"ecotone" The relationship between clear landscape context and land use is truly unique and distinctive of Westlake. Because of this unique land/ land use association it can be said that as Westlake grows in accordance with the Comprehensive Plan Land Use plan,the Town will evolve 4 primary contexts which will be 4 primary"Art Settings." Each of these distinctive landscape/built-scape settings of the Framework plan presents a unique opportunity for, and challenge to,public art...if that art is to support, advance, and otherwise be responsive to the Compre- hensive Plan. Therefore,the Comprehensive Plan Framework defines not only community types but"art set- tings"within the Town. The following map is the Public Art Framework brought to the Public Art Public Work- shop which places people in the art settings as a perspective from which to have discussion. Resolution 17-09 20 Break-Out Groups _ , fry — Regional Commercial Context Town Open Space Context 1 ©Town Community Context Pastoral Community Context r k , 7 �I r t t Note that the above map is labeled"Break-Out Groups."The participants were asked to assemble in smaller discussion groups (called"break-out groups") after hearing a general presentation on Public Art and example purposes that Public Art serves within a community. By allowing participants to view the topics of conversa- tion from within a particular"art setting"the dialogue was more focused on how art relates to the setting,what influence it has on development within it, and the purpose it serves for the larger community. Attendants at the Public Art Public Workshop were evenly distributed among the 4"Art Settings"portrayed above and held dis- cussion within the breakout group for about an hour. Discussions within the breakout group and viewing the topic of art within the characteristics of that setting naturally directed the conversation away from art objects and toward art performance and relationships. This kind of discussion is far more productive in generating statements that can guide the operation,mission, and administration of the Public art strategy(yet to be devised). The workshop based on the 4 art settings promoted a discussion of the"purpose" of art and avoided the preferred aesthetics in art. The Purpose of the Art rather than the Art: In order to further facilitate robust discussion about the purpose of art in any of the Town"Art Settings",the presentation which preceded the breakout group discussion explored art purpose and effect. The presentation was given by MESA-Planning, Russell Tether Fine Art, and Sue Canterbury(Associate Curator of American Art at the DMA). The presentation contained 3 parts: Part 1:The reality of perception (Russell Tether) which discussed the attributes of"greatness" and"masterpiece" and revealed the implications of striving for anything less. The presentation explored critical elements/ consider- ations in developing a Public art program and presented benefits of a successful effort. Part 2:Creative Place Making:A Union of Art and Environment (Sue Canterbury) which discussed the transfor- mative power of art and presented possibilities/effects of good art. Possibilities were explored through a presen- tation of successful, innovative, and impactful examples of Public art. Resolution 17-09 21 Part 3:The Purpose of Public Art in Westlake (Ashley Shook and Robin McCaffrey) which discussed the inev- itable evolution of the above described"Art Settings",the opportunities for art in each setting(giving broader definition to the notion of domain within which Public Art can be effected), and example purposes of Public Art in the landscape and human settlement. Attention was given to the close parallel between the effect Public Art can have in Westlake as it anticipates the yet to evolve Township and the effect Public Art had on Rome under Pope Sixtus and his Plan for Rome which used public art to shape and give form to the city that has evolved. Westlake is again unusual among cities and townships of the Metroplex as it has a unique opportunity to be informed by its art in ways that most cities can- not.Westlake has an awareness to guide the art fabric the way it guides the other built fabric, it has an opportuni- ty to make Public Art a broad issue that reaches to the treatment of the following within each Art Setting. 1. Regional Commercial Setting • Skyline • Regional Roadways and associated Grounds • Plazas • Lakes • Pedestrian Walkways and Pedestrian Streets • Hubs/points of confluence/ convergence • Monuments and Signage 2. Town Open Space Setting • Hilltops • Preserves and parks • Trails and trailheads • Waterways and lakes • Plant communities • Rural Heritage fabric 3. Town Setting • Town Roadways and associated grounds • Campus grounds • Hilltops,waterways,lakes • Activity focal points • Trails and trailheads • Walls and fences • Gates and entries, including entry structures • Parks 4. Pastoral Setting • Pastoral Collectors and associated grounds • Walls and fences • Entries • Trails and Trailheads • Common areas • Sidewalks For each of the above listed settings and opportunities within the setting,there is a purpose that Public Art here should endeavor to serve. Example purposes given to spur discussion include: Resolution 17-09 22 1. Landmark Demarcation:Art used for the purpose of setting a place,feature, center of activity...assigning location. 2. Focal Definition:Art used for the purpose of claiming space for activity...identifying center. 3. Portal Definition: Art used for the purpose of identifying entry,place of beginning...a frame for experi- ence. 4. Sub-market Association: Art used for the purpose of communicating sequence...announcing something forthcoming...position relative to other places. 5. Commemoration:Art used for the purpose of remembering,honoring,portraying, interpreting an event, place,personality,tradition,time, etc... 6. Interaction/. Communication: Art used for the purpose of engaging the viewer/participant in an experi- ence. 7. Translation: Art used for the purpose of enhancing understanding or making something heretofore un- perceivable...perceivable. 8. Interpretation:Art used for the purpose of presenting something known or familiar in new terms...new insight...new aspect that expands comprehension/ experience. 9. Preservation of Conservation: Art used for the purpose of protecting or carrying forward an aspect of the present in the face of change. 10. Expression of Public Values:Art used for the purpose of establishing, affirming, and transferring the aspects of character, accomplishment, and collective consciousness that are valued by the community and distinguish it within the larger commonwealth of townships and cities. After presentation of the above described information,workshop participants gathered in smaller discussion groups, one for each of the"ART SETTINGS"mentioned above. Discussion within each group lasted about an hour. Each group had a"scribe"that captured key statements on a"flip chart"for use by the consultant team in gleaning the goals and objectives expressed therein...goals and objectives that will guide formulation of the Public Art Program going forward. Documentation of the participant statements and the goals and objectives expressed thereby is presented below. Program Goals and Objectives Goals and Objectives for the Public arts program can be viewed as a"guiding document"that will direct the planning work to follow. Goal Statements presented in this Section,provide the Public Arts Planning Team with: • An understanding of what the residents of Westlake value and see as important distinctions, accomplished through Public Art, separating Westlake from other cities and Townships. • An understanding of what the citizens of Westlake consider worthy as a purpose and effect of Public Art. • An understanding of the extent which Westlake,it's features and characteristics, should inform the art. • An understanding of the commitment to art that the citizens of Westlake see as appropriate. • An understanding of the relationship between art and the development of the Town over time. • An understanding of the relationship between Westlake, artists, and the larger arts community. Once goals (listed in the Section) were established (bringing together inputs from citizen participants in the Pub- Resolution 17-09 23 lic Art Public Workshop. The process employed to distill the wide spectrum of comments into a more concise list of mutually exclusive statements at a similar level of generality is called the TRIO method. The acronym"TRIO" stands for: Themes: Themes are unifying characteristics or characterizations of art, art place, art setting, and art and the community that emerge in the Break-out Groups (discussed above). These are often characterizations of outcomes that may be suggested by various descriptive terms or phrases. For example the phrase "Restore one's self" (Open Space Group), connection with nature (Pastoral Group)....Stop and smell the roses... (Town Group);illustrate a common concern to find a restoration through art. These statements reflect a"the- matic"passion for the salubrious benefits of art. • Repeats: repeats are more particular phrases or words that are simply repeated by more than one break- out group. For example, "nature" is a word often used. Repeating"nature" suggests that the natural environ- ment as it may be affected, amplified,interpreted, and/or replicated by art is an important issue. Input indicators: Input Indicators are statements about problems or conditions that call for remedial ac- tion set in motion by the goals. The desire is for a different outcome than the problem statement or condition statement describe. • Output Indicators: Output Indicators are statements of desired outcomes or conditions that reflect reme- dial action set in motion by the goals. Output Indicators suggest goals that are required to attain a stated out- come. As discussed below,the focus of breakout group conversation on the purpose of art meant that many of the statements would be about"outcome";therefore, many of the statements would be Output Indicators. The pictures below show the actual flip chart sheets from the various breakout groups and the participant state- ments which are presented in the matrix below in bold type. - ' As ANra°�,'�1R ntotidfi�a �9'�j er-Sj T{* rte' � � +•2 . dd,n�J {'4�,.� + :- :. Arr ,yam �/ •5` 11 l�I / ! .-.j 5a�e�ll+,rY'e. Y}"•'�r�� 'S:�7 R�15i �5�i�.�51.5��5 La� � , :Cf:.` The following matrix shows the outcome of the Workshop Breakout Group discussions and how the TRIO pro- cess translated these discussion statements into Goal Statements. Comments made at the Workshop are shown in bold type and the Goal Statements flowing from that original discussion group comment,listed below. As suggested above,public participants in the workshop were focused on discussion of'Art Purpose': Therefore, many of the statements made can be classified as "Output Indicators': Also, stated above, Output Indicators state the desired"effect"/the "result"/the impact of an action related to a goal,not yet disclosed. Therefore, getting to the Goal Statement implied by the Output Indicator requires a certain amount of"un-packing" of the multiple contributing pre-conditions and/or pre-activities necessary to yield the desired result. As a result,it can be said that the necessary contributing activities constitute the real goals...when a properly crafted goal is defined as starting with an action component. Resolution 17-09 24 When crafting Goal Statements that are useful for guiding Public Art Program formulation and management, it is essential that the statements be: 1. Of the same level of generality: This means that all goal statements speak to the same magnitude, scope, or range of action.When statements are uniform in their level of generality...then...certain comparative meth- ods can be applied which are necessary to organize and prioritize citizen inputs. 2. Mutually exclusive:This means that,through comparative methodologies,the final list of goal statements contain discrete areas of action. It would be impossible to get a mutually exclusive outcome...if...the input statements were not at the same level of generality. When crafting Goal Statements that are"actionable" it is also important that such statements have a similar structure. The most usable statement"structure'includes: 1. Actionable: Goal Statements should start with an action statement that indicates the nature of the action required for implementation. Therefore, each Goal Statement in the Matrix below begins with an action word such as "Promote" "Encourage;' "Create" "Protect" and"Preserve" 2. Focus Specific:Goal Statements should identify the focus (or object) of the action stated. This part of the Goal Statement links the appropriate action to areas of citizen concern (or citizen aspiration).An example of linking action to focus includes"Preserve History" or"Promote Economic Development" 3. Outcome Oriented: Goal Statements should associate the action focus with a desired outcome. In this way, the driving concern and desired result are revealed. For example, "Preserve Nature so that natural waterways remain in their natural condition': When all the goal statements are structured using the"syntax" described above,they are made more appropriate for comparative methodologies that allow determination of priorities. The matrix depicted on the following pages illustrates "translation" of the workshop statements about"purpose' and"outcome' (shown in bold type) into Goal Statements (listed below the bold type workshop statements). More specifically,the Workshop Statements and resulting Goal Statements (derived from using the TRIO meth- od) are: Resolution 17-09 25 REPEATS THEME I THEME 2 THEME 3 THEME 4 THEME 5 THEME 6 OS-1:Like seeing"historic"setting of Westlake,natural original vegetation,animals,fences Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that accentuates Westlake's natural,undeveloped areas. X 2. Promote Public Art that preserves Westlake's unique vegetation brought forth through the merging of two ecoregions:The Eastern Cross Timbers and the Grand X Prairie. 3.Seek Public Art that remembers Westlake's agrarian past in its reference,form, attachment to the fabric thereof. X OS-2:Treescape as undisturbed,a snapshot in time Related Goals: 1.Public Art in the open spaces of Westlake must preserve mature tree canopy and X facilitate the restoration of diminishing plant communities. OS-3:Would like to see a combination of plants,animals,trees,grasses when you come back in 20 years(a vignette of original Westlake) Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that maintains Westlake's diverse plant and animal communities X for future generations to see and experience. 2.Promote Public Art that educates its audience about Westlake's natural diversity and X systems. 3.Create Public Art that memorializes the various states of Westlake's history. X OS-4:Sound-as you walk around the trails...as you pass through...to see movement and hear movement. Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art,understood through its relationship to the five human senses, X that is responsive to senses and engages the senses in the work itself. 2.Public Art that allows the audience to interpret a place based on a combined sensory X experience. 3.Create Public Art that captures and translates the sights and sounds of nature into X X X something experiential. OS-S:As you walk around open space need interactive spaces. Kids have activities not to be restricted-special areas to have contact with open space,hills,rock climbing. Related Goals: 1.Provide Public Art that encourages interaction with it. X 2.Encourage Public Art to invite the audience to express motions and sentiments X normally restricted or suppressed by conventional standards. 3.Promote Public Art that motivates one to physically exert themselves through X voluntary participation. OS-6:A series of meditative spaces Related Goals: 1.Create Public Art that defines areas for solitude. X 2.Create Public Art that allows for reflection of the world and one's self. X 3.Create Public Art that encourages spiritual connection. X 4.Create Public Art that reveals the presence of something larger than the individual. X OS-7:To restore one's self Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that advances self-healing,rejuvenation and refreshment. X 2.Create Public Art that aids in the nurturing of one's self that is suppressed in the X everyday. OS-8:Approachable,safe,kids can climb and have fun Related Goals: 1.Create Public Art that is approachable,non-threatening and therefore familiar. X 2.Allow Public Art to serve as a refuge,sanctuary and/or safe-haven. X 3.Promote Public Art that encourages exploratory interaction in a fun and safe way. X OS-9:In Butchart Garden(Vancouver)kids can roll down hill and experience outdoor open space Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art that uses nature as its medium and source for inspiration. X X OS-10:Using tree branches and roots to climb in and around Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art that uses nature as its medium and source for inspiration. X X Resolution 17-09 26 OS-11:In water can sit alongside and look,and walk on stepping stones(In Solana now you can connect one area to another Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to use water as a connecting element. X 2.Promote Public Art that uses water as a form of attraction and interaction. X 3.Encourage Public Art to address various physical conditions imposed by water. X OS-12:Water features scattered throughout Westlake can have different experiences with different kinds of water Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to accentuate the various states and kinetic expressions of X X water. OS-13:At night to see lights off in the distance,defining natural features in the dark Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to showcase the night forms of a place. X 2.Promote Public Art that plays with the darkness of Westlake's pastoral settings. X 3.Create Public Art that reveals natural features of Westlake from distant developed X areas during the night hours. OS-14:Inviting,make you want to stop and go into areas to see Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to draw in the audience for an experience. X 2.Promote Public Art that sparks intrigue between it and normal activities. X 3.Create Public Art that expands the potential for an experiential domain. X 4.Encourage Public Art to establish location and orient the audience. X OS-15:When all development is in we need a place that is peaceful and tranquil and reminds us of the past Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to provide relief from the intensity of development. X 2.Create Public Art that remembers Westlake's past. X 3.Encourage Public Art to transport the audience to another state of consciousness. X 4.Promote Public art that makes the intangible dynamics of Westlake's natural heritage X more tangible. OS-16:Water-touch it,can look at it,use water flowing between elements,over stones, downhill,cascading to show what water can do,small waterfalls,sprays of water. Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to accentuate the various states and kinetic expressions of X X water. PC-1:Connection with nature Related Goals: 1. Promote Public Art that connects the audience with nature. X PC-2:Interaction with nature,trails Related Goals: 1.Create Public Art that interacts with nature. X 2.Create Public Art that encourages physical,sensory and spiritual interaction of the X participant with nature. PC-3:Emphasizing Westlake's natural beauty...respite...opportunity to enjoy,setting the stage Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that provides an opportunity for respite. X PC-4:Access to nature/Westlake opening up the hidden Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that translates the hidden potential of Westlake's natural assets X into something experiential. 2.Encourage Public Art to strengthen the clarity of Westlake's identity. X 3.Create Public Art that expands one's capacity to see,understand and otherwise X experience Westlake. PC-S:Adding flow from east-west to soften the segmentated feel of subdivision...fluidity Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that overcomes physical fragmentation of communities. X 2.Encourage Public Art that resonantly unifies communities. X 3.Encourage Public Art to seamlessly transition from public to private domains. X Resolution 17-09 27 RC-1:Contextual connection-reflecting aspects of location in the work Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that considers the context in which it will reside as the messageX X and/or the medium of the art,itself. 2.Create Public Art that becomes a part of the context in which it resides. X 3.Encourage Public Art to facilitate comprehension of the context of place. X 4.Promote Public Art that contributes to the definition of the context around it. X RC-2:Do not suppress originality Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that expresses the public value of originality. X 2.Encourage Public Art to reflect Westlake's unique identity and therefore provide X greater understanding of place. RC-3:Thematic-the works within the Regional Community should have some apparent association that is Westlake Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that creates context through aspects of continuity among other X works. 2.Reduce the potential for competing centers by creating Public Art that unifies independent development projects. X 3.Create Public Art that reconciles otherwise regional development vernacular with X uniquely Westlake features. RC-4:Progression-the works should connect with features that extend into the Regional area from other districts upstream Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that reflects,interprets,and otherwise makes visible the X relationships of regional natural systems. 2.Encourage Public Art to unify and seamlessly transition between character zones X within Westlake. RC-5:Water a theme Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that maintains the identity provided by natural waterscapes of X Westlake. 2.Promote Public Art that engages water,when appropriate,in all conditions that are X relevant to Westlake's Regional Commercial Community. 3.Encourage Public Art to shape development patterns within the Regional Commercial X Community. RC-6:History a theme Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to communicate events,places,people,accomplishment, X and/or characteristic processes of Westlake's history. 2.Promote Public Art that monumentalizes aspects of Westlake's history so that it may X be experienced by and communicated to large amounts of people. 3.Promote Public Art that seeks to make Westlake's history visible,thereby providing a X way to understand its influence and trajectory. RC-7:Culture a theme Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that communicates processes of human relationships,behavior X and economy. 2.Public Art in Westlake should seek to externalize,interpret,and accommodate the X culture of place. RC-8:Preservation/Conservation-water and the ecological systems it supports Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that preserves and conserves the distinctive processes essential to natural systems or the valued remains of a changing condition of natural systems. X RC-9:Tapestry of Town-make a tapestry of projects=Town Related Goals: 1.As Public Art in Westlake becomes part of the fabric of community,it must fit and X integrate with the tapestry that is the community. 2.Public Art must share a common identity of location in Westlake as the living fabric of X Westlake is more than a background for the work. RC-10:Enhancement-enhance expansion of public space acquired through gathered density Related Goals: 1.Public Art must expand the power,usability,and presence of open space created by X X the future gathering of development density. RC-11:Unite-blend development...overcome project autonomy Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to unify autonomous developments to create community. X Resolution 17-09 28 RC-12:Relation to the Whole—each art installation is part of a larger whole. Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to address and express its relationship to a collective art-scape X within Westlake. RC-13:Express public Values—open space is a value,corporate citizenship is a value Related Goals: 1.Public Art must clearly reflect public values in its location,purpose,subject matter, X X reference,and/or form. 2.Promote Public Art that educates the audience on Westlake's community values that X wish to be passed to the future population. 3.Create Public Art that honors Westlake's values that,as a community,are viewed as X essential to its social cohesion. Town Community Context TC-1:Portal Identification—define function of the area,like a 3D road map know when you enter a different area Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that identifies key elements of cognitive structure that forms one's mental map of place,including portals,nodes,landmarks,edges,and districts. X 2.Encourage Public Art to denote informative experientially significant portals from one area to another. X 3.Encourage Public Art to function as portals when placed in locations in need of portal X definition. TC-2:Translation—we try to be global/worldly,allows for subconscious perception to become conscious(making something imperceiveable...perceivable) Related Goals: 1.Public Art must seek to be responsive to all five sense and be incorporated into the X work itself. 2.Create Public Art that broadens one's range of subconscious perception. X 3.Promote Public Art that elevates hidden processes of nature to a physical X manifestation that shapes the context in which it resides. TC-3:Help People Be Present—"stop and smell the roses"concept,grateful for the moment Related Goals: 1.In the fast pace of life,Public art in Westlake should nurture and provide opportunity X to enjoy respite relief from the ordinary pace of activity. 2.Where appropriate,Public art in Westlake should provide micro-climate conditions X that encourage gathering and nurture the presence of people. TC-4:Intentional—calls for quality craftsmanship timeless Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that embodies the craftsmanship of enduring construction with X X materials that manifest the workmanship of the craftsman. 2.Public Art in Westlake must transcend those aspects of construction and design that X X would fix the work in time and seek to attain timelessness. TC-5:Subtle—contextually appropriate,works with what is there Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that considers the context in which it will reside as the message X X and/or the medium of the art,itself. TC-6:Personal—uniquely Westlake,gives hopefulness for opportunities they wouldn't otherwise have Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that comes from the participation of both established and X emerging talent in the art community. 2.Promote Public Art that is reflective of Westlake's role in encouraging and nurturing X the emergence of artistic talent. TC-7:Cohesion—create unity,balance,flow,harmony between the different areas...transition Related Goals: 1.Encourage Public Art to seamlessly transition from public to private domains. X TC-8:Sophisticated—timeless Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that embodies the craftsmanship of enduring construction with X X materials that manifest the workmanship of the craftsman. Resolution 17-09 29 OCS-1:Westlake=Trinity beautiful but pressures the natural environment Related Goals: 1.Public Art must expand the power,usability,and presence of open space created by X X the future gathering of development density. 2.Encourage Public Art to creatively withstand the pressures of development. X OCS-2:Functionality—seating...Jackson Hole—sitting with great figures in history(Einstein, etc.)—all the mayors of Westlake Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that commemorates figures in Westlake's history that shape its on X going progress. 2.Public Art must clearly reflect public values in its location,purpose,subject matter, reference,and/or form. X X 3.Create Public Art that may serve multiple functionalities. X OCS-3:Oslo Norway—(illegible)...200 acres every statue in the park naked—point= timeless Related Goals: 1.Promote Public Art that embodies the craftsmanship of enduring construction with X X materials that manifest the workmanship of the craftsman. 2.Public Art in Westlake must transcend those aspects of construction and design that X X would fix the work in time and seek to attain timelessness. The Matrix above contains 99 Goal Statements. These statements clearly reflect a continuity of concern and aspi- ration. The threads of common aspiration that flowed through the participants include: 1. Natural Westlake features as the medium/part of medium for the artwork. Art=fully integrated with place 2. Overcome development pressures through respite, reflection, and/or altered state of mind. Art=Transformative 3. Overcome development pressures with physical transitions from place to place/context to context. Art=Connection 4. Contributing to, revealing or defining identity,public values, cultural history, and/ or education. Art=Distinction 5. Engaging the senses (sight, sound, smell,touch, taste) in exraordinary ways to enhance experience or to be the experience. Art=Experience In light of the above summation,it is clear that Public Art in Westlake is viewed as about, and infused with, Westlake ...where Westlake is the medium,the inspiration,the venue...and the people of Westlake are uplifted by the experience it facilitates. This means that Public Art in Westlake is intensely integrated with place. The intent here is to bring Westlake TO THE ART not simply BRING TASTEFUL ART TO WESTLAKE. This means that the Artist must also come to Westlake. As a result,Westlake will need to become a place where artists come to do their work. To hold such attraction for artists,Westlake itself must become a regional leader in the Arts of the Metroplex. The Workshop products (Goal Statements) have set a high bar for the purpose and nature of a Public Arts Program for the Town...one that is less,perhaps, about the art and more about Westlake's place in the arts. To accomplish this requires a clear strategy and organizational structure. The next section of this report outlines the basics of that strategy,to be executed by the Consultant Team in their next phase of work. Resolution 17-09 30 STRATEGY TDw - DPEN rr-yr F;1y� �7 •y �1�' 1.RTy _ yft y,N - VP y 9 . 4 0 Resolution 17-09 31 THE STRATEGY Building on the history of Art in Westlake and the sentiments/directives established by the citizens of the Town the strategy needed to fulfill the vision put forward is one which has the following attributes: 1. Building Partnerships with the larger Arts Community 2. Creating a governance structure within which the Arts Community and Town work as partners 3. Establishing a venue that brings the Art Community and Town together in a common search for masterpiece 4. Finding funding and sponsorship 5. The regulatory and policy backup The following text addresses each of the above strategy components: Building Partnership with the larger Arts Community After the mid-20th century,private galleries played an ever-larger role in setting art value and establishing new talent in the art market place. As a result,the"gallery system"was the normal path to finding notoriety and sta- bility as a source of income. Even in the earlier days of Monet and Renoir great art houses (as they were known) such as that of Daniel Wildenstein and Bernheim-Jeune were the main drivers of fame and value in the art world. However,galleries in the early 21st century are facing significant challenges to the old system and the profitabil- ity of it. A recent study by the Cultural Research Center and Magnus Resch surveyed 8,000 art galleries based in the US, UK, and Germany and found that more than half were turning over less than$200,000 a year and 30% were losing money. The reasons for this is attributed to rising costs in the running of galleries, costs associated with rent, art fair expenses, international competition,private sales by artist, "uber" galleries, internet sales, and auction houses now eating into the traditional gallery business. According to the Art Newspaper, across the art trade, galleries are spending more on so-called support services ($17,8 Billion) to conduct business. This places pressure on a gallery to find,hold and work with marketable and established talent. As a result, emerging and new talent is finding it more difficult to breakthrough and realize recognition. The consequence of this is a need for change that will introduce new pathways for finding, devel- oping, and promoting talent for the future. In this reality of need lies opportunity for new partnerships with the major art institutions who also find it increasingly difficult to cultivate art in the continually restricted gallery system. The gallery system was similarly challenged in the depression era and efforts taken to fill the gap created by diminishing gallery venues. To fill this gap,the US government created a program, as part of the "New Deal" known as the Federal Arts Project (1935-1943). This program established more than 100 community art centers throughout the country and commissioned works (200,000 separate works) which produced what is now regard- ed as some of the most significant public art in the US. Many of the celebrated public building murals are a lega- cy from this era. Because the program pursued a mission instead of a style it promoted young talent expressing directions yet to be recognized, such as Jackson Pollock. In Texas, at the threshold of the 1929 crash, an oil wildcatter, named Edgar Davis sponsored a Wildflower Com- petition in partnership with the San Antonio Art League. Financially supported by the wealth of Mr. Davis,the competition offered the largest prize money of any US competition to date. Attracted to the opportunity for prize money, artists from across the country made their way to Texas to take part in the event which resulted in a form giving aggregation of talent and an extreme elevation of awareness which became the"big bang"moment in the arts of our state. From this event the many young art societies, art camps, and emerging art movements finding their way into the debate were strengthened and came to fruition. Resolution 17-09 32 There was a coalescing of the dispersed art energy around the state, as a result of this powerful event, and from such coalescing the major art institutions of Texas (Dallas, San Antonio, Houston) found energy to expand, emerge, grow, and establish. Due to the decreasing venue of galleries and the proven potential of art events and public programs to make meaningful contribution in such times (discussed above),there is a present-day opportunity for a meaningful partnership between the Town of Westlake and representatives of the major art museum of the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Already,the Planning Team,for this project,is joined by Sue Canterbury(Associate Curator of American Art at the DMA). Other such important institutional participation is possible if the Westlake Public Art Program can respond to the shifting conditions described above and, in so doing,fill the gap created by di- minishing galleries and gallery influence. The Planning Team recommends that the basis of this partnership is in the operation of a venue/program that seeks to cultivate,recognize,promote, and establish artistic talent. Just as Edgar Davis joined forces with the San Antonio Art League to implement the Edgar Davis Wildflower Competition, so can Westlake join forces with representatives of Metroplex Art Institutions. Seeking the credibility of recognition afforded by this partnership, Westlake can become the venue discussed below. Creating a governance structure within which the Arts Community and Town work as partners The nature of the partnership described above lies in a governance structure that creates an appropriate place for each party to come together around a single, and shared,purpose (the venue). Basically,the parties that need to be engaged within the governance structure include the following: 1. Westlake a. Civic leadership b. Citizens and land owners from the Regional Commercial Art Setting C. Citizens and land owners from the Town Art Setting d. Citizens and land owners from the Pastoral Art Setting e. Citizens and land owners from the Open Space Art Setting 2. The Arts Community a. Art Institutions (such as the DMA,The Amon Carter,the Grace Museum,the Kimball,Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, etc...) b. Curators (public and private) C. Design professionals d. Art Experts (academic and Galleries) Number one (above) establishes the input side of the partnership while number 2 establishes the output side of the partnership. Westlake provides the Objectives, Criteria, and Performance Standards and management of the venue (which speaks directly to the Goal Statements discussed above) and the Arts Community provides selection, curation, and operation of the venue. The overall form of this partnership is expressed in the governance structure diagram below. Note that the diagram has 2 components, a Westlake side,and an Arts Community side. The sides, and their participating members, are brought together by specific responsibility to a common purpose (represented by the Artists/Venue bubble in the middle). Note that each side has the opportunity for sponsorship and that the West- lake side (as an eligible public enterprise) has the additional capability to receive donations and grants. On the Westlake side,the Art Settings and the Goals associated therewith are brought into the area specific management groups arrayed to the right of the"Westlake Arts Council'bubble. The Arts Council itself is a legacy of the 2008 Resolution 17-09 33 effort (discussed in the Assessment portion of this report),thereby building upon the work done earlier. OBJECTIVES,CRITERIA,PERFC)RMANCE,, MANAGEMENT ` SPONSORS 1 ADVOCATES, WESTLAKE PI SOCIETY SOCIETY S POWSOISS, DONORS, SELECTION,CURATION,OPERATION and G RANTS Similarly,the Arts (represented in the Competition Team) includes the institutional,profession, and business members of the Arts Community. Representatives of the areas of interests (listed to the left of the bubble) com- prise the Competition Team. Both the Town and the Arts Community, operating through the organizational structure pictured come together upon the Artist/Venue. The venue (represented by the central bubble) is de- scribed in the following text. Establishing a venue that brings Art Community and Town together in a common search for Mas- terpiece Throughout History(perhaps starting with the Greeks) art competitions have been a primary means of culti- vating talents and finding the best of the arts. Artist's Daily presents a brief history of competitions and gives account of 2 notable events that have significantly contributed to artistic achievement for western civilization, as follows: Florence's Baptistry Doors The art competition that every art history student studies came in 1401 in Florence, Italy,where the Baptistry of St. John,the oldest church in the city,held an art competition to find an artist to make a pair of bronze doors for one of the entrances of the building. In the end,the two contenders for the commission were Lorenzo Ghiberti and Filippo Brunelleschi. Ghiberti won the art competition, and his first set of Baptistry doors took 27 years to complete (he was eventually commissioned to do a second set). The Prix de Rome In France in 1663, during the reign of Louis XIV,the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture instituted the Prix de Rome, an art competition award that offered the winning artist a stay of several years at the Palazzo Mancini, in Rome, at the expense of the king. Resolution 17-09 34 The prize afforded an artist of exceptional promise the opportunity to reside in an important cultural metropolis and refine and expand his professional, artistic, and scholarly aptitudes. By instituting this award,the stewards of French culture were tactically recognizing and seeking to address a significant challenge: how to provide for the continuing support and education of artists and secure the continuance of the visual arts for future generations. Monet and the Salon des Refuses The most famous and first"exhibition of rejects" came in 1863 when many of the 3,000 works that had been passed over by the fine art competition officials of the Paris Salon were shown in a nearby gallery hall. To many, this marked the creation of the avant-garde. Edouard Manet's Luncheon on the Grass was among the paintings shown in this group, as was Whistler's Symphony in White,No. 1: The White Girl. Art Competitions have served western civilization well throughout history and as illustrated in the above ac- count of the Edgar Davis Wildflower competition,they have had a significant and beneficial influence on the State of Texas. In light of the increasing shrinkage of gallery based venues,it now seems appropriate to visit competitions once again. The planning Team sees the governance structure described above (which brings the arts community and the Westlake community together in a format reflective of the Town's goals and Art settings) is best organized to administer and operate an on-going series of art competitions that serve the Public Art needs of Westlake and the"continuation of talent"needs of the Arts Community. The Art Competition is an opportunity for emerging and existing talent to find a respected venue and get expo- sure to the art institutions that can under-write their place on the stage of accomplishment. The competition is also an opportunity for Westlake to find"Westlake integrated" (as per the goals) art for the Town that is more affordable. The desire to break into the strata of recognition that the competition can afford will encourage art- ists to make every effort to maximize use of the purchase prize. Also,Westlake can hold rights to other awarded work for implementation at a later date, giving the Town a portfolio of opportunity. In addition to bringing the Arts Community and the Town together around a common enterprise,the on-going competition is well suited to the nature of Westlake's corporate future. Individual corporations can sponsor and associate with any of the competitions, especially those that would add art to their own sites. Through the Competitions, curated by representatives of the Arts Community,Westlake will stand as a Civic patron...something unique and highly attractive to the corporate market as well as a measure to give greater contextual value to the Westlake residential sub-market. The Competition program would become a major sub-component of the Westlake Public Arts Program and include the following components: 1. Management:As identified in the above Organizational Structure Diagram,the Westlake Art Council would manage the Competitions. In that capacity,the Council would define the place and purpose of the competition, set guidelines and other directives for considerations by the artist (mainly flowing from the goals established by the larger Town), arrange sponsorship or otherwise find funding for the event. 2. Curation:As identified in the Organizational Structure Diagram above,the Competition Team would curate,judge, qualify entrants and judge outcomes of the event. 3. Location: The event location would be within an Art Setting at a location or site related to the sponsor or related to the Town's determination of Public Art need. 4. Sponsorship: To the extent possible,the Town should find sponsors for each competition and give the sponsor every opportunity to benefit from the exposure and stature that sponsorship can afford (especially Resolution 17-09 35 with the participation of the larger Arts Community). 5. Purchase/Commission Prize and other Prizes:A key function of sponsorship is financial contribution to the competition in terms of prize money and operational expenses. However,the creation of a municipal fund for the competitions may make it possible for a corporate sponsor to realize greater art potential than their ordinary budget would afford. Certain developments within Westlake have commitment to art place- ment in their PD Ordinances. For these properties,participation in a City managed program may actually save money and result in better art for them and the Town. The prizes offered could be a purchase prize which allows purchase of the artwork proposal and the retention of rights to its commission for a budget pro- posed by the artist...or...a commission prize,where the winning artist is commissioned to do the work as in the Bronze doors for Florence's Baptistry) 6. Operation and communication: Communications before, during, and after the event is critical to event success. Starting months before a competition with publicity about and announcement of the event is ex- tremely important to attracting entrants and having a robust competition. Communications about events preceding and following the competition is important to finding future sponsors and bringing the two com- munities together in fellowship. Finally,publicity for the event and the artist after the award is paramount to under-writing the importance of the event and for establishing the winning talent. Finding funding and sponsorship Westlake,Texas is unique among cities and townships of the Metroplex with regard to the unusual opportunities it enjoys for funding a Public Arts Program. Unlike other communities,Westlake stands in a"value mature" proximity with mostly undeveloped land while many of its neighbors come to this"value mature state"having little land availability with which to harvest the benefits of such a state. This condition and the significance of it can be summarized as follows: 1. Available supply in the context of high demand: To put it in the most basic of economic terms...Westlake has a significant supply(of well-located land) in a context of high demand (for class "A"office and high end residential). This means that the potential for return makes issues of cost more negotiable. Therefore, "fund- ing" as a cost becomes more likely when"value" can generate greater"return"that embodies that cost within the parameters of normative financial performance. Understanding this relationship between value and the costs that are associated with building the future that citizens of Westlake seek is essential to finding a strate- gic path to attaining those desired outcomes. 2. Unusual Industrial Cluster: The desirability of Westlake's location in the context of limited supply and the contextual attributes that Westlake offers has attracted (and continues to attract) Financial Services and pro- motes the formation of a Financial Services Cluster within the economic sphere of the township. Unlike oth- er industrial clusters, financial services presents great receptivity to the arts. As an example, Charles Schwab Company and its chairman, Charles Schwab,have a long-standing commitment to the Arts.According to Forbes Magazine, Charles and Helen Schwab were instrumental to San Francisco Art Museum's ascendancy to become one of the most influential museums in the country. Like Schwab Company, other Financial ser- vice enterprises share a concern for, support of, and commitment to community, education, and the arts. 3. Urban core to economic region: The "economic organ"within which the transactional relationship be- tween land uses are expressed is not contained or expressed within invisible municipal boundaries. The relationships between land use functions that constitute the economic functions of"township" comprise a necessary constellation of such uses that come together around this central purpose whether those land uses are located within the legal boundaries of the Township or not. Therefore,one must envision that Westlake's place within that constellation is determined by the larger constellation of land uses,which define the com- Resolution 17-09 36 ponent of that constellation to be filled by development within Westlake. Flying at a relatively high level, one can see that a variety of industrial,residential,retail, entertainment, and generally commercial land use clus- ters are arrayed around the well-developed perimeter of the Township. In this constellation,it is clear that Westlake's function is one of being the urban core of this economic organ. In recognition of this inevitability, major land owners of Westlake have stockpiled more than 25 million square feet of office and other commer- cial entitlements. Therefore,it seems that Westlake's destiny as a center to an economically functional"city" extending beyond Westlake's corporate boundaries is set and that the aggregation of financial services in the Town today(nearly 4 million square feet of this specific industrial cluster) is clear evidence of that inevitabil- ity. Therefore, the issue of funding (and art itself) must be viewed as something larger than Westlake and the Citizens of Westlake alone. Westlake can clearly become the urban center to an economic region...just like downtown Dallas is center to Dallas, Highland Park, Oak Cliff, Richardson, Plano, etc. and that those experiencing the art of that center come from many places outside the Town...but within the functional City. This makes any funding that flows from patronage more lucrative. All three of these conditions conspire to create a unique"funding"landscape in Westlake. This funding land- scape opens opportunity for such approaches to funding as: 1. Sponsorship:The stronger Westlake becomes as a center for the financial services cluster and the stronger relationships between Westlake and the art institutions of the larger metroplex become (a central strategy of this report) the more attractive Westlake is as a place for Art Sponsorship. The benefits of sponsorship in this context provides return to the money spent on such sponsorship, making that expense an investment. The return is realized in exposure,publicity, recognition, standing, and employment attractiveness. These are all areas of cost that are lessened by sponsorship within an environment that Westlake can offer. Sponsorship is particularly essential to the strategy outlined in the preceding text as art events (the central activity join- ing the Town and the larger Arts Community) only flourish with sponsorship. Sponsorship opportunities include: • Purchase Prize money • Event activities pre, and post event • Publicity • Object of the event (artwork for a specific location) • Funding operational costs 2. TDI Bonuses: Westlake has recently adopted a Transfer of Development Intensity ordinance in which land owners and developers within Westlake are able to sever development square footage (development intensity) from properties which will likely develop at densities less than density specified in the entitlement and move that"severed intensity"to parcels likely to develop at densities greater than the density specified in the entitlement. Within this ordinance, additional square footage may be added to the transfer(called a bonus)when the property owner/ developer contributes land to public purposes that advance the Compre- hensive Plan or the Plan of Westlake Academy. It seems that other public purposes (such as Public Art) could also qualify for a bonus under the manage- ment of this TDI ordinance. Potential language that can be added to Section 5 of that ordinance could state: "When the applicant for a Severance or a Transfer supports the Westlake Public Art Program in any of the following ways,the applicant shall qualify for a bonus under this bonus Section: a. When the applicant is a sponsor of a Public Art Competition Event and assumes the financial costs thereof(including prize awards),that applicant may receive a bonus at transfer of the Severed Develop- Resolution 17-09 37 ment Intensity equal to 15% of the Severed Intensity or an additional 15 %bonus added to any bonus received in accordance with item "C"or"D'; above (whichever constitutes the larger bonus benefit.) b. When the applicant donates to the acquisition of Public Art or acquires Public Art for the benefit of the Town and that acquisition is approved and supported by the Town Arts Council and the value of that acquisition is equal to, or greater than,the normal cost of supporting a"Competition event";that applicant may receive a bonus at transfer of Severed Development Intensity equal to 15% of the Severed Intensity or an additional 15 %bonus added to any bonus received in accordance with item"C" or"D'; above (whichever constitutes the larger bonus benefit.)' This constitutes a considerable incentive to sponsor or otherwise fund Westlake's Public Arts Program as such participation can yield increased development rights not available within the current zoning. Further, such compensation for participation offsets a disproportionate burden borne by the landowner when under- taking an activity/responsibility benefitting the larger public. 3. Share of Capital Expenditure: The 2008 report by the Public Arts Society makes a recommendation that 2% of the cost of a Capital Improvement Project be set aside for Public Art. This is not dissimilar from a program in Dallas. However,the Dallas program is focused on the artist more than the art and calls for the incorporation of an artist in the architectural design phase of the Capital Project. In this way,the art pro- duced by the artist is more integrated to the built-scape as it emerges. This report would slightly modify the 2008 recommendation to similarly be focused on the artist and set aside a percentage of the Capital Costs for the inclusion of an artist integral to the project that will fully integrate the work. Similarly,this report recommends that the percentage of Capital Cost set aside be 2% of the total project val- ue. This percentage is generally in use by many other cities with successful Public Art programs and recom- mended in the 2008 Public Art Society Report. Example Cities with a 2% commitment,include: a. Allen, Texas b. Austin,Texas C. Fort Lauderdale, Florida d. Fort Worth,Texas e. Sacramento, California f. San Francisco, California g. Frisco,Texas 4. Venue Tax:By forging a strategy around an art event (rather than art objects),there is the potential to establish a"venue Tax"which can help fund such events. A city or county is permitted by Chapter 334 of the Texas Local Government Code to undertake "venue projects" This term applies to a"venue and related in- frastructure that is planned, acquired, established, developed, constructed, or renovated under this chapter': Venue is defined as one of the following: • An arena, coliseum, stadium, or other type of arena or facility; • A convention center or related improvement; • A tourist development area along an inland waterway; • A municipal park or recreation system; • A certain economic development project authorized by Section 4(A) or 4(B) of the Development Corpo- ration Act of 1997. Under this act,4(B) funds can be used for projects which advance economic develop- ment and improve the Quality of Life. • A certain watershed protection and preservation project. Resolution 17-09 38 The physical Art Installation and Art Events which produce the art and the promotion and funding thereof are Quality of Life projects as well as Economic Development initiatives The Texas Economic Development Handbook states that"in order to undertake a venue project, a city or county must receive voter approval of the project and the proposed means of financing the project... the local government cannot proceed with such an election without approval from the Comptroller's office and, if applicable,from the local transit authority. Once it has received the required approvals,the city or county may order the required election': In the prescribed election,voters can approve the taxes that will be used to finance the project. Taxes that may be employed to fund a venue project are: • Sales tax(if such a tax is approved by voters and the city is already at its 2%limit, the voters must also ap- prove which applications of the sales tax will be reduced in order to direct this sales tax to the venue project funding); • Short-term motor vehicle tax; • Tax on event parking at the venue project; • Hotel occupancy tax; • Facility use tax Under Chapter 334, a city or county is required to establish a"venue project fund"by resolution and there must be a separate account for each of the project revenue sources. The city or county must deposit revenues received from any tax imposed under Chapter 334 and any other money required by law to be deposited in the fund. 5. Cash-In-Lieu-Of Strategies: The Planned Development Ordinance for Entrada contains a site plan which sites numerous works of public art. In the aggregate,these art objects that represent a considerable financial commitment to art. Similarly,zoning ordinance amendments that will potentially come before the Town Council can be required to make similar commitments to art. In addition,the existing Planned Develop- ment Ordinances have specific requirements for open space and facilities that may no longer be important IF implementation of the Comprehensive Plan provides such space and facilities on a more holistic and coor- dinated basis. Therefore, a land owner making a commitment to Comp Plan implementation may be given relief from other ordinance-driven obligations and/ or given relief from selecting and installing public art if they contribute cash to the art program in lieu of physical compliance with the PD requirement and such "cash in-lieu-of"payment is approved by the Town. Therefore, each of the major PDs should be reviewed to isolate the obligations of that document which can be met by a cash-in-lieu-of contribution to the Public Art Program. In those areas where more intense de- velopment can be tolerated (such as the Regional Commercial District) early PD provisions meant to soften/ mitigate density may no longer be viewed as necessary. Therefore, off-setting such provisions, off-set by contributing cash in lieu of compliance,may be more consistent with current public intent. 6. Assessments:Special Assessments is another potential funding avenue for Public Art in Westlake. Pub- lic Improvement Districts,Municipal management Districts, or Business Improvement Districts are special assessment districts recognized by State Statute and in general use throughout the State of Texas. These additional assessments can only be leveed upon certain designated districts within a municipality. These assessments fund improvements, services, and/or activities within the defined district. The two most com- mon types of assessment districts in Texas include Public Improvement Districts (PID) and Municipal Man- agement District (MMD),which is much like a Business Improvement District. The designation of these districts requires support and involvement of property owners within the district, as they must agree to the added assessment of real property. Funds generated through this assessment are tied to provisions, defined when the district is created, and typically focus on improvements to public spaces,building facades,manage- Resolution 17-09 39 ment, advertising, maintenance operations, and economic development activities. Public Art would qualify under this broad range of applications. More specifically: a.Public Improvement Districts(PID): Regulations governing the formation,management of, and pow- ers of the PID are found in Chapter 372 of the Texas Local Government Code. PIDs may be formed to develop, rehabilitate, or expand affordable housing; create water,wastewater,health and sanitation, or drainage improvements;mass transit improvements;parking improvements;library improvements;park, recreation, and cultural improvements;landscaping and other aesthetic improvements; art installation; creation of pedestrian malls or similar improvements; supplemental safety services for the improvement of the district, including public safety and security services; or supplemental business related services for improvement of the district,including advertising and business recruitment and development. PIDs are set up by ordinance upon receiving a petition requesting that a district be established. If the governing body of a city or county finds that a proposed improvement project would promote the in- terests of a city or county, "the governing body"may undertake an improvement project that confers a special benefit on a definable part of the municipality or county or municipality's extraterritorial jurisdic- tion': According to the Texas Attorney General, "After a PID has been established,the governing body of the municipality or county shall apportion the cost of an improvement to be assessed against property in an improvement district. The apportionment shall be made on the basis of special benefits accruing to the property because of the improvement. After holding a hearing on a proposed assessment,the governing body,by ordinance, shall levy the assessment as a special assessment on the property". 7. Municipal Management District(MMD):A Municipal Management District differs from a PID as such districts are comprised of an organization of property owners in a commercial district who tax themselves to raise money for neighborhood improvements. Traditional uses of the funds collected goes to operations within a commercial area, such as keeping sidewalks and curbs clean,removing graffiti, and patrolling the streets. Once a MMD is formed,the assessment is mandatory and collected by the city like any other tax. However,unlike other taxes,the city returns the tax to the MMD management for expenditure within the district. 8. Donations: Since the beginning of civilization,the arts have relied upon donations and the patronage of donors. Therefore, donations remain a primary funding source for art and art activity. Donations require several component parts in order to be an on-going program. These component parts include: a.Recipient: In the case of Art in Westlake,the logical recipient is the"Westlake Arts Council" as iden- tified in the Governance Structure diagram above. Established by action of Town Council,this body functions under the authority of the Municipality which is further authorized to receive donated contri- butions and provide the donor with qualification for any tax benefits associated with such donation. It would be possible for the municipality to identify internal targets for the donations (such as the Westlake Arts Council). The Arts Council can administer a fund created for the Arts into which donated and other funds described in this chapter can be deposited and used to fund any part of an Event, including the work of the Event Team. b.Donors: Identifying donors is directly related to the extent to which the Westlake Arts Program is gen- erally recognized and valued within the metroplex, county, and state. Such recognition is expanded and enhanced by the integration of Westlake's Arts Program with the larger arts community, especially the institutions that reside therein. Plugging into the"network" of donors means going where the donors can be found...and this is within the arts community. Therefore,integration with that community is abso- Resolution 17-09 40 lutely essential for cultivating a reliable bench of willing and supportive donors. Involvement with the arts community also provides Westlake with exposure to publicity of its program and,through such publicity, dissemination of information about the Westlake Arts Program well beyond the metroplex itself. Through such exposure,the base of donors is vastly increased,which saves Westlake from being in the position of over-reliance upon a small group of individuals. In order for the donor pro- gram to be a significant source of funds for the arts,the bench of potential donors must be pretty deep. c.Mission focus: The recipient and the donor are brought together around mission and the clear state- ment thereof. It would be difficult for the Westlake Arts Program to find committed donors (willing to provide long term and committed support) without a clear mission that speaks to the interest of those donors and presents the legacy of contributions made. The mission is particularly important for estate donations as donors who may provide for the program in their estate are those who see the legacy value of the mission. Further,the mission clarifies the target donor population and facilitates effective use of time and money in finding and attracting committed donor-ship. d. Communications Infrastructure:All of the above described aspects of a donor program are supported by a robust communications infrastructure. Westlake already has the basic elements of such an infra- structure. The challenge is to carry the infrastructure beyond the Town to the metroplex at large. There- fore, on-going contact with various forms of media is essential,writing articles/press releases, and social media are all important. Cultivating an electronic mail list as well as a conventional mail list is essential. The communication infrastructure developed is essential to carrying the program to the broader commu- nity of support and participation which enhances the program, attracts donors, and further distinguishes Westlake. In addition to print and electronic media, a good/well designed website for the Public arts program is needed. The domain address of this website should build from the mission of the program. For example,wwwwestlake.artofplace.com 9. Grants: The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an independent federal agency supporting art organizations and artists alike. One of the existing programs that the NEA offers that would benefit West- lake is the Our Town Grant Program (https://www arts.gov/grants-organizations/our-town/introduction). This program seeks to promote creative placemaking by providing grants to assist in improving livability in communities in places with arts at their core. This program provides assistance for planning, design and arts engagement activities, such as industry cluster/hub development, creative entrepreneurship, design of rehearsal, studio or live/work spaces for artists, community engagement activities, festivals, and performanc- es in non-traditional spaces and public art. Much that has been laid out in this strategy report would help Westlake rank high in any arts related grant program. Because art is such a broad topic and can have so many manifestations, it may be possible to cast the Westlake program in terms that qualify for other grant initiatives not normally associated with art. This includes such grant programs as those administered by Texas Parks and Wildlife (TWP). TPW would be a viable candidate for partnership in the development of art associated with greenbelts, greenways,parks, and/or trails through the Recreational Trails Grant (http://tpwd.texas.gov/business/grants/recreation-grants/recreational-trails-grants). The regulatory and policy backup In order to put the above described Public Art Strategy into action,it is necessary to establish certain regulatory and policy enablements,which include; Resolution 17-09 41 1. Program Formation: At the outset, it is essential to formally establish the program. One way to do this would be to designate staff support within the organization of municipal administration and charge that staff with coordinating implementation of the Public Art Strategy. 2. Governance: The Westlake Arts Council (supported through the above designated staff function) should be established by ordinance (hereinafter the Westlake Public Arts Ordinance) which identifies the represen- tational structure of membership,the four sub-committee Task Forces to be formed from each Art setting as well as specifying the responsibilities and authority of each. Creating the governance structure can also in- clude the provision of a designated fund category and specify the uses of such funds. In addition,the West- lake Public Arts Ordinance should form the Competition Committee, or committees, and specify how those committees will be populated with members of the larger Arts Community. Finally,the Westlake Public Arts Ordinance should authorize the event(s) and describe the responsibilities of the various committees and Task Forces for conducting and managing the event(s). 3. Funding: The broad nature of the funding strategy requires a range of regulatory and policy back up. This includes: a. Share of Capital Expenditures: This will require specific policy and perhaps an ordinance which com- mits the Capital Program to such set aside. b. Cash in lieu of.This will require modification of Section 102 and a rigorous review of the PD's and open space requirements of categorical zones to determine which, and under what conditions,they may be off-set by cash-in-lieu-of payments. c. Assessment(PID,Municipal Management District,etc.): This will require compliance with State Statute by setting up such ordinances as are called for in that statute. d. Venue Tax:will require implementation of a venue tax ordinance (as per state statute) and voter ap- proval of the taxes themselves. e. Sponsorship:This will require provision for the recognition of and service of sponsorship in the Gov- ernance ordinance described in"a' above. f. TDI Bonuses: This will require amendment of the TDI ordinance going before Town Council with language as suggested above. Any role of the Westlake Arts Council in verifying such bonus should be mentioned in the TDI ordinance as well as the Westlake Public arts Ordinance. g. Donors: This will require a communications infrastructure as described above and integration with the institutions of the larger Arts Community. Also needed is the designation of a fund category and clarifi- cation of the tax-exempt status of any donation to that fund. Such fund and status clarification should be referred to in the Westlake Public Arts Ordinance. h. Grants: This will require staff support for the writing of grants and establishment of the grant recipi- ent...namely the Westlake Arts Council. 4. Coordination:The primary means of coordination within the Governance structure will be the staff re- sponsibility determined by location of the Public Art Program within the organization chart of the municipal staff. It seems logical that this should fall to a cultural office or a communications office and work closely with Development and Planning. Resolution 17-09 42 5.Building on the Town of Westlake Resolutions 07-25,08-12,and 09-38 In April,2007,the Westlake Town Council passed Resolution No. 07-25 which established the Westlake Pub- lic Art Committee and a Charter membership (whose terms have since expired). This Committee was given a specific Mission and Charge as follows: Mission: Founded as a commitment to protect and improve the quality of life of Westlake residents,busi- nesses and students by encouraging, inspiring, documenting, educating and entertaining artistic and cre- ative endeavors throughout the community,the Westlake Public Art Committee will provide a wide range of professionally excellent and artistically significant presentations,preserving, collecting, and fostering the engagement of arts into the community. Charge: 1. Scope of priorities for first term: a. dentify and recommend artists and raise funds to ultimately commission an outdoor statue of The Blacksmith at a designated location at Westlake Academy b. Raise funds to be able to acquire and display significant works of art consistent with the theme and culture of the Town of Westlake to display in Westlake Academy and other public buildings. c. Raise awareness of the importance of the role of art in Westlake by sponsoring artistic and creative endeavors that will benefit the community. 2. Prepare an annual budget of projected revenues and expenses necessary to accomplish the mission and that such budget be presented to the Town manager no later than August 1 of each fiscal year to then be deliberated by the Board for inclusion in the annual budget. 3. The Board will identify a funding source for public art no later than their 2007-2008 annual budget process. The intent of this resolution is clear,namely to establish a central body designated with the responsibility of advancing Westlake's progress toward experiencing a greater presence of Public art in the community. By taking formal action,through resolution,the desire of the Council is set in motion until that resolution is rescinded or replaced. In February,2008,the earlier 2007 resolution was built upon,not replaced,by Resolution No. 08-12. This resolution left in place all that was charged to the Westlake Public arts Committee in 2007 and simply changed the name of that Committee to the Public Arts Society and authorized a larger membership (whose terms have since expired). In August of 2009,The Westlake Town Council passed another resolution (Resolution No. 09-38) which again built upon the previous resolutions (Nos. 07-25 and 08-12) by authorizing that the Westlake Public arts Society to apply for 501(c)3 status. Therefore,through all three related resolutions the mission and charge to a formally established public art advisory body remains unchanged and is still in effect although the advisory body is without membership at the present time. Lacking needed membership,the activities of this body, and any advancement toward furthering its mission have become dormant. It is the intent of the Public arts Strategy advanced by this report to build upon the important accomplish- Resolution 17-09 43 ments of Resolutions 07-25, 08-12, and 09-38. The governance structure discussed earlier and illustrated in the diagram below. OB1ECfIVES,CRITERIA,PERFORMANIC- MANAG€ME N T SPONSORS ADVOCATES, J WESTLAKE 1 PLIBLICART 1 SOCIETY SPONSORS, DONORS, and SELECTION CURATION OPERATION GRANTS Note that the Westlake Community and the Metroplex Arts Community are represented,in the "arts';by two separate bodies. The Westlake Community is represented by the Westlake Arts Council which is supported by advocates such as the Westlake Public Arts Society. As a 501(c)3,membership driven organization estab- lished by Town Resolution,with a specific charge to "raise awareness" and"raise funds"; and a mission which calls upon the organization to "encourage and inspire artistic and creative endeavors throughout the commu- nity";the Westlake Public arts Society is particularly well positioned to be a primary advocacy group. What is missing is a recipient of the benefits of the Society's work,who can put the efforts of the Society to a use which fulfills the Society's mission. To accomplish this,the Town needs to now create a Westlake Arts Coun- cil specifically charged with responsibilities of the Art Venues recommended herein. Therefore, another resolution is needed which creates The Westlake Arts Council. This resolution would set up the Council and charge it with further creating a Composition Team (as shown in the Governance structure above). More specifically,this resolution would read: TOWN OF WESTLAKE RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS ESTABLISHING THE WESTLAKE ARTS COUNCIL,DEFINING COMMITTEE RESPONSIBILITIES,ESTABLISHING ADJUNCT COM- MITTEES AND RESPONSIBILITIES,AND SPECIFYING MEMBERSHIP STRUCTURE AND PROCESS FOR MEMBERSHIP APPOINTMENT. WHEREAS,the Town of Westlake has adopted the Public Art Strategy as presented in the Public Art Strategy Report by MESA-Planning, Russell Tether Fine Art, and Sue Canterbury; and Resolution 17-09 44 WHEREAS,that report specifies a governance structure for Public Art Venues that implement the goals established by Citizen participants in a Public art workshop held on October 20,2016 and are recommended by the report; and WHEREAS,that recommended governance structure builds upon the Public Arts Society established by Westlake Resolution Nos. 07-29, 08-12, and 09-38 and completes the intent of those resolutions relative to Public Art in the Public Domain; NOW THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF WESTLAKE,TEXAS: SECTION 1: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas does hereby establish the Westlake Arts Council which shall be comprised of 7 members appointed by Council upon recommendation of the West- lake Public Arts Society and which membership shall include: 2 property owners with an ownership greater than 100 acres 2 corporate representatives 3 home owner or property owner,with an ownership smaller than 100 acres, representatives SECTION 2: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas establishes the following mission for the Westlake arts Council: Represent the Town of Westlake in any implementation of the Public Art Strategy presented in the Town adopted Public Art Strategy Report by providing oversight to the execution of Art venues as recommended in, and related to the recommendations of,the Public Art Strategy Report adopted by the Town of Westlake. Such oversight shall include the recognition of,fulfillment of, and inclusion of the Public Art Goals as docu- mented in the Public Art Strategy Report and formulated based on inputs from the October 20, 2016 Public arts Workshop. SECTION 3: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas establishes the following scope and prior- ities for the Westlake Arts Council: 1. Establish'Art Setting" sub-committees: Future Art Venues, as recommended in the Westlake Public Art Strategy,will take place in each of the Town's 4"Art Settings" as identified in that strategy. Therefore, before any venue is held within any of the 4 Art Settings,the Westlake Arts Committee shall appoint a, Art Setting Sub-committee which assures that the population and interests of that Art Setting are proper- ly represented in execution of the Art venue. The Art Setting Sub-committee shall not have more than 5 members and may be less than 5 and shall at a minimum include representation of any private property owner on whose property a particular venue is being conducted when the venue is executed in partner- ship with a property owner. The Art Setting Sub-committee acts as an area specific Task Force to advise the Westlake Arts Committee on matters related to a particular venue. The Art Setting Sub-committee is a partner with the Competition Team in the execution of any venue related activities conducted within the setting. 2. Establish the Competition Team: Each venue shall include a"Competition Team"with specific re- sponsibility to curate the venue. Curating the venue includes: a. Vetting and approving artists Resolution 17-09 45 b. Selecting work for the venue,including engagement of engineering and design expertise to determine the feasibility of the submission. c. Judging finalists in any competition d. Preparing a budget for the venue that will be submitted to the Westlake Arts Committee for consideration and action e. Primary responsibility for Coordinating, advertising/marketing, and executing the venue and any pre-post venue activities. Coordinating venue related art activities shall include participation of the Art Setting sub-committee established for the venue location. Therefore,the Competition Team shall be composed of representatives of the Metroplex Arts Community as follows: a. 3 members from major Art Institutions which include the art museums of the metroplex. b. 2 member representing private art dealers. c. 2 members representing the design community, including Landscape architecture (ASLA) and Architecture (AIA). All venues may be curated by 1 Competition Team or multiple venues may be assigned to separate Competi- tion Teams if the Westlake Arts Committee so determines. 3. Establish the Venue: The Westlake Arts Committee shall identify and authorize an Art Venue and assign that venue to the Competition Team established as specified above. 4. Provide the Charge to the Artist: The Westlake arts Committee shall provide a charge to the Artist which is derived from the Goals established in the adopted Public art Strategy and as may be expanded from time to time as authorized by the Town Council and based on further citizen input. 5. Recommend a venue budget: Upon receipt of a Venue Budget from the Competition Team,the West- lake Art Society shall make recommendation to the Town Council as regards action on that budget and identify funding opportunities available to support the venue. 6. Provide Venue funding: The Westlake Arts Committee shall recommend the commitment of funds from any funding sources available to the Westlake Arts Committee or available from funds raised out- side the Westlake Arts Committee (e.g. The Westlake Public Art Society or donors) SECTION 4: That the Town Council of the Town of Westlake, Texas assigns a representative of the Town to serve the Westlake Arts Committee and further implementation of the Public arts Strategy. Such Town representative shall be appointed by the Town Manager. This may be a staff position or a contracted position upon approval of the Town Council. The sample resolution presented above establishes all components of the Governance Structure presented earlier. This resolution would not take away from any charge given to the Westlake Public Arts Society and allow that Society to re-establish with a specific charge to support the Westlake Arts Committee with: 1. Advocacy Resolution 17-09 46 2. Public Relations 3. Funding Finally,it will be necessary for the Town to support the work of the Westlake arts Committee and the Com- petition team in the following ways: • Assist in the creation of an advertising and marketing plan for the competition. This would include advertising the competition and request for entries,public relations,Awards gala and related activities. It should also include proposed revenue generation from the public event. • Identify appropriate personnel or a submissions review panel. This should include A city approved engineer and landscape architect to review the feasibility of the submissions. Based on this feasibility analysis,the Competition Team will narrow the entrant selections Once the submission approval is complete,the Competition Team can proceed with public events and curat- ed judging to select the finalists. The final selection can produce 1 of 2 results: Result 1: A selected work best suited to meet the competition charge at which will be installed based on bud- get set as part of that charge and awarded to the finalist. Result 2: A work proposal or proposals best suited to meet the competition charge which are the property of Westlake (acquired as a result of a purchase prize) and installed over time. Resolution 17-09 47 NEXT STEPS A f go I%it � r f Resolution 17-09 48 Next Steps Following adoption of this report by the Town, it is necessary for the Town to authorize continuation of the ex- isting Public Arts Contract and fund work beyond Part 2 (which is concluded by this report). In continuation of the contract,there will be 3 components: Town Component: Led by MESA-Planning,The Town component will focus on setting up the governance struc- ture,preparing ordinances,policies, and other actions that must be executed in order to establish the program, its governance structure,funding authorities. The Curatorial Component: Led by Russell Tether Fine Art,this component will establish and organize the Com- petition Team and bring together major connections with the larger arts community as well as their participation in the Competition Team. The Inaugural Event: Working jointly, MESA-Planning, Russell Tether Fine Art, and the leadership of the Town will promote a corporate sponsorship of the inaugural event intended to set the entire on-going program into motion. Resolution 17-09 49